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03-MarchRains Inundate Davie B y D oiiff l,ivt*ng<iod Between 3'*. and 4 inches nf rain ^ u n d a te d Davie County during the past H eekend. The heavy rainfall caused the Yadltin River and most of the county’s streams and creeks to overflow. Roads covered with water were not an uncommon sight during the watery deluge. Russell Lyday of the Soil Conservation Service Office in Davie County reported fjonday that "all of the major creeks in le county” were out of their banks because of the rainfall. Lyday also noted that there is “a good chance" some of the bottom land acreage within the county suffered flood and erosion damage as the result of overflowing streams. «le said the "m ajo r" damage to low- ng lands will probably occur from "scouring" (waler eating out holes in these lands.) "The amount of damage to these lands will depend greatly on how much in the way of cover crops a farm er has on his particular pieco ol land because an increased amount of vegetation on the land helps hold down the scouring,” Lyday explained. Another problem caused by the flooding of the low lands is that large deposits of “sedimentation” and mud, perhaps 1-2 inches thick, are often left on pasturelands after such a large rainfall, he said. And many fences along creek and river banks are sometimes destroyed because of the onrush of flood waters. Van Swicegood with the Division of Highways for the N.C. Dept, of Tran­ sportation O ffice in D avie County reported Monday afternoon that Un­ derpass, Ratledge, Godbey, Murchison and Howell roads in the county were underw ater because of the heavy rainfall. "Wo have these roads barricaded and will only allow local traffic to use these roads if they are at all passable,” said Swicegood. According to Swicegood, “some ex­ tremely bad problems” also occurred lo some of the county's unsurfaced roads as the result of "washouts” causing holes within these roads. “ O ur biggest problem w ill be replacing material that sank in on these roads. We are replacing this m aterial as fast as we can, but we have to let the roads dry up some because our big trucks would tear the roads up more carrying the material in if we went in while they were still real wet,” said Swicegood. Mocksvilie town supervisor Andrew Lagle said after the rainstorm that some "excessive infiltration” of water in the town's sewer lines from the rainfall caused some treatment problems at the town's waste treatment plants. E le ctrical utilities and telephone companies reported no m ajor problems locally because of the heavy rainfall. (USPS 149-160) DAVIE C O U N TY P.O. Box 525, MocksviUe, N.C. 27028 ■ $10.00 Per Year in North Carolina $15.00 Per Year Outside North Carolina THURSDAY, MARCH 1, 1979 24 PAGES Single Copy 25 cents Water! r V ' i , ' . ; / ¡ I •• ! The transformation of fields into lalces was prevalent this weekend as heavy rains continued to fall throughout Davie County. More People in Davie County Now (Participate In Food Stamp Program Commissioners Vote To Renew Sciiooi Bond Anticipation Notes The elimination of the purchase price for food stamps that became effective on «nuary 1, was just the beginning of veral changes in federal regulations governing the food stam p program according to Daonald C. Wall, director of the Davie County Social Services Department. The elimination of the purchase requirement was designed by Congress to allow more of the very poor to par- ' H iipate in the program stjch ;as’ the-' elderly living on very sm all fixed in­ comes. W all says since, the first of January the local Food Stam p Office has had a significant increase in people applying for the free stamps L "W hen Congress passed the new food ^pam p law it not only was concerned with more of the very poor par­ ticipating, it was also c mcerned with people being eligible v higher |n- comes. Effective March 1, only in­ dividuals or families with net incomes below the federal poverty level will continue to be eligible for food stam ps,” said. "The current federal poverty level for a fam ily of four is $6,500 a year net in­ come. It is estimated by the U.S. Departm ent of Agriculture that some 1.3 m illion people will be dropped form the program and 3 m illion people will find & eir food stam p benefits reduced. I f liv e no way of telling what the effect will be on the participants in Davie County.” In addition to new lower income lim its, the food stamp program will have a new system of standardized deductions. Under the old system, households were allowed to claim numerous deductions from their gross income. “The new regulations should make the program easier to adm inister and less (continued on page 2) The Davie County commissioners voted Monday to renew $500,000 in school bond anticipation notes for another three months until they can be paid off from $5.5 m illion in school bonds to be sold in April. These notes were sold last June to finance preliminary expenses in con­ nection with the construction of two junior high schools - purchase of the two sites, surveys', grading of the properties and architect’s fees. Republican Dinner Is Saturday Evening Republican Congressman Jam es T. ■Broyhill of the lOth Congressional District of North Carolina will be the guest speaker for the annual Davie County Republican Lincoln Day Dituier to be held this Saturday night, M arch 3, at 7 p.m . at the Davie High School cafeteria. The 51-year-old Broyhill is currently the second ranking Republican member of the House Interstate and Foreign Commerce Committee and the second ranking Republican member of the House Budget Committee. He is the ranking Republican member of the Consumer Protection and Finance subcommittee of the Interstate and Foreign Commerce Committee and the ranking Republican m ember dt the Tax E x p e n d it u r e s , G o v e r n m e n t O rganization and R egulation sub­ committee of the Budget Committee. Born in Lenior and still a resident of that city, Broyhill graduated from the University of North Carolina in 1950 with a B.S. degree in business a d ­ ministration. He was associated with Broyhill Furniture Factories of Lenior from 1945-62. In 1957 Broyhill was chosen Young- Man-of-the-Year by the Junior Chamber 8f'C om m erce for his distinguished sfervice'to his city and county. Broyhill was first elected to Congress in 1962 and served in the I960’s in the old Eighth Congressional District, which included Davie County. He has been elected to each succeeding Congress since 1962. The nine-month notes required renewal until the bonds are sold through the Local Government Commission in April. The notes will then be paid off from proceeds of the bond sale. The interest rate paid on the notes for the first nine months was 4.35 percent, and the rate m at will be charged during the three-month renewal period will be 5.45 percent. The bonds will be paid off in 20 years. Bids on the two junior high schools will be opened at the Davie County Board of Education on Thursday, March 1, at 3:00 p.m. February 20th IVIeeting At their meeting February 20 the Davie County commi8sion4>irs passed a resolution opposinghew state logislatibh requiring counties to pay a bigger share of the cost of nursing home care ad­ ministered by the Department of Social Services. The commissioners also decided to ask representatives from the area to am end the legislation to its old status. T h r e a t C h a r g e I s D is m is s e d Kep. James T. Broyhill A threat charge against a Cooleemee woman was dismissed in Davie County District Court on Monday. The misdeanor charge was filed by Brenda McQuary, a 14-year-old student at Davie County High School, who testified that Mrs. Geraldine York Ridenhour telephoned her and ex­ pressed anger about some personal difficulties between the girl and Mrs. Ridenhour’s daughter. Ginger. The plaintiff said Mrs. Ridenhour warned her in the conversation on Feb. 15 that “she would shoot m y guts out and wring m y neck if I touched Ginger...and she said it was m y fault that her little Heffner Opens New Store In W illow Oak Heffner’s Land of Food located on Highway 601 north in the Willow Oak Shopping Center will open for business Tuesday, M arch 6. Owned and operated by Oren J. iffner of Mocksvilie, the 19,000 square t t facility offers the most modern, both in design and equipment. This is the seventh store in operation by Heffner and the second one based in Mocksvilie. The largest store in his supermarket chain, the new Willow Oak location is 6,000 square feet larger than the other Mocksvilie based store. According to Heffner, the m ajority of space has been equally distributed throughout all food sections allowing a larger inventory. Special expansions were given to the frozen food section and the deli-bakery. Home made desserts, salads, cheeses, sandwich loaves and freshly baked doughnuts will be featured in the deli- bakery. P late lunches are also available. The interior of the store is done in bright, cheerful colors and features the most modern in supermarket decor. W all decor blends with refrigeration equipment and shelving, providing a pleasant atmosphere in which to shop. The designs also aid in customer con­ venience by easily identifying various food sections. "W e are very proud of our new facility,” said Heffner, and feel that i s New Store Harold Allen, supervisor and Oren Heffner, owner, look at tbe new 19,000 sq. ft. »tore in WUIow Oaks Shopping Center that U scheduled to open Tuesday .This Is the seventh new store |0 be opened by Heffner. Allen is area supervisor for the stores. (Photo by Garry Foster) when the shopping center is completed, it will be a poüit of pride for people within the county.” "It is anticipated that the new store will remove some of the traffic from the older location,” said Heffner, “But we hope that this will aid in customer convenience by allowing less congested areas in which to shop.” “ I do hope that the people who con­ tinue to shop at our North M ain Street location will be able to do so in comfort, because of less crowded conditions.” During the grand opening to be held March 6-17, m any prizes will be given to shoppers. Included in the prizes are 900,000 green stamps, a baby play pen, G .E. color portable television, toaster oven plus a host of others. Winners will be announced on Saturday, March 17. The store will be open from 8:30 a.m . - 9:00 p.m. Monday through Saturday and 8:30 a .m .-7:00 p.m . on Saturday. It will be under the m anagem ent of Jim Mony, former manager of the Yadkinville based store. Oren Heffner gained experience in the retail grocery business at an early age while working at bis father’s store in Maiden. FoUowing service in the Air Force during World War 11. he returned to Maiden and went lo work for thé Heffner & Bolick Grocery Store. In 1948 this company expanded to Mocksvilie and opened a store in the site now occupied by B.C. Moore and Sons, Company. The operation of both stores was maintaineci until the death of Heffner’s father when interest in the Maiden store was traded and full ownership of the Mocksvilie business acquired. In 1952, Heffner moved Uie store into a larger facility. Located in the site now occupied by Belk, the store remained here until the present location was constructed in 1963. Heffner's Land of Food now has stores in YadkinvUle. Lexington, Clemmons, LewisvUle, Cardinal Shopping Center in Forsyth County, in addition to MocksviUe. girl got killed... The "little girl” referred to was Michelle York, Mrs. Ridenhour's 10- year-old daughter who was killed the night of Feb. 3 when the car in which she was riding with her 15-year-old cousin, Vernon Tyler, wrecked. Young Tyler was charged with a felony in connection with Michelle’s death. He will be tried in Superior Court as an adult. He is also charged with driving under the influence of alcohol and no operator’s license. Thomas L. Ridenhour, the York chUdren’s stepfather, was charged with authorizing an unlicensed driver to use his car, abetting in the operation of a motor vehicle by a drunken driver and contributing to Vernon’s deiiquency by supplying him with beer. Youths Charged W ith Larceny Of Battery Two sixteen-year-old youths have been arrested and charged with the larceny of a battery from a vehicle in Heritage parking lot on February 22nd. Walter Scott Snyder, 16, of Cooleemee and Rocky HamUton, 16, of Greasy Corner, were arrested by the sheriff's department on February 23rd. They were charged with the larceny of a battery from the car of Mrs. Camelia (continued on page 2) The law was changed by the General Assembly last year, according to County Manager Ron Vogler. The law wiU cost Davie County $40,000 in increased support of nursing home care each year, Vogler said. In other action, the board further reviewed requests for the construction of a central community recreation area for a Little League Park. The Little League Association initially brought the request to the board about four months ago. The project has not been approved, Vogler said, due mostly to cost questions involved. E stim ates range w idely, depending on how many baUfields the park includes, whether the county ap­ plies for end receives a p rant'fdi'th e project; iiiid whether land can be leased or must be bought. The board also reviewed ambulance rules and regulations, at the request of ambulance personnel and instructors of the I.V. (ambulance training) program. Vogler said some doctors wanted rules changed so they would have more supervisory control over the I.V . program, which confers an intermediate degree between E.M .T. and paramedic. No action was taken on the matter. Board members said they wanted a closer look at liab ility insurance recently obtained by Tri-County Mental Health. Vogler said the county was being asked to self-insure the deductible portion of each claim , and corn- missioners wanted to review the wor­ ding of tbe agreement to see what the policy was calling for. In routine business, the board ap­ proved one tax refund, approved an audit contract for a revenue sharing audit and renewed school bond an­ ticipation notes. Vehicles Collide On US 158 Two vehicles were involved in a wreck last Friday about 8:15 a.m . on US 158, nine-tenths of a m ile east of MocksviUe. Involved was a 1973 Ford operated by Paul Keith Robertson, 17, of Rt. 2, Ad­ vance and a 1976 AMC operated by Loretta Jane Pilcher, 18, of Rt. 1 Ad­ vance. State Highway Patrolm an W. D. Grooms said his investigation showed that Robertson had sto p p ^ for a school bus and other traffic that was also west boun(i. Miss Pilcher was unable to stop, skidded to the lett and struck the vehicle in the left front. Dam age to the AMC was estimated at $100 and $300 to the Ford. Miss Pilcher was charged with failure to reduce speed. Fred Pratt Resigns Post From Sheriffs Department Fred Pratt Fred Pratt of Rt. 2 MocksviUe has resigned from the D avie County Sheriff's Department effective with the close of business, February 28th.No reason was given in Mr. Pratt's statement of resignation to Sheriff George Smith which read as follows: "Dear George: As I advised you previously, 1 am resigning from the department effective with the close of Business, February 28, 1979. With best wishes for your continued success, I remain, —-Sincerely yours, Fred W. P ra tt.” Pratt has served as administrative officer for the sheriff's department since December 1st, 1978. He was responsible for the management of the sheriff's office and acted as the department's public relations officer. Pratl retired from the Central In­ telligence Agency in June 1977 after more than 20-years of service. He ran as a Republican candidate for the State House of Representatives last faU. 2 DAVlli COUNTY UNTriRPRISE RHCORD, THURSDAY, MARCH 1, l<»7‘) Advance Post Office Announces Exam For Substitute Rural Carrier Of Record The United Slates Postal Service has announced an examination for sub­ stitute rural carrier of record at the Advance Post office. The examination will be given at 900 East Market Street, Greensboro. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, national origin, sex political affiliations, or any other non-merit factor. Applications are now being accepted, and an examination will be given to establish a register of eligibles from which future substitute rural carrier of record vacancies in this post office will be filled. There are no expierience or training requirements in the substitute rural carrier of record examination. Ap­ plicants must take a written test which consists of vocabulary and reading com prehension questions and com- W anted Youths To Be Returned To Davie Representatives of the Davie County Sheriff’s Department are to go to Ocala, Florida this week to return two youths to Davie County for trial. Bruce Wayne Smyers, 19, of Rt. 1 Advance, and Jeffrey B. Webb, 19, of Rt. 2 Advance, are wanted in Davie for larceny and dam age to personal property. They were arrested recently by law officials in Florida. The two are charged with stealing and dam aging new spaper racks the property of the Winston-Salem Journal, on or about January 1st this year; the larceny of $10 in cash from John W. Boger of Rt. 2 Advance. Webb was scheduled to appear in D avie County Superior Court on January 22nd on three counts of con­ spiracy to violate the narcotics laws but failed to appear. New court date for these charges has been set for April 16, 1979. Webb will also be charged with the violation of terms and conditions of probation. Lynn Haven Residents Rock To Tune Of $320 For Heart Fund Residents of Lynn H aven Con­ valescent Center in Mocksville rocked and rolled to the tune of $320.65 Thur­ sday for the Davie County Heart Association. Sponsored by the American Health Care Association, the “Rock-N-Roll Jam boree” was a way of involving nursing home residents and helping them to feel useful in a worthwhile cause. The eighteen residents who par­ ticipated between 1:30 p.m . and 3:30 p.m . either did sb by rocking in chairs or rolling in a wheel chair. F am ilies, staff and businesses pledged from two cents to ten cents per m inute on a resident. Mrs. Kate Brown had the longest rocking time with one hour and 55 minutes, and Mrs. Eugenia Shook placed second just ten minutes behind. Several people also made donations in honor of a certain resident. In 1978 North Carolina Nursing Homes were challenged to raise $11,500 for the Heart Association. Only 29 facilities participated and a total of $15,458 was raised. Liberty House Nursing Home of Thomasville was the top fund raiser in the state. The N.C. Nursing Homes have been challenged in 1979 to raise $20.00 and David Joyner said the residents of Lynn Haven have been looking forward to this event for the past few weeks. It has been the topic of discussion at fellowship lunch and other activities. “This is one way we can involve our residents in community activities,” said Joyner. In the U.S. more people die from diseases of the heart and blood vessels than any other cause. The sole mission of the American Heart Association is the reduction of premature death and disability caused by cardiovascular research to help develop the knowledge that is saving lives today. By involving the Lynn Haven residents and staff, as well as members of the community in this special program which has been tun for all, it gave them an opportunity to become involved in a project to benefit the Heart Association in iU fight against the nation’s leading killer. : Mrs. Belle Nichols was recognized as the resident raising the most money and ■Mrs. Margaret Hoyle placed second. putations. A pplicants m ust be physically qualified to perrform efficiently the duties of this position. The requirement for distant vision is 20-30 (Snellen) in the better eye and at least 20-50 in the other eye, with or without corrective lenses. Applicants must also be able to read printing as sm all as Jaeger’s test type No. 4 at 14 inches with the better eye. Hearing must be acure for ordinary conversation, with or without a hearing aid. Hernia, with or without a truss will disqualify an applicant for appointment. Certain physical requirements may be waived for preference eligibles. An eligible selected for appointment must have a valid driver’s license and safe driving record, and he must pass Ihe postal service road test to show he can safely drive a vehicle of the type used on the job. Applicants must have reached their 18th birthday on the date of filing ap­ plication. There is no m axim um age limit. To apply, an applicant must submit PS Form 2479AB to the Advance post­ master. This form is available at the postoffice. A pplications m ust be subm itted before March 12, 1979 or postmarked on or before that date. Eligibility from this examination will be limited to one year, unless after 10 months a request is made to have eligibility extended for an additional year. M axim um eligibility is two years. New Planning Region I Begins Organizing Actions In a meeting in Winston-Salem last week a state official told representatives of the new Planning Region I that this is the first time the state has been through the process of organizing such a body. “We are learning as we go,” said Billy R. Hall, assistant director for regional programs and policies with the state Department of Administration. Hall told the group that the decisions on what power and authority the new organization will have will be left up to city and county officials in the new five- county region, which is composed of Davie, Forsyth, Stokes, Surry and Yadkin counties. Under state statutes, the member governments m ay form a regional planning com m ission, an econom ic development commission, a regional council of governments Nineteen of the 20 governmental units in the new region were represented at the meeting in Winston-Salem last week. The town of Arlington was the only one not represented, but officials there have said they intend to join the new organization. Representatives of the 19 units oi government elected Henry Ridenhour, a Surry County commissioner, as tem­ porary chairm an. Fred Hauser of Forsyth County was elected ch airm an of the steering committee to set up the guidelines for the new organization; J.G .H . Mitchell of Stokes County was elected head of the search committee to screen applications for a staff for the organization; and Roger Swisher of Kernersville was elected head of the finance committee to work on a budget. Each county selected a representative for each of the three committees. D a v ie 4 - H H o r s e C o u n c il M e e t s The newly formed 4-H Horse Council met Wednesday, February 21, to discuss plans for events in the 4-H Horse Program for 1979. The Council discussed the strengths and weaknesses of the Horse Program and what our county needed for im provem ent. The designated members and leaders from the two clubs discussed their needs and problems confronted in their clubs. D ouglas Lee, A ssistant E xtension Agent, 4-H, discussed with the council ways to keep recruiting young members in the clubs as well as new leaders in order to avoid fading out of club m em bership and leadership. The council discussed ways to keep yonng people without horses interested in 4-H Club participation. The C ouncil approved Saturday, September 29, as the date for the Davie County 4-H Horse Show. Sunday, Sep­ tember 30, will be the rain date. It was decided that this show would be strictly for 4-H participation. Judges for Ihe show were discussed and contacts will be m ade to these individuals. Also the Council agreed to conduct another Benefit Horse Show this sum m er like the Johnny 0 . Benefit Horse Show last sum mer. Recipients of the benefit show were discussed, but it was decided to wait until a later date to nam e who the proceeds will go to. July 14 was set as the date for the Benefit Horse Show. The Council agreed that each club would decide individually whether to sponsor an Open Show or to plan Horse Learning Clinics. April 21 was set as the date for a county Practice Horse Show Clinic to prepare and critique the members for the District Horse Show in May. Douglas Lee, 4-H Agent, emphasized the importance of using older 4-H members for clinics, club programs, leader assistance, and helping younger members with their horse activities. Also, he stressed the importance of increased participation on Horse ac­ tivities such as County Activity Day. Monday, April 2, was set as the date for the next meeting of the Davie County 4-H Horse Council. Report From Raleigh by Rep. Ram ey F. Kem p The big news of the first part of the week in Raleigh, as it was elsewhere, was the heavy snowfall which struck the area Sunday. The people of Davie County should be proud of the local H ighw ay D epartm ent and the systematic way they got rid of the snow on the highways, and the same is true of the city crew. The City of Raleigh has no such organized snow removal. We slipped and slid for several days until warm weather and rain took care of the mess; however, the sessions continued on schedule. O neSill which could affect every area in North Carolina was discussed early and finally passed by the House this week which deals with Open Meeting Laws. I am sure you will be hearing more about this Bill after it passes in the Senate. Another popular Bill passed the House of Representatives Wednesday. This Bill would allow a registered voter to notify the Board of Elections of a 124 South Main Street Mocksville, N.C. Published every Thursday by the DAVIE PUBLISHING COMPANY MOCKSVILLE ENTERPRISE 1916-1958 DAVIE RECORD 1899-1958 COOLEEMEE JOURNAL 1906 1971 Gordon Tomlinson............................Editor-Publisher Becky Snyder Director of Advertising Second i'Jass Postage Paid in Mocksville, N.C. 27028 SUBSCRIPTION RATES $10.00 par year in North Caroiini! $15.00 per ye«r out of stitt. Single Copy 25 centi Portmister: Send iddreu chingetto Oavie County Enterpriie Record, P.O. Box 525, Mocktville, N.C. 27012 change of address from precinct to precinct by m ail instead of having to do it in person. I believe this Bill will easily pass through the Senate. ■ Representatives L am beth, Varner^ and I introduced a Bill to provide a full­ time ranger to operate and m aintain Boones Cave Park in the edge of Davidson County. This Bill will be voted on in the House next week, and we believe it will pass. A lot of time was spent in Thursday’s session discussing the removal of the containerized crane from the Morehead City port to the Wilmington port. The State Ports Authority had already contracted to move the crane, and the House concurred with the movement. With the E R A ligislation a dead issue for this session, the Legislative Building has not been near as full of visitors. However, the W ildlife Committee had a hearing this week, and several foxhunters and trappers from this area visited my office. Please come to visit us whenever you are in Raleigh. Larceny Charged (continued from page 1) Nail on February 22nd. The two are also charged with taking a battery from a vehicle on the Furches Motor Company lot on January 29th. Parents signed bond for their court appearnace on February 12, 1979. Food Stam ps (continued from page 1) subject to fraud. The Department of Agriculture estimates that doing away with the purchase price aione should save states and counties 40 m illion staff hours a year. The new system of deductions will simplify the eligibility process, this reduces the risk of errors,” Wall said. For people using food stamps, there will be tougher work requirements and stricter penalties for fraud. People who are physically and mentally fit and between the ages of 18 and 60 with sqme exceptions, must not only register'for work, but must actively look for a job. Students over 18 will also be required to register for work during sum m er vacations. States will be given more money by the federal government to investigate and prosecute fraud according to WaU. Davie Conservation District Gives Speech, Essay Awards The Davie Soil and Water Con­ servation District sponsored its sixth annual speech contest on Monday, February 26, 1979, at 7:00 p.m . in the auditorium of the Mocksville Middle School. Topic of speeches this year was “Conservation, The Choice Is Ours". County winners in the speech coniesi were: Betsy H elm s, Shady Grove School, first place, awarded a $25.00 Savings Bond; Brent Smith, second place, awarded $15.00; Tracy Hodges, third place, aw arded $10.00; and receiving $5.00 for being his school w inner was E ric H argrove from Cooleemee School. Awards were also presented' to win­ ners of the Conservation Essay Contest which was sponsored in the sixth grade. Topic for the essay contest was the same as the speeches. County winners in this division w ere: Michelle Morgan, Pinebrook School, first place, awarded $25.00 Savings Bond; Steven White, W m . R. Davie School, second place, awarded $15.00; and Lee Rollins, Mocksville Middle School, third place, awarded $10.00. School winners in the essay division included: Cooleemee School: Leslie Daniel, first place; Mike Elliott, second place; Pat Gadson, third place. W m . R. Davie School: Steven White, first place; Deborah Glasscock, second place; and tying for third place were Johnny Whitaker and Dawn Brown. Mocksville Middle School: Lee Rollins, first place; Tonya Evans, second place; Valerie Angell, third place. Pinebrook School: Michelle Morgan, first place; Sherry Burger, second place; and Rhonda Salmons, third place. Shady Grove School: Sue Bennett, first place; Cherie Rose, second place; and Melissa M at­ thews, th ird place. R ibbons were awarded to the school winners. Winners of the Conservation Poster Contest sponsored in the fourth and fifth grades were also recognized. School winners on the fourth grade level were: Mocksville Elementary School: Cherie Graves, first place; Jeff Sanford, second place, Alan Bowles, third place; and Kyle G oins, H onorable M ention. Pinebrook School: Andrea Rayle, first place; Steve Hutchins, second place, and L aura R eynolds, third place. Cooleemee School: Joel Evans, first place; Ju lie R evis, second place; Janeen Jam es, third place; and Susan Vance, Honorable Mention. W m. R. Davie School: M ark Seawright, first place; Jeannie Latham , second place; Leslie Baity, third place; and Randy Gannam an and Shane Rogers both honorable mention. R eceiving engraved plaques for county winners on the fourth grade level were: Cherie Graves, first place; Jeff Sanford, Second place, and Joel Evans, third place. School winners intheposter division on the fifth grade level were: W m. R. Davie School: Patrece Lyles, first place; Missy Gaither, second place; Monica Harris, third place; and Steven Dyson, Honorable Mention. Cooleemee School: Teresa Polk, first place; Wendy O ’Neal, second place; and Jerry Medlin, third place. Pinebrook School: Kelly Kinder, first place; Edie Johnson, second place; and Ju lia H ow ell, third ' place. MocksviUe Middle School: Joe Mischier, first place; Beth Edwards, second place; Regina Swicegood, third place; and Sheila Hinkle, Honorable Mention. R eceiving engraved plaques for county winners on the fifth grade level were: Joe Mischier, first place; Patrece Lyles, second place; and Missy Gaither, Uiird place. All school winners in the poster division received ribbons. All first place county winners wUl be Sixth Grade essay winners, Lee Rollins (1) and Steven White (r) яге shown receiving checks from Soil and Water supervisor Brady Angell. Winners of the poster contest from 4th and Sth grade were: (l-r) Patrice Lyles, Missy Gaither, Cherie Graves, Joe Mlscher, Joel Evans. Not pictured is Jeff Sanford. Speech contest winners were (l-r) TVacy Hodges, Betsy Helms, Brent Smith, and Eric Hargrove. (Photos by Garry Foster) entered in the area competition which wUI be on Friday, March 2, in Dallas, North Carolina. Charles BuUock, Supervisor of the Davie Soil and Water Conservation District and MC for Uiis event made Uiese comments, “On behalf of the Board of District Supervisors we would like to express our appreciaUon to Uie parents for taking time to attend Uiis event, and to the teachers for without Uieir encouragement, it would not have been possible, and especially to Uie students for Uieir interest in Uie con- servaUon of our natural resources.” In v e n t o r y C le a ra n c e ! A iMich of Glass mates the dlffefence Spills won’t drip tiirough wltli ttiese strong, tempered glass slielves. Adjustable lor varying food needs. Get no-(roit convenience in thit 17.6 cu.ft. refrigerator• 4.67 cu.rt. freezer • Equipped (or optional Automatic Icemaker • "Moist n Fresh" sealed, high humidity pan• Extra storage pan for "Meats n Snacks" • Energy Saver Switch • Rolls out on wheels TBF-18ZW W A S * 5 5 9 . 9 5 Mocksville Furniture & Appliance Inc. 2 Court Square Mocksyille. N.C.¿ h o n e 6 3 4 ; 5 8 l 2 ^ # DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, THURSDAY, MARCH 1, 1979 - 3 Children’s Chorus Practice To Begin March 7th Practice for a children's chorus will begin at the Mocksville Middle School Auditorium on Wednesday, March 7th at 3:45 p.m . Each child will tie responsible fbr his or her own transportation to practices. Pre-registration m ay be made by calUng the Davie Arts Council al 634-3112 between 8:30 a.m . and 5:00 p.m . or by students contacting Mrs. T om m ye K elly in the schools, preferably before 9 a.m . and after 3 p.m. No registration fee is required. Tommye Kelly, instructor for the children's chorus, is a graduate of the Univ. of South Carolina with a degree from the University of M iam i, Florida. She had sung and studied with numerous choral directors in various parts of the United States since 1942, including, Lara Hoggard of Chapel Hill, who at one time, was an assisitant director for Fred W aring. In the past few years she has attended sum m er workshops in which choral techniques weoe involved with Bert Konowitz (a public school Music Supervisor on Long Island, New York, teacher of Jazz at Columbia Union in New York and does some musical arrangements for John Denver; besides composing and arranging choral works for school choruses). Other workshops Mrs. Kelly has attended were with Nancy Ferguson and Konnie Saliba of Memphis, Tennessee for Karl Orff teaching techniques which emphasize tbe use of rhythm instruments with vocal work, and a workshop with Eunice Boardman and Barbara Andress, two of the authors of the Holt, Rinehart and W inston C om pany M usic textbooks series, currently in use in the Davie County Elem entary Schools. Ms. Kelly has worked with children’s choruses and directed youth choirs in churches in m any different states. II is her hope to give students in the Sth and 6th grades of Davie County an op­ portunity to learn vocal and choral techniques with some use of rhythm instruments as enrichment and a sup­ plement to the basics of music that is now being taught in the public schools. "Fifth and sixth grade boys and girls Mrs. Tommye Kelly have the potential to attain a higher level of performance than is possible until they are past adolescence when boys voices have setUed after the changing process. I hope all students in the 5th and 6th grades who have an in­ terest in music are willing to m ake a com m ittm e nt to attendance each Wednesday afternoon until we are ready for a performance in May or June before school is out; and are w illing to be cooperative and attentive during practice", says Mrs. Kelly. “This children’s chorus is being sponsored by the Davie Arts Council - be sure and have your child pre­ registered before March 7th” , said a m ember of the Arts Council. Protect Your Landscape Plants During the winter months it ' is necessary to offer protection to certain North Carolina landscape plants. Winter protection does not mean to keep plants warm, as this is virtually impossible, but to provide protection from . dam aging wind, heavy snow and ice, the alternate freezing and thaw ing of the soil beneath the plants, and heat from the sun or very cold days. Protection should be offered to evergreen p lants by reducing water loss. Plants ' transpire water through their leaves. Evergreens continue to lose water during the winter; therefore, moisture must be taken up by the plants’ roots. Homeowners are m ore conscious of watering shrubs during the sum m er months and often this garden chore is neglected during cold weather. The roots will absorb moisture when it is avaUable, but when the ground is frozen or during a very dry period the moisture is not available. The ' plants continue to transpire water but at this time draws moisture from Uving ceUs. If too m uch is given off from this source, the ceU dies. Con­ sequently, leaves brown out and die. High winds and a w arm sun on cold days results in a higher rate of water tran­ spiration. Protection could be offered by planting suscep­ tible plants in a sheltered location and providing ad­ ditional water during dry periods or prior to expected I hard freezes. Foundation plantings are often injuried by ice and snow faUing from the roof of their frozen branches. It is som etim es necessary to construct a temporary shelter for shrubs in a precarious .1 situation. I Wide tape or cloth can ¿m p ly be wrapped around an evergreen to prevent broken branches. This is quite helpful to boxwoods and arbor vitaes. If branches are bent and broken over by heavy ice or snow, it is advisable to wait a few days before pruning and cleaning up. Often branches wiU recover to a degree of satisfaction on their own-so don’t be hasty to prune drooping limbs. An additio nal layer of m ulch is usually recom ­ mended during winter months after the first freeze Mulches will reduce water loss from the soil thus aiding in tran­ spiration, and also reduce “heaving” of the soU as the soil freezes and thaws. P rune or rem ove overgrown foundation plants before M arch 1. Don’t be 'bashful! Often Chinese and Japenese HoUies, boxwoods, and ligustrum need a severe pruning. Cut the plant size down significantly-where as a ‘tip’ pruning wUl only induce branching at the top. To im m ediately solve the problem, remove the entire plant and select a sm aller and slower growing variety. In a densely shaded area, or an area susceptible to erosion or for a ‘lower’ maintenance landscape, plan those areas using ground covers. Good ground covers are english ivy, periwinkles, or pachysandra. K em ber, to cut pam pass grass within sbc inches of the ground now that the leaves are completely dorm ant. If you w ait until spring, you could possibly dam age new emerging leaves. Pampass grass can be used in your landscape as accent plants. For additional landscape tips, contact M . Douglas Lee. Assistant Extension Agent, 4- H. Council Of Hom em akers Has M eeting The County Council of the D avie County Extension Homemakers Club met at the County O ffice B uilding Thursday, February IS at 10:30 p.m. Mrs. Nelda Brown, CouncU president, presided over the business session. Mrs, Dot Chaplin, Fam ily Life Leader, reported on a Fam ily Living Seminar at­ tended by Mrs. Chaplin and Mrs. Ruby Markland. M rs. Jack ie H arris, C ultural Arts Leader, reported that on February 24 the Davie High' School Band wiU have a telethone on radio station WDSL to raise money for their trip to Daytona, Florida (0 participate in band competition. Mrs. Joan PitU , Health Educator with the Health Dept, and a Jaycette gave a short report on the Health Dept’s. prenatal clinic and the Jaycettes Better Infant Birth program . The Jaycettes provide Layettes to the ex- P.B.'S HOBBY SHOP pectant mothers that attend the cUnic. Mrs. Pitte and the Jaycettes asked for support from the council in helping carry out this program . Each hom em akers club in the county is to be responsible for a project to aid the BIB program. The Council approved the recom m endation of the Travel Expense Committee to m ake reim bursem ents on travel expenses m ade by county council officers, county program of work chairm en, and council ap­ pointed com m ittees. E x ­ penses to be covered are: mileage-12 cents per m ile (point to point) to the driver of car (car pool when possible); Meals-$3.00 per meal or when meals are catered to group, w ill pay catered price .; Lodging-wili pay for over­ night lodging when necessary. The council approved a motion to donate $25.00 to the Davie High Band. The council will purchase a book entitled “ I Remember When” to be placed in the county library. Mrs. Brown appointed Mrs. N ora S m ith , M rs. Dot Chaplin, and Mrs. Burma Foster to the Dixie Classic Fair Committee. Calendar of events: February 27 and 29-Money managem ent sem inar at the County Office Building. March 1-Bus to ^ u th e rn Living Show in Charlotte. April 23-26-Trip to Amish Country in Pennsylvania. A pril 24-District Spring Meeting. The meeting was adjourned with Uie Club CoUect. Following a covered dish lunch the county program of work ch airm en conducted workshops p lann ing their years work. 126 North Main Street Mocksville, NC Phone 634-3915 Enargy cannot ba created or daitroyad. It can only be changed from one form to another. O P E N F R ID A Y N IG H T T I L 8 : 3 0 p . m . O N E G R O U P STARTS FRIDAY M ORN IN G 10:00 A.M. ODDLOTS-BROKEN SIZES-ON LYl AND 20FS0M E j_T E M S LADIES DRESSES AND PANTSUITS BROKEN SIZES Usually’22.00 toM2.00 7 5 % OFF O N E G R O U P UtDIES BOOTS FIRST QUAUTY AND IMPERFECTS Usually *22.00 to’45.00 »1 0 »» TO »1 6 ** SM ALL G RO U P CHILDREN’S BOOTS BROKEN SIZES 50%O O F F ODD LOT LADIES AND CHILDREN’S S H O E S BOOKEN SIZES Usuill;'4.00 to'20.00 50 * TO »5®® UDIESJEWELir EARRINGS-BRACELETS-NECKLACES Usually’2.00 to 7.50 5 0 " TO * 1 . 5 0 O N E TABLE GIRLS AND TODDLERS WEAR lEANS, TOPS, SWEATERS PLUS OTHER ITEMS 5 0 % TO 7 5 % O F F O N E G R O U P LADIES ACCESSORIES HANDBAGS, BILL FOLDS, BELTS, SCARFS 7 5 %o f f ORIG.PRICE 1 LADIES PANT COAT siza8>>**>.............••••••$55.00 1 LADIES CORDUROY PANT COAT size to.......$35.00 1 LADIES ALL WEATHER PANT COAT size e—$34.00 1 LADIES ALL WEATHER PANT COAT size 8 ..$54.00 1 LADIES DRESS COAT size is ...................•••$70.00 1 GIRLS COAT.....................................................$14.88 1 GIRLS COAT.....................................................$27,00 2 GIRLS COATS...................................................$26.00 4 GIRLS COATS........................•...........................$10.00 O NETABLE H O U S E F U R N IS H IN G S SHEETS, BEDSPREADS, TOWELS DRAPERIES PLUS OTHER ITEMS SALE $ 1 0 .0 0 $8.00 $8.00 $ 1 0 .0 0 $15.00 $4.00 $9.00 $8.00 $3.50 4 0 r « e T O 6 0 r « OOFF O N EG R O U P MEN’S DRESS SHIRTS LONG SLEEVES BROKEN SIZES Usually’9.50 to >16.00 * 4 ^ ' TO » 8 ® ® SM ALL GROUP MEN’S CASUAL KNIT SHIRTS LONG SLEEVES ASSORTED STRIPES Usually’11.00 S I W U /|00 SM ALL GROUP MEN’S SHOES DISCONTINUED STYLES BROKEN SIZES Usually’14.00 to’31.00 ToM5*®$yroo SM ALL GROUP MEN’S SLACKS BROKEN SIZES Usually’12.00 to’16.00 SALE ^ 2® * T 0 ^ 5 ® * O N E G R O U P MEN’S WEAR INCLUDES TIES. BELTS, SWEATERS PLUS OTHER ITEMS 50 % T o 75 % o M O NE G RO UP BILLY THE KID BOY’S WEAR SPORT COATS, VESTS, SHIRTS, JEANS Usually’13.75 to’21.00 3 3 % TO 5 0 % O F F 2 MEN’S CORDUROY SPORT COATS 1 MAN’S CORDUROY COAT & VEST • 1 MAN’S CORDUROY VEST............... I MAN’S POLYESTER VEST............... ORIG. PRICE SALE • $40.00 $10.00 •$50.00 $15,00 > $23.00 $8.00 $17.00 $5.00 .$22.00 $9.00 .$27.00 $9.8^ O NE TABLE B O Y ’ S W E A R ASSORTED ITEMS Values To’15.00 $ I 0 0 $ IKOOTO5 O N E G R O U P FABRICS 5 0 " •1.00 J n.W ll ( ln \T^ I NTl Rl’RISI- RIK O R O . TMl'RSDA'»’, MARCH I. Cathy Gaither Attends Farming Short Course Githy Gaither Cathy Gaither was the 26th person from Davie County to attend a Modern Farm ing Short Course at N.C. State U. Mrs. Gaither and her husband, Mike, run a dairy farm in the County Line Community. She is the first woman lo represent Davie at this workshop. This workshop was coordinated by , Continued Education Division of N.C. State University with participants . receiving a $200 scholarship from local banks. Ms. Gaither’s scholarship was provided by the Branch Bank and Trust Company of Mocksville. • Ms. Gaither and other participants loured one of the State Dairy farms and observed Ihe use and management, ferlllliy farm planning. Two days were devoted to tours of research stations and farms which Included two outstanding private farms. This workshop was designed for the purpose of developing leadership ability nf young people who are interested in pursuing agricultural careers and to provide some broad range agriculture commodity information. The following are participanls who have taken the Modern Farm ing Short Course from Davie Couniy :Odell Boger, 195.1; Charles Phillips, Jr., 1954; Claude Beck, 1955; Roger Gabbert, 1958; C.W. Allen, 1959; Herman Gabbert, 1959; M adison A ngell, 1960; J . N orm an Riddle, 1961; Wade Moody, 1961; Jack Koontz, 1962; Benny Boger, 1962; John Singleton, 1963; Wayne Reavis, 1964; Johnny Allen, 1966; Jam es Homer Barnes, 1967; Charles Franklin Eaton, 1968; Spurgeon Foster, Jr ., 1969; Eugene Hunter, 1970; Lonnie G. Miller, 1971; Jam es Larry Boger, 1972; Charles Pope, 1973; Stanley F. Forester, Jr., 1975; Jim m y Swain, 1976; Harvey W illiams, 1977; Billy Munday, 1978; Cathy Gaither (Mrs. Mike Gaither), 1979. Vehicle Overturns On US 64 A one vehicle accident occurred last Thursday about 4 p.m. on US 64, 9 miles west of Mocksville. Involved was a 1971 Chevrolet operated by Carolyn Potts, 32, of Rt. 1 Harmony. State Highway Patrolm an J. L. Payne said his investigation showed that Ms. Potts lost control of her vehicle on the wet portion of the highway after ap­ plying brakes, ran off the road on the left, overturned and struck tree while overturning. Dam age to the vehicle was estimated at $1,000. Ms. Potts was charged with driving a vehicle w ith im proper equipment. _________________ m L e t t e r s T o E d it o r .Dear Editor; There are times when aid and assistance by cooperating, concerned citizens make the difference in service 40 others. During February we have had Jw o rather large snows w hich ^momentarily brought most aclivity to a ^standstill. But not so Davie County Hospital. As ■is its responsibility, it continued to serve .'the community by m aintaining patient rare and being ready for every ^emergency need. I No patient in the building failed to -receive appropriate care and no citizen ^who needed the hospital's service failed ¿to be cared for by appropriate per- »sonnel. T Many employees braved hazards of •bad roads either by themselves or with .•aid and assistance from relatives or 'neighbors to get to their respective jobs, ^ h e re were m any individual and per- rSonal assistances provided. There is no ;way we can know of them all. But there »were groups whose assistance con- 'tributed significantly to the hospital’s •ability to continue service “as usiial” . OVe speak specifically of the Davie ^County Rescue Squad under the •direction of M arvin Heilard whose ^members with their personal vehicles as ;well as those of the squad, drove many -miles at all hours getting employees to Iwork and home afterwards who lacked ;other means. Too, members of the •ambulance squad, off duty, did likewise. ;We want them to accept this letter to you •as our expression of appreciation for ;their aid during these trying times. Very truly yours, Allen J. M artin, Jr. ! Administrator UJear Editor: • 1 would like to thank, through the use ’of your newspaper, the Smith Grove ;F ire D epartm ent for extending a 'helping hand to the First United ¡Methodist Church, Saturday, Without ;their help and the use of their facilities, •the barbecue chicken supper would not ^have been a success. It is gratifying to ;live in a county where there are always -kind people to help one another out in !:time of emergencies. • We call on firemen usually for fire- ifighting, rescue work and numerous I other things, but it is seldom that they are called to rhelp with a church supper. T H ^ came through for us though, and we will forever be grateful. A special thanks also to each and everyone who helped in anyway with our supper and auction. Mrs. Sarah Wood First United Methodist Church Mocksville, N.C. Dear Editor: I want to thank the businesses and people of Davie County who contributed to the Heart Fund through the Rock- N - R oll Jam boree held at Lynn Haven Convalescent Center on February 22. The residents at Lynn Haven raised $320.65 for the North Carolina Heart Fund. This is a large am ount of money for a group of people ages 78 to 94 to raise through contributions. . We appreciate the c o j^ ^ ^ n ity 's continued interest in our vahous ac- Uvities. Sincerely, David Joyner, Social Worker Lynn Haven Convalescent Center Dear Editor: I think we owe a word of thanks to the Davie County Hospital, Rescue Squad, E.M .S., Sheriff Department, Volunteer F irem en throughout the county, Mocksville Police Department, Nortii Carolina State Highway Patrol, and the North Carolina Department of Tran­ sportation for their efforts during our recent snowstorm. The situation could have been more unpleasant than it was without their efforts. Sincerely, Luther Potts Rt. 3 Mocksville Dear Editor; I would like to take this opportunity to thank the Davie Co. Rescue Squad and all the neighbors who came out on the flooded river near Farm ington and worked so hard to help us rescue about fifty head of cattle stranded in high water. Had it not been for the Davie County Rescue Squad and those friends with four wheel drive trucks, boats and tractors we could not have saved those cows. We will always be grateful to these people. Thanks again and may God bless each of you. Mrs. Frank PotU Jerry and Charles * Weslon Gray Wallace, son of M r. and Mrs. Wlllle Wallace of Route 2, Mocksville, celebrated his 2nd birthday, Sunday, February 25, with a party at the home of his grandparenU, Mr. and Mrs. Bud Wallace, Route 5, Mocksville. His birthday cake was baked and decorated by his mother depleting a farm with a tractor, anim als and chickens. His other grandparents are M r. and Mrs. Batry Smith of Route 5. Mocksville. Pesticide School The Pesticide School has been re-scheduled for obtaining a private license. Meetings will be held on Monday, March 5,1979, and Tuesday, March 8, 1979, at 7:30 p.m. In the auditorium of the County Office Building. Center Holds Annual Firemen’s Banquet The Center Community Development Association honored their volunteer firemen with a banquet Monday night. The menu consisted of pork bar-b-que, all kinds of vegetables, salads and desserts. Roberl Tutterow, president of the association, presided. Paul Forrest, chaplain, gave the invocation. After the meal, Norman Forrest, fire chief, commended everyone for the great progress made in the past year in behalf of the Center Volunteer Fire D epartm ent. In his words, “ the department really came alive in the past year". Each m ember of the board of direc­ tors was recognized. Three deceased m em bers were rem em bered and members of their families present were recognized. The names of the following will be added to the memorial plaque in Ihe community building: Clyde Dyson, Dewey K im m er and T.A. Blackwelder Jr. W illiam Fishel, instructor at Forsyth Technical Institute and a certified fire training instructor with the Griffith Volunteer Fire Department of Forsyth County was the speaker. He encouraged all firemen “to do their best and then keep on trying". William Fisliel, speaker, is shown with Center Fire Chief, Norman Forresl, and Robert Tutterow, president of the association. "A volunteer fireman's reward is to know that he has freely given of his time and efforts for his com m unity," said Mr, Fishel. He also paid tribute to the wives of the firemen "who stay al home and worry about their husbands in the wee hours of the night." Door prizes of floral arrangements were won by Odell W illiams and Bill Harmon. Door prizes of toy fire trucks and toy fire chief autos were won by the following children in attendance: David Beck, Brad Anderson, Ray Tutterow, Holly Harpe, Paul Harpe, Frankie O'Neal, Rodney Evans, Keith Lumley, Sam Harmon, Wanda Ratledge, Brian W illiam s, Teresa Ratledge, Deanna Lumley, Chad Forrest and Ben Forrest. Local Health Department Shows Increase In Patient And Services Vehicles Collide On N C 801 Two vehicles were involved in a collision February 21st on NC 801, 10.5 miles east of Mocksville. Involved was a 1965 Plym outh station w agon operated by E dw ard Lee W illiam s, 24, of Clemmons, N. C. and a 1978 — Chevrolet operated by Donald Odell Butner, 19, of Rt. 3 Advance. Siate Highway Patrolm an J. L. Payne said his investigation of the 8 p.m . wreck showed that W illiam s foot slipped off the brake pedal while attem pting to enter highway from a private driveway, ran into ditch on opposite side of the road. A friend came by and attempted to pull him out with a chain. The Butner vehicle came along and was unable to see ahead due to dense fog and ran into the chain causing the W illiam s vehicle to slap the side of the Butner vehicle as it passed by. Dam age to the W illiam s vehicle was estimated at $100 and $600 to the Butner vehicle. Butner was charged with ex­ ceeding safe speed. M otor Vehicle Operators Licenses Are Suspended Motor vehicles operator's licenses suspended or revoked in Davie County for the period ending February 2nd _ include; Johnny R. McBride, 32, of Cooleemee, revoked as of January 17, 1979 until January 17, 1980. R. L. Hayes, 28, of Rt. 7 Mocksville, revoked as of January 8, 1979 until January 8, 1980. Michael K. Joyner, 23, of Rt. 1 MocksviUe, revoked as of January 8, 1979 until January 8, 1980. Herman M. Peacock, 44, of Rt. 7 Mocksville, revoked as of February 12, 1979 indefinitely. For the period ending February 9th; Randy C. Plott, 21, of Rt. 1 Advance, revoked as of January 15, 1979 until January 15, 1983. Ricky L. Dillard, 20, of Rt. 7 Mocksville, suspended as of February 18, 1979 until April 19, 1979. Joseph H. Downs III, 29, of Rt. 4 Mocksville, revoked as of January 17, 1979 until January 17, 1983. Forrest W. Hartley, 17, of Rt. 1 Mocksville, revoked as of January 15, 1979 until January 15, 1980. Cicero H. Jones, 34, of 598 Avon St., Mocksville, revoked as of February 15, 1979 indefinitely. Ronald W. Smith, 20, of Rt. 5 Mocksville, revoked as of M arch 5, 1979 until M arch 5, 1980. Larry M. Spencer, 29, of Rt. 1 Mocksville, revoked as of January 18, 1979 until January 18, 1980. Johnny C. Waller, 32, of Rt. 7 Mocksville, revoked as of January 5, 1979 until January 5, 1980. Billie L. Russell, 41, of Cooleemee, suspended as of February 3, 1979 until April 4, 1979. "Never injure a friend, evenin jest." Cicero Board of Health members received a progress report from the Davie County H ealth D epartm ent at their last meeting, February 15. Figures released by the Health Department reveal that the services provided lo the citizens of Davie County had greatly increased during 1978. The number of patienU seen in the clinics increased 42 percent from 7760 in 1977 to 11,025 in 1978. The num ber of patients seen in the chronic disease program alone, more than doubled in 1978. The num ber ol cunic services also increased dram atically during the past year - by 52 percent. The number of diabetic screenings increased three fold, serologies doubled, urine test doubled, as well as the number of blood chemistry series performed. Also, the number of visits by Home Health Nurses to their patients in­ creased by 48 percent over the last year - - 3215 visiU were made in 1978. Other programs in the Health Department also increased their patient load. Two new programs were begun in 1978. In February, a prenatal clinic was started. This clinic is prim arily for women who cannot afford the cost of prenatal care and would not have received any. The W IC program also began last year. W IC provides formula, m ilk, juice, cereal and eggs to women, infanU and children at nutritional risk. Ms. Connie SUfford, Director of the Health Department, commented on the increase of services. “We are pleased to have been able to increase the number of Davie County residenU served by the Health Department during the past year. We are always striving to im ­ prove the quality of the services that we are able to provide and I'm very plased that more citizens are taking advantage of this valuable local resource." “ In addition to the clinical, en­ vironmental health and home health services, we also can offer health education programs on various topics to groups in Davie County. For more in­ formation on these programs or any of our services simply contact the Davie County Health Departm ent." "Old friends are best."John Selden Service Pins Presented Mrs. Joyce Ritchie (left) owner and manager of the local H&R Block office, presents service pins to Jean Pratt and Helen Bean. Mrs. Pratt has been employed with the firm for 4 years and Mrs. Bean for 5 years. The presentations were made in honor of their excellent service and dedication. (Photo by Robin Carter) Blaise Baptist To Have Sem inar On Dying Blaise Baptist Church will hold a sem inar on the subject of “ D eath and D y in g ” throughout the m onth of February. All sessions will be open for the public to attend. These w ill be held each Sunday evening from 7:00 to 8:30 p.m . with topic schedules as follows; M arch 4 - Legal aspecU of D eath and D ying. O .B . Crowell, Jr. attorney, and Bobby H. Knight, insurance agent, w ill co-host Ihis session. The public is invited to attend these very informative sessions. A nursery is provided. R um m age Sale At W m . R. Davie The W illiam R. Davie Fire Department will sponsor a R u m m ag e Sale Saturday, April 21st starting at 10 a.m . If you have items to donate please call 492-7211, 492-7769, 492-7232 or 998-3043 or contact any m em ber of the fire department. In the language of flowers, a bright pink peach blossom means "I am your captive." Come To A Free Trial Usion ¿T o « д / T U E S . , M A R C H 6 T H Anytime Between 2 & 7 P.M. For More Information Phone 704-249-I5I8 Dav or Evening Classes- SpeciaJ Scholarship Awards Leitlii^n college ^nter Street Lexington,N.C. 27292 a MIDWAY RESTAURANT "* Located In The FJlis Center On Highway 601 3 Miles South of Mocksvillo BREAKFAST SERVED EA C H M O R N IN G AT 6:00 A.M Wednesday & Thursday Lunch & Evening Special HambureerSteak W ith French Fries ju st I t t Or Baked Potato, Toss Salad or Slaw.................. • ^ Friday & Saturday Special Fresh Flounder W ith French Fries & Slaw ALL Y O U C A N E A T ........................................... O .Z j Saturday Lunch & Evening Special! Italian Style Spaghetti AM, YOU CAN KAT W ith Salad...........................,.................... We Appreciate Your Busineim!!!! Lib Crubb & Fred O. Ellis,owners Lib Crubb.manager Open Monday-Saturday 6:00 A.M.-9:00 P . M .____ ,’1.99’2.99 . Ml *J. МГ '/Г Ml Ml INVENTORY CLEARANCE! onthis GENERAL ELECTRIC 'quality DUILT M U L T I- S P E E D 2 i n i W A S H E R virtth the Mini-Dosket™ Tub 2inlW A SH E R V A R IA B L E W A T E R L E V E L S T hree Wash/Rlnse Temperature Combinationsv Bleach & Fabric Softener Dispensers Reg.’369.95 HOVONLY 339” Mocksville Furniture & Appliance Inc. 2 Court Square Mocksville, N.C. Phone 634*5812 Model WWA7070V DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, THURSDAY, MARCH 1, 1979 New Heffner’s Land Of Food; Ultim ate In Energy Conservation By Kathy Tomlinson In this era ot fuel shortages and high energy costs, methods of conservation must be achieved and maintained. Oren J. Heffner of Heffner’s Land of Food In Mocksville has achieved this goal through the construction of his new store In the Willow Oak Shopping Center. Located on Highway 601 North in M ocksville, the 19,000 square feet facility features the latest in energy efficient equipment. Installed by W.A. Brown & Son Refrigeration Co., Inc., the new store features the ultimate in energy conservation and custom er convenience. J. David Morris, sales representative for the W.A. Brown Company said, “There is no supermarket nationwide to my knowledge that can top Ihe energy conservation methods featured in the new Heffner’s Land of Food facility.” “Through the use of the most mooerii equipment, Heffner has utilized every possible aspect of fuel loss in the con­ ventional store, and transformed them into fuel conservation assets for this store.” This has been achieved through the installation of environmental control and energy management systems. The first system will annually cut $10,000 - $12,000 off the fuel bill of a conventional supermarket of comparable size. The energy management system will assure an additional 10-15 percent reduction in this already re d u c ^ bill. Reflecting on his efforts to conserve energy, Oren Heffner, owner of the store said, “The cost of energy is such a factor in the operating expense of a super­ market, that this alone causes us to investigate every possible means of keeping cost in line.” “All of us, as citizens and business men must strive to conserve energy in this time of extreme power shortages. Businesses that use large amounts of power must conserve in an effort to relieveiin already critical situation,” he said. The environmental control systems assures o p tim al refrigeration case performance and customer comfort while in the store. Temperatures are m aintained at a constant 72 degrees and a 55 percent relative humidity is maintained. The system through the placement of intake and discharge vents, assures optim al circulation of w arm air resulting in a reduced power con­ sumption. In the conventional super­ market, both intake and discharge heating and air conditioning vents are located in the ceiling. This results in the heat being released through the discharge vents before it reaches the floor where warm th is needed. Not only does the store feel cold, but the heating units are forced to run almost con­ tinually. In the new heating system located in Heffner’s discharge vents have been placed on the floor just beneath the refrigeration units. This in turn forces the air to reach the floor before being discharged by vents into the at­ mosphere. The results are a warm store at a m inim al amount of energy con- Wm. R. Davie Institutes School Bus Safety Program Because of the large num ber of bus accidents and student fatalities which have occurred in North Carolina this year, a school bus safety program has been initiated at W illiam R. Davie School by the Principal, Mrs. Betty E. West. The purpose of this program is to encourage students to follow bus safety rules with the hope this will reduce the likelihood of bus accidents. Bus drivers are asked to keep a record of those students who follow bus safety rules and exemplify good bus behavior. The first group of safety club m em ­ bers were recognized at a recent school assembly program. Each driver had chosen 5 students from kindergarten thru 6th grade and 5 students from 6th thru 8th grades for membership in the club. Certificates, signed by the bus driver and principal, were presented to the 80 charter members of the W illiam R . Davie Bus Safety Club. Bus drivers were made honorary members and awarded certificates of membership also. The students inducted will rem ain in the club as long as they observe good safety rules and new members will be inducted into the club each month. W illia m R . D avie Safety Club members are as follows: 8th Graders; Vicki Reeves, Tam my Hutchins, Karen Pardue, Leesa White, U sa Reeves, Sherry HaU, Phil Ireland, ’Trina Beck, Brent Smith; 6th and 7th Graders; Paula Masten, KeUy Folds, Audra Rasmussen, Tracy Gobble, Steve Stewart, M ark Sheets, Beth Mincey, Janice Bledsoe, Dana Boger, Brenda Potts, Vickie Barnhardt, Am y Reavis, Jackie W all, Teresa McEwen, Hilda Grose, Kathy Latham and Buddy Myers; 6th Graders: Steve Gaither, Edna Godbey, Cynthia Harding, Mitzi Hobson, Marty Draughn, Johnny Whitaker, Andy Atwood, Dawn Brown, Jay Lockhart; 4th and Sth Graders; M ark Seawright, MeUssa Hedrick, Julie Mincey, Melissa White, Nancy Shore, John Reeves, M ark Harding, Michael Jones, Amy Keaton, Debbie Ratledge, Melanie Cornelison, Andy R eavis, R andy G rannam an, Michael Beck, Donnie Ratledge, Donald Snead, Robin White, Jam es Peoples; 2nd and 3rd Graders; Chuck Jones, Steven Pope, Steven Jones, Jeff Cor­ nelison, Sally R asm ussen Leon W hitaker, B renda Shore, K endall Stewart, Mike Campbell, Rodney Jones, Terry Brown; K indergarten and 1st G raders; Tommy Vestal, Brett Foster, David Baity, Kathy Ligon, CoUeen Shore, T am m y Bledsoe, Jen nifer E aton, Rodney Dewalt. Bus drivers wbo are charter members in the club include: Mrs. Freda Stanley, Mrs. Grace Anderson, Sylvia Smith, Daphne Weeks, Coleen Gaither. 'P ainted M usic’ At Library M onday N ight Maxine Swalin, pianist and lecturer wiU present “Painted M usic” at the public Ubrary, Monday, M arch 5, at 8;1S p.m .“Painted M usic” is a presentation of piano selections and sUdes of masterpieces. Both the music and paintings are chosen for correlations and simUarities of style; probing a wider area of Art that can be enjoyed by everyone. Selections include composers such as Schumann, Bach and Joplin, and artists from Renoir to Picasso. Throughout coUege, graduate school and travels abroad, art and music have been a dual interest for Maxine Swalin. She has taught music theory at the Hartford School of Music, and after moving to North CaroUna served as pianist, harpsichordist, and coordinator for the Young Artists’ Auditions and the C hildren’s Concerts of the N orth Carolina Symphony. At the present time, Mrs. SwaUn is vitally interested in the achievements of women in the Fine Arts, while she shares ensemble programs with Dr. B en jam in S w alin, conductor and violinist. This presentation is sponsored by the Arts CouncU and is free of charge to the public. ‘This project is supported by the Grassroots Arts Program of the North CaroUna Arts CouncU, a state agency. can FOODS The store decor features bright colors and modern design, creating a pleasant, attractive atmosphere in which to shop. Oren Heffner (left) and J. David Morris discuss annual power savings provided by the new energy efficient system. sumption through an accurate ther­ mostat reading. When the desired level of warm th is achieved the heating units cut off until needed. Another conservation aspect of the Angela and Michael Lee Robertson, children of the Rev. and Mrs. Tommy R obertson of T hom asville, N orth Carolina celebrated theh- birthdays last week with a fam ily party at home. Angela was five yeari old February 24, and Michael was 2, February 22. Their grandparents are M r. and Mrs. Robert L. RoberUon of Route 3. Mocksville, John Godbey and Mrs. Lucille Lanning, both of Lexington. Beekeepers Association To M eet M arch 6 The D avie County Beekeeper Association wiU have a meeting March 6 at 7:30 p.m . in the Commissioners Room, Davie County Court House. The special speaker for the meeting wiU be Angie L. Crone, promotion specialist with the North Carolina Department of Agriculture. She wUl be discussing the UNCAP program (Use N .C . A griculture Products). AU beekeepers in the county are in­ vited to attend the meeting. For information caU Ronnie Thomp­ son, Associate Agriculture Extension Agent, 634-5134. Collard Greens Leafy parts of collard greens, turnip greens and kale have much more vitam in A content than their stems or midribs. Futuro liglitweight aluminum walkers feature:• Non-slip plastic hand grips, for maximum safety.• Strong, anodized aluminum tubing• Relnforcsd frame tor extra strength and stability.• Slip resistant, non­marring, steel rein­forced rubber leg tips.• Adjustable legs for proper height WALKERS Also available from Futuro is a convenient folding walker, ideal for travel or storing in limited space. fiEN TA L R A TÊ S ON R EQ U EST M «dlc«r» Not«: It you qualify, M edicBfe may pay for a large part o( Ihe purchase or renial price of FU TU RO Pftiienl-A id i convale*ceni producís Headquarters tor ttie complete line ot Patlent-Alds convaleicent products. WILKINS DRUG & WILKINS HOSPITAL PHARMACY Wa Speclaliza In 3rd Party Pratcriptlon Cr*«cent Elec.—Employer, W-S-Htilth Plan Clark Equipm ent, etc. Farmington News M r. W.H. (H am p) Seats has returned hom e from the D avie County H ospital. I haven’t heard how his con­ dition is at this writing. Mrs. Queen Bess Kennan of Lynn H aven N ursing Center was feeling m uch better than she had a few weeks ago. We hope she continues to improve. Mrs. Laura Brock and Mrs. NeU Lashley are both getting along very weU at this time. Mrs. Lashley attended church last Sunday the 2Sth even though it did rain. Our comm unity was again saddened last Friday Feb. 23 when M r. Roland Winfrey Lakey, one of our older citizens passed away at the Davie County Hospital. M r Lakey was a veteran of World War I. He is survived by his wife Bernice, one son, Bobby Lakey and 2 grandchildren. He wUI be greatly missed by his loved ones and his friends and neighbors. Our deepest sympathy goes out to the Spach famUy in tbe death of their son Terry Eugene Spach who was ac­ cidently kiUed in an auto wreck near F arm in g ton February 16. May God be near Terry’s parente M r. and IMrs. Sanford Spach and other relatives and friends during their hours of bereavement. The U nited M ethodist to the fund or one may i____not to participate. Taxpayers who choose not to participate should check the “NO” box on the tax form. system is that the warm air created by the refrigeration units is recycled into the store as heat. This utUization results in free heating for the store in terms of energy consumption, free defrosting for me retrigeration units, partially free not water for the store and reduced air conditioning loads. The energy m anagem ent system allows the operator to m aintain the m inim um of power necessary for the store to operate efficiently. After this point of power consumption is deter­ mined, the system has a pre-set point that keeps killowatts used at the desired level. When usage exceeds this point the system au to m atically searches for means of cutting back in energy con­ sumption. This is achieved by its automatic cut off of a light, hot water heaters, compressors, etc. for a short period of time until the energy level returns to the desired point. “The systems assure not only optimal energy efficiency,” said Morris, “but also provides warm comfortable aisles and a specifically designed environment for customers to shop in.” Heffner’s Land of Food located in Clemmons is equipped with the en­ vironmental control system and has proved effective in the reduction of power usage to operate the store. It is not equipped with the new feature of the energy management system. Oren Heffner said, "Any expense one incurrs when operating a business sooner or later has to be passed on to the consumer whether in a manufacturing or retail business. “ If we can save dollars through conservation, then we wUI be able to lower prices for our customers.” "Keeping a handle on operating costs,” said Heffner, "is one way we have of keeping prices down for the consumer.” The new location wUI open Tuesday, March 6. Store hours are 8:30 - 9:00 Monday through Friday and 8:30 - 7:00 on Saturdav. Vehicle Dam aged In Wreck On 1-40 A 1978 Mercury suffered $250 in dam ageslastSundayabout7:4Sa.m . on Interstate 40. The driver, Deborah Seratt Toney, of Rt. 1 Ellenboro, told State Highway Patrolm an Jam es M. Newton that she was proceeding east on 1-40 in the right lane. In attempting to pass, another vehicle struck her vehicle in the right side. № t e h o a s e O v e r lo a d e d - N e w S h ip m e n t s o n t h e R o a d ! General EktrtriclNVENTORY CLEARANCE OO Model No. JCS06 RANGE FEATURES 1. OVEN SET Knob2. OVEN TEMP Knob3. Oven Cycling Light4. Master Indicator Light for Surface Units5. Controls for Surface Units 6. Calrod® Surface Units— Trim Rings, Aluminum Reflector Pans7. Oven Vent Duct (Under Surface Unit) 8. Oven Liner 9. Oven Shelves10. Shelf Support11. Broiler Pan and Rack12. Removable Oven Door13. Oven Door Liner14. Storage Drawers15. Interior Light Queen Bee’s wUl meet at the feUowship haU of the Far­ mington Methodist Church on Tuesday night, Feb. 27 at 7;30 p.m . We request aU members to be present for this meeting. Due to our weather con­ ditions last week some of these items m ay seem as late news. I felt like I could not let our readers down tills past week though. So I ’m using both late and present news. Taxpayers May Donate To The 1980 C am paign Taxpayers who wish to p articip ate in the 1980 Presidential Election C am ­ paign Fund m ay do so again this year by designating a doUar of their taxes on their Federal income tax return. By designating $1 of their lax to the Fund, taxpayers can play a part in financing candidates running for the Presidency in 1980. The designation will not decrease any refund nor increase any tax bill for the taxpayer. On joint returns, husband and wife m ay each designate 40 Inch Range C U S T O M E R ^ C A R E .. S E R V IC E .E V E R Y W H E R E You can count on General Beetric for great Ideas In cooking. - COMPLETE LINE OF RANGES IN STOCK!!!! -WESERVICE- Mocksville Furniture & Appliance No. 2 Court Square Mecksvlll«,N.C. LB. GOLDEN CRISP 12 0 Z .P K G . BACON ^»riNe HORMEL PURE PORK L IN K ^ U S A G E LITTLE SIZZLERS' $ |0 9 H AM IT UP W ITH H O RM ELH AM LUNCH MEATS PKG. HEFFNER'S FRESH PURE PORK PORK SAUSAGE . « IO » SIRLOIN STEAK $2 '« ARMOUR’S FINEST POHED MEAT ARMOUR’S FINEST VIENNA SAUSAGE 50Z.CANS $ 1 0 9 ★ SAVE 38* S^OLCANS ★ SAVE 25* MUELLERS THIN SPAGHETTI STEWART’S FROZEN FISH SANDWICH KRAFT'S SLICED *Ш 1С Л М , 160Z.PKG. ic SAVE 18* PKG. OF 2 SAVE 40* VANITY FAIR PAPER TOWELS JUMBO ROLLS ★ SAVE 19* DISH DETERGENT IVORY LIQUID 480Z.B0nLE 4 » ’ l GOLD DEODORANT DJAL SOi SIZE BARS ir SAVE 37* PAMPERS 24 COUNT “t i f ; ABSORBENT $ 0 4 9 12 OZ. PKG. PKG. U SAVE 40* H E P F N E K ^ S P R I C E S DiscountPrice Armour’s Corned Beef Hash i 5Ho^.can 87*6*\ Armour’s Chopped Beef 120*. can *1.29 12*1 Armour’s Beef Stew 24 oz. size «1.17 10*1 Armour's Beef Sloppy Joe is oz. size 93*10*1 Armour’s Pork Sloppy Joe 15 Oz. Size 93*10^1 Armour’s Chill w /B eans 69*10* ' Mount Olive Hamburger Dill Chips I6 0z.jar 65*10* Mount Olive Fresh Kosher Dill Pickles 32 0z.size 89*i 6*L Mount Olive Sweet ^2 Oz. Sweet Cucum ber Chips j«r 95*12*1 Comet PÌQ0 I Lb. Celo Bag 35*ЛTexize Spray «W ash »1,39 10* Sta Puf Concentrated Blue Laundry Rinse ^o z.s ize »1.57 42*1 LAUNDRY DETtRGENT » • I I C h e e r I 'w e s t e r n RED [gH GOLDEN DELICIOUS] APPLES 9 LB. iiiij I■■•II DAVIE COUNTY EOTERPRtSE RECORD. THURSDAY. MARCH 1. 1979 - 7 300 CANS HUNT’S SPECIAL TOMATO SAUCE • Iit SAVE 41* MARUSHAN ^ INSTANT LUNCH "TT- 1.3 oz, CUP ★ SAVE 28* DELIGHTFUL TANGY TASTE - FLORIDA CITRUS PUNCH m m t ¿ " .a - T f'c - Vi GALLON ★ SAVE 30* DIXIE XTAL SUGAR LAND RIGHT TO R E S E ^ ^QUANTITIES A l OF FOOD NONE SOLD TO DEALERS $ 1 0 95 LB. BAG ★ SAVE 13* FRENCH'S SCALLOPED INSTANT POTATOES 5ViOZ.PKG. 5 9 * ir SAVES* m f i i i ES HALVES YOUR ANKA COFFEE iaz.iAR $ 3 9 9 ★ SAVE 60* rANT COFFEE MELLOW ROAST.^M 80Z.JAR it SAVE 38* J F-G ALL GRINDS COFFEE « G $ f 99 it SAVE 20* iON DAIRY COFFEE CREAMER ?ET CREAMER 160Z.JAR ★ SAVE 40* g r e e n, ST A M PS Idea Books Are Here G re e n S tam psI ' with thli Coupon and PurchiM of . One $9.95 or More Food Order | I NOTE; Limit of one Food Bonui Coupon with each oidei; | Good Only at Heffner’s through, | March 7,1979 I m A.y,{r T o to / S h o p p in g ” V a lu e 3 l-No Limit Special' ^ | \ i Valuable Tradmf’ FOLGER’S COFFEE ^ / • u i g e r s . FUKED 13 OZ. BAGS $ |9 5 . ★ SAVE 14* ALL GRINDS 1 LB. BAGS * SAVE 4* W i t h o u t , '^COUPON $1.09 HEFFNER'S LAND OF FOOD COUPON EXTRA 20« OFF WITH THIS COUPON CARTON OF 8 16 OZ. BOHLES WITH THIS COUPON o n l y ^ . , . ,: Thli coupon will ba redeemed lor 20c prc that you and your customer have compiled with the ol thli oiler. Invoice! proving purchaee ol tuHiclentto cover coupon! redeemed mu!t be ehown by dealer upon requeet. Thi! coupon may be ueed only In the area eerved by Ihe Coca-Cola Bottl­ing Company ol WInaton-Salem. Thi* coupon I may only bo uaed lor purchase deacrlbed | hereon. Any other use l! Illegal and prohibited. One purchaee per coupon pTeaee. This oHer I void wherever prohibited or restricted by law. OFFER EXPIRES-March 3.1979 20 <= FRESH CRISP LB. 1 H E F F N E R 'S P R I C E S DiscountPrice YOU SAVE Sta Puf Pink Fabric Rinse '/i GaUon 67‘ Texize Fabric Rinse Gallon 99*34* Fantastic Cleaner 22 Oz. Size 87‘22‘ Grease Remover Grease Relief 22 Oz. Size 89*6* Texize Pine Power 28 Oz. Size *1.0?14* Big Tate Instant Potatoes 16 Oz. Size 83*26* J-F-G Peanut Butter 28 Oz. Jar ‘1.35 34* Wagon Trail Syrup 24 Oz. Size 49*30* Welch’s Grape Jelly 3 Lb. Jar ‘1.19 40* Sioux Bee Honey 16 Oz. Jar 99* 14* Lysol ^^aquid"12 Oz. Bottle *1.09 20* RefiU Bottle ^ 0 9 Cleaner H GaUon »1.49 30* DAVIU rOUNTV l-NTERPRISE RECORD, THURSDÁV, MARCH 1, IQ79 Local Students On Dean’s List At Mitchell Mary H. Angell and Billie H. Bean are among the IS students from Mitchell C om m unity College in Statesville recently selected to be included in the publication, "W h o ’s W ho Am ong Students in American Junior Colleges." Selections for this honor are made by campus nominating committees and are based on scholarship, leadership In academic and extra curricular ac­ tivities, citizenship and future potential. M ary Hollis Angell Is the wife of George G. Angell of Rt. 7, Mocksville. She Is a member of Phi Theta Kappa, Art Club, France Hispanic Club, a dean's list student, 1978 graduation m arshall, and received first place in the Political Science Competitive Essay Contest. Billie H. Bean Is the wife of Jam es Ray Bean of Woodleaf and the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. M illard Harmon ot Mocksville. She is vice-president of Phi Theta Kappa, a member of the Art Club, a 1978 graduation m arshall, and a dean’s list student. Their names, along with students from over 600 Junior colleges, will ap­ pear in the 13th edition of “Who's Who” for 1979. On A Diet? On a diet? Marinate vegetables in .salad dressing lo pack In a plastic container for low calorie picnicking. Foster-B lackwelder M r. and Mrs. Buddie Foster of Route 2 Advance announce the engagement of their daughter, Bonnie Denise to Thomas Leslie Blackwelder, Jr., son of Mr. and Mrs. Leslie Blackwelder of Route 3, Mocksville. The wedding is planned for 3 o’clock on May 6,1979 at Fork Baptist Church. Miss Foster is a 1978 graduate of Davie High School and is employed by Hendricks Furniture, Mocksville, N.C. Mr. Blackwelder is a 1974 graduate of Davie High School and is employed by Mocksville Furniture and Appliance, Mocksville, N.C. Miss Jerom e Is Honored At Party Mrs. V.G. P rim and Mrs. John Spargo honored Miss M artha Louise Jerome, bride elect of Jeffery Hart Ward, and Miss Ann Barber, bride elect of Ron Cannon, with a Coke Party at the Spargo home on Ruffin Street in Cooleemee on Saturday, F ebruary 24 th. A p­ proximately 40 guests called during the afternoon. The refreshment table was centered with an arrangem ent of mixed spring flowers and candles. Special guests Included Mrs. John Barber and Mrs. Jack Jerome, mothers of the brides elect, and Mrs. Jack Ward, mother of Jeffery Ward. The honorees were presented with corsages of daisies upon their arrival and hostess gifts of silver in their chosen patterns. Amy Carter Observes Sixth Birthday Amy Carolipe Carter celebrated her 6th birthday a day early, with a party at her home on Route 7, MocksviUe, Monday evening, February 26. Among Uie guests sharing her fun were Traci and Chad Sechrest, Jenny Rebecca Spry, Brandi and Scott Dwiggins, her aunt, M rs. Ann Sechrest, Breck Feimster and Am y’s mother, Ms. Robin Carter. Decorated birthday cake, poUto chips, nuts, Kool-Aid and candy were served. The highlight of the evening was a very special gift, a Beagle puppy that emerged from a gift wrapped box complete with ribbon bows. Chandler-Smith M r. and Mrs. U.M. Chandler of 29 W att Street, Cooleemee, N.C. announce the engagement of their daughter, Karen Teresa to Je ffr y AUen Smith, son of Mrs. WiUiam Dodge of Charlotte, N.C. and Frank Sm ith of Lancaster, S.C. Miss Chandler is a 1975 graduate of Davie County High School. She is presently employed by Davidson County Community CoUege as an A udio-visual^ receptionist. W Mr. Sm ith is a 1973 graduate of Lexington Senior High School and is presently employed by the P .P.G . Industries in the Data Processing department. The wedding is planned for April 1, et the Catawba CoUege Chapel in Salisbury. Chicken Cooking Contest Seeks Entrants IW Anniversary M r. and Mrs. Henry MiUer of Advance, North Caroltna celebrated their 30th wedding anniversary Sunday, February 4, with a surprise reception at their home. Hosts were their children, M r. and Mrs. Spurgeon Foster, Jr. and Mr. and Mrs. M . David MUler, Susan and Rodney MUler and grandchildren, Bryan and Wesley Foster. Approximately seventy-five friends and relatives called during the appointed hours from 2 p.m . until 4 p.m . Plans for the 16th North Carolina Chicken Cooking Contest, sponsored by the North CaroUna Poultry Processors Association in cooperation with the N orth C arolina D epartm ent of Agriculture, North Carolina Poultry Federation, and the North CaroUna State University are well underway. The deadline for entries in the contest is April 1,1979. Just send a copy of your recipe, giving amounts of ingredients and fuU instructions with your name, address, and telephone number to Chicken Contest, Box 281SS CentroT Station, Washington, DC 20005. From all the entries submitted to the National Broiler CouncU, five con­ testants will be chosen to compete in the State Cook-Off Contest in R aleigh Friday, April 27, 1979. If you have any questions or would to have more information regarding Uii ^ contest, please contact Mrs. Ostine' W est, H om e E conom ics Extension Agent, in the County Office Building or caU 634-2634. Rem ona Frye Honored At Shower Remona Frye, bride-elect Jones, was honored with a of Barry floating B i r t h Gas Stations Aid Heart Fund The following service stations in Mocksville will contribute 1 cent per gallon of gas pumped, Friday, March 2, to the Davie County Heart Fund Campaign: Union 78 at Sam ’s Country Kitchen; Andy’s Union 76, Osborne's SheU, Thompson’s 601 Shell, M & S 601 Sunoco; G ra y ’s Exxon. H eart Fund posters and balloons will be displayed at each of the staUons. Justin Frye Foster, son of M r. and Mrs. Kenny Poster of Advance, N.C. celebrated his first birthday Friday, February 23, with a party at his home. Friends and relatives were served Winnle-The-Pooh birthday cake and ice cream. His grandparents are Mrs. Hazel Foster and Mrs. Eleanor Frye of Cooleemee. V:I M r. and Mrs. Gaither M arkiand and daughter, Joy, proudly announce the birth of a son and brother, Jason Eugene, born Sunday, February 18, at Forsyth M emorial Hospital in Winston- Salem. The baby weighed 9 lbs. 4 ozs. and was 22 inches in length. M aternal grandparent is Mrs. Edgar Burgess of Rt. 5, Mocksville. Paternal grandparents are M r. and Mrs. R .J. M arkiand of Route 2, Ad­ vance. M aternal great grandmother is Mrs. Alice Meyers of Route 2, Advance, N.C. Mrs. M arkiand is the former Ann Burgess. shower, Saturday, February 24, from 2 to 4 p.m . at the home of Fred Jones on WiU<sboro Street. Hostesses for the occasion were June Beal and Annette Jones. The refreshment table was covered with a white cloth, centered with a floral arrangem ent in green and yellow and lighted with green tapers. R efreshm ents consisted of green punch, green and yeUow cake squares, crackers w ith cheese topping and pickles. Many lovely and useful gifts were received by the honoree including an electric-blanket and crystal egg tray from the hostesses. The couple wiU be married March 3rd. Miss Everidge Entertained At Luncheon Mrs. Lester M artin, Jr. and Mrs. George M artin entertained Miss Candy Everidge, Saturday, February 24, with a luncheon at Bermuda Run Country Club. Places were set for eight guests. An arrangem ent of white hyacinths in a basket was used as a centerpiece, and later presented to the honoree. The hostess gift was a crystal salad bowl set. Gospel Baptist Revival Gospel Baptist Church of Route 6 MocksviUe wUl hold a week-end revival, Thursday, Friday and Saturday, M arch 1,2, and 3 at 7 p.m . each night. Guest speaker wiU be Rev. Aaron Carter from King, N.C. There wUl be special singing on Friday and Saturday night provided by the Glory Road Singers. The church is located 4 mUes north oi MocksviUe off 601 on the flrst dirt road to Uie right past Cana Road. Everyone is invited to attend. Mrs. Draughon To Address Reading Group Mrs. Bobbye Draughon, Staff Development Specialist for the State Department of Public In- striiction. Division of Exceptional chUdren wUl speak to the Davie County CouncU of the International R eading Association M onday, M arch 5, at the M ocksville Elementary School at 3:45 p.m. M rs. D raughon has taught English and French for 10 years in the public schools in addition to the foUowing: Reading K-8 one year, resource teacher K-8 three years and has been a reading consultant to classroom teachers for 5 years. Mrs. Draughon received her undergraduate degree in English and French from M ississippi W om en’s U niversity and her graduate degree in Special E ducation, the m e ntally h an­ dicapped and Learning Disabled from ASU, Boone, N.C. We Are Pleased To A nnounceT hat... M a r t y C a r d Has Joined Our staff! She Invites You To Come By^ Or Call For An Appointment! “Individually You Invites You To Visit Our New Salon! The H a i r s e t t e r 505'/i Avot\ Street Phone 634-3442 Sandy KeUer, Owner Operator. W estw o o d V illa g e S hopping C e n te r Clem m ons, N.C. (919) 766-4474 Hair & Skin Care For Men & Women S te < d ^ e n Marty Smith (Owner) Vvonnf Tiiicy Brenda Lord F o s te r- R a u c h D ru g C o . W ilkesboro Street M ocksville, N.C.Phone 634-2141 CONTAC 20's %1.99 3 79 VALUe GAVISCON®ANTACID TABLETSlOO't 3.59 6 76 VALUE AFRIN® SPRAY 15 cc. 1.49 2 39 VALUE AfrinNASALSPRAY IH COVER GIRL NAIL CONDITIONER k STRENCTHENER I so VALUE wftmá -— o n — - D IA L S O A P ™ ^ 4 B A R S F O R .8 8 Colgate Toolhpaile5 oj...........................AD .aaFluorigird Dental Rinse 10 oz.. Reg. 1.29......................AO .aS Ultra Brite Toolhpaile1.3 01.................................. Telia Pad! Reg. 1.09........................... 2" « 3" - 10 i . AO .78 . AD .68 MENNEN SPEED STICK - DEODORANT 2Vi OZ. RECULAR AND SPICE 1 69 VALUE CURITY® SUPER SOFT PUFFS 260'S 2/1.00 88 EA. VALUE TYLENOL® TABLETS 100'S 1.77 269 VALUE 6 Color Reprints $|19 2-5x7 Enlargements $ |6 9 W e ’ r e N o . 1 B e c a u s e Y o u ’ r e N o . 1 DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, THURSDAY, MARCH 1, 1979 - 9 B l a c k w e l d e r - J o h n s o n V o w s MRS. NELSON EUGENE SMITH ... was Dawn Carol McBee M c B e e - S m i t h V o w s A r e S p o k e n ^ Miss Dawn Carol McBee and Nelson E u g e n e Smith were m arried in an evening ceremony, Saturday, February 24, at 7 o’clock at the Christ Wesleyan Church in Greensboro, N.C. Officiating ministers were the Rev. Forbis Kivett and the Rev. J. Eugene Smith. , A program of wedding music was likresented by Mrs. John Warner, Mrs. W illia m Hunt and Mrs. Jack Ray. The bride was given in m arriage by her father, S. Archie McBee. Miss Vicki Floyd of Greensboro was m aid of honor. Matron of honor was Mrs. Duke Stone of Tulsa, Oklaham a. Bridesmaids were Miss Karen Kearns Point, Mrs. John Vogler of dvance, Miss Darlene Smith of Har­ mony, sirs. Robert Swan and Miss Cindy Gibson of Greensboro. The bride is the daughter of M r. and M r. and M rs. Francis Eugene Hunter and son announce the birth of a daughter I sister, E m ily Renee, bom Monday, ■uary 19, at Forsyth M emorial ,)ital in Winston-Salem. 'T h e baby weighed 7 lbs. 7 ounces at Birth. -M aternal grandparents are M r. and M rs. Harvey Green Barnes of Route 2, Advance. Mrs. S. Archie McBee, 2601 W. Woodlyn Way, Greensboro, N.C. She is a graduate of Ragsdale High School, Jamestown, N.C. She was salutatorian and M agna Cum Laude graduate of Lees McRae College at Banner E lk, N.C. where she was a m ember of Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society. She has also completed a secretarial Internship at Wesley Long Hospital in Greensboro. The bridegroom is the son of the Rev. and Mrs. J. Eugene Sm ith of Route 1, Harmony N.C. He graduated from East Rutherford High School in Forest City, is a graduate of Isothermal Community College, a member of Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society and received a B.S. degree Cum Laude from ASU at Boone, N.C. where he was a m em ber of P olitical Science A ssociation, Lew Association and the Alpha Chi Honor Society. He is completing his Masters Degree in Urban Administration at UNC-Chariotte. He is a member of A m erican Society of P ub lic A d­ ministration and is employed as Town Administrator at Cornelius, N.C. Im m ediately following the wedding, the bride’s parents entertained the guests with a reception at the church fellowship hall. After a trip to Orlando, Florida, the couple will m ake their home in Cor­ nelius, N.C Mrs. Ornelas Returns To Calif. After Visiting The RodwelU ^ b s . L e R o y TyndaU of Winston-Salem. Rodw ell Ornelas has______J Roy Tyndall Great grandparents are Mrs. Nellie B. Hunter and M r. and M rs. Lonnie Driver. M r. and M rs. Tony R . Hutchins of Advance announce the birth of their fourth chUd, a daughter. Crystal Elaine, Wednesday, February 14, at Forsyth lemorial Hospital. At birth the baby girl weighed 8 lbs. 15 ozs. and was 2H4 inches long. The Hutchins are also parents of another daughter, Tam m y, age 10, and two sons, Michael, age 4, and Gregory, 2. Mrs. Hutchins is the former Brenda y A ’M ara of C lem m ons. The maternal grandparents are M r. and M rs. W .E . O ’M ara of Lewisville- aem m ons Road. The paternal grandmother is Mrs. Lucille Hutchins of Pfafftown. Mr. and Mrs. Roger Horne of Route 5 (dfMksvUle announce the birth of a u u g h te r, Trudy Dawn, on February 14 at Forsyth Memorial HospiUl. At birth, the baby weighed 7 lbs. 1 oz. and was 18 inches long. Trudy has a sister, Angie, and two brothers, Tracy and Shane. ^Paternal grandparents are M r. and rs. Henry York of Courtney and atem al grandmother is Mrs. Hazel Horne of Rt. 2, Mocksville. Trudy’s arrival made a very special Valentine Day for her fam ily. L orraine R odw ell Ornelas has returned to her home in Lomita, C alifornia after spending tim e in Holyoke, Massachusettes visiting with her father and mother, M r. and Mrs. Jack D. Rodwell. M r. Rodwell was struck by a car in December and is still recuperating at the Holyoke Hospital. He well be moved to a local nursing home shortly when he no longer requires acute medical care. Mrs. Ornelas has been on a fam ily illness leave from her position with the City of Los Angeles Recreation and Parks Departm ent where she serves on the A ffirm ative Action Advisory Council as Secretary and Membership Committee Chairperson. Mrs. Ornelas has received a AA degree in supervisory management with honors from Los Angeles Harbor Junior College and Bachelor of Science Degree with honors from U.C.L.A. She is a mem ber of the National Honor Society, AlphaM u G am m a Language Fraternity, AlphaG am m a Sigma Honor Society, President of the Bay Unit of C alifornia Association of H ealth, Physical Education and Recreation, and Treasurer and President Pro Tem for the C ouncil level of In ternational Toastmistress Clubs. Mrs. Edwin M ann and her son David Mann, a student at H arvard Medical School, have returned hom e after spending time with Mrs. Rodwell also. M ri. M artha Barney Blackwelder and Jam es Vernon Johnson were united in marriage Saturday evening, February third at (Ix o’clock In the W llllam i Boulevard Baptist Church In Kenner, Louisiana. Doctor Burford Easley of­ ficiated at the double ring ceremony. The church was beautifully decorated with gold glass candelabras entertwlned with bouquets of spring flowers and fern. The bride is the daughter of M r. and Mrs. Tony Barney Sr. of Woodland Estate, Mocksville, N.C. She is a graduate of Davie County High School and the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. The bridegroom is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Gaston Johnson ot Montgomery, Alabam a. He is a graduate of Auburn University in Alabam a. The bride wore an ivory floor length gown featuring a laced V neckline. The gown was lightly gathered at the waist which flowed Into a tiounced hemline. She carried a graceful cascading bouquet of yellow silk rose buds, stephanotiR, and babies’ breath. She wore a gold serpentine necklace and earrings, which were a gift from the groom. M rs. R an d all O rr of K enner, Louisiana was matron-of-honor. She wore a gown of gold fashioned with empire waistline, and carried a long stemmed yellow silk rose. The groom’s father served as his son’s best man. For her daughter’s wedding, Mrs. Barney chose a light blue evening gown wilh a chiffon cape. A white orchid corsage complimented her ensemble. The bridegroom's mother was attired in a formal gown of blue chiffon with matching Jacket. She also wore a white orchid corsage. After a ski vacation to Lake Tahoe, Nevada, the couple will return to their home in Destreham, Louisiana. RECEPT IO N Following the wedding ceremony, a reception was held at the Hilton Inn in Kenner, Louisiana. The dinner tables were covered in white linen with floral arrangments of pom poms, marguerite daisies and lighted tapers. The guest were served a four course dinner which consisted of a fruit cup, salad, baked fillet of chicken, rice and broccoli with hollandaise sauce. After the meal was served, a tiered wedding cake, topped with a miniature bouquet of spring flowers was cut by the bride and groom. Out-of-town guests attending the wedding were Tony Barney, Jr., Dianne B arney, M ocksville, N .C ., R ich ard Barney from Winston-Salem, M r. and Mrs. Van Johnson, M r. and Mrs. Gene Johnson and M r. and Mrs. Dale Brown from Montgomery, Alabam a. Victoria Jennifer Rivers, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Paul E. Rivers of Route 5, Mocksville, celebrated her 2nd birthday February 12. Sunday, February 11, she was honored with a party at her home. Refreshments served included a Mickey Mouse and Heart shaped cake both decorated and made by her mother. Friends attending were Uncle Keith, Aunts Cindy, E m ily, Am y, Cousin John Rivers, Jr. and Vincent Myers. Jennifer’s grandparents, who also attended are Mr. and Mrs. Virgil Gray Smith of Rt. 1, Rainbow Road, Advance; and Mrs. Savannah Rutland of the home. Rowan-Davie Medical Society To Meet Thursday Dr. David Bass, M .D. Associate Professor of Medicine, Bowman Gray School ot Medicine, will present the program at the regular meeting of the Rowan-Davie Medical Society, Thur­ sday evening, M arch 1, 1979, at the Salisbury Country Club. The subject will be “Management of Urinary Tract Infections.” The lecture is sponsored by the Rowan M em orial H ospital Area H ealth Education Center (AHEC) and Nor­ thwest AHEC in affiliation with the division of continuing education of Bowman Gray School of Medicine of Wake Forest University. There is no charge for the lecture w hich is open to a ll interested physicians in surrounding counties. Dinner will begin at 7 p.m . and is op­ tional tor non-members at the in­ dividual’s expense. The lecture will follow. For additional information contact Mrs. Linda Hicks, AHEC administrator. Rowan Memorial Hospital. Winston-Salem Antique Show Is This Weekend The Winston-Salem Antiques show will be held in the Benton Convention Center. Hours for the show are Friday and Saturday-1 p.m . to 9 p.m . and Sunday-1 p.m . and 6 p.m . Sponsor for this three day event is the Colonel Joseph Winston Chapter D.A .R. Dealers from throughout the Eastern and Mid-western states will display their rare collections of antiques, all offered to the public for sale. Some ot the highlights are Sterling Silver to m arch any pattern, Sterling Tea and Coffee Sets, Heirloom Jewelry, Art Glass, Cut Glass, Clocks, Coins, Dolls, Furniture, China, Primitives, Paintings, and m any objects of art. Food is available during the showing of antiques, and there is am ple parking. Managers for the show are Virginia and Roy Chapman, Chapman Shows, Bat Cave, North Carolina. Joey Wagner celebrated his llth birthday Saturday, February 24 from 3 to 5 p.m. Joey’s cake was fudge marble topped w ith chocolate icing and decorated with a miniature squirrel fam ily . O ther refreshm ents were popcorn, potato chips. Ice-cream and punch. Guests included Andy Reavis, Jeff and Angle Potts, Scott Gobble, Stéven Dyson, Bradley and Jeff O'Neal, Ritchie and Gregg Reavis, Scotty Speer and Joey's brothers, Timm y and Marc. Joey’s birthday was Monday, February 26. He is the son of M r. and Mrs. Joel Wagner of Rt. 6. Refrigerated Hams Refrigerate whole hams no longer than 7 days, cured half hams, slices ot fresh ham , no more than 3 to 5 days. Fresh ham s m ay be kept in the freezer from 4 ot 8 months, but cured ham s no more than 1 to 2 months. H o s k i n s - W a l k e r Mrs. Geraldine N. Hoskins and the late Harry L. Hoskins, announce the engagement of their daughter Terri Lynn to Jam es Michael Walker son of Mr. and Mrs. W illiam Lloyd Nance ot Winston-Salem, N .C. The bride elect is a 1977 honor graduate of George Washington High School and is presently employed by LaVogue, Inc. The prospective bridegroom is a 1975 graduate of R. J. Reynolds High School. He is presently employed by the R. M. Butler Co. of Greensboro, North Carolina. An church wedding is planned for Saturday, March 17, 1979 at 4 p.m. Piney Forest United M e th ^is t Church. Miss Everidge Is Honored A t Shower Mrs. Carl Humphrey and Mrs. John N icholson entertained M iss Candy Everidge, M arch bride-elect ot David Poplin, with a lingerie shower, Friday evening, February 23, at the home of Mrs. Humphrey at Hickory Hills. Upon arrival, a corsage of yellow daisies was pinned to the off-white winter wool dress. Miss Everidge was wearing. Refreshments ot spiced cake and Russian tea were served to the twenty- five guests attending. Special guests included the bridal mothers, Mrs. Jam es Everidge and Mrs. Harold Poplin, and a sister. Miss Anna Everidge. Local Students On L-R Dean's List Two Davie students have been named to the Lenoir-Rhyne College dean’s list, a Lenoir-Rhyne student must compile at least a 3.4 academic average of a possible 4.0 and must carry a course load of at least 12 semester hours. He also must make no grade lower than a “C.” Those from Davie named to the dean’s list were: Patricia Arleen Lewis of Harmony, daughter of M r. and Mrs. Jam es Eugene Lewis; Kenneth Blaine Burton Jr., of Advance, son of Mrs. Lynda Burton ot Advance and Kenneth Blaine Burton Sr., ot Mocksville. Niki McCulloh celebrated her 8th birthday, Saturday, February 24, with a party at her home on Route 3, Advance. Her parents are Mr. and Mrs. Dennis M cCulloh. Twenty-four friends and relatives enjoyed refreshments con­ sisting of a guitar birthday cake. Ice cream and Pepsi. N iki’s grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. Junior Spry and Mr. and Mrs. J.K . McCulloh, Jr. of Advance and great grandparents are M r. and Mrs. J.K . McCulloh, Mrs. Nettle Tucker and Mrs. Rosie Spry. An aunt, Mrs. Joann Armsworthy designed, baked and decorated the cake. The Dishwasher The average dishwasher uses more than 14 gallons ot hot water per load. S o sa y s th e V A ... DR. KILDARE by KEN BALO IF rtlEOICALLY INDICATED , VA MAY PRESCRIBE OLTT- PATIENT TREATMENT FOR EU&IBUE VETERANS EITHER BEV=’ORE ADMISSION TO--OR FOLLOWING- DiSCHARSE FR6WV--A V A H05PITAI-. C o n t a c t n e a r a s c V A offioa (c h e c k y o u r p h o n e b o o k ] o r a lo c a l v e t e r a n a g r o u p . Bob T im b e rla ke Orí “ Snow W orld il 7 color etching !d und numbered oy the artUt on ntilural deckledmat 7 color etching signed und numbered imade Twin Koclier lUCi rag paper with It. Edition of 300 plut SO atlUl pioofi. Available Through T-F: 9-5 SAT. lO-S CLOSED MONDAY Cuttom frami 101 WEST 3rd. AVENUE LEXINGTON, N.C. (704) 2«9-442a Trotnun’t of WinWon-Salem UMYFHas Hunger Banquei The U M V F (U nited Methodist Youth Fellowship) ot Chestnut Grove United M ethodist C hurch p a r­ ticipated in the sub-district World Hunger Banquet held February 11. The Youth group contributed $323.00 to the cause of World Hunger. A Roller Skating Party was held Tuesday, February 13 at the Fam ily Skate Center in Winston-Salem, with forty- tour (44) youth and adults participating. The U M YF plans to con­ tinue ils regular program of visitation to the ghut-ins of Ihe Chestnut Grove Church and comm unity. This is the young people’s way of sharing God’s love w ith those much- appreciated elderly persons. The current adult coun­ selors and U M Y F officers are as follow s; Counselors - Jeanie BameycasUe and Sue Walker; President - Lorie Myers, Vice-President - Steve McBride, Secretary - Becky M cC lam rock, T reasurer - Melissa Walker, Represen­ tative to the Administrative Board - Tim McBride. S P f ie c it ilf New Shipment & Patterns of Acrylic Impressions Elephant Temple Bell Buffalo Horni « 9 * 9 W Brass Letter Openers' Brass Bottle Opener Bran Caniils Sticks Bnn Picture Frames 3 Sizes Musical JelmI Boxes Brass Old Fashion Horns Phone 634-3418 13 Court Square Mockivlil^ NC Loses 96 Pounds and K eeps It Off! C re d its H e a lth y C o n w a y D ie t Pat Bennett lost 96 pounds in nine months on the Conway 1000 Calorie Diet. That was in 1977. in 1978 she had her first thin year since beginning her family. Pat has experi­ enced no difficulty main­ taining her entire weight loss. She attributes her success to sound nutrition, in­ creased physical activity and maintaining her own personal motivation. "I learned it all at the Con­ way weekly seminars." says the smiling, self- confident Mrs. Bennett. The Conway weiglit reduc­ tion program consists of three main elements; • T he Id e a l 10 0 0 c a lo rie d ie t that includes all food groups and exceeds the established nutritional require­ ment for aduhs. • W eekly e d u c a tio n a l s e m in a rs that deal with the physical, nutritional and emotional causes of overweight. •T b e Forever S lim p la n for permanently maintaining slimness. W e e k ly I n s i g h t - M o t i v a t i o n S e m i n a r s M ocksville "Tuesdays, 7:00 p.m . Rotary Hut Statesville -M ondays, 7:30 p.m . Holy Trinity Lutheran Church, 465 Hartness Rd. OR CALL 873-4996 JV««i M tm b en A lttayt Welcome Rc'gistration $6 00 plus Wiiekly St?iniiidrs f:iO O CONWAY DIET INSTITUTE-No Fish Required 10 -- DAVIB COUNTY ENTERPRISU RECORD, THURSDAY. MARCH 1, 1979 Hospital Auxiliary Presents Annual Awards i Davie County Hospital Auxiliary held their fourth annual awards presentation February 22, at the hospital cafeteria. Rev. Jam es Hodnett, representing the hospitals chaplaincy program, led the invocation and a welcome was extended by Allen J. M artin, hospital ad­ ministrator. Service award presentations were made by Sam Daywalt and Mrs. Jessie Junker. Those receiving pins for 1000 hours of volunteer work were Debbie F urches, Louise H am m er, Jessie Ju n k e r and R uby Southern. Lois Glasscock, Johnny Hendrix and Ed Rosser received pins for 500 hours of volunteer work. Carroll Crowell, Libby Gales, Barbara Green. Wayne Long and Sarah Owings were honored for 100 hours of service. A special presentation in honor of the late Mabel Dull was made by Mrs. Annie Lois Grant. The award was accepted by Mrs. Gary Dull. Officers of the auxiliary for 1979 were also elected. They are Mrs. Ted Junker, P resident: W ayne Long, Vice- President; Mrs. Tony Green, 1st vice- president; M rs. Knox Johnstone, secretary; M rs. V irgin ia W aters, treasurer; M rs. G lenn H am m er, assistant treasurer; Mrs. A.T. Grant, volunteer coordinator; and Mrs. Sue Short and Mrs. Ed Rosser, publicity chairmen. Photos by Robin Carter ^rs. Gary Dull (left) accepts a pin honoring her late mother-in-law, Mrs. Mabel Dull. Tlie presentation was made by Mrs. A. T. Grant. Officers elected for the 1979 year are (I to r) Mrs. Knox Johnstone, secretary; Mrb.Ted Junker, president; Mrs. Glenn Hammer, assistant treasurer; Wayne Long, vice-president; Mrs. A. T. Grant, volunteer coordinator; and Mrs. IVmy Green. 1st vice-president. Hospital Auxiliary members receiving service pins for 1000 hours of work are Debbie Furches, Louise Hammer, Jessie Junker and Ruby ^*GETACASH REFUND DIRECT FROM GENERAI ELECTRIC IF YO U ADD-ON, OR M ODERNIZE YO U R PRESENT W A R M AIR HEATING SYSTEM BETWEEN FEB. 1 AN D M ARCH 31, 1979 (WITH INSTAL­ LATION BY M A R C H ^ , 1979). i, GALEYARBOROUGH THREE TIME CONSECUTIVE NASCAR GRANO NATIONAL CHAMPION 2GREATWMV5 TO SAVE GET $75 ORSlOO • • • Hlgh-efflclaney Exeeutiva Modal Weathertron* Heat PumpReduce vour electric heating bill 34 to 68% compared to ordinsrv electric hestinQ, depending on where you live. Available in capacitiet from 24.000 to 60,000 BTUH C A S H R E F U N D Hlgh-efflclency Executive Model Centrel Air ConditioningThe most economical to operate of any GE central air conditioning. Available in capacities from 30.000 to 60,000 BTUH. ON TN. WR 2, 2Va AND ~ TON SIZES O R 5 TON SIZES• $ 7 5 . ® » I Get Whole house comfort w ith General Electric central air conditioning or a GE W eathertron* Heat P um p that heats in winter, cools in sum m er. if you add-on or m odernize your present w arm air heating system betw een February 1 and M arch 31, 1979 (w ith installation by M arch 31, 1979). The GE C ash R efund — 2 great w ays to get com fortable. A nd get $75 or $100 o n G E 's best! C A U TODAY FOB A FBEL H O M E SU RV EY 8i ESTIIVIATE and ask about General Electric's National Service Agreement covering 2nd through &th year. tfNflAlI I fiicTRie UICBB Office Phone: 988-2121 24 Hour No.: 723-2510 Advance, N.C. 27006 volunteer Southern. 'Poor M an’s M eal’ Is Served At Union Chapel A “Poor M an’s M eal” was held Saturday, February 3 in the U nion Chapel United Methodist Church Fellowship H all. Over $135.00 was donated to fight world hunger. Following the meal, the film “ Because We C are” was shown, and a discussion on the causes and solutions of the world hunger problem was led by Vada Beck, chairm an of tlie C hurch’s C ouncil on Ministries. Thirty-six m em bers and friends particip ated in a church-sponsored bus trip to enjoy the sights and sounds of the Ringling Brothers and Barnum & Bailey Circus in the Greensboro Coliseum on Saturday, February 17. A delightful and safe trip was experienced by all. The United Methodist Youth Fellow ship (U M Y F ) spon­ sored a Bowling Party on Saturday, February 24 to the Pla-Mor Lanes in StatesvUle. Sixteen members and guests bowled two games together. The Union Chapel U M Y F also attended the recent sub­ district W orld H unger Banquet, contributing $202.00 to the total of over $2,800 that was raised. New U M Y F officers and adult counselors pre as foUows; Counselors - Nettie G roce and Ju lia H ow ell; President - Olene Taylor, Vice-President - Jan ice Speer; Secretary - Treasurer - Susan HoweU. "Silence is a fence around wisdom." Proverb Also receiving pins for volunteer work were (I to r) Barbara Green, 100 hours; Libby Gales, 100 hours, Sarah Owings, 100 hours; Wayne Long, 100 hours, Lois Glasscock, 500 hours and Ed Rosser, SOO hours. M ethodist W om en Retreat Planned A ll U nited M ethodist Women of Davie County are invited to join other United M ethodist W om en of the ThomasvUle District for the “Day A part” service to be held at First United Methodist Church, Lexington, N .C. Sunday, M arch 4th, 2:30-4:30 p.m. Don’t miss hearing Dr. Lox Witherspoon when he brings the message oh God's Promise and Covenants with women. The Love Offering taken during the afternoon will be used for medical care for the retired m issionaries and deaconess. For any information, please call M argaret Shew, Davie County Area Chairperson at 492-7111. Barbecue Chicken At Ijam es Saturday There w ill be a BBQ Chicken Supper at the Ijam es C om m unity B uildin g on Saturday, M arch 3, beginning at 5 o’clock. Prices are as foUows; 13.00 for a quarter of BBQ chicken plus aU the vegetables and desserts you can eat. $1.50 for chUdren under 6. Take out boxes will be $3.50 each. The public is invited. All proceeds w ill go tow ard sending the Ijam es Youth to Bible Camp. le a tin g & A ir C o n d it io n in g C o m p a n y , In c . Pharm acists B iU Foster & Bob Rauch -----S a y- 700 Wilkesboro St., MocksviUe, NC, Tel. 634-214 F e ta l A lc o h o l S yn d ro m e How often I’ve said, strength and long hair“Alcohol is a drug.” It’s fame, was bom. addictive. It’s dangerous. Ask for additionalAnd it may cause birth information. Clip thisdefects in children of editorial and send with drinking mothers.your address for FetalWarnings to mothers Alcohol Syndrome, who drink daie back to 5051, R ^eigh, N.C. ancient times. In the 27606. Don t drink Bible, a woman was told and encourage other by the Lord’s angel that women of childbeBring she would bear a child but age to do the same, cautioned, “Now therefore beware . . . drink nu wine nor strong drink...” (Jud. 13:3-5). Samson, of great H e lp y o u f ^ H M ^ rtF u A d W American Heart AuociaUon Fireplace Equipment Reduced for Clearance I Antique Brass W ith Screen Four Sizes $ 9 9 9 5 Satin Biacic W ith Screen Four Sizes $ 3 9 9 5 S p e c ia l S iz e s O r d e r e d A t S l i g h t l y H i g h e r P r ic e s ! Black And Brass 38x31...*18.75 M x 3 1 ...*29.95 Other Specials in Fireplace Equipment such as Spark Guards, Andirons, Wood Grates, Pokers, and Shovel Sets. Caudell Lumber Co. 1238 B ingham St.Phono 634-2167 M ocksvilie, N.C.1 DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, THURSDAY. MARCH 1, 197P - 11 Venerai Disease Is Still A Health Problem In Davie C.W. Shepherd was honored recently by the C.W. Shepherd Sunday School class of the Cooleemee United Methodist Church for his 46 years of sei%ice as a Sunday School teacher. He was ^presented with an engraved plaque In wppreclatlon of hls dedicated love and service to the class as a teacher beginning In 1932. N ational N utrition Week |)To Be Observed ‘‘Set the Pace! Take the Food Way for Good Nutrition” is the theme that North Carolina dietitians and nutritionisU will emphasize during the seventh annual National Nutrition Week, M arch 4-10. “Exercise and a sound diet are the cornerstones of good health,” it was V ^ in te d out by Gail Hogan, president of the Winston-Salem District Dietetic Association. Mrs. Hogan explained that good nutrition and regular exercise that you enjoy can cut the cost of health care. Your know-how about foods and their ^n u trie n te can m ultiply the benefite of '^physical activity in keeping fit. For starters, begin with m inim um servings of the essentials: m ilk and m ilk products; m eat or an alternate, such as dried beans and peas, chili, eggs, or fish; fruits and vegetables-one deep green or yellow and one a source of ^ .^ ta m ln C; and wholegrain or enriched ttb re ad s and cereals. NaUonal NutriUon Week is sponsored by The Am erican Dietetic Association and its affiliates in the 50 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico. N U T RIBIRD , the association’s symbol of good nutrition, helps to carry the < message. This year he’s running with it. W Local dietitians have planned m any activities for National Nutrition Week. "Life is a jigsaw puzzle with most of the pieces missing."Anonymous Even though veneral disease is easily treatable, it is still a health problem in Davie County, according to Ms. Connie Stafford, Davie County Health Director. In 1978 there were 52 cases of venereal disease reported in the county. Although the reported cases of venereal disease were treated, there is a health problem in that portion of the population which is unaware of being infected with these diseases. The case of the pregnant female with syphilis is p artic u larly a la rm in g . During the last quarter of 1978 In North Carolina there were three children born with congenital syphilis - a disease passed on from the mother to her child which m ay cause serious birth defects. Children with congenital syphilis may be bom with deformed limbs, blind and deaf, with cardiovascular problems, mental retardation or be stillborn. The most important aspect in the treatment of syphilis is early detection. If syphilis is treated in its early stages, when its symptoms often go unnoticed, especially in women, it is very easy to treat and causes little side effects. U ntreated syphilis causes insanity, blindness, heart disease and crippling in those who have it, but it can be treated with penicillin and other antibiotics. Gonorrhea is the most prevalent of the venereal diseases. Untreated honorrhea m ay residt in sterility in both the m ale and the female through the growth of scar tissue. It m ay also cause heart disease and gonorrheal arth ritis. Gonorrhea can also be easily treated. Because venereal disease is sexually Vehicle Hits Pole A vehicle ran off Salisbury Street in Mocksville and struck a utilify pole last Friday about 6:45 p.m. Dennis Ray Lanning, 16, of R t. 2 MocksviUe was the driver of the 1971 Ford at the time of the accident. Mocksville Policeman A.D. Adams said his investigation showed that L anning was traveling north on Salisbury St., ran off the right side of the road and struck the utility pole. Dam age to the vehicle was estimated at $500 and $00 to the utility pole of Central Telephone Company. There were no injuries and no charges. Fires Reported Fires reported in Davie County during the past week included; February 21, about 7:32 p.m ., the Smith Grove Fire up for the Clemmons Fire Department. February 23, about 7:56 p.m ., the WUliam R. Davie Fire Department answered a call to a chimney fire at the residence of Ada Rum ple on US 601 North. February 25, about 6:08 p.m ., the Smith Grove Fire Department answered a call to the E rvin Wilson residence, gas stove on fire. transmitted, the sexual partners of those who are found to have these diseases will be contacted through the health department. The identity of the person with the disease is kept ab­ solutely confidential, even from those who were sexual partners, to insure confidentiality and privacy, Ms. Staf­ ford pointed out. Venereal disease can be detected by doctors through simple blood tests. The Davie County Health Department will test for syphilis in both males and females and for gonorrhea In females only. For more information you may call the Health Department at 634-S985. Are You Fit To Drive? Are you fit to drive? Before' you automatically reply "O f course,” take stock of your mental at­ titude and physical condition. You may be unsafe behind the wheel, both to yourself and to others on the road. You m ay think you are in good health. You m ay have an excellent safety record. Yet, under certain cir­ cumstances, it can be dangerous for you to be in the driver’s seat. The American Medical Association reminds that the emotional stability of the driver is as important as any single factor in m aintaining traffic safety. That’s why you owe it to others and to yoursell, not to drive when you have serious problems on your mind. If you’re thinking about that argument you had before you left home or office; if you’re in a depressed or angry “I don’t care what happens” mood; if you’re very worried about a personal problem, you’re better off not driving. The sleepy driver causes many ac­ cidents. In fact, a sleepy driver is as much as a hazard as a drinking one. Dozing at the wheel can occur in broad daylight as well as at night. When making long trips, rest every two hours and drink coffee or cola to stay alert. Many medicines, not just a few, can affect the way in which you handle the wheel. Certain commonly used drugs such as antihistamines, cold tablets and m ild sedatives m ay dull your reflexes or im pair your coordination. Stimulants can make you nervous. Tranquilizing drugs can cloud your judgm ent and in­ terfere with driving skills. Consult your doctor about the side effects of any drugs you take. D riv in g calls for clear healthy eyesight, good side vision, judgm ent of distance and tbe ability to see well at night. Have your eyes tested regularly. If you have glasses for distance vision, don't forget to wear them. If you have a nervous disorder or a heart condition, ask your doctor whether you are a safe driver. This also applies as you get older. Past 65, reflexes and coordination tend to be somewhat slower. A District Dignitaries J Dignitaries of the day on hand for the festivities were (I to r) Mrs. Vance Grubb, past president; Mrs. Norman Smith, arts chairman; Mrs. Harold McNeill, district president; Mrs. J.W. Johnson and Mrs. Frank Bryant, GF- WAC officers. The group Is looking over <№ album by Sherrill MUnes, famed varitone that will present a concert April 22 in Raleigh. W o m a n ’ s C lu b H o s t s D is t r ic t 6 F in e A r t s Despite heavy rains, the Mocksville W om an’s Club hosted a most successful District 6 Fine Arts Festival on Satur­ day, February 24. Held at the First Baptist Church in M ocksville, M rs. H arold M cN eill, district president and Mrs. Norman Smith, arts chairm an welcomed some 200 club women to the festival. There were approximately 150 high school students from a six county area entered in com petitive categories. Mocksville students did well in four of the six categories entered. Randy Boger placed third in the boy- vocal competition. Avis W atkins placed second in dram a and George Kimberly .placed forst in Public speaking. He will represent the local club in the state festival to be held March 24 in Winston- Salem, Barbara Shore was first runner-up in the scholarship contest. This is the most sought-after award presented. Other Davie students participating were Lu Ann Eaton, girl vocal; Mike Murphy, piano; and Paige Sm ith, in­ strumental. Mrs. W illiam Spencer took a blue ribbon in the visual arts category. The Mocksville W om an’s Club would like to thank the teachers at Davie High School in selecting these most talented students. Avis Watkins (left) and George Kimberly were winners in District 6 Fine Arts Festival sponsored by the Mocksville Woman’s club. ^ Dairy Herd Assn. To M eet M arch 8 The Davie County Annual D airy H erd Im provem ent Association meeting w ill be held M arch 8, 7 p.m . at the Center Community Building. All Davie County DHIA C em bers and fam ily are vited to attend. Aw ards for outstanding herd production w ill be presented by Guy Lyons, Davie County D H IA super­ visor. The guest speaker will be Fred Knott, Extension iry Specialist from North rolina State University. The meal is being sponsored by the F arm and Garden Service of M ocksville. Reservations must be in by noon M arch 5th. Call Ronnie T h o m p s o n , A s s o c ia te Agriculture Extension Agent 634-5134 for information or reservations. Barbecue The WUliam R . Davie Fire Department wUl hold a Pork Barbecue, Saturday, M arch 10 at the fire station and wUl begin at 10 a.m . Barbecue trays and sand­ wiches wiU be avaUable. Anyone Interested in or­ dering a whole shoulder must caU 998-3043 by March 6th. Proceeds wifi go toward the fire departm ent building fund. IN VEN TO R Y CLEARANCE! Model TB 14SW R e g .’399.00 * 3 2 9 0 0 Mocksville Furniture & 1 Appliance Inc. 2 Court Square Mocksville, N .0. Phone 634-5812 F IR S T FE D E R A L H A S A R E T R E IffiN T PLA N W ITH B E N E FIT S YOU CAN U SE NOW. First Federal offers a retirement plan that allows persons not covered by a qualified pension plan to save in a tax-sheltered account that yields a high return. The money you deposit is tax defen-ed and deductible from your annual income, so you pay less in income tax. These tax benefits can mean big savings each year. If you would like to leam more about I.R.A., see the folks at First Federal... where putting First Things First is a way of business. H R S T F E D E R A L S fí/ » tG S Main Office: 230 N. Cheny Street Branch Offices: 490 Hanes Mall • 130 S. Stratford Road 3443 Robin Hood Road (Robin Hood Center! 2815 Reynolda Road • 3001 Waughtown Street Mocksville Office: 215 Gaither Street i: n\vii c o u M v I M i-Ri’iíisi; k it o iu ). t iii'r s d a y, m arch i , i ‘)7‘i Cana News M rs. Lloyd Brown was hostess lo the Cana H om em akers Club on February 22, 1979 al her home on Cana Road The meeting was called to order by the President Mrs. Brown. She conducted the devotion by reading "Your L ife! A M inim um or a M ax im u m ” , also a poem suggestive of the reading. Due to the absence of our secretary, R uby Leagans acted as secretary protem. She read the minutes of the January meeting which were approved. The treasurer’s report was also given. Mrs. Brown gave a report on the County Council and work.shop held in County office on February 15th. Information our club must keep in mind is as follows: 1. There will be a special interest meeting on “Money Management - Making Ends Meet" on Feb. 27 at 7:30 p.m. and Feb. 28 at 10 a.m . in County office. All fam ily members are invited and urged to attend either class. 2. Those going to Southern Living Flower Show call Mrs. West by March 1st. 3. A tour is planned for homemakers to Pennsylvania Dutch Country in Lancaster, Penna. April 23 - 26. Ap­ proximate cost will be $60.00 plus meals. More details will be sent later from Mrs. West, Anyone wishing to attend must call Mrs. West for bus reservations. 4. The D avie County Jaycettes are sponsoring the B.I.B. (Better Infant Births) P rogram . D av ie’s Health Center is conducting pre-natal classes for indigent mothers- to-be and urges all interested to attend. As a reward for attending all classes par­ ticipants are given a layette for the new baby. The Jaycettes have asked our help in donating any articles of infant clothing to this worthy cause for use in the project. Any members who have used clothing, etc. will also be appreciated. 5. We are to keep in mind Cana will be one of the hostesses for the Achievement Day in the Fall. 6. We are to continue membership drive for new club members. Program of work reports given were: Aging - Mrs. E ra Latham told the club “How to live w hile death w aits” . She stressed the fear we often have of saying or doing the wrong thing. We m ust face reality. A sudden death is harder to accept. In prolonged iUness we build up preparedness. If one has guilty feelings they should be said before death. Most of all say the right thing and be honest and gentle. If one has nothing to say, just presence to let the ill know, is a com­ fort. Cultural Arts - Mrs. Brown asked us to enter a craft, n e e d le w o r k , p a in t in g , sculpture, photographs, or any other arts for county screening to have entered in our district m eeting. She asked if anyone was in ­ terested in m aking photos of historical places or things, w riting an article about subject. If so, they will be displayed in County Library. Foods and Nutrition - Ruby Leagans read an article on “ Safe Additives or N ot” . Synthetic additives in most cases are safe to be added to foods if proper conditions are met. They should be useful - such as help preserve the food or make it taste or look better. There are som e natural products that are poisonous and a lot of synthetic ones that are harm less. A natural additive for exam ple is Cochineal. This is red dye which has been used for years in food and medicine and still is. The dye is an extract of the dried bodies of the female coccus cacti, an insect cultivated on cactus plants in Central America. The red color comes from the yolk of the eggs and the fatty parts of the female insects. A natural poisonous part comes from some plants. The little round fruits produced by potatoes are poisonous. Clothing - Ivey Nell Boger gave some pointers on spring fashions. Mrs. Edwin Boger gave a very interesting program on “Curbing the Cost of Living - A Purse Full of Ideas’’. This program dealt with inflation and how to curb it. She displayed a purse w ith p la c a rd showing some ways to help conserve. E ach member present was asked to write a suggestion or ways to curb inflation. Some m entioned were: Compulsive buying, staying w ith in budget, services, luxuries, items on sale, faulty goods, em ergencies, im ­ proper care of appliances, poor choices, and buying of expensive items. The meeting closed with all repeating the club collect. During Ihe social hour, Mrs. Brown served a delicious array of foods suggestive of George W ashington’s b ir­ thday to 7 members. SAVE UP T O ...eootccmcc BE A ... we welcome FOOD STAMP SHOPPERS COOLEEMEE, N.C. OPEN FRIDAY NITES TIL 8:30 P.M WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT S U P E R M A R K E T SERVE ICE COLD C O K E S aia-oz. I "'^lusofp. BTLS. I SAVI 74'WITH ONE flUED SUPER SAVER CARD OFFER GOOD THRU MARCH 3, 1979 YOUR CHOICE S U G A R 5-Lb. B A GWITH ONE FILIED SUPER SAVER CARD OFFER GOOD THRU MARCH 3, 1979 LAUNDRY DETERCENT GRADE "A " MEDIUM F A B 49 - O z. O O C B O X # y SAVIM'WITH ONE FlUED SUPER SAVER CARD OFFER OOOD THRU MARCH 3, 1979 E G G S LAIDE EGGS 0.1.59* 4 D O Z . WITH ONE miEO SUMR SAVER CARO OFFER GOOD THRU «ARCH 3, 1979 PET RITZ PIE S H E L L S SAVI 2»WITH ONE FtLlEO SUPER SAVER CARO OFFER GOOD THRU MARCH 3, 1979 FRISKIES' DOG F O O D 5 Q Q t C A N S # T sA vtw WITH ONE FlUED SUPER SAVER CARD OFFER GOOD THRU MARCH 3. 1979 PURE VEGETABLE SNOW- D R I F T 32 - O z. C A N 39 SAVE5CWITH ONE FILIED SUPER SAVER CARO OFFER GOOD THRU MARCH 3, 1979 HUNT'S TOMATO K E T C H U 3 2 - O z. BTL.WITH ONE FILIED SUPER SAVER CARD ^OFFMGOODTHRUA^^ SAVEM* RED BAND F L O U R 5-Lb. B A G SAVI SI'WITH ONE filled super SAVER CARO OFFER GOOD THRU MARCH 3. 1979 MAXWELLHOUSE C O F F E E 10 1-Lb. B A G 99 SAVI4»WITH ONE FILIED SUPER SAVER CARD OFFER GOOD THRU MARCH 3, 1979 100% PURE GROUND ^m SUKISAvnOPUIMIION«^ ÜIIAPTFß • Vov'IW»<»lv» t * t S $«vtf• ItH • $€¥0f Ir«« • I ftur c h v c h o iitt). • Wolch for our ly ^ r Sé¥f ir«w wlM n—é w lltM for ono of ooch %pt\9Ì. will M 01 mwcti •• 40% off oor roQuIor prko. Alto—wouh for oiiro Froo tonuft Svpof Sovof Coupon» Qood lor ostro Ffoo Sypor Sovort with o » ^ Ifk purchoto. tho»o wtll fili yowr cordi foitor. Wo moir «Ito o^ortiio o $ttpor le w Prko Hom ro^ulrtnf ono flllod cord ond o coupon Irom our od. PORK U.S. CHOICE WESTERN BEEF GUARANTEED TO BE TENDER TRIMMED TO SAVE YOU MEATY LEAN L b . BONE -LESS U.S. CHOICE ROUND STEAKS SIRLOIN TIP ROAST cScE WATERMAID RICE OLD VIRGINIA APPLE SAUCE HEINZ KOSHER Or GENUINE DILL PICKLES CARNATION COFFEE-MATE 2-LITER BOTTLE COCA-COLA 6 ” “ ' 2-LB. BAG 25-OZ. JAR 46-OZ. JAR 16-OZ. JAR CUT INTO RIB-EYES 'S Ib. ’ 2 ” SIRLOIN TIP t # % A O STEAKS c!i5a lb. *2^’ IDEAL m BREAD n l9 CANS IDEAL-BROWN'NSERVE B A I I e HAMBURGER QK O L L S hotdog 0 LIBBY KRAUT 3 AURORA BATH TISSUE LAUNDRY DETERGENT FAB 2 2 -r o l lPACK 49-OZ.BOX 4-Lb.BAG VALLEYDALE STICK BOLOGNA Ib. RUSSET FROZEN FRENCH FRIES WELCH GRAPE JUICE ^ ¡ S t GORTON'S FISH PORTIONS “r » PILLSBURY PRAISE BISCUITS M.D.I. AMERICAN CHEESE MRS. FILBERrs ^lO-CT,PKGS. 12-Ox.PKG. LEAN STEW BEEF LEAN GROUND CHUCK. FRENCH'S INSTANT POTATOES LOG CABIN BUTTERED SYRUP FANCY RED RADISHES FIRM RED TOMATOES YELLOW SWEET POTATOES ò’/j-Oi.BOX 24-Oz.BTL. 6-Oz.PKG. CTN. O ta ’s SUPER SAVER SPECIALS! SAVE AS HUNDREDS ARE DOING! Willie Grooms is prepared for anything froni speeders he stops. The new K55 unit is the latest in patrol equipment and is very versatile. In addi­ tion to the dash unit (above) il also fea­ tures a hand implement (l®ft) allowing two cars to be clocked simultaneously. The fuzzbuster, commonly used by motorists, is ineffective against them. D a v i e T r o o p e r s First Sergeant Jethro WaUace (left) from District headquarters in Rowan and Sgt. W.R. Wooten chcck the troopers’ work sche­ dule. Everyone has experienced the knot in their stomach as they catch the first glimpse of a blue light in the rear view mirror. And at that instance feelings of anxiety and hostility flood the l ^ y , aided by the old stand by of "W hy me out of all the other cars?” As the patrolman approaches the car with a solemn look, in his official black and silver and with ticket book in hand, minds race to find that one excuse that might persuade the officer to let them by this time. People tend to forget that the N.C. Highway Patrol is on the roads for drivers' protection, and by enforcing the speed lim it could save many from injury and death. D avie County has six dedicated members of the Highway Patrol, all of whom take their job very seriously. They are Sgt. W.H. Wooten, J.L . Payne, W.D. Grooms, Andy Stokes, Larry Bjorklund, and J.M . Newton. With a combined total of 73 years experience in law enforcement, the six have heard every im aginable excuse and are not surprised by anything. “One of the most common excuses given by speeders In an effort to avoid a Ucket,” said Trooper Larry Bjorklund, “is but officer, I couldn’t be speeding, my cruise control was set.” "Another common one given is my speedometer is stuck. Why I ’ve even been told,” said Bjorklund, "That the driver was trying to get to the liquor store before it closed.” Willie Grooms, who has been on the force for eight years commented, that in his profession "H e believes nothing and expects anything from speeders he "It is not uncommon for men to cry while I ’m writing a citation, 1 sim ply hand them a kleenex and keep on writing.” “An officer’,’said Grooms, “has to be im m une to all excuses. Afterall, we are hired to enforce the law, and like it or not...speeding is against the law. Excuses run from the reasonable to the extreme, but all have the same purpose...to out-smart the patrolmen at their own game. But with the new K55 radar units in use, Davie speeders will have a harder time escaping the wat­ chful eye of the patrolman. The K5S unit differs from the standard unit in that it has a unit incorporated that allows the patrol operator to delay the release of radar beams until the exact vehicle suspected is directly in radar range. Effective over a one-tenth m ile range, this power storage causes the commonly used fuzzbuster to be ineffective. Used by drivers to determine patrol car locations, the unit functions on the constant radar beam projected by the traditional MR7 radar. It is of no use against the new K55. The new K55 radar is also more versatile in that it can function simultaneously as two units. It has the capability to clock one car and lock the speed into the hand held unit, while the dash unit continues to clock oncoming cars. The antenna also allows it to be m ulti­ directional in that cars coming from different directions can be clocked. Trooper W .L. Payne said, "m ost speeders don’t think about the con­ sequences of using a fuzzbuster. In essence there are times when they are aiding and abeting a crim e.” "For example, once when I was in pursuit of a robbery suspect on 1-40, through the routine use of a fuzzbuster the crim inal was alerted to my whereabouts. He was then given a better chance to escape.” " I realize,” said Payne, "that most users have them in a harmless effort to avoid tickets, but there are incidences when they cause severe problems.” According to statistics the Highway Patrol made 4,049 arrests in Davie County last year. This covers speeding, D .U .I., im proper passing, reckless driving and a host of others. According to all six Davie patrolmen, however, D .U .I. was cited as Davie’s biggest problem. "D riving under the influence,” said Trooper B jorklund, "is especially dangerous because of the increased risk of injury and death to innocent people on the road.” “Last year we made 151 arrests on this charge. This is something that all officers take extremely serious and are constantly on the lookout for drivers that could be under the influence.” All men on the Davie force are cer­ tified breathlizer operators and have been approved and accredited by the Department of Hum an Resources. In the composite accident picture for the entire state for 1977, figures show that 19 percent of the drivers in fatal accidents were known to have been drinking, and drinking is also a known factor in 19 percent of accidents where injuries were sustained. Becoming a member of the Highway Patrol is a strenuous process. After a rigid screening and examination period, prospective troopers are enrolled in 16 weeks of active training. This seems a short period but daily training begins at 5 a.m . and ends at 10 p.m . After com­ pletion of the training period, troopers are stationed in appropriate locations. They cannot, however return to their hometown for duty. This can only be accomplished through approved request and after 10 years of duty. “No one enjoys a week end off like a Highway Patrolm an,” said Trooper Andy Stokes. "O ur hours are so erratic that a normal schedule is impossible.” Sgt. W .R. Wooten commented, “Yes, after 30 years on the force the hardest thing I ’ve had to do was convince my wife to put m y supper in the oven if I wasn’t home at meal time. That’s something one never knows.” " I could be on my way home one minute and called out on an accident tbe next. There is no way,” said Wooten, “that our job could be set up or ac­ complished on a 9-5 schedule.” “ It’s hard on our families, but we love the work. Patrolm en,” he said, “have a responsibility to protect the public and (hai must come first." Our local patrolmen are involved in all aspects of law enforcement and stopping speeders is only a sm all portion of their work. They are strong, dedicated men compelled to protect the public through law enforcemenl. Story by Kathy Tomlinson Photos by Robin Carter Filling out accident reports keeps J.M. Newton Dusy. DAVIE COUNTY Feature 1-B x - i V March 1,1979 ril -J. ' Uirry Bjorklund, dressed in official black and silver, writes a ch dreaded speeti j atrolnien are always swamped with paperwc catches up on his filing of reports. . Andy Stokes jr J.L. Pa>iie is the operator of an uiunarked veti ,has stopped many an unsuspecting motorist. 2В DAVIH COUNTY HNTERPRISK RHCORD, THURSDAY. MARCH 1. 1979 Davie High Tennis Team The 1979 Davie High Boys Tennis Team. Pictured I-r, front row: Steve Heffner, John Kimberly, Alan Crawford, Davey Smith, Chipper Barnhardt, Frank Lawhon, Scott Humphreys, Aaron Miller. Back row (I-r): Bobby McDaniel, Jerry Fleming, Joey Everidge, George Kimberly, John Heslhi, Jeff McCullogh, Paul Rauch, Rick Gillis. Not pictured: John Holleman. (Photo by Garry Foster) Davie Natters Open Play Next Week “Considering the amount of time we’ve had to practice we look good and we really look better than we did at this time last year,” observed Davie High boys’ tennis coach Robert Landry in an interview earlier this week. The Davie High netters are scheduled to open their season this Monday af­ ternoon with a 2:30 p.m. match with a match at 2:30 p.m. next Wednesday against Trinity on the Davie High courts. Continuing his comments about his squad, Landry said, “My boys have taken the attitude they’re going to be aggressive and attack in their style of play this year and I hope they keep up this attitude.” He added, “In the past we’ve played as a defensive team and I ’m trying to get them to be more aggressive by pushing them to get the shot and go to the net instead of staying back.” Landry has 6 boys returning from last year’s Davie team which finished Srd in the North Piedmont Conference with an 11-5 record and posted an overall m ark of 12 wins and 5 losses. Returnees include seniors Joey Everidge, Jerry Fleming, and Aaron MiUer and juniors George Kimberly, Paul Rauch and David Smith. Coach Landry has chosen these returnees to be the memljers of his starting singles’ lineup this spring. Everidge will be starting in the No. 1 seeded position in singles’ competition. “Everidge has a good overall gam e and is very smooth,” noted Landry. The Davie coach has tabbed Rauch to be the No. 2 seeded player in the singles’ Tennis Schedule matches. Landry commented that “at this time Paul has probably got the best form of anybody on the team and he is a very strong player.” He did mention that he wishes Rauch “would be a little more aggressive and take better ad­ vantage of his height.” Holding down the No. 3 seeded spot will be Aaron M iller, a player Landry describes as “having really worked hard on his game since last year and who plays a good game when he’s aggressive.” In the fourth-seeded position will be junior George Kimberly. Said Landry, “George is a good all-around player and is pretty good at the net.” The 5th-seeded spot in singles’ play will be occupied by David Smith. Ob­ served the Davie coach, “David has improved quite a bit from last year when he played in the No. 10 position.” Rounding out the top 6 seeds in singles’ play will be Jerry Fleming. Said Landry of Flem ing, “He hits the ball as hard or harder than anybody on the team, but he’s gotten off to a slow start this year.” At the start of the season Landry has chosen Everidge and M iller to be the No. 1 seeded players in doubles’ play, Kimberly and Rauch to play No. 2 in doubles and Smith and senior Bobby McDaniel to play in the No. 3 spot in doubles’ matches. Other players on the Davie tennis team this year will include senior Ricky G illis, ju nio r John H ollem an, sophomores Chipper Barnhardt, Alan Crawford, John Hesiin, Frank Lawhon, Jeff McCullough and Scott Humphreys and freshmen Steve Heffner and John Kimberly. L andry predicts that Salisbury, Lexington and Asheboro will be the teams to beat for the North Piedmont Conference crown. “Salisbury has just about its whole team back which won the conference championship last year and Lexington will be pretty strong with three good freshmen back from last year’s team. And Asheboro could be a strong con­ tender for No. 1,” said Landry. Is Revised Several revisions have been made in the 1979 schedule for the Davie High boys’ varsity tennis team. The revised schedule is as follows: M arch 5 - Lexington (there) March 7 - Trinity (here) M arch 8 - South Rowan (there) M arch 12 - Thomasville (there) M arch IS - North Rowan (here) M arch 19 - Salisbury (here) M arch 22 - Wost Rowan (there) M arch 26 - Asheboro (there) M arch 29 - North Davidson (here) April 2 - Trinity (there) April 5 - Lexington (here) April 9 - Forbush (there) April a - Thomasville (here) April 19 - North Rowan (there) April 23 - Salisbury (there) April 26 - West Rowan (here) April 30 - Asheboro (here) M ay 3 - North Davidson (there) Matches start at 2:30 p.m . until Daylight Saving Time begins and then the matches will start at 3:30 p.m. Davie Republican Convention, Mar. 10 The Davie County Republican Party Convention will be held Saturday March 10,1979 at 7:30 p.m. at the Davie County Courthouse. Attorney Eddie Powell of Winston- Salem, formerly of Davie County, will be the speaker. Officers to lead the party for the next two years will be elected. All Republicans are invited to attend._ The Love Valley Four sbiging group will appear at the professional wrestling match at StatesvUle on Friday night. The members of the group are J. D. Benfield, Frank Patterson, Allen Burgbi and Denny Milsaps. P r o W r e s t lin g A n d C o u n t r y M u s ic S p e c t a c u la r S e t F o r S t a t e s v ille An exciting professional wrestling and country music spectacular will be held Friday, M arch 2, at 8:15 p.m . at Grace Park Recreation Center on W. Ball St. in Statesville. The m ain event will be a mixed match between Daisy Mae and Johnny Hunter battling Belle Starr and the Great Bolo. The semi-main event will find the country music stars, the Love Valley Four, with J.D . Benfield, Frank P at­ terson, Allen Bürgin and Denny Milsaps, singing good old country music for 30 minutes. E d Fury, top black star, will match holds with young Jim Gallagher. Belle Starr will go head-to-head against Daisy Mae in a girls’ match. An Eastern U.S. Title Match finds champion Johnny Hunter tackling the G reat Bolo. Promoter Ann Hunter also has a brass-knuckles match slated between champion Rickton Link and the Masked Inferno. The matches will be sanctioned by the E astern W restling Association of Atlanta, Georgia. Tickets are on sale at W FM X and West Gate Pharm acy in Statesville. Tickets are also available at Grace Park Recreation Center, the Western Auto stores in Mocksville and Harmony, Service D istributo rs’ No. 1 in Mocksville, Jones Grocery at Harmony, S p illm a n ’s Exxon a t Cooleem ee, Gambles’ Food Store in Troutman or from Johnny Hunter, Herman Kerli Charles Price. Tenor, Gene Biddix or Bi ley, Bill Lanny Wadkins Wins Los Angeles Open The North Carolina A.A.U. held its annual Teague-rA.A.U. Awards Banquet in High Point Saturday at which out­ standing am ateur athletes in North Carolina were honored. W alt Boyle, Sr. of Bermuda Run was selected as a 1978 North Carolina A.A.U. All-Ster athlete and received the Judge Lewis E. Teague award, an engraved marble plaque. Mr. Boyle is nationally ranked as a U.S. Masters Swimmer, and holds eleven North Carolina state records. He at­ tended the banquet with his wife Joanie, daughter Janna and mother, Mrs. Harold L. Boyle of Winston-Salem. Duke Is 5th; UNCIs7th ' IndianaState, having completed its first undefeated regular season, re­gained the No.l spot in The Associated Press college basket­ball poll today, easily outdistanc­ing runnerup Notre Dame.The Sycamores, 26^) and ranlied second last week, col­lected 51 of 61 first-place ballots and 1,192 points in balloting by a nationwide panel of sports writers and broadcasters. Indi­ana SUte, which beat Drake 76-68 last Tuesday night and crushed Wichita State 109-84 in its first appearence on national^ television Sunday, was named on all the ballots although the! Sycamores were ranked as low \ as seventh bv one voter. UCLA, to^ranked last weeT but upset by Washington 69-68 ‘ Thursday night and ^tended to U-ipie overtime in a liO-102 vic­ tory over Washington State Sat­urday, collected two first-place votes and 1,060 points while sliDPine to No.3.Preseason favorite “Duke moved from No.6 into the No.5 position with 914 points follow­ing a 47-40 victory over North Carolina and a 70-49 loss to Clemson.Syracuse, eighth last week, jumped two notches to sixth with 897 points — 18 more than North Carolina, No.4 last week. Th# Top Twenty t# *m i In Tti* Ai* lo clattd P r e u c o jito t te ik ttb tll poll, w ith first'piac« volts Tn M r o n th tifi. m * M n r«cord» and total pom tt. P o ln ti bp ttd on .•4-S.4-3-2-1:l.ln d la n a St. (SI) S.Notr« D am « (7)3.UCLA (2)4.M lchlgan St. (I) 5.0tfk« é.Syracu»«7.North CarolinaI.L o u lila n a St. f.A rka nias lO.M arquaH« n .lo w a 12.Ttm pla » .L o u iiv lll«U .T o ia tl5 .0 «P aulU .G torgatow n. D.C. 1 7 .0 h lo » . II.O ttro lt IV.Purdu«20.San Francisco 34-022ЭЗЫ 20-5 1,192USOI.OM Itl Ж21-522*4 21-4 If-S IM22-Э23-6 304 204 22*4 174 21*5 2b7 21*4 I7 t151 7125214M4414)7415394 34121« Cross-Stitch Classes Offered S P O R T 8 H O R Classes in counted-thread cross stitch will be taught on the four Monday nights in March at 7 p.m . in room 209 in the Brock Building. Each participant is asked to bring to the first class an eight-inch square of No. 414 Aida cloth, a No. 24 tapestry needle, and an embroidery hoop. The fee for this Davidson County Community CoUege mini-course is $5.00. It is free for those over age №. For further inform ation about this very popular form of needlecrafi, those in ­ terested may call the in­ structor, Mrs. Rufus Brock at 634-5128. California Veterans California is home to more veterans, m ore than 3.3 miUion of them, than any other slate. New York trails with 2.5 miUion veterans, whUe Pennsylvania, Texas, Illinois and Ohio, in that or­ der, have between 1.5 and 1.7 mUlion veterans each. Thinkers Are Sinkers The University of Penn­sylvania is usually thought of more for its Ivy League academic reputation than as a national collegiate basketball power. But over the past 10 years, Penn has ranked with the ijest in basketball. The top five teams in NCAA Division 1 l>asketball during the past ten years stacl( up tllis way in won- lost records; 1. UCLA-277-23 (.923)2. Marquette-25-1-38 (.870)3. North Carolina-243-64 (.792)4. Kentucky227-62 (.785)5 Penn-2I3-59 (.783)It all goes to show that the Ivy League can effect­ively combine athletics and academics, and still produce tup-flight winning teams. Uood thinlters can be tops us basltetball sinliers. PTA-Student Gam e is Played The annual Parent- Teacher-Student BaUgame was held at WiUiam R Davie School G ym on F riday , February 23, 1979. This baUgame was sponsored by Uie WiUiam R. Davie Booster Club, Inc. A good turn-out of fans saw Uie P.T. Ladies’ team faU to me W RD G irls’ team. (Nice try, ladies). The P.T. Men struggled for a win against Uie W RD guys. The highlight of the evening was Uie performance at half- Ume by the students of K in­ dergarten thru 4Ui grades. The P.T. Cheerleaders were super and a Great Delight. The Club wishes to Uiank aU persons who volunteered their Ume and effort. We would lUce to recogniie the W R D C afeteria Staff, Teachers, P arents, and Students. A special thanks to Mrs. Donna Ireland, P .E . Coordinator for the County, Mrs. “Pan Beck and Mr. Benny Naylor, School Board Members. WiUi the help of these people, the evening was a great success. Proceeds of the evening wiU be used to furUier Uie athletic program at WUUam R. Davie Disco And Social D ancing Offered Classes in disco and social dancing are being offered at Sm ith G rove C om m unity center gym , beginning March 5, and wUl continue for eight weeks. The lessons wUl be for one hour. Any information concerning this coivse can be obtained by calling either Mrs. Jessica Shields at 998- 3473 or Ms. PhyUis WiUiams at 998-8303. A course for teenagers wiU be offered at a later date. This is being sponsored by the Sm ith Grove com m unity center group headed by Ms. WiUiams Anim al Protection Society IMeets The Davie County Anim al ProtecUon Society, Inc. wUl hold its m onthly m eeting Tuesday, March 6 at 7:30 p.m. in Uie grand jury room of the court house. A regular business meeting, Uie session is open to all m em bers and prospective members. For further in­ form ation concerning the organization, call 634-5138 8:00-12:00 Monday through Friday.______________________ Promotor, Ann l-lunter Presents: WRESTLING & Country Music Spectular! Tickets On Sale; WFMX, West Gate Pharmacy (In Statesville) Spillman's Exxon, Cooleemee, Western Auto & Service Distributor, Inc.(In Mocksville) & Jones Grocery(ln Harmony) Main Event: Mixed Tag Team M atch! Jo hn ny H u n te r & D aisy M ae VS. The O re a t Bolo & B e lle Sta rr SEMI-MAIN EVENT: C o u n try M usic S tars WFMX's- THE LOVE VALLEY Four J.O. Benfield, Frank Patterson, Allen Berqin, Denny Milsaps ____WiU Sing For 30 Minutes! ED Fury VS. Jim Gallagher (Top Blaclc S t a r )______________ GIRLS! GIRISI GIRLS! Bglle^tarr VS. Daisy Mae. Eaftern U.S. Title Match! The Great Bolo VS. Johnny Hunter (Champi6n) Bran Knuckt Title Match! (Ctiampion) Another^eenHVjertUnj^Ajsoc^EJV^^ Lanny W adkins’ conquest of the 18th hole had a $45,000 booty attached. Wadkins made bogeys on the l8Ui hole of the Riviera Country Club the first Uiree days of the Los Angeles Open, but the 29-year-old veteran w ith the checkered professional career didn’t make one Sunday and that gave him a i- shot victory over long-hitting Lon Hinkle. On the par-4, 450-yard finishing hole, Wadkins calm ly sank a 12-foot putt for a par and his triumph. “ 1 felt that hole owed m e,” he sighed. "I had a good atUtude. I made three bogeys in a row and I wasn’t going to make another one today. I hit four good drives and four bad shots in. “What happened Uie first three days was in the back of my mind I suppose, but I didn’t worry about it. Each day is a new day.” Wadkins made it clear he wants to tiecome known as a consistent golfer. "I'd love to find more consistency,” he said wiUi a smUe. “ I want to become known as a very steady player. I should be a steady player, too, because I drive Uie ball so straight. If I could do Uiat, I should be able to put some wins together. “But winning is winning, period. If I don’t win the Masters or U. S. Open in Uie future, that’s just too bad. Believe me, winning the Los Angeles Open at Riviera is exciUng to me. This is a great golf course. I wish we could play the whole tour on this course.” Wadkins, who slumped to $53,811 and didn’t win a tournament last year after capturing the PGA tiUe and winning $244,882 in 1977, took Uie lead when he canned a 2-foot birdie putt on the 615- yard par-5 17th hole. But the tournament looked lUce it was headed for a playoff between Wadkins and Hinkle when Hinkle sank a 10-foot par putt on the 18th h9ld, a 454-yard par- 4, and Wadkins had his problems on Uie same hole. Wadkins chipped 15 feet past Uie hole on the 18th but then calm ly knicked in his tournament-winning putt for the $250,000 in first-prize money. For Wadkins, who started the final round tied with Hinkle and Kerm it Zarley, it was the sixth tournament win of his nine-year professional career. Wadkins, of Bermuda Run, a former PGA Tournament and U. S. am ateur champion, won $45,000 while Hinkle, the No. 2 winner this year, got second-place money of $27,000. Wadkins was runner-up by one shot to Tom Purtzer in Uie 1977 Los Angeles Open, and the former Wake Forest star shot a closing round two-under-par 69. Hinkle had a last-day 70. Wadkins finished two shots in front of Zarley, the 37-year-old journeyman trying to win for the first Ume since 1972, and Andy Bean, a three-time tour­ nament winner last year. Zarley had a last day 71 and Bean carded a 70. Wadkins finished with a 72-hole score of 276, eight under par over the 7,029- yard Riviera Club layout. There was a Ue for fifth place at 279 between Fuzzy Zoeller, who shot a 70 Sunday, and E d W Sneed, who had a 69. Wadkins shot 35-34 in his last round with two birdies and two bogeys on the front side and three birdies and two bogeys on Uie front side and three bir­ dies and a single bogey on the back nine. He bogeyed Uie llth hole to fall tw o ^ shots back of Hinkle-Uien Uie leader aU ^ by himself-but he birdied the 12th and 13th holes and that put him into a tie with Hinkle and Zarley for Uie lead. On Uie 17th hole he knocked a wedge to within two feet of the pin and then sank Uie putt to take a lead that he never relinquished. Wadkins, who also won Uie World Series of golf in 1977, c a m e # into this tournament as Uie No. 29 money winner Uiis year with $16,667. In 1973, he won $200,455 and two tournaments, seemingly on his Way to instand stardom. But gaU bladder surgery Uie foUowing year caused his career to go into stagnaUon for three. seasons. ip There was a three-way Ue for seventh place at 280, four under, among 1973 Masters champion Tommy Aaron, who shot a 69 Sunday, veteran Rod Curl with a 66, and veteran Jim Colbert with a 69. Artie McNickle finished with a 69 for a 281 total and lOth place. a Tom Watson, the No. 1 money winner ^ on Uie PGA tour Uie past two years, finished at 287, Uiree over, with a 71 Sunday. Pinebrook Little League'* Registration Ume is here for the 1979 Pinebrook LitUe League and Girls’ Softball AssociaUon season. RegistraUon times and places for the , associaUon wUI be as foUows: Far-# mington Community Center - Saturday, March 3, from 10:00 a.m . to 4:00 p.m. and Wednesday, M arch 7, from 7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m . ; Smith Grove Com­ munity Center - Wednesday, M arch 7, from 7:30 p.m . to 9:30 p.m . and Satur­ day, M arch lOth, from 10:00 a.m . to 4:00 p.m. m Programs avaUable this season in theW association wUl be L ittle League basebaU (m ajor and minor leagues) for ages 8-12; Pee Wee basebaU for ages 5-8; and girls’ softbaU for girls aged 10-12 In the m ajor leagues and girls aged 5-9 in Uie minor leagues. The Pinebrook LitUe League a r e a ^ comprises what used to be known as theF^ old Pinebrook School District, which now includcii Bermuda Run. C o o le e m e e S o f t b a ll Anyone interested in entering a team in the Cooleemee SoftbaU League should contact David Jordan (284-2030) or BUly Correll (284-2762) as soon as possible. I n v e n t o r y C le a r a n c e ! Save now on these 6 E quality built 3 0 ' Self-Cleaning Oven Ranges • 3 plug-in Calrod ' surface units plus 3-in-1 "P ow er Saver" unit • W ood-grained vinyl trim and glass control panel • Fluorescent cooktop lam p • Picture w indow oven door • Digital clock Model JB500W/GW R e g . ’ 5 5 9 ’ * w /T N O W O N L Y Mocksville Furniture & Appliance Inc. 2 Court Square Mocksville, N.C. Phone 634-5812 DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD. THURSDAY, MARCH I. 1470 3B D a v ie H ig h G ir ls W in D is t r ic t T o u r n a m e n t Advance To State Playoffs In Hickory Tuesday night the Davie High girls' varsity basketball team won Ihe North C arolina H igh School A thletic Association District Five 3-A Basketball Tournament by defeating North Stanly, 49-33, in a game played at Merner Gym nasium on the Pfeiffer College campus. By winning the district championship, Davie now advances to the state 3-A tourney to be played in Hickory, March 7-10. At press time no pairings or game times had been set for play in the state tournament. Davie had won the right to play in Tuesday night’s district championship game by defeating East Rowan, 55-37, last Friday night in the opening round of the tourney and by defeating Thomasville, 54-47, in Monday night’s semifinal game. North Stanly got to the championship game by winning, 49-39, over Asheboro last Thursday night in an opening round gam e and by trium p h ing, 60-49, Saturday night over Northw est Cabarrus in semifinal play. North Stanly best Davie for the North Two Davie Stars.......Jill Amos and Deanna Thomas leave the court Tuesday night after leading Davie to one of the best records in it’s basketball history. Amos and Thomas combined Tuesday night to score 34 of their team’s 49 points as they beat North Stanly for the title. Thomas paced the scoring with 21 points; Amos had 13. (Photos by Garry Foster) Weather Delays Baseball The baseball season for the Oavie High baseballers was scheduled to begin ~ this Friday, M arch 2, However, Davie High baseball coach Ken Boger declared Monday “ there is no way we can play that opening gam e Friday at Forbush.” Boger was referring to the fact that inclem ent w eather conditions have , prevented his and other area teams from practicing and getting in shape to ^ open their spring baseball seasons. Commented the W ar Eagle coach, “ I could have an All-American out there and wouldn’t know it because I wouldn’t have seen him in action in practice." Said Boger, “ Wejve yet to take any batting practice, infield practice or anything.” He added, " I haven’t even ^ made m y first cut yet because I need about five days on the playing field with the boys before I can make a cut.” According to the Davie coach, this year is the “latest” he has gone Into a new baseball season “without even getting a team on the field.” ^ When the W ar Eagles finally do take ~ the field Boger is hoping his squad will equal or improve on last’s year’s record of 11 wins and 5 losses, which placed Davie in 2nd place in the North Pied­ mont Conference title race. Boger has twelve returnees from that team which finished second in the (H conference. ~ Returning pitchers include senior Bart Reece and sophomores Scott Pratt and E d Smith. Reece was an all-conference per­ former last year as a starting pitcher. Pratt also saw some starting duties last season. Smith did not pitch m uch last year, but played a lot tn the outfield. ^ At the catching position Boger has seniors Bobby Smith and Todd Jones returning along with the junior, Dean Smith. Bobby Smith was the starting catcher last year and Jones saw much action as a designated hitter. David Barnhardt, a senior and started last season for the W ar Eagles at first base, is returning this year to continue his duties at that position. At second base is Kenny Hellard, a returnee who did not play too m uch last season. Senior Brent B urton, an all- conference performer last year at third base, returns to play that position during his final year of high school. Outfielders Steve Grubb, a senior, and Larry W hitaker, a sopliomore, both started some last year in the W ar Eagle outfield and are returning this season to pick up where they left off. “We’ve got the have real good per­ formances out of two of our three pit­ chers if we’re going to have any chance at ail of winning the conference this year,’’ predicted Boger. “Also,” he continued, “In order to make a good showing we’re going to have to Improve our defense and get some hitting from some guys who did not hit the ball that much last year.” Boger noted that he lost three good players to graduation last spring “who are going to be hard to replace.” Those losses included center fielder Jeff Cline, second baseman Jeff Pardue and shortstop Tom Amidon. “Amldon was probably the best all- around ballplayer we’ve ever had here at Davie and he is scheduled to start in the infield this year at Duke Univer­ sity,” remarked Boger. The Davie coach believes Asheboro is the “ team to beat” this year for the baseball crown in the North Piedmont Conference. “ I ’m afraid everybody will be chasing Asheboro because Uiey went as far as the third round of the state playoffs last season and they have a lot of №eir boys back this year,” reported Boger. Three Local Golfers On Team *Gardner-Webb Golf Team Seeks National Title Three former Davie High golfers are preparing to participate on the Gardner- Webb National Championship golf team this sprhig. The Bulldog golf program gets into swing on March 5-6 when they participate in the Coastal Carolina Tournament at North Myrtle Beach. Stanley Randall, a freshman from MocksviUe was one of three playing behind the two All-Americans (Wayne Myers and Steve Sherman) on the team. Ronald Webb of Cooleemee and Johnny M iller of Mocksvilie, both fresh­ men, are also members of the team. Last year, 1978, Gardner-Webb placed 6th In the national tournament without lg||ienior All-American Steve Sherman ^ w h o was ineligible his junior year. With Sherman, the Bulldogs won the national tournament in 1977. Myers has played on both the 1976 and 1977 national cham ­ pionship teams. Or. G arland Allen, head coach, feels that this year’s Gardner-Webb team has M a n exceUent chance of winning the ^ n a tio n a l tournament. "W e have some young golfers that are very good and Sherman and Myers provide valuable leadership” , said Dr. Alien. Tbe 1979 golf schedule for Gardner- Webb Is as foUows: ^ March S-6 Coastal Carolina Tour- V o a m e n t North Myrtle Beach, S.C. M arch 13-lS Pinehurst Intercolligate Tournament Pinehurst, N.C. M arch 26-27 P feiffer In v itatio n al Tournament Badin, N.C. April 5-7 Carson-Newman Invitational Tournament Jefferson City, Tenn. April 23-24 District 26 Tournament Durham , N.C. Piedmont Conference tourney cham ­ pionship two years ago, 55-46. Last year, the Comets topped Davie, 59-50, in the district semifinals. Davie and North Stanly were league rivals for 11 years in the old North Piedmont Conference. Going into Tuesday night’s game both Bill Peeler, the Davie coach, and Lonnie Chandler, the North Stanly coach, predicted thal their squads would have lo play their best gam e of Ihc season to defeat the other team. D avie won the North P iedm ont Conference regular season and tour­ nament titles this year, while North Stanly paced the Soqth P iedm ont Conference in the regular season, but fell to Sun Valley in the conference lourney finals. The first half of Tuesday night's championship gam e saw the two teams swapping Ihe lead back and forth. North Stanly oulscored Davie, 10-8, in the first quarter, but Oavie came back in the second stanza to outscore North Stanly, 10-8, to even the score at the half. Davie reaUy began to turn things around in the third period by scoring 11 points to North Stanly’s 4 and in the final quarter Davie outpaced North Stanly, 20-11, for the final 49-33 victory margin. Davie was led in scoring by senior forward Deanna Thomas, who poured in 21 points, while junior guard Jill Amos added 13 for the W ar Eagles. Other Davie scorers included M ary Gardner with 2 points, Gina Howell with 4, Rhonda Bullabough with 1 and Sarah. Gardner with 8. In the opening round gam e with East Rowan the Davie team jum ped out to a quick 6-0 lead before the Mustangs of East Rowan caught fire for 11 straight points, including 7 from guard Cindy MiUer, to lead, 11-6. East then went into a long scoring drought of almost 10 minutes, including Uie first 7:31 of the second period. Meanwhile, the W ar Eagles ripped off 18 consecutive points of their own and by the time Connie Trexler dropped in two free throws for East with 31 seconds left in Uie half, Davie held a 24-13 advantage and was well on its way to victory. Jesse Watson, coach of East Rowan, in hopes of upseting the favored W ar Eagles, employed a box-and-one defense with guard Donna South on Davie’s star . guard, JUl Amos, whUe the other four Mustangs sagged back into a zone. Watson had hoped the zone would keep Davie forward Deanna Thomas away from the basket. Watson’s stategy held Amos to just 12 points but Thomas roamed through the East zone for 17 points, including 10 of those In the first half. “We were trying to keep Thomas outside,” said Watson, “but the box broke down and we lost our composure a litUe. And they were just strong for us inside.” Davie coach BiU Peeler was surprised by the box-and-one on Amos, but he was aware of something else Watson m ight have tried. “ If he (Watson) would have held Uiat Uiree- or four-point lead. I’m sure he would have stalled,” said Peeler. “We talked about it before the gam e and decided that we had to just go out and get the opening tap and go down and score.” Watson adm itted that if given the opportunity In the second half. East would have held the baU. “We were hoping to keep It close in the first half and, if we would have gotten the lead in Uie second half, we probably would have staUed,” he explained. “But Uie second quarter took care of that.” The Mustangs missed all 17 of their field-goal attempts in Uie second period and Davie took its 13-point halfUme ' lead. E ast’s cold shooting set the stage for what Davie likes to do most - run. “We had a bad first quarter while East Rowan was MtUng from the out­ side,” said Peeler. “Then, when Uiey (East) missed a couple outside shots, we started running. But Uie big Uiing for us is that we spend more pracUce time on defense than we do on offense but I ’ve got seven girls who can shoot.” Walsdn 'aTso agreed that once the Mustangs’ outside shooUng went cold. East was In trouble. “We’ve been an outside shooting team aU year and when Uiat is cut off we’re hurUng because we really don’t have an inside gam e,” he said. “But overaU, 1 Uiink we played about as weU as we could. They (W ar Eagles) are a good team and Uiey are very big. Andwhen you’re big, you have a basketball team .” Davie conUnued to roll in the third period as baskets from Thomas, Amos and Rhonda Bullabough gave the W ar Eagles a comm anding 34-15 margin. Davie went on to outscore Uie Mustangs in the quarter, 13-8, to take a 39-21 ad­ vantage into Uie final stanza. For Uie game, Davie made 22 ol 55 field goal attempts (40 percent) In the gam e wiUi Thomasville, Davie Excitment and emotion reigned following the final buzzer Tuesday night that gave the Davie girls a 49-33 victory over North Stanly and the District Tournament Championship. Mary Gardener . Deanna Thomas, Rhonda Bullabaugh, and Jill Amos are shown above happily signifying.....“We’re Number 1" guard Jil! Amos got off to a hot start. The junior hit her first five fleld-goal attempts, all on jum pers from about 15 feet. She went on to make 10 of 18 field goals, five of eight at Uie foul Une and scored 25 points. Other Davie scoring leaders were guard Rhonda Bullabough with 12 and forward Deanna Thomas wlUi 11. Davie outrebounded ThomasvUle, 39- 30, led by Thomas wiUi 11, forward M ary Gardner with 10 and center Gina HoweU with nine, so each Davie starter con­ tributed either a lot of points or a lot of rebounds. “Jill was hot in the first quarter. You don’t give her that shot (jum per at foul line). She has been Uiough Uiree times against ThomasviUe,” said Peeler. Amos had scored 24 and 18 in the first two meetings with ThomasviUe. Davie won those games by 16 and 30 points. Peeler was impressed with the way T hom asville’s defending district champions played in defeat. "W e had to play one of our better games because ThomasvUle played the best they’re played against us,” he said. Amos led Davie to a 16-10 lead after one quarter. The lead reached 11 in the second stanza at 26-15, but ThomasvUle closed the gap to six at intermission. Bullabough and Amos each had four points in the quarter for Davie. ThomasviUe gained a UtUe ground In the third stanza, outscoring Davie by 10- 8, cutOng Uie lead to 36-32. In Uie final stanza, ThomasvUle pulled within two at 36-34 on Jan Montfora s basket after an offensive rebound. But Gardner’s basket and two field goals by Amos held off Uiat threat. ThomasviUe got within four three Umes in Uie final 4:05. The first Ume, BuUabough countered with four straight free throws. The second time, Thomas came Uirough with a field goal. After Sharon Parks ot ThomasviUe cut the lead to 51-47 with 35 seconds to go, Amos made two free Uirows and Thomas made one to protect the lead. Davie hit 21 of 49 field goals for 42.9 percent and made 12 of 20 free throws. ThomasviUe was 19 for 60 from the floor for 31.7 percent and added nine of 16 free Uirows. INVENTORY CLEARAN CE! 2in1X«nSHER w i t h M i n i - W a s h ® s y s t e m Reg. *389.95 OWONLY » 3 5 9 * 5 W /T Davie Cheerleaders shared post-game thrills and joy with the players as shown above. Kim Foster i with arms around Rhonda Bullabaugh . Tax Credit Given To Energy Savers NorUi Carolina taxpayers who take certain steps to save energy in their homes can realize a significant cut in their Federal tax bUI, the Internal Revenue says. The law , w hich is reU-oactive to April 20, 1977, provides for a tax credit of up to $300 for energy con­ servation m aterials instaUed In Uie home, and a separate credit of up to $2,200 for taxpayers who install “renewable” energy source devices such as solar or wind equipment. The sm aller credit is 15 percent of Uie first $2,000 spent on such items as storm windows and doors, in ­ sulation, w eatherstripping and cauUcing. Also qualifying are furnace replacem ent b u r n e r s , flu e - o p e n in g modifications and mechanical ignition systems to replace gas pilot lights. The “renewable” energy source credit ic 30 percent of Uie first $2,000 plus 20 percent of Uie next $8,000 invested In q u alify ing solar, w ind or geothermal equipment for use in the home. The credit is computed on Form 5695, which should be attached to F orm 1040. However, Uie taxpayer need not itemize other deductions to claim Uie credit. If the credit is more Uian Uie tax­ payer's tax lia b ility , the unused credit m ay be carried over lo next year’s tax return. R enters as w ell as homeowners are eligible for Uie energy credit. Gina Howeil goes up for two .nore points for Davie in their «ctory Tuesday night over North Stanly. Mocktville Furniture & Appliance Inc. 2 Court Square ___________Phone 634’5812_________ I i 4H DAVII COUNTY 1 NTF-RPRISH RliCORD, THURSDAY, MARCH 1, 1<)7<) Aflpr weeks of stalking the monkey-oaling eagle through Ihe dense forests of the P hilippines, a group of American scientists finally found the rare bird. In tact, they think they might have found ,‘iOO of them. They also discovered that Ihc monkey-eating eagle isn't that wild about monkeys. The blue-cyed, white-crested bird seems to prefer dining on flying lemurs, anim als that resemble flying squirrels. Even though the eagle population apparently is in the hundreds, the bird still faces the threat of extinction, says Dr. Robert S. Kennedy, and expedition member. So the bird’s name recently was changcd to Philippine eagle, the first step in an effort to have it declared the country’s national bird. The A m ericans hope the new name will draw attention to the eagle, which was discovered in 1896 on the Philippine island of Sam ar bul ignored for years. "W e view the eagle as a symbol," Kennedy said. ‘‘It we can help Ihe eagle, we will preserve other P hilippine wildlife." One of Ihe rarest eagles in the world , the monkey-eating eagle was believed extinct on Samar, but the group now thinks the island has a sizable population. More eagles were found on three of Ihe other islands, expecially Mindanao. But despite these discoveries, the bird remains in danger. Native only to the Philip­ pines, the eagle builds its huge nest-five by eight feet in size -high in the trees ot mountain ranges. In the last 30 years it has lost nesting ground to extensive logging and clearing ot forest for agriculture. The eagles also have been killed by trophy hunters. Hoping to educate Filipinos about the bird’s plight, the A m erican scientists are observing and counting the eagles and film in g their behavior on a grant trom the National Geographic Society. Other sponsors are the M arcos F oundation and Monkey-Eating Eagle Tailed In Phillippines Thomas C. Ounstan c 1979 National Geographic Society I’lERClNG EYES, a narrow, curved beiik, und u bonnet of slender fcuther.s make the monkey-eating eagle of the Philip- pinc.s a distinctive looking bird. A group of Aniericun re­ searchers have found that 1500 to ,500 eagles —also called the Philippine eagle —may live on the islands, despite forces that have wiped out much of the species. Philippine Airlines. Photographers Alan Degen, Neil Rettig, and Woltgang Salb are perching in treehouses, recording days in the lives of the monkey-eating eagle. The scientists also have attached a radio tran­ smitter to the tail of a juvenile eagle to track its behavior p tterns. “ We know where he is 24 hours a day,” Kennedy said. To help ensure the species’ survival, K ennedy and a colleague, R onald K rupa, have begun a captive breeding and release program. They plan to use such techniques as artificial insemination to breed the birds where they are sate from m an’s encroachment. The scientists also are w o r k in g ^ iv itj^ ^ r e s id w i^ Ferdinand Marcos to curb the destruction ot the eagles’ habitat by loggers and far­ mers. The second largest eagle in the world, the monkey-eating eagle has a wing span ot about seven teet and weighs up to 15 pounds. It has chocolate brown and while feathers and an extremely narrow, curved beak. Its m ost unusual feature, says Kennedy, is its “moppy crest,” a bonnet ot feathers that rise when the bird is provoked. A fter it was first discovered, the eagle was practically forgotten until a scientist began studying it in the 1960s. It then cought the eye of Chalrles A. Lindbergh, hwo helped set up a program to preserve the specie s .___ Davie Division Of DCCC To Begin Spring Quarter Equivalency) The IIC otters placement testing and in­ dividualized program s of study to help prepare students tor the G ED Test. The coordinator is av ailable Mondays and Thursdays from 10:00 until 8:30 p.m ., Tuesdays and Wednesdays trom 9:00 to 5:00, and Fridays from 9:00 to 12:00. For more information call Mrs. Judy Griffin at the college office 634-3415, B.C. Brock Center 717 N orth M ain Street, Mocksville. Lawn Mower Repair (Tune Up and Overhaul) Thursdays from 7:00-10:00 at Shoaf's Garage. Classes begin March 1, 1979. Shoaf instructs this course call 492-5367 or 634-3415 to pre-register. M acram è Tuesdays from 7:00-10:00 at Farm ington Rec. Center. Classes begin April 24, 1979. Smithers instructs this course, call 998-5150 to pre-register. N eedlepoint Thursdays trom 6:30-9:30 at the B.C. Brock Center. Classes begin The Davie County Division of Davidson County Com­ munity College will begin the spring quarter March 2,1979. Persons interested in the Adult E nrichm ent Classes offered by the college may register by attending the first class meeting. Registration will rem ain open through the second class session. The following classes are open for registration: A dult Basic E ducation (ABE) Mondays and Thur­ sdays from 6:00-9;00 p.m . at the B.C . Brock Center. Classes begin March 1, 1979. Dyson instructs this course. Arts and Crafts Mondays from 6:30-9:30 p.m . at the Sm ith Grove C om m unity Center. Classes begin March 12, 1979. Hurt instructs this course, call 998-3118 to pre­ register. A rt (O il and P astel) Mondays from 6:00-9:00 p.m. at the B.C. Brock Center. Classes begin March 5, 1979. Beard instructs this course. A rt (W atercolor) T hur­ sdays trom 6:00-9:00 p.m . at the Farm ington Rec. Center. Classes begin March 2, 1979. Beard instructs this course. Auto E ngine Overhaul Tuesdays trom 7:00-10:00 p.m . at Shoafs Garage. Classes begin March 6, 1979. Shoaf instructs this course. Call 492-5367 or the coUege at 634-3415 to pre-register. Ceramic Thursdays trom 6:30-9:30 p.m . at P eg ’s C eram ic Shop on Prison Camp Road. Classes begin March 1, 1979. Joyner in­ structs this course. Call 492- 5559 to pre-register Counted Thread Cross Stitch Mondays from 7:00-9:00 at the B.C. Brock Center. Classes begin March 5, 1979. Brock instructs this course, call 634-5128 to pre-register. Crocheting tor Beginner’s M ondays from 6:30-9:30 classes begin March 19, 1979 at Shady Grove School. Tuesdays from 6:30-9:30 classes begin March 20, 1979 at the B.C. Brock Center. Thursdays from 6:30-9:30 at Sm ith Grove C om m unity Center. Classes begin March 22, 1979. M arkiand i n s t r u c t s ______________________ this course. Call 998-4192 to The a n c ie n t G reeks trie d pre-register. to m ake rain by dipping G E D (H igh School o ak branches in w a te r . April 5, 1979. Brock instructs this course. Call 6.34-512B lo pre-register. Old Furniture Refinishing Mondays from 7:00-10:00 al Shoaf’s G arage. Classes begin M arch 5, 1979. Shoaf instructs this course, call 492- 5367 or 634-3415 to pre­ register. Old Furniture Refinishing Fridays from 7:00-10:00 at Sm ith G rove C om m unity Center. Classes begin March 16, 1979. Shoaf instructs this course, call 492-5367 or 634- 3415 to pre-register. P olice Defense T actics (Men) Wednesday trom 7:00- 9:30 at the B.C. Brock Center. Classes begin March 7, 1979. Godbey instructs the course to pre-register call 634-3415. P olice Defense T actics (Women) Mondays from 7:00- 9:00 at the Town H all Mocksville. Classes begin April 23, 1979. Cope instructs this course lo pre-register call 284-4322 nr R34-3415 Pottery (without a wheel) M ondays trom 7:00-10:00 Rainbow Road Advance. Classes begin March 5, 1979. Holland instructs this course call 998-8474 lo pre-register. Stretch Knits and Lingerie Mondays trom 7:00-10:00 at the Smith Grove Community Center. Classes begin March 5,1979. Harmon instructs this course call 766-8345 or 634-3415 lo pre-register. TailorinK Tuesdays from South Davie Ruritans Are Entertained South Davie Ruritan Club members were entertained by Eugene Hire, a magician from Morganton, N.C. at their regular m onthly m eeting which was held February 13 al the U Stop N Grill. A welcome was given by the president Herman Waller. The nexl meeting will be March 13, 1979. 6:30-9:30 at the B.C. Brock Center. Classes begin March 6, 1979. Lyerly instructs this course call 634-2138 or 634-3415 to pre-register. Tole P ain tin g Tuesdays from 9:00-12:00 at the B.C. Brock Center. Classes begin March 6, 1979. Schooler in­ structs this course. Call 634- 5235 lo pre-register. Tole P ain tin g Tuesdays trom 6:30-9:30 at the B.C. Brock Center. Classes begin March 6, 1979. Schooler in­ structs this course. Call 634- 5235 lo pre-register. There is a $5.00 registration tee per course for any classes being offered. Classes wilh insufficient enrollment will be dropped. Classes are open to anyone 18 or older. There is no fee for anyone over 65 years of age. For more in­ formation call Tim Ebright at the college office 634-3415, 717 N orth M ain Street, Mocksville, North Carolina. Mocks Chad Mock celebrated his 7th birthday al McDonalds Saturday evening al 3 p.m. Several children from his Sunday School class enjoyed the occasion and his mother, Mrs. Roger Mock Jr. Mrs. Charlie Myers spent the week-end w ilh her daughter in Lewisville. Paul W. Jones is still quite ill in the D avie County Hospital. Roger Mock Jr. has been sick the past week. (Correction from last week news) Mrs. Irilla McNeil of Winston-Salem was Tuesday dinner guest of M rs. Margaret Carter. Mrs. Clarence Campbell of Thomasville was Tuesday dinner guest of Miss Mattie J ones. INVENTORY CLEARANCE! 30>iNCH K U C T m c HANOI WITH LAROI BASV«LIAN OVIN.• Select th* heat you want with rotary controls lor Calrod* surface units • Uft-oH oven door simplllles dsanlng• Recessed seamless oooktop wipes clean easily • Large storage drawer.Reg. >319.95 W /T 2 7 4 ’ Mocksville Furniture & Appliance Inc. 2 Court Square Mocksville, N.C. Phone 634-5812 The Biggest Sale bi Elmore’s History.. LMORE’S • Z e n it h • S y lv a n ia • M a g n a v o x • F r ig id a ir e • K itc h e n - A id $30 FREE M erchandise For Every $100 You Spend 1 4 Big Days Г Ш Ш т . • E n g la n d e r • S c h a e f e r • A t l a n t a • H o n d a • T o r o • M u r r a y • M a y t a g • M G A • M a g ic C h e f • L it t o n • S a n s u i • H it a c h i • P io n e e r Rules Of The Sale Are Below—Seeing Is BeUeving! 1. Sale Starts Wednesday, Feb. 28 At 9 AJV\. Till Saturday, March 3 At 5 PJVl.! 2. For Every $100 You Spend, You Can Pick Out $30 Worth Of Free Merchandise Of Your Choice From Our Regular Stocic. 3. $1CX) Minimum Purchase Required On Name Brands Listed. Check The Examples Listed Below-There Are Many More! • H o m e l it e E u r e k a • C o o p e r & D u n lo p T ir e s • A t l a s T ille r s • J a c k s o n W a t e r H e a t e r s ^ Purchase A Purchase A Purchase A Purchase A $699.95 $579.95 $379.95 $300 ^ COLOR TV REFRIGERATOR AUTOMATIC LAWNMOWER Л Pick O u t $210 W o rth Pick O u t $174 W o rth DISHWASHER Иск O u t $90 W o rth J O f Free M erchandise ^ [ O f Free M erchandise O f Free M erchandise Pick O u t $114 W o rth O f Free M erchandiser O f Y o ur Choice O f Y o u r Choice O f Y o u r Choice O f Y o ur Choice 2 FREE DELIVERY FREE DELIVERY FREE DELIVERY FREE DELIVERY 1 fTT ' IT Bin::: ili'DU_ Г:• -uiiH, “OUR SERVICE MAKES THE DIFFERENCF" L N O R E ' S P L E N T Y O F F R E E P A R K I N G 9 7 0 N . B r i d g e S t . E l k i n 8 3 5 - 2 2 5 8 — 8 3 5 - 1 6 0 4 S a le s S e r v ic e 6 7 9 - 8 3 9 7 6 7 9 - 2 4 4 2 Y a d k i n P l a z a — Y a d k i n v i l l e Highway 601 North At 421 Int.- 25 Minutes From^ _ IN THE YADKIN PLAZASHfltPING CENTER DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, THÌIRSDAY. MARCII 1. IO?') 5B S h o w T im e Is M o n d a y N ig h t Fifth through eighth grade students at Mocksvillc Middle School will present a variety show at the P.T.S.A. meeting next Monday night at 7:30 p.m. E n titled "S how tim e '79” ap­ proximately 25 acts displaying various talents will be featured. Robert Martin (left) will Im m ltate a popular singer while Misty Clonti (top) performs an acrobatic routine. Britt Sanford (top, center) moves to a disco beat and Dawn Enloe expresses her talent at the piano. The show also includes a puppet show and trumpet solo by Jim m y Bares (bottom right). The show was coordinated by teachers Mrs. Alyce Bagshaw and Mrs. Bobbye Ellis. It was presented to the student body last Friday, (Photos by Robin Carter) Don't Hide The Truth D o Y o u K n o w ? Microwave Hot Spots Too many hot spots In a microwave oven can cause an uneven cooking pattern. This means that more time must be spent rotating food to make sure the food gels evenly cooked. To test for hot spots, cut brown paper to fit the bottom of your oven. Thoroughly dampen the paper using a fine mist spray. Then turn the mIcroWave oven on high power for 30 seconds. Remove the paper. If some areas of the paper are drier than others, you have hot spots, say specialists with the North Carolina Agricultural Extension Service, Call a qualified repairperson to adjust the stirrer blades in the oven it there are three or more hot spots. Save Energy Turning off the lights when they’re not in use is a good way to save energy. But since light bulbs use relatively little energy, you can do more to save energy with the m ajor appliances around the house. For instance, it takes the same amount of energy to wash just one item in the washing machine as it does to do a whole load. W aiting until you have a full load each time before laundering will save a lot over the period of one year, say NCSU agricultural extension sep- cialists. If practical, hanging clothes up to dry rather than using a clothes dryer will save several dollars a month as well as saving energy. All Children Need To Be Prepared For V isit To Hospital A child is entering the hospital today to have his tonsils removed,but he thinks he’s Just going to the comer store for an Ice cream cone or possibly to the doc­ tor’s office for a simple checkup. That’s the kind of explanation some parents m ay give, but hiding the truth from a child usually does more harm than good, says Patty M aynard Hill, an assistant professor of nursing at the University of North Carolina at Chapel HUl. “We see a num ber of children in the hospital who thought they were going somewhere else for a reward,” she says. •'It’s not easy for a child to discover he’s been tricked and that he’s actually going to have an operation. It’s particularly difficult for him if he’s been misled by his most trustea support person, his parent.” Many parents conceal a hospital visit from a child either because they fear the news will upset him , or they don’t know what to say. But simple preparation often relieves stress associated with a hospital stay, says Hill, whose clinical specialty is pediatric nursing. “A lot of studies have shown that children can tolerate a great deal of unpleasantness as long as they know what to expect,” she says. Some fairly simple rules of thumb can help parents ease the difficulty of the task. But Hill reminds parents to take into account the child’s age and developm ental level, ind iv id ual characteristics and the nature of the RENT A NEW 1979 b v t h e d a y , w e e k o r m o n t h LTD II *Low Daily Rentals I *Air Conditioning available *R«nt newest Model Fordt- M sizes and models. M o s U jia jo rc re d r^ ^ -Phone TOLL FREE from Wintton-Mem 722-2386 Irent -a-car For Cars, Trucks and _ ’ Savings Bucks See.. • " R e a v is F o r d , In c . Highway 601 North 'N.C-'DMler Mocksville, N.C. 27028 Licmsk Phone 634-2161 2416 1 illness. It’s very important to be honest and to keep the information simple. “One way to convey information so that a young child will understand is to talk in terms of sequence of behaviors,” Hill says. “ Young children, especially those under 7, have litUe perception of time, so if you say tomorrow we are going to the hospital, the child m ay not really understand. Instead, it would be better to say that after he goes to bed tonight, he will wake up, have breakfast and go to the hospital.” Also, a child age 2 to 3 should be told about the visit only a couple of days in advance. “Thought at that age tends to be in­ tuitive, pre-logical and m agical,” Hill says. “This means these kids will often fantasize, so you don’t want to give them so much time that they misconstrue the explanation,” Hill says. The 4- to 7-year-old child can be told several days in advance of hospital admission. This allows time for asking and resolving questions. In contrast. Hill says, it’s good to prepare most children over the age of 7 a couple of weeks in advance. That way the older child can get his questions answered and come to terms with his feelings. It also gives him time to plan for hospitalization and to make some individual decisions. Children need to be told specifically what to expect about the hospital itself, and taking the child to visit the hospital prior to admission is often helpful. “TeU the chUd about the people there, that somoe of them w ill have on white or pastel-colored uniform s, and about things like the hospital gowns they m ay need to wear,” she advises. ‘‘If you visit the hospital, show the child all the practical things about him and explain their use. "You m ay say things like ‘this will be your bed, and this is your dresser to put your clothes in, and they have these strange little things (bedpans) for you to use.” Children at various developmental stages are concerned about different things and need different kinds of supports, Hill says. For example, a 2-or^ m à À L Save now on General Electric quallty-bullt major appliances! I N V E N T O R Y C L E A R A N C E General Electric refrigerators... famous for quality for over 5 0 years! Now get a General Electric 15.7 cu. ft. No-Frost at a spe­ cial low price. 15.7 CU. ft. No-Frost refrigerator Big 4.67 cu. ft. freezer section Energy-saver switch helps cut operating cost 3 a(jjustable shelves R olls out o n w heels Regular Price l.ess Sale Discount •489« ♦ 5 Q 0 0 ONLY W /T Mocksville Furniture & Appliance Inc. 2 Court Square Mocksville, W.C. I Phone 634 5812 3-year-old’s m ain concern is separation from his parents, while a 4-year-old is more concerned about bodily harm . Parents m ust be aware of particular concerns like these in order to suc­ cessfully deal with them. By school age, a child has developed a conscience, and Hill (Mints out that this m ay also affect hospital adjustment. “School-age kids will seek approval from their teachers and feel guilty if they think they are falling behind classmates,” Hill says. “Parents should discuss the hospitalization with teachers and reassure the child that his teacher understands. Maybe some of the child’s work can be done at home or in the hospital setting. It’s also important to talk in terms of when the child comes back from the hospital during Uie explanation, she says. This helps reassure Uie child that he really will come home again. H ill says com m on reasons for hospitalizing children are accidents, various infections and surgery. When preparing a child for a proc^u re, relate what wUl be done in very simple, truUi- ful and reassuring terms. “ You m ay tell a chUd who’s going to have his tonsils out that the reason he’s been having so m any sore throats is because of those two litUe lumps caUed tonsUs in the back of his throat. It’s a good idea tp try and show them to a chUd with Uie aid of a mirror. “Then you can say Uiat Uie doctor is going to take them out so Uie sore throats or earaches wUI go away, and he wiU feel better,” HUl says. “Make sure Uie chUd knows that his throat w ill not be cut, any oUier body part operated on or Uiat he hasn’t exaggerated the procedure in his own m ind.” HUl suggests using puppets, dolls, drawings or children’s doctor kits to aid in the explanation. After a parent has explained the hospital visit to a child, he should ask Uie youngster simple quesUons about what wiU happen to make sure he is not confused. “ Y o u ’d be surprised how m any misunderstandings can occur, even when you think you’ve done an exceUent job of preparing Uie chUd,” HiU says. One way to help a child adjust to the hospitalization is to involve him in getting ready. Let the chUd help pack and decide what items he wiU take along. Security items, like a favorite blanket or toy, are very important and a chUd should being them along to make him feel more confortable. "One man’s fault is anotherman's lesson." I-I.G. Bohn PIK-A-PAK KITCHEN ENSEMBLES by Cannon and Revere Large Selection ALUMINUM BAKEWARE and KITCHEN ACCESSORIES Take your choice of: • 1 Kitchen Mitt • 2 Terry Potholders • 2 Terry Dishtowels • 3 Terry Oishclothes • Broiler Pan • Roasting Pan • Sifter • Colander • Springform Bake, • 4-Sided Grater Mold. Freeze Pan Show-thru Pans S U P E R P R IC E Polyester BED PILLOWS Full Sized - 2rx27" Summer’s Eve OISIHISABLE DOUCNE S U P E R P R I C E Unfinislied BAR STOOLS Set of 2 $ ^ 9 7 Large Selection of PLASTIC WEAR»100 l$ 4 9 7 From 4.5 oz. Regular or Herbal Scented S U P E R P R IC E CHEF* FOIL ALUMINUiN WRAP 25 Sq. Ft. Roll S U P E R P R IC E MENS TUBE SOCKS •White with top stripe •S lig h t irregu lars •Sizes 9-15 and 10-13JliOO iUAKER TATE MOTOR OIL 30 wt Regular or Detergent Limit 6 Per Customer s | 9 u 9 6 r O ““!■ P R I C E t Ê m F o r ■ PUREX BLEACH Gal. Plastic Jug 2 J 1 IVORY SOAP Bar Pack4 5 T Priect good thru (Mi ai««k«nd mhll* qusnlllltt Isn. Lowes Shopping Center W ilkesboro Street :00-9:00 Dtily 1:00-6:00 Sun.M ociisville, N.C. 61) DAVlli COl'NTY l-NTI RI’KISI KhCORD, THURSDAY, MARCII 1, I‘>7') ' T h e L a w A n d H u m a n R ig h t s ' D is c u s s e d B y N C S U P h ilo s o p h e r By Ken Love O 1979 NOS No Place for Elephants By William Campbell e 1979 NGS FLEEING fmm drought and Irom poachers who kill them for their ivor>, these elephants in Kenya invaded settled areas. Their presence terrori/.ed rural families and the herds destroyed farm crops. "Last Stand in Eden,” a one-hour National Geonniphic Television Special on stations of the Public Broadcasting Service Sunday evening, Mar. 4, shows how the Kenyan gov­ ernment used a spotter plane, helicopter, and teams of trackers to try moving the animals hack into the for- est-with only limited success. Although shooting an elephant is illegal, a few were killed, probably by angry farmers. The film notes that Rwanda earlier slaughtered its last herds fo protect needed food crops, and suggests the elephants’ days nuiy be numbered.By William Cam pball C 1979 NQS F ilm S h o w s A f r ic a n E le p h a n t s I n D a n g e r O f B e in g W ip e d O u t The African elephant has joined tbe whale as a giant of the anim al kingdom battling for survival. In Kenya, where elephants once thrived in huge numbers, the anim als m ust now com­ pete with the nation’s growing population for living space and food to eat. An upcom ing N ational G eographic TV special examines the remnants of Kenya’s once-great elephant herds and their uncertain future. The program, “Last Stand in E d e n ,” w ill be telecast by stations of the Public Broadcasting Service on Sunday evening, March 4. Kenya’s elephants are not being ignored. In fact, authorities are trying to preserve the nation’s wild anim als. They are a m ajor tourist attraction, and tourism is K enya’s third largest source of foreign exchange. But only about 17 percent of Kenya’s land is suitable for cultivation, and when ravenous elephants invade farm lan d , conflict is inevitable. A six-ton elephant con­ sumes 300 to 500 pounds of vegetation a day. A herd can smash farm fences, and by If you have a child who will be five years old on or before October 16,1979, and you have not registered her or him , please get in touch with the school as soon as possible. The num ber to call is 492-5421 Redland Club A nnounces Events W m . R. Davie School Conducts Survey For Kindergarten W illiam R . Davie School is conducting a survey of children who will be attending IRS Offers Assistance In Different Ways The In te rn al Revenue Service in North Carolina offers assistance to taxpayers in tax return preparation three different ways. Tbe most convenient way is the use of the toll-free telephone number. The state­ wide num ber is 800-622-8800 and is available every week­ day trom 8 a.m . to 4:45 p.m. On occasion, this num ber is monitored to ensure cour­ teous treatment and accurate information to the taxpayer. Another service offered is the self-help method. While the IRS usually does not actually prepare a tax return for a taxpayer, they will assist in completing the return as necessary. If a taxpayer needs one of the 90 different free publications offered by the IRS to aid in preparing his or her return, or a form or schedule, call the 800-241-3860 toll-free number installed this year for forms orders. Regardless of the type of assistance the taxpayer uses, it’s free. tram pling what they do not eat, destroy an entire crop in a single night. The film , produced by the National Geographic Society and PBS station W QED in Pittsburgh with a grant from Gulf Oil Corp., includes one sequence on the fate that can befall elephants forced to compete with farmers for food. It takes place in Rwanda, where by 1975 the growing population had left the anim als no more wilderness for foraging, and the elephants turned to raiding farm crops. To stop them, the nation hired a professional “cropper.” The cam era shows his marksm en standing shoulder to shoulder, emptying their rifles into the m illing herd until only 26 orphaned calves rem ain. T hese-am ong the last elephants in Rwanda- were then tranquilized and moved to a national park. Encroaching setUements and the clearing of forests for timber and farm land are only Mrs. Rhea Potts spent a few days last week in Florida where she visited M r. and Mrs. Joe Foster and M r. and M rs. Hosie C ornatzer in Jacksonville. She also at­ tended the Dog Races one night. Andrea and Melissa Hen­ drix of South C arolina, GREAT GE1ÀWAY SAL£! WAliCOVERINGS L o w e s t p r ic e s e v e r 30% O F F thru March 24 CAUDELL LUMBER CO. 1239 Binghim Street Mockiviile, N. C. Phone 634-2167 The Redland Homemakers Extension Club met with Mrs. Geraldine Pilcher for their February meeting. Mrs. M arian Funderburk, club president, presided. Mrs. Jean West began the meeting by directing group in singing “ A m e ric a " after which the hostess read a poem entitled “God Knows Best” by Helen S. Rice for devotionals. Change in the Area I meeting for M arch to be held at the W illiam R. Davie Fire Dept, was noted for M arch 22 at 7:30 p .m . w ith the Clarksville Coub as hostess. County agents will present a program on “Landscaping- House Plant Selection and C are-Flow er A rrang ing ” . The public is invited to attend. Redland’s regular meeting for M arch will be held at Bethlehem United Methodist C hurch w ith M rs. M itzie Foster >ind Mrs. Nellie Cook sharing their talents in a cake decorating demonstration. The following events were announced; February 15-County Council M eeting follow ed w ith a catered dish lunch and program of Work Committee Group Sessions. F ebruary 27 and 28- Workshops at County Office B uilding on “ Money Management-Making Ends Meet” . Public invited. M arch l-Bus chartered to take Davie County Extension Club members and friends to Southern L iv ing Show in Charlotte. Reservations are requested. Tickets to show available at County Office Building. April 23-27-Davie County Extension Club members are to tour Pennsylvania Dutch C o u n try . R e s e rv a tio n s requested. M rs. T helm a Terrell presented an article prepared by F .J. Wagner, Ext. Human Development Specialist, with excerpts from Today b; entitled Being H urt” . This article explained in depth why we are so often "to u c h e d " by strangers' unexpected actions and yet so invariably hurt by those we love on whom we depend for emotional sur­ vival. When hurta occur we might consider wither we are getting less support from our loved ones than we are en­ tiUed to, or expecUng too much. Mrs. Funderburk reported on the “DeaUt and Dying Sem inar” . Rhe Rev. George Bowman spoke of atUtudes and various steps of grief. Book report« were given and the club voted to purchase the new edition, “ I R em em ber W hen’’ now available at Uie Home Ex­ tension Office, to be presented to the library at Bethlehem United MeUiodist Church. Mrs. Jean West presented a w ell-planned p rogram on “ C urbing the Costs of Everyday Living” . Pointers were given on money leaks in the individual or fam ily’s budget. A plan for idenUfying the leaks and analyzing needs was dem onstrated. Cost cutting habits for everyday living requires study, thought, p lann ing , and discipline. Suggestions were: R educe prices paid for goods and services needed; Reduce am ount of in ­ vestments in goods; Conserve energy costs; Recycle items for fam ily use; Save on medical bUls and medicines; Pay cash as much as possible. In fo rm ativ e sheets were distributed to club members on “Be A BeUer Shopper in Uie Supermarket” prepared by Nancy Hartm an, Home Ecomonics Ext. Agent, and "C u rb in g the Costs of Everyday Living” by Thelma Hinson, Specialist In FamUy Resource Management. M rs. P ilch er served Cherry Y um Y um as her V alentine dessert w ith beverages to the 10 members present. daughters of M r. and Mrs. Jerry Hendrix, spent from Thursday to Monday night with Uieir grandparents Mr. and Mrs. BUl Zim m erm an. ’The children were here while their parents vacationed at HUton Head Island. Steve Tilley, son of M r. and Mrs. Harold TiUey underwent tonsillectom y a t Forsyth Hospital last week. - He is recuperating saUsfactorlly. M r. and Mrs. BiU Stafford of Mt. Airy, Miss Connie Stafford and M rs. M ary Berridge of Rural HaU were Sunday luncheon guests of Mrs. Virginia Cornatzer and M rs. Weentz. Mrs. Alm a Kale of Winston- Salem is still at the home of her son-in-law and daughter Mr. and Mrs. Doug Spry where she is recuperating from recent surgery. On Thursday Mrs. Kale spent the day with Mrs. Grace Spry. During Uie day Mrs. Kale’s sisters visited her at Mrs. Spry’s home. They were Mr. and Mrs. R H .E asle y , M rs. M ildred H ankins and daughter Sandra of Walnut Cove. Mrs. P at Jones, Mrs. Mabel Minor and Mrs. Gladys Jones attended the Southern Living Spring Flow er show in Charlotte Sunday. imeni opeciBiui, wiui ts from Pscyhology by Willard Gaylln “Being Touched and H«nry W. Block “If you don’t know tax laws...you need H&R Block!” W e are in c o m e tax specialists. O u r p reparers a re carefully trained. W e'll p re p are th e form th a t is b e s t fo r y o u b e c a u s e w e w a n t to m a k e s u re y o u p a y th e s m a lle s t le g itim a te tax . A n o th e r re a s o n w h y y o u s h o u ld le t H & R B lo ck d o y o ur ta x e s .. .w h ic h e v e r form y o u u s e , S hort o r lo n g . HftR BLOCK- THE IN C O M E TAX P E O PL E 201 DEPOT ST. MOCKSVILLE. N C. Phona 634 3203 Op«n 0:30 a.m.— 9 p.m. w««ka«yf 8:30-5 Sèi. NO APPOINTMENT NECESSARY ; part of the elephants’ problem. Ivory prices have soared. A tusk may weigh several hundred pounds, and Uiis “white gold” brings up to $45 a pound in illegal markets.Fleeing the guns of poachers as well as drought, some 2,000 elephanta in Kenya recenUy migrated to more settled areas, destroying crops and panicking rural famUies.The fUm shows Kenya’s attempted soluUon: driving Uie herds back to their home range, using ground trackers, a spotter plane, and a helicopter equipped with a siren and loudspeaker.But success was limited, and didn’t last. WiUiin a week, Uie harassed animals started drifUng. back. And as Uie elephants grew accustomed to Uie noise of Uie low-flying helicopter, they stubbornly refused to be moved. By Gloria Jones “ If we believe government Uiat governs leasts governs best, then Uie implementation of hum an rights is taking us on a contrary course,” says a philosopher at NorUi Carolina State University. Or. IredeU Jenkins, visiUng philosopher at NCSU, says that hum an rights become legal rights and their im ­ plementation leads to Uie expansion of governm ent regulation. Jenkins has conducted in- depth studies of Uie law and indiv idu al rights under a grant from the N ational Science FoundaUon. He has written a book on law, order and justice, and now is wriUng another on the law and hum an rights. He also has taught and written about philosophy and Uie law at the University of Alabam a and at Yale and Tulane UnlversiUes. Jenkins believes that tax revolt is a subconscious effort to place limlta on what govern­ ment can do. Jenkins says tax revolts w ould be unlikely if Americans could go back to Uie old values, if individuals could be insUlled with a larger m easure of responsibility, and if famUy, church, school, unions and corporaUons could take over som e of the responsibilities that have been abdicated to govern­ ment. He points out that emphasis on hum an rights implies that individuals are enUUed to benefits or services that someone else has the duty to provide. Government is Uiere to m ake sure they are provided. H um an rights, such as the right to a m inim um income and decent housing, are positive and benehcial. Anyone would be foolish to protest these rights, Jenkins says. “But,” he adds, “I am concerned with the conflict between hum an rights and consUtuUonal rights.” He emphasizes that the ConsUtuUon is protecUve of ind iv id u al rights and restrictive of governm ent. The ConsUtution states what Uie government “shaU not” do to infringe on individual rights, he says. For example, the government “shaU not deny due process of law .” On the other hand, laws dealing wiUi hum an rights expand the role of govern- ment, staUng what govern­ ment “shall do.” The ConstltuUon guaran­ tees the individual’s freedom of choice and opportunity. If hum an rights are to be im ­ plemented, the government has to be able to muster the resources of people and direct Uieir use, thus intruding upon Ihe individual, Jenkins says. “I am concerned that the radical shift in the vision of our society is being ac­ companied by something very important,” he conUnues. “It seems easier for people to move wiUi the Ude, and aUow government institutions to take over Uielr respon- sibiliUes.” In studying cases of law, Jenkins has explored some of Uie problems which arise in Uie conflict of hum an rights wiUi individual rights. An example is privileged ad­ mission, in which universities set aside a certain num ber of places for m inority ad­ missions. This is in direct conflict with the 14th amendment of the C onstitution, w hich guarantees equal protection of the law, he notes. Implementation of hum an rights results in conflicts in society, and in an enormous intrusion of the federal courts into fields which normally come under Uie state, Jenkins conUnues. In addiUon, federal judges who issue court orders dealing with hum an rights often deal in areas in which they lack expertise. This creates dlfflculUes for Uie judges, who m ust spend an inordinate am ount of time on c a s e s - s o m e tim e s m a n y years. It also creates conflicts between federal and state Announcing MCC. institutions, ho says. Jenkins, who has written more than 50 arUcles, many dealing with Uie law, says his prime concern is Uiat people are m ade aw are of the inevitable conflicts which arise out of the im ­ plem entation of hum an rights, and of the manner in which their implementation expands the role of govern­ ment. He concludes that courts intervene and recom m end and implem ent a hum an right because individuals and in- sUtutions have shirked their responsibilities. Union Chapel To Have Bible Study Union Chapel United M ethodist Church w ill sponsor a Bible Study on the Book of Psalms beginning Sunday, March 4 at 7 p.m. EnUUed “The Psalm s in Your I Life,” the Bible study wiU conUnue each Sunday evening during the season of Lent, Uirough April 8. The first meeUng on March 4 will be proceeded by a snack supper at 6 p.m. in Uie Church fellowship hall. All friends and neighbors in the com­ munity are welcome to attend Uie snack supper and each session ot Uie Bible study. Please bring your Bible and come prepared to discover new m eanings from the fascinating Book of Psalms. t'oreign Countries Som e 237,000 ex-service m em bers live in foreign counU-ies and U.S. territorial possessions, 163,000 of Uiem in Puerto Rico and Uie Virein Islands. MCC Mortgage Co. Jerry Mackie 873-3221 (O ut of tow rHC«ll eollect) 302 Buttalo St.(CorMrlndustrlilBlvd.)STATESVILLE, N.C. It took astronauts about three days to get to the moon; at that rate, It would take 878,000 years to reach the closest star, Proxima Centauri. S a le D a y s IN V E N T O R Y C L E A R A N C E ! CRUSHED ICE, CUBES AND COLD WATER, WITHOUT OPENING THE DOOR Model Tff 24 RW I Automatic Ice-maker replaces ice as you use It I Adjustable Porta Bin Door shelves I Adjustable, tempered glass cabinet shelves I Rolls out on wheels I Energy Saver helps cut operating cost No-Frost 23.5 cu ft. Refrigerator witti &57 ca ft freezer Reg. *1289.95 NOW ONLY • 1 0 5 9 ’ ® W/T Mocksville Furniture & Appliance Inc 2 Court Square Mocksville. NC.Phone 634-5812 f . Earthquake Awareness In The Design Of Structures Is Being Encouraged D/WIU COUNTY INTURPRISI RUCORD, THURSDAY, MARCH I, 1Ч7Ч 1 Certificate Of Recognition laker, CLU, President of American Defender LIEdwin C. Baker, CLU, President of American Defender Life Insurance Company (L) presents Alice Ellis of Davie County a certificate of ^ recognition at tlie North Carolina Jaycees Awards Banquet held in ^ Greensboro, Saturday night. Ms. Ellis was recognized for her out­ standing performance In her city and community which led to her nomination as one of North Carolina’s "Five Outstanding Young Women”. This event was sponsorred by American Defender In com- mectlon with the North Carolina Jaycees’ “Five Outstanding Young Men" program. T Scouting News u y Rev. Gerald Carter Scouters of the Uwharrie Council and friends of scouting met at Wesley Jle m o rla l United Methodist Church in jH igh Point on Thursday, February IS for The A nnual R ecognition B anquet. Special recognition was given to all scouters who have given leadership to council level functions. Scoutm aster Jim m y Roberson of Troop 525 received the prestigious SUver R e av e r award for outstanding service to A o u th and the comm unity tlirough Scouting. We add our congratulations and thanks to Jim m y for his con­ tribution to all of us. A number of Boy Scout Trroops and Cub Scout Packs have not re-registered. Let m e encourage your to “get 'em in now ". Help scouting continue to grow in #avie County. A few special events are in the m aking. These events are designed to help all scout leaders to become better equipped to do a good job. The first of these events is a seminar for cub scout leaders. The sem inar will be conducted at Fort Bragg, N.C. M arch 2,3 and 4. Jghy so far away? This event w iii in- ^ d e cubbers from throughout both Carolinas all bringing experiences to share with you. Those who are able to attend this exciting sem inar wiii find it to be of great value. It is SM E time again. The Uwharrie Council is a member agency of United Way and even though the Council is supported, in part, by United Way of Greater High Point, Thomasvllle Area United Fund, Lexington United Way, and Davie County United Way the combined efforts ot these agencies provide only 41 percent of our total support. We thank these agencies for their help and belief in the Boy Scouts of A m erica, but we still need the remaining 59 percent in order to carry out our scouting programs. This brings us to what we call Sustained M em ­ bership Enrollm ent which we hope will provide another 21.5 percent of our support. We turn to scouters and friends of scouting for help. Young Farmers And Ranchers Have M eeting Fertilizer was the topic of the February 22 meeting of the Davie County Young Farm ers and Ranchers held at the Smith Grove Ruritan Building. Von Sprinkle of IM C Com pany presented the film presentation to ap­ proxim ately 40 farm ers from the county. Ronnie Thompson, assistant county agent, was also on hand to present a short program on equipment iden­ tification. By Gloria Jones It couldn’t happen here, but it did in 1886. Raleigh and points west felt the severe shocks of an earthquake that originated 215 miles away In Charleston, S.C. That was 92 years ago when North Carolina was more rural than urban. Now, the population oi the North Carolina and other Southeastern states is increasing rapidly and becoming more urbanized. A North Carolina State University architect who is concerned about tbe structural safety of buildings-not only from earthquakes, but also from hurricanes, floods and other natural disasters~has begun research to in­ vestigate building applications that could m inim ize their effects. Professor John Loss of the NCSU School of Design, Is working under a $29,752 grant from the National Science Foundation to encourage awareness of earthquakes as one of the natural hazards in the Carolinas and to en­ courage proper design of structures. Loss will determine if hurricane and flood construction standards could be applied to construction standards for eartiiquakes and which standards might m inim ize structural dam age for all natural disasters. He has selected two densely populated areas in different regions of the state as test sites. They are the City of Wilmington and New Hanover County and the City of Asheville and Buncombe County. Loss will review state building codes and disaster relief and assistance plans, as well as local codes, ordinances and construction practices. He points out that Charleston, which experiences frequent light quakes, lies on a m ajor fault that extends northwest through South Carolina and into the North Carolina mountains. The Carolinas could be characterized as the seismic risk area of the Southeast, Loss says. But, If m ajor quakes are Infrequent and occur as far away as Charleston, why the concern? The answer lies in the following description Loss gives of the results of a moderate quake, such as m ight occur in the Carolinas: “Everybody runs outdoors. Dam age is negligible In buildings of good design and construction; slight to moderage In well-built structures; and considerable In poorly-built or badly-designed buildings.” How many poorly-built or badly- designed structures is one likely to find In a region where the bast majority of people do not even recognize the ear­ thquake as a potential hazard? Loss says m a jo r problem s could be eliminated if only a tew structures were poorly-designed, and even m in im al building construction standards could minim ize their number. Although the possibility exists that other severe earthquakes could occur in North Carolina, seismic activity Is not associated with the m ajor natural threats to heavily populated cities In the state. Hurricanes, thunderstorms and tornadoes are. While great economic loss and loss of lite does result from the annual 40 to 60 thunderstorms with hail, high winds, lightning and fires set by lightning and flash flooding, building codes often ignore even these natural occurrences. Loss says. In some cases, where good building codes do exist, enforcement does not. In early February, a representative from the National Science Foundation visited NCSU to discuss the Foun­ dation's grant program regarding seismic activity and environmental design and planning. Fred Kringold, the first architect to serve as a program manager for the National Science Foundation, said that NSF grants are available to sm all businesses as well as the academic community. Funding is available for research on siting, design and policy, with emphasis on design and practices to mitigate earthquake danger, he said. BB&T Announces Quarterly Dividend The Board of Directors of Branch Corporation, meeting in Wilson on February 20, 1979, declared a quarterly dividend of $.22 per share payable M arch 15 to shareholders of record M arch 1. This is a $.02 increase over the $.20 per share quarterly dividend declared a year ago, and the dividend will be paid on an increased num ber of outstanding shares as a result of the 10 percent stock dividend which was issued January 15, 1979. Branch Banking and Trust Company, sole subsidiary of Branch Corporation, has an equity capital base in excess of $46 m illion and operates 79 offices In 41 North Carolina cities and towns. Short Course Certificate D. G. Harwood, assistant director of N. C. Agricultural Extension Service, presents certificate for completion of a tobacco short course at N. C. State University to James C. Stanley of Rt. 2, Mocksville. U n c o u n t e d F a r m e r s A n d R a n c h e r s U r g e d T o C o n t a c t C e n s u s B u r e a u Farm or ranch operatoA who have not been counted yet in the 1978 Census of Agriculture still have an opportunity to be included, according to the Bureau of the Census, U,S. Department of Com­ merce. Uncounted operators are urged to write for a farm census report form to (W YC), Bureau of the Census, 1201 East lOth Street, Jeffersonville, Ind. 47132, The census has been underway since January 1, 1979. Bureau officials remind farmers and ranchers that the census will include producers of many commodities not often thought of as agriculture. Among these are rabbits, goats, honey and honey bees, fish in captivity, worms, and ducks, pheasants, q u a il, and pigeons or squab. Greenhouse and such nursery products as sodi mushrooms, greenhouse vegetables, cut flowers, and bulbs are also on the list as farm and ranch products. Any com m ercial producer of these commodities should fill out a census report form. Bureau officials also remind farm operators that the quicker report forms are returned to the Bureau the less it will cost In follow-up work to complete collection of census data. "Man by nature is fond of novelty." Pliny The Elder CROP-HAIL INSURANCE 'QC'! All Types Of Crops TOBACCO ORIENTED PROGRAMS TOBACCO WAREHOUSES A N D C O N T E N T S TOBACCO BARNS Easy Monthly Premium Financing Pro gram 503 Avon Street Mocksville, NC 3RANTLEY-EDWARDS IN SU RAN C E AG ENCY AGENT: DARRELL EDWARDS Use Our Easy Monthly Premium Financing Plans O fJ S S IO /V PIA. *a n c e a ®' P H O iiE " 634-2105 *-- i* |(appa Homemakers Meet With Mis. Turner ”----- ” --------- protei " " ‘ protel body. Clo K a p p a E x t e n s i o n H om em akers Club m et Tuesday, February 13 at the home of Mrs. Jenny Turner. Mrs. M avis Peoples was ..' welcomed as a guest. ^ M r s . Peggy Wtafrey lead W ie singing of Aunt Dinah's Quilting Party, Mrs. Turner read "Someone Cares” by Helen Steiner R ice for devotions. P resident M rs. Joetta Snow, presided over the i Business Session. . Ц Cultural Arts Leader, Mrs, • Заппу Turner, reported on the Г various fund raising activities of the Davie High Band. Fam ily Life Leader, Mrs. Louise Cartner, read an ar­ ticle that said listening not only to children but adults P lelp s strengthen those -. 'relationships. Foods Leader, Mrs. Mae Walker, reported that it is very necessary to the diet to get the proper am ount of protein each day because otein Is not stored in the lothing L eader, M rs. Louise Steelman, told that using O ctagon soap on polyester will remove stains. Safety Leader, M rs. M argaret Shew, reported that a childs ordinary wiiistie can be used to scare off a possible attacker. During the business session nam es w ere draw n for Poilyanna’s. The program on “Curbing the cost of Living” was given by Mrs. Joetta Snow. Each member was asked for their ideas of cutting spending. The meeting was adjourned with the Club Collect. During the social hour Mrs. Turner served Cherrip Salad, surag cookies, V alentine candy and punch. The next meeting will be M arch 6. Mrs. Louise Cartner will be hostess at her home. Mrs. Judy Hartness will have the program on house plants. 7 W V iE 1 ■ III' In the ISOO'i Sam Carter the US. Army and a rear became a major general of in the US. Navy.admiral ALL TYPES OF INSURANCE ^ PERSONAL ’ A H om eow ners T h e r e o r e b r g e r s a b r ie s w e insure. B u t n o n e m o r e i m p o r t o n t . II every cenl ol yout lake-home pay goes toward lood. sheller. and clothing tor the lamily. wilh no surplus al Ihe end o) Ihe week, whal could be more important than protecting yout in­ come? Most ol our health, disability, and life in­ surance goes 10 protect salaries like yours Call us lor the personal allenlion you - and youi financial luture deserve HtpiHtnlInt T h i Tk v iIi i» lr< iutsn ci C om pany •n g III A K ilK iid C o m p tn iM H ir iio /d C on n o e iii Fire Personal A rti­ cles C overage Life Accident/ D is a b ility H ospital Plans M o b ile Home H om eow ners Bonds A u to Estate Planning COMMERCIAL Business Life F ire Speda L Package Discounts G e n e ra l L ia b ility G roup Plans. Com m ercial A uto Life Special Events BRANTLIY- Ш !1Ш с A01IÌTL lELL EDV^OARRILIIDWAROS Use Our Easy M onM y Premium 503 Avon Street Financing PlansMocksviUe. NC riA PHONE634-2105 A t la s t t h e r e ’s s a v in g s a c c o u n t t h a t c o u ld s a v e y o u . Central Carolina Bank’s O n C all Savings allow s you to w rite a check for nxire money than you haveinyour checking account.So you can get nxmey instantly in tim esof emergency. W hen you need it most. There’s no m inim um deposit requiredw ithO n C a ll Savings. Plu s there are no fees u n til it’s used. A nd even then it’s cheaper than an overdraft. To get O n C all Savings just come by any C C B office and sign up for it. A ll you need is a C C B Personal Savings A ccount and a C C B R egularQ ieckingA ccount. Then should you ever need more money than you have in your checking account,we’ll see thattheexactam ountisborrowed from your savings to cover your payment, But don’t worry,you w on’t eat up all your savings.W ith the exclusive Savir^gs Protector, you sim ply select the m inim um bal­ ance you w anttom aintainin your savings account We’ll stop m aking payments whenever that balance is reached. C C B 's O n C all Savings is emergency cash on calLIt could not only save your checking account, it could save you, too. O n G d lS a v i GCEV№llhdp)oufinda^NVmkKf FDiC su DAVII; CCHNn LNTl-RPRISli RITORD. TIIURSDAY, MARCH I, И7‘) Funerals MRS POI.I.Y M YEKS M rs. Nancy P auline “Polly" Myers, 45, of R l. 1, was dead on arrival at Davie County H ospital Saturday morning. The funeral was held Monday at Chestnut Grove United M ethodist Church. Officiating at the rites were Ihe Rev. Larry Staples, and burial was in the church cemetery. Born Jan. 2, 1934, in Davie County, Mrs. Myers was a daughter of W illiam Henry and Mattie Wood Bracken of Rt. 2 Mocksville. She was a former employee of Hanes Corporation. In addition to her parents, survivors include her husb­ and, Bruce Myers; three daughters, M rs. P atricia Snow of C lem m ons, M rs. Norma Naylor of Rt. 6 and Miss Lorie Myers of Rt. 1, both of Mocksville; three sons, Daniel Ray Myers of Rt. 6, and David Bruce and Franklin Dale Myers, both of Rt. 1 Mocksville; a sister, M iss N ella B racken of Mocksville; three brothers, Franklin Bracken of Har­ mony, Paul Bracken of Rt. 1, and Jerry Bracken of Rt. 6, both of Mocksville; and three grandchildren. MRS. M A RY R. LEONARD Mrs. M ary Madeline Rattz Leonard, 59, of Route 15, Lexington, N.C. died Friday, F ebruary 23, at North Carolina Baptist Hospital in W inston-Salem, after a serious illness of six months. She was born in Davie County, January 5,1920, to the late W illie Gray and Lizzie Hartman Rattz. Survivors include one son, Johnny W. Leonard of Rt. 18, L exington; one daughter, Mrs. Don (Carolyn) Wood,- also of Rt. 18, Lexington; a brother B ill R attz of Jacksonville, Florida and a sister, Mrs. Dorothy Gurley of Lexington, N.C. F uneral services were conducted Monday at 2 p.m. at the P iedm ont F uneral Home Chapel in laxington, N.C. Burial was in Reeds Baptist Church cemetery. ROLAND W. LAK EY Roland Winfrey Lakey, 84, of Rt. 2, died Friday morning at Davie County Hospital. The funeral was held Monday at Eaton’s Funeral Home Chapel. Officiating at the rites were the Rev. J.C. Shore and the Rev. George Bowman. Burial was in the F a r m in g to n C o m m u n ity Cemetery. Born Aug. 17, 1894, In Davie County, he was the son of the late Thomas G. and Mary Rebecca Winfrey Lakey. He was a farm er and a retired fertilizer and lumber dealer. Survivors include his wife, Mrs. Bernice McClamrock Lakey; a son, Bobby Lakey of Rt. 2, Mocksville; and two grandchildren. J.W . T IL LE R Jam es Wilson Tiller, 69, of Swainsboro, Ga. died Sunday in Em m anuel County № spltal following a long illn e ^. Graveside services were held at 5 p.m . Monday in the Sw ainsboro City cem etery conducted by the Rev. Frank Terry. Mr. Tiller was bom in Cooleemee on July 14, 1909, a son of the late Christopher C. Tiller and Roxanna Wilson Tiller. He was vice president In charge of production for Argo Mills in Swainsboro and a m em ber of the F irst M ehtodist Church of Swainsboro. Survivors include his wife, R uth H enry T iller; one daughter, Anna Ruth M iller of Long Boat Key, Fla.; three sons, Jam es W . Tiller Jr. of Cocoa Beach, Fla.; Henry C hristopher and W illiam Tiller of Swainsboro; three grandchildren; a brother, E.C. Tiller of Eden; four sisters, Mrs. H.L. Huffman and Mrs. E .E . Gibson of K annapolis, M rs. George Shaver of Salisbury and Mrs. Ralph H illard of Cooleemee. M RS. V IR G IN IA COLE Mrs. Virginia Mills Cole, 55, of Route 7, died this morning in Davie County Hospital after a long illness. The funeral and burial will be held Friday in^eckley, W. V a., b.ul rem ain in g arrangem ents are in ­ complete. Mrs. Cole was born in Raleigh 'County, W. Va., on Sept. 8, 1922, a daughter of Pearlie and Beulah Foley Mills of Route 7, Mocksville. She was a former employee of Blackwelder Manuracturers in Mocksville. Survivors, in addition to her parents, include two daughters, Mrs. Rhonda Cole Oaddock and Miss Cheryln Ann Cole, both of Beckley, W. V a.; one son, Randolph Duane Cole, of the home; two sisters, Mrs. Paul Cole of Coal City, W. Va. and Mrs. J.G . E d­ wards of Cooleemee; two borthers, Jam es W. Mills of Shady Springs, W. Va. and David L. Mills of Black Sheer, G a.; and one grandson. MRS. NANN IE W ILLIAM S M rs. N annie Dyson W illiams, 87, of Route 1, died this morning at her home following a lengthy illness. Thefuneral will beSp.m . on T hursday at South R iver United M ethodist Church conducted by the Rev. Shirley Jones, pastor. Burial will be in the church cemetery. The fam ily will be at the B uncy - Joh nson F u n e ra l Hom e in Statesville on Wednesday night from 7 to 9 p.m. The body will be placed in tlie church 30 minutes before the funeral. Pallbearers will be Junior W illiam s, Jim m y W ooten, Wayne Myers, Larry Allen, T om m y W illiam s, Jim m y Gaither. Lee W illiams and Joey Steele. Born June 12,1891, in Davie County, Mrs. W illiam s was a daughter of the late Robert and Mary Baker Dyson. She was a mem ber of South River United Methodist Church. Her husband, John F. W illiam s, died on Dec. 25, 1965. < Survivors include two sons, Henry and l« o W illiam s, both of Mocksville; six daughters, Mrs. Fred Myers of Clem­ mons, Mrs. Carl Bumgarner of W ilkesboro, M rs. J.B . Wooten of Statesville, Mrs. Fola Murph, Mrs. J. Hughey Gaither and Mrs. Kenneth Steele, all of Rt. 1, Woodleaf; One brother, Jake Dyson of Salisbury; 30 grandchildren; and 22 great-grandchildren. At Advance March 3 The Caswell gospel singing group will appear at the Advance Fire Department at Advancc, March 3rd from 7:30 p.m. until 12 o clock. All other gospel groups In the area are invited to attend and Join in the singing. There is no charge, but an offering will be taken. Refreshments will also be on sale. The public Is Invited to enjoy an evening of special music. Cooleemee Seniors Have Meeting The Cooleem ee Senior Citizens held their meeting Monday in the fellowship hall of the First Baptisi Church Center M eets On C om m unity W atch All interested people in forming a community watch p rogram for the Center C om m unity are urged to attend a meeting on Monday night, March 12, at 7:30 p.m. at the Center Community B uilding. A representative from the Sheriff’s Depart­ ment will be present to assist in organizing the program. If enough interest is shown, proceedings will begin im ­ mediately. Hope to see vou there. __ Evangelistic Sunday The Cooleem ee United M ethodist Church w ill c e le b ra te E v a n g e lis tic Sunday on Sunday, M arch 4, at 7:30 p.m. The H arm ony Four, a gospel froup from Winston- Salem will present a program of special music. The short message will be delivered by the pastor, the Rev. John Edwards. The public is in­ vited. with 48 members and guests attending. The Rev. and Mrs. Lee Whitlock and daughter. Jenny , were am ong the special guests. Mrs. Kate Foster led a discussion on “Snow Time as a Y o u n g ste r" during the program after w hich all m em bers celebrating b ir­ thdays during the month of February were honored in song. Mr. and Mrs. Romie Gregory, who celebrated their 5!ith wedding anniversary on February 27th, were also honored . A covered dish luncheon was served at the conclusion of the meeting. Blue Ridge Lupus Chapter M eets Mar. 4 The regular m onthly meeting of the Blue Ridge Lupus Chapter, Inc. will be held M arch 4, in the Iredelll County Hall of Justice on Water Street, Statesville. The business meeting is scheduled to begin at 3 p.m ., followed by the fund-raising program at 3:30 p.m . This m onth’s speaker w ill be Marlene Warren. Anyone interested is invited to attend. C o Q { s e m e e Mr! and Mrs. Thurman Bowles had their entire fam ily hom e over the weekend. They are: Mr. and Mrs. Norman Bowles and Myra of Wrightsville Beach, Mrs. Ruby Whistnant and Beth of Fincastle, Virginia, Mr. and Mrs. Terry Wilson and daughters, Tonya and Tracy of Llncolnton, Mr. and M rs. A rnold Bowles and fam ily, Mr. and Mrs. Jack Tolbert and Mrs. Laverne Holder all of Davie County. Steven Head of Knot- tingham D rive K annapolis were the Sunday guests of Mr. and Mrs. Jam es W. Head. Mrs. Hulda Nolley returned home Friday from Davie Hospital and is recuperating nicely after having surgery. M rs. E u la H offm an returned home from Johnson County Hospital Saturday and is improving. Mrs. Terry Myers W illiams of Atlanta, Georgia entered Davie Hospital Sunday and is recovering nicely after un­ dergoing surgery on Monday. She is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Myers of North Cooleemee M arshall Thomas Kurfees was named to the Deans list for the fall sem ester at Campbell College tn Buies O eek. M arshall, a senior, is the son of M r. and Mrs. Jack K urfees of 52 Duke St., Cooleemee. Thomas Head, eighth year student of Cooleemee Elementary School, won the school’s annual Spelling Bee Tuesday and will represent the school in the county spelling bee. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Jam es W. Head of Edgewood Circle. The Episcopal Church of the Good Shepherd w ill hold special services each Wed­ nesday evening during the month of M arch beginning Wednesday, M arch 1, at 7 p.m. During these services, special emphasis will be on healing in prayer and preaching. News has been received in the Cooleemee area that the Rev. W .L. Smith, a former pastor of the Cooleemee Church of God, died Monday at Blaisville, Georgia. At L ighthouse "The Brighter Day Quartet" of Stony Point, N.C. feature4il above are left to right: Waltsell Lackey, Edsel Dyson, Betty Combs and Faye Lackey; In front, Helen Dyaon. This group will present an evening of gospel music at the Lighthouse at the Cooleemee Recreation Center, Saturday, March 3, at 7:30 p.m. Jericho-Hardison I Nothing much in the way of news but weather and we are having a variety of that, as everyone knows. This is a good time to get some inside home repairs made and get ready for the spring outside work. The mister and I have been looking through the seed catalogues “anticipating". M r. H ardy Steelm an celebrated a birthday yesterday. The children and grandchildren helped him eat a big dinner. Congratulations M r. Steelman. M r. and M rs. Sm iley Prevette brought her mother home from NorthtiVilkesboro Hospital last week. She has been staying with them a fei|| days but went home S u n d d ^ much improved. Mr. and Mrs. Bill Ratledge and M rs. Bouknite and children visited Mrs. Grace Ratledge. Also her grand­ daughter and husband, Mr. and Mrs. Carlton Nobles w H 0 has recently moved to M id w t^ from Dublin, Ga. SERVICES: JERICHO ^ CHUR(»I OF CHRIST Route 7, Jericho Church Road Phone: 492-5291 Minister-Charles Isenberg Sunday: Bible Study and classes for all ages at 10:00 Morning Worship at 11:00 a.m.Evening Worship at 6:00 p.m.Wednesday Night: Mid-week Bible Study at 7:30 SERMON TOPICS FOR SUNDAY, A.M. "Why N. T. Churches Assembled" P.M. “Separation from the ungodly." FARMINGTON METHODIST CHURCH Worship: 1st Sunday 10 a.m. 3rd Sunday 11 ajn.- Sunday School 1st Sun. 11 a.m. 3.2,4; Sundays 10 a.m. ____ WESLfiVCHAPEL METHODIST ' CHURCB Worftlp: 1st Sun. 11a.m.3rd Sun. 10 a.m. ~ Sunday School 3rd Sun, 11 a.m., 1,2,4, Sundays 10 a.m. NO CREEK PRIMITIVE BATOST CHURCH THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH Cooleemee; The Church of the Good Shepherd: Morning Worship:SllQ a.m., C3iuich School: 10:45a.m.The Rev. WillisJlosenthal, Priest In Charge HUNTSVILLE 'METHODISTCHURCHWORSHIP:2nd Sun. 10 a.m.4th Sun. 11 a.m. THOUGHT FOR THIS WEEK Who worked seven years to earn a wife? ANSWER TO LAST WEEKS: See 1 Sam. 18:27 /S A TIME FOR EVERYTHING . , 3:1, Th> Liyins Bible, Tynd'.l. House M iN U T e s CAUDELL ' LUM BER CO.’ 1238 Bingham Street Mocksville, NC PHONE 634-2167 EATON FUNERALHOM E 328 N. Main Street MocksviUe, NC PHONË 634-2148 MARTIN HARDWARE iC E N E R A L MERCHANDISEFeeds, Dry Goods Groceries, Fertilizer. PHONE 634-2128 DAVIETRACTORt Implement CO. Ford Farmina-Sales fjtd ;Serrice-Uew HoUand'/Equifi Mitbuiy Roiii A Complete PHONE B34-698i( RMMir COBLE LIM E & FERTILIZER SERVICE Cooleemee, NC - Hwy 158 Buiinen Phone 2844354 Home Phone 284-2782 ADVANCE BAPTIST CHURCH CEDAR CREEK BAPTIST CHURCH FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH Rev. George Auman . Sunday School ■ 10 a.m.-Worship Service 11 a.m. MOCKS UNITED METHODIST CHURCH .YADKIN VALLEY BAPTIST CHURCH CHINQUAPIN GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH EDGEWOOD BAPTIST CHURCH SMITH GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH CORNATZER BAPTIST CHURCH FORK BAPTIST CHURCH 6 miles East on Hwy 64i Rev. Yates K. Wilkinson, Pastor, Sunday School 9:45 a.m. Wonhlp Service 11:00 a.m.-Evening' Worship 7:20 p.m. CORnS zERUNITED METHODIST CHURCH UNION CHAPEL UNITED METHODIST CHURCH ELBAVILLE UNmD'METHODIST CHURCHOAK GROVE UNITEDMETHODIST CHURCHCENTER UNITED METHODIST CHURCH SALEM UNITED METHODIST CHURCH LIBERTY UNITED METHODIST CHURCH ADVANCE UNITED METHODIST CHURCI BETHLEHEM UNITED METHODIST CHURCH HARDISON UNITED METHODIST CHURCH TRINITY BABTIST CHURCH, Route 4. MocksviUe, Pastor: Gene Blackburn, Sun­day School-10:00 a.m., Worship Service- 11:00 a.m.. Evening Service-7;00 p.m., Wednesday Service-7 p.m.A.M.E. ZION METHODIST CHURCH~‘ DUUN UNITED METHODIST CHURCH COOLEEMEE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH-Rev. John F. Edwards DUTCHMAN CREEK BAPTIST CHURCH* NORTH MAIN STREET CHURCH OF CHRIST Donald Freeman, Minister, Sunday School 10 a.m.-Worship Service 11 a.m.-Evening Worship Service 7 p.m.-Wed. Service 7;30 FARMINGTON BAPTIST CHURCH LIBERTY WESLEYAN CHURCH Troy C. Vaughn, Pastor MOCKSVILLE WESLEYAN CHURCH . Hospital St., Mocksville, NC Rev. Lindsay Walteri .SundaySchooltf:'4ja.m.Moming Worship 11 a.m.-Evening Worship 7 a.m. BEAR CREEK BAPTIST CHURCH REDLAND PENTECOSTAL HOLINESS CHURCH Rev. Paul C. Ledbetter,Sunday Scho­ol 10 a.m.-Worship 11 a.m.-Llfelinets 6 p.m.-EvangeUstic Service 7 p.m. - Wed. Bible Study 7 p.m. GIVE ME ONE OF EVERYTHING Because the Christian lile has so much to oiler the really alive person, the Bible is designed to respond to your needs as a candy store keeper responds to the request ol the excited child who says, 'Give me one of everything." ATTEND CHURCH THIS WEEK Ocommunitv Adv»rti>in| GREEN MEADOWS BAPTIST CHURCH Rev. David E. Roberts, Sunday School 10 a.m.-Worsliip Service 11 a.m.-B.T.U, 6:30 p.m.-Evening Worship 7:30 p.m. Evening Worship 7:30 p.m.-Prayer Meet ing Wed. 7:30 p.m. CHURCH on GOD, Cooleemee, NC CLEMENT GROVE CHURCH OF GOD I. W. (james. Pastor, Sabbath School 10 a.m.-Worship Service 1 p.m.-Prayer Meeting Wed. 8 p.m. SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST ON MILUNG ROADBarry Mahomey Pastor, Sabbath Scnool Betty’s Florist Flowers For All Occasiong Call 634-3136 If No Answer 284-2629 927 Yadkinville Rd. Mocksville, N.C. COMMUNITY BAPTIST CHURCH Gladstone Road.Sunday School 10 a.m.-Worship Service 11 a.m. HOPE BAPTIST TABERNACLE Norman S. Frye. Pastor, Sunday School 9:45 a.m.-Worsliip Ser^ce 10:45 a.m.-Evangelistic &rvice J:30 p.m.-Wed. Service 7:30 p.m. iiOLY CROSS LUTHERAN CHURCH Sunday School 9:45-Worship 11 a.m.t MOCKSVILLE PENTECOSTAL HOLINESS CHURCH James C. Hodnett, Minister Sunday School 10 A.M.Worship Service 11A.M.Evangellttic Service 7:00 p.m. FamUy Night Wed. 7:30 p.m. MACEDONIA MORAVIAN CHURCH Rev. John Kapp, pastor-Sunday School10 a.m.-Worshlp Service II a.m.-Youth Fellowship 6:30 p.m.-Evening Worship 7:30 p.m. MOIWT OLIVE METHODIST CHURCH Worship: 2nd Sunday 11 a.m., 4th Sun.10 a.m.-Sunday School: 4th Sun. 11 a.m 2,1,3 Sundays 10 a.m. JERICHO CHURCH OF CHRIST Jericho Road, Office: 492-5291 Home: 492-5257, Charles C. Isenberg 7257 ST. FRANQS CATHOLIS MISSION Sundays at 10 a.m. - Sunday obligation fulfilled also at anticipatory mass on Saturdays at 8 p.m.634-2667 or 246-2463 BLAISE BAPTIST CHURCH Rev Jimmy Martin Pastor, Sunday Service 9:50 a.m.-Worship Service 11 a.m.-Sunday Evening 7 p.m.-wed. Evening 7:30 p.m. CHESTNirr GROVE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH BAILEY’S CHAPEL UNITED METHODIST CHURCH FULTON UNITED METHODIST CHURCH BETHEL UNITED METHODIST CHURCH SMITH GROVE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH ZION UNITED METHODIST CHURCH NEW UNION UNITED METHODISTCHURCP EATONS BAPTIST CHURCH Sunday School 10 a.m.-Momlng Worship11 a.m.-Training Union 7 p.m. DAVIE BAPTIST TABERNACLE Rev. T. A. Shoaf, Pastor, On Fork Bixby Rd. Sunday School 9:45 p.m.-Moming Worship 11 a.m.-Evening Worship 7:30 p.m.-Bible Study Wed. 7:30 p.m.-Evening Worship 7 p.m JERUSALEM BAPTIST CHURCH Sunday School 10 a.m.-Worship Service11 a.m.-Evening Worship Service 7 p.m. FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH Cooleemee SHILOH BAPTIST CHURCH TURRENTINE BAPTIST CHURCH CHURCH OF THE LIVING GOD BUby CHUR'CH OF GOD OF PROPHECY Rev. CharUe Talbert. MocksvUle, Rt. 4 (Epheaus) 284-4381 CONCORD UNITED METHODIST CHURCH CLARKESVILLE PENTECOSTAL HOUNESS CHURCH MocksviUe. Route 5, Rev. Albert Gentle Sunday School 10 a.m.-Worship Service 11 a.m.THE EPISCOPAL CHURCHFork, N.C. The Church of the AscensionChurch School 10:00 a.m. Worship &Sermon 11:00 a.m. Prayer Meeting 7:15 p.m. on Wednesdays: Canon C.Nichols, Pastor. W ilkins Hospital Pharm acy Located beside Davie Family Clinic BUl CoUette, R. Ph. Full Prescription Service At Discoun^t №ces 713 Hospital Street 601 Shell Joe Thompson, Owner 7 Days a Week 140 at Hwy. 601 N. MocksviUe, N.C. Phone: 634-3211 CJkSEAFORD 2 LUMBER COMPANY. Jericho Road MocksviUe, NC PHONE 634-5148 J.P . GREEN MILLING CO. INC. Diusy Flour We Ciutom Blend 524 Depot Street Phone 634-2126 FARM & GARDEN SERVICE. INC. 961 YadkinviUe Road PHONE 634-2017 or 634-5964 FOSTER-RAUCH DRUG CO. Lc^wei Shopping Center MockiviUe, NC PHONE 634-2141 DAVIE SUPPLY CO.MARTIN EQUIPMENT ENTERPRISE-RECORD MockfvUle, NC ¿SERVICE 124 South MainPHONE 634-2859 508 D ^ t St. MockavUle, NC PHON¿^634-2082 Mocksville N.C. J.R. C am pbell & Son Specializing in Commercial Building«' Milling Rd.. MockeviUe,-N.C. Phone; 634-534J' JEFFCO CO. J N C . ROUTE 1 - Advance "Our staff and employees encourage you to attend the church of your choice.' SHEFFIELD LUMBER & PALLET COMPANY Route 6 - Do* 153 MockaviUe, NC PHONE 492-5565 DAVIU COUNTY l-.NIhRPKISH RWORD. TMURSDA'» . МЛКС11 I, 1470 OB V «к Social Security ; ; V.. '•»•r.-., 8l' A • Up! iv,? ':й7 65 ii - if ^ e e About 143,269 needy aged, blind, and disabled people in North C arolina received $177,697,000 in supplemental security Income payments in 1978, according lo Robert C. Thom as, social security district manager. Of thal amount $66,080,000 III was paid to aged recipients, $5,306,000 to blind, and $106,311,000 to the disabled, Thomas said. N ationw ide, 4.2 m illio n persons are receiving SSI. Payments totalled 6.4 billion in 1978, including $4.9 billion A in Federal funds and 1.5 "b illio n in State funds. Supplem ental security Incom e is a Federally- administered program that pays m onthly checks to people in financial need who are 65 or older and to people in need at any age who are blind ir disabled. The aid of SSI Is to provide monthly checks so that needy people 65 or older, or blind or disabled, can have a basic cash income-~$189.40 a month for one person, and $284.80 for married couple. ” "N ot every person gets that much In his supplemental security income check every month,” Thomas said. "Some people m ay get less because they have other income. Some get more because they live in ^ S t a t e that adds money to the 4|Federal paym ent.” ■ Supplem ental security income Is not the same as social security, even though the program Is run by the Social Security A d­ ministration. The money for kSSI checks com es from ^general funds of the ■ U.S.Treasury. Scoial security benefits, on the other hand, are paid from contributions of workers, employers, and self- em ployed people. Social security funds are not used for ffil checks.m People who get social "se curity checks can get SSI checks, too, if they are eligible for both. But a person does not have to be eligible for social security to get SSI. If you think you m ay be •j^eligible for SSI, or if you want fkm ore information, call your "n e are st social security office. I thought M edicare in ­ surance was for everyone 65 and older. When m y uncle, ' who just turned 65, applied for It, be was told he’d have to ly a monthly prem ium for ith Medicare hospital am d ' Medicare medical Insurance. I thought there’s no charge for the hospital part. Can your , explain this to me? ' Although everyone who is 65 or older can get Medicare, ou must be eUgible for social Security or railro ad retirement benefits to get the hospital insurance part of M edicare free of charge. Apparently your uncle doesn't have enough credits to be 'eligible for social security or l ^ l r o a d retirement benefits. ^ Iie re fo re , he must also pay a ^ m onthly prem ium for ' M edicare hospital hospital insurance. When I apply for social security retirement benefits at 65, m y wife will only be 63. Ve know that her payments iS m y wife will be reduced . because she’ll be under 65, but vrtll she be able to get ' Medicare? No, only people who are 6S or older, and certain disabled people can get Medicare, ^ v e n though your wife will be (B e ttin g m onthly social 'security checks on your eam ings record at 63, her M edicare protection won’t start until she reaches 05. Although I'll be 65 next year, I ’m not planning to retire for a couple of years. M ow ever, I want to make sure ^ get Medicare insurance. What do I have to do? Three months before you reach 65. you should apply at any social security office, even though you're not going J o take your retirem ent Jk iy m e n ts at that time. If Y o u ’re eligible for social security retirement benefits, your Medicare protection will start at 65. I know that the medical .insurance part of Medicare is voluntary, and that I don’t ^ te v e to take It if I don't want * t . But before I make a decision. I'd like to know what the medical insurance covers that the hospital part of Medicare doesn't cover. M edical insurance helps pay for doctors' services, as f ,ell as outpatient hoipiU i are. outpatient physical therapy and speech pathology services, home health care, and som e other m edical services and supplies that aren't covered by Medicare pital insurance. I have Medicare hospital nd m edical insurance bcKsause I've been getting social security disability payments for the past 3 years. If m y condition improves, will the Medicare insurance be canceled? ^ Your Medicare hospital and M e d ic a l insurance protection will end when you are no longer entitled to monthly disability paymenU. If you're M tU U d that you're nol eligible for further disability checks, your Medicare In­ surance will continue for one month after that time. It seems to me that even though social security benefits have been increased over the years, and a p ­ parently will continue to In­ crease, they can't possibly keep up with the high cost of living. I just can’t see how people are expected to get along on social security benefits. Are there any plans lo solve this problem? The social security law was amended to help cope with the rising cost of livin g by providing built-in automatic increases when the cost of living index rises about 3 percent In a year. But the important point to remember is that social security was never meant to be your sole source of support. That’s why we urge people to add to their social security protection during their working years with savings, private pen­ sions. insurance, or other investm ents. In addition, besides the continuing in­ crease in monthly benefits, the am ount you can earn without losing any of your benefits has been gradually increased so you can add to your social security payments by working a little. My mother, who’s 71, has been living alone and gets m o n th ly s u p p le m e n ta l security income payments. She just took a grandniece in to live with her so she won't be alone. Is this the kind of thing that has to be reported to social security? Yes, any change in living arrangem ents m ust be reported to social security because some changes might affect the am ount of your mother's monthly SSI checks. She should do it as soon as possible so her records can be brought up-to-date. Q. W ill appealing the claim have any effect on any future claim I m ay have With social security? A. Not so long as the subject of the claim was not covered in the prior claim in which you appealed. For example, if you were denied disability benefits and later applied for retirem ent benefits, there would be no effect on your retirement claim . Likewise, if you filed a second disability claim based on a different disabling condition with new medical evidence it would be considered a different claim and would not be affected by the first. Q. I will be eligible for a Federal civil service pension in 1981 but haven’t decided whether I ’ll retire then. If I don’t, does that mean the public pension offset w ill prevent m e from getting w ife's benefits on m y husband's social security record later on? A. As long as you are at least eligible to receive a Federal, State, or local government pension - based on work not covered by social security - before December 1982. then the offset won’t affect you. You need not actually apply before the deadline and can eventually receive the full amount of both benefits. Q. I have a county job not covered by social security and the earliest I can start my pension is 1984. WIU the public pension offset affect m y right to wife’s benefits on my husband’s social security record when I ’m 62? If so, to what extent? A. The offset applies to aU Federal. State, and local government workers whose jobs are not under social security when they retire and who are not eligible for a pension before Decem ber 1982. The amount of any benefit you become poten­ tially eligible for on your husband’s social security record wiil be reduced - dollar for dollar - by the amount of your government pension. Q. I have my social security check deposited directly into my checking account. I'm moving to another Stale next month and want to have my check mailed to me until I can arrange for direct deposit with a bank In my new town. How do I stop direct deposit at my present bank? A. All you have to do to stop direct deposit is notify a social security office. But. try to give social security advance notice. If you close your ac­ count at your financial in­ stitution before social security has been able to record the new m ailing ad­ dress for your checks, the financial organization may return your next check to the Treasury Department. Then, it could take time to reissue your check to the new ad­ dress. Q. I've decided to have direct deposit of my SSI payments. After I fiU out the form at the bank, how long WiU it take before direct deposit starts? A. Direct deposit of your monthly payment will start about 90 days after you submit the direct deposit form to your financial organization, in the m eantim e, you’ll continue to get your check at home. Q. My husband and I have been m arried for 3 years. I have two children by a previous m arriag e . W ould they be eUgible for social security under either their stepfather's or their natural father's social security record or boUi? A. Generally, your children could receive benefits on either father's work, but not both. If both the natural father and the stepfather retired, became disabled, or died the children's benefit would be based on the work record that results in the highest amount. Q. My husband died and my youngest child is over 18. Does this mean he's too old to receive social security benefits? A. If your child Is disabled, or is in school full time, benefits may be payable. See your social security representative. Q. Up untU now, my mother lived alone in an apartment. Because her health is failing, I’ve convinced her to come live wiUi us. How will this affect her SSI payments? A. If an eligible person (or couple) lives In another person's household and receives support and m ain­ tenance In kind from that person, the basic SSI amount Is reduced by one-third. This reduction takes the place of counting the dollar value of the support and maintenance as incom e. Y our m other should notify social security of her change In living arrangements. In March I'm going to work part time doing inventory for a local store. I’m a high school student and have never had a job before. The store manager told me I n < ^ a social security card. How do I get one? You can apply for a social security card at any social security office. You’ll need evidence of age. Identity, and U.S. citizenship or lawful adm ission status. The documents must be originals, not photocopies. It usually takes about 8 weeks to get your card after your ap­ plication has been filed. Since your job starts in March you should apply for your card now. --------How much money can you earn without affecting your social security benefit? It depends on how old you are. In 1979, at age 65 or older you can earn $4,500 without affecting your social security benefite; under age 65. the lim it is $3.480; at age 72. the earnings lim it does not apply. Once you earn over the Umit the check is generally reduced $1 for every $2 in excess earnings. W hat do you mean when you say I don’t have to retire to get Medicare? People age 65 who have worked under social security long enough to qualify for retirement benefiU m ay sign up for M edicare w ithout stopping work. You should be sure to check with your social security office before m aking a decision. SH EEK AUCTION & REALTY CO. PHONE 634-3611 P. 0. Box 903 Mocksvme, NC 27028 NCAL 924 NCRL 40328 Bonded Res. - 704-872-0502 Route 12 StatesÆe, NC 28677 В Larew-Wood-Johnson, Inc. CALL OR SEE Don W ood - H u gh Larew O f f ib 634-5933 Highway 601 South Established Mobile Home Park. 13 mobile homes, 11 acres with pond, nice 2 bedroom hom e, outbuildings. E xcellent op­ portunity. Hickory HUI Nice lot on Pinevalley Rd. Priced at $6.950. Cooleemee ’Two story com m ercial building. 98 x 48. Only $20,000.00. JackB ooeR d. (off Hwy 601 North) - Sm all acreage tracte available. Southwood Acres We are seUing agents for the lots in Southwood Acres, behind Davie County High Schools- Several lots available to fit almost any style house. Let us show you today. Highway 601 North and Fostall Dr. 7 lots for sale, 6.8 mUes north of Interstate 40. Call today for detaUs. BIG TOOL SALE! Sat. Mar. 3 9:00 a.m.-7;30 p.m. Selling Direct From The Mobile Showroom Located At Mocksvilie Shell Station SPECIALS: 5-Speetl Intl. Drill Preii..............................$226.001/2 H.P. Bench Grinders $64.963/4 H.P. Bench Grinders...........................*” $94.9621 Pc. 1/4 & 3/B Dr. Socket Set......»••••••...#.#•#.»#$14.958 Pc. 3/8"Si|. Of. Deep Sockets**".........####•••••• $12.96B Pc. 1/2" Si|. Dr. Deep Sockets Met. or Std.*****......**$16.963/8 Impact Drivers...................................$8.96Stanley Hand Saws................................... $6.96Fuller Claw or Rip Hammers #•••#............##.##....*$5.9610 B.C. Fire Ext. UI*Approved....................•■»•$10.96 Many Other HooU Too Nunieroug To List! Hughey's Tool Co. __________4022 N. Main St. High Point, N.C. 919- B69-8818 H o w a r d R e a lt y & In s u ra n c e NOW LOCATED IN THEIR NEW LOCATION Corner of Lexington Road and Saltabuiy ftrcet 315 Salisbury Street ^ E W U l T l ^ b : W H IT N E V R O A D ^p T it L evei H o m e convenient to schools, churches and shopphig. T hree bedroom s. P /i b ath s. H ving ro om , larg e kitchen-eating are a. L ow er level u nfinished . P erfect for fam ily- p lay ro o m . 100 percent F in a n c in g If you q u alify . C O U N T R Y L IV IN G - L ovely rustic contem porary! ran ch e r. 1 Mi acres of p riv acy . 1500 sq. f e ^ of heated are a. M an y nice features. 2 car g arage. P ra c tic a lly new . C all today. M A IN C H U R C H R O A D - T w o b e d ro o m h o m e situated on tw o w ooded lots perfect for s m a ll fa m ily to reth-em ent hom e. R ecently rem odeled interior an d p ain te d exterior. F ire p lace , u tility . O il fu rnace. P le n ty of p riv a c y . M an y featiu'es a t afford able price . G ood financin g a v a ila b le .______________^ TOT A N D AVON-Very attractiv e , very liv ab le three bedro om ra n c h e r w ith fu ll basem en t located In e x c e lle n t c o n v e n ie n t n e ig h b o rh o o d . M a n y features include c a n '^ 0 dishw asher, firep lace in fa m ily ro o m a n d bSaem ent, IV i bath s u p stairs, 1 bath d ow n stairs, drlve-hi basem en t a n d a larg e w ell lan d scap e d lot. P riced to su it even new lyw eds budget. C a ll T oday. H OV V A RD ~ ST REET -T hree bedroom s, I '^ baths. L arg e w ell-equipped k i'^ 'e n and d in in g . Spacious liv in g room . Sepa.SC^Vnitility and carp o rt. A ll electric. V ery good loan av aila b le . ^ ( ' ilO W A N C O U N T Y -D on’t m iss this one! Three bedroom s. 2 fu ll baths. E x tra larg e fa m ily room . V ery nice kitche n w ith rang e included. C en tral air. This lovely ho m e is situated on 4 </2 acres enhanced * I by com plete o rch ard of ap p le, p lu m , peach and p e ar trees. Also g rap e vines. F iv e m iles from FJber. ' -------------------- N O R T H M A IN ST REET -3 bedroom fra ln e h o m e- P e rfe ct for rem ode lin g . V ery nice fa m ily n e ig h ­ borhood. A p p ro x im ate ly I </‘2 acres included in lot. C onvenient to shopping. P ric e d to sell. 100% F lN A N C lN G - 3 bedroom b rick veneer I'/i baths. L arg e kitchen-dining. L iv in g ro o m . C ity w ater and sew er. A L L electric. N o m oney dow n,I if you qualify. _ H O L ID A Y A C R E S-Lovely 3 bedroom b rick ranch er w ith ce n tra l a ir. A ll electric. O ver 1400 sq, feet of heated area plus garage and p atio . V ery quiet location. N ice lot. H om e in extra good condition w ith m a n y conveniences. C H E R R Y H IL L R D .-Spacious b rick ranch e r w ith full basem ent. C ustom b u ilt w ith m a n y features in clu d in g w a rm in g oven a n d dish w ash e r in kitchen, extra larg e fam ily - din ing room w ith fireplace , separate fo rm a l d in in g , study, or 4th bedroom . 2V2 • I b ath ro o m s. U tility . 2-car g arag e . E x tra large storage shelter. F inishe d basem en t w ith p lay ro o m and drive-in a re a . P riv a te country location w ith I room for g ard e n in g a n d fa m ily l i v i n g .____ 416 F O R E S T LA N E-V ery nice location for 1300 sq. ft. F ra m e ex terior hom e. L iv in g room , kitchen- d in in g c o m b in atio n . 3 bedroom s, b ath . O utside u tility . C arp o rt. Lot ITS x 88. Trees an d paved d rive. G ood starte r h om e w ith p riv acy and in-town conveniences.__ ___________ C R A F T W O O D - No dow n p a y m e n t if you q u a lify . T hree bedroom s, liv in g •’"■кп carp eted, k itchen, d in in g co m b in atio n . F u S O J^ e m e n t. A ll electric. N ice lot. P riced to sell. C R A F T W O O D - A ll electric 3 bedroo m b rick hom e. C arp eted. L a rg e kitchen w ith range. F u ll b a se m p n t w ith d rive in dSQV^xtra nice q u ie t lot on f dead end street. N o dow n p a y m e n t to q u alifie d purch aser. S P L IT L iiV E L - O v e r 1500 so. feet heated are a. A lso a ir conditioned. 3 ' c o l D'"^> liv in g room , large k itchen a n d d in in g a ° ^ , . ,i baths, u tlilty L ow er level finish ed nicely w ith fu-eplace. A ll electric. L arg e lot. P ric e d to sell q uickly . R ID G E M O N T - o ff M illin g K oad. V ery good buy in 3 bedroom , a ll electric hom e. L iving-dining co m ­ bin atio n . K itch e n w ith storage ro o m . C arp o rt. C all today . N o dow n p a y m e n t if you qualify^ C R A F T W O O D - T h re e ^ ' 0 0m s w ith 1'Л b ath ro o m s. A il e le ctr SOLD garden spot, extra large lot. P rice to seli. C R A FT W O O D -3 bedrc"- room, kitchendining. F u ll basement.SOLUort. L arg e lot. Ex- tceiient financing. S O U T H W O O D SCT lE5-№ ce“ Targe c o m e r lot, deeply w ooded. G ood re siden tial section. C ity w ater. C ounty taxes only. H W Y 601 SO U T H -C all today for c o m m e rc ia l lan d a n d buildings im m e d ia te ly a v a ila b le . C all today abo ut business property now a v a ila b le ne ar M ocksvilie. ___________ C IV V F T W O O D - A IR C O N D IT IO N E D - 3 b e d ro o m B rick R a n c h e r. I « L a rg e kitchen- din in g . C arp o rt u tility . R a n t® " igerator.w asher-dryer in clu ded . N o d o wn p a y m e n t if you qualify^____ L A K E W O O D V IL L A G E - V ery neat. 3 bedroom b rick an d sid ing ranch e r. L iv in g ro o m , fa m ily room w ith firep lace . N ice kitchen w ith dishw ashe r. A ir condition u nit. G ood lot w ith trees. P a v e d drive. LO T S * D A N IE L R D - R e sidentlai lot-117 x 200 x 142 x 200. Trees. G ood location. L A N D A C R E A G E T R A C T -A pproxim ately 17 acres. L ake. I^ncludes tw o largreQ\ .Odbig lots hi W oodland S ubdiv isio n . V ery good locaU on. L ak e lots now a v a ila b le at H igh R ock. C all today& 2 acres plus in b e au tiful w oooded residential section. ' P crfe ct for construction site of d re a m hom e. 4.4 acres of 04 E a st an d C edar C reek R d . State R d . No. 183«. P riced to sell. R E N T F O R RENT-3 bedroom b rick ranch er, 2 bathe, den w ith firep lace . V ery nice neighborhood. 1300.00 m o n th . F O R R E N T -O ffice space- ground floor wtUi p riv ate b ath . A pprox . 400 sq. ft. m th good p ark in g - w a te r furnish ed. $200.00 m o nth. Ju lia C . H ow ard O ffice - U34-3538 H om e - «34-3754 M y rtle G rim e s O ffice - 1И4-3538 H om e - «34-5797 (fiiliUAL ШПИНИow iiuiw .'\nii F . W ands O ffice - «34-3538 H um e - Ü34-TJJH C h ariie B row n O ffice • 634-3538 H om e - «34-5230 C .C C h k p m a n O ffice - «34-3538 H om e - «34-2534 I ■ m ■ Ü ^ HOMEFINPER M U L T I P L E L I S T I N Q - S . E R V I C E OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY- З .«! P M C R A F T ^ V O O D ^ e w hom es of ' designs. valiable. a ll carpet. P ric e d from R an ch e rs & S p lit Levp'- L arg e lot« $25.900 t S tV .w i; R ID G E M O N T - N e w hom e .“ ¿c\WG CO.?,'iM i B aths,iftArrC arp o rt. L arg e '¿W S tV - "® percent F in a n c h ig _ A y a ila b le .^\ ,V .t^.. p ay m e n t to q u alifie d b u y ^ r._ _ W IL K E S B O R O H O M E S ST REET -H ouse--------------- & lo t 150x200located in front of D av ie A uto P arts. A d dition al lot 150x100 a d jo in in g property av aila b le - fro n ts on G w yn St. F O S T H A L L D R IV E - N ice 3 B .R . b rick h om e, 2 baths. D en w-fpl., 2 c a r carport. 2 lots, one lot fenced w ith b arn. F A R M IN G T O N - N ew 3 B .R ., 2 B ath hom e b u ilt to sell. L .R . D en w-fpl., heat p u m p , cen tral a ir, 1 acre. N O R T H M A IN ет.-5. B .R . quaU ty b u ilt hom e on b e au tifu l w ooded lot. P a rtia l basem ent. C H E R R Y H IL L RD-3 B .R - fib C T bom e on 7.93 acres. P a rtia l мм пЕП С 0 И 1 Г iJeai, larg e b a m , num erou s out b.VLgs.. SOO ft. paved road frontage. SO U T H M O C K S V IL L E - V ery p riv ate location on q u iet street. N ice b rick hom e located on 4 lots. L .R . w-fpl., glassed-in porch w ith heat, fenced-in back y a rd , larg e g arden space. H om e Is furnished. E x cellent b u y !_________ H IC K O irrH IL L S - V e ry nice 3 B .R ., 2 bath split level. L .R . w-fpl.. full base m e n t, p lay ro o m w-fpl., H O M E S W IT H A C R E A G E 21 A C R E S a n d be au tifu l h o m e hi prestigious area. H om e has L .R . fo rm a l D .R .. 2 fpls., гУг baths, exposed beam s. C all for m ore in fo rm ation. F O S T A L L D R IV E - V ery nice 3 B .R . 2 b ath brick ran ch e r on 1.25 acres. L.R. D en, den w ith fh-eplace in b asem en t. H e at p um p s, central a ir. A d ditio n al lot m a y b e purchased. FARMINGTON-Double wide mobile home with 3 B.R., 2 Bath, beautiful wooded lot of 1.2 acres. Furnished. H W Y . 64 W EST-Very nice 4 B .R ., 2 B ath brick ran ch e r on 11 acres of land. K it. w ith B rk. R m ., D en w-fpl., F o rm a l D .R ., L arge L .R ., glassed-in porch, full base m e n t w-rec. rm .. p atio & carp ort. P rice d to sell! C H ES'T N U T W AY-3 B .R ., 2 B ath Tri-level on a p ­ prox. 2 acres of lan d. L arg e kitchen. F o rm a l D .R ., D en w-fpl. an d rec. b a r, p a rtia l b asem en t & c a r­ p ort. C ounty W ate r! ; L O O P ROAD-2.875 A cres w ith b e au tifu l b rick , 3 B .R . 2 fu ll baths. L .R . w-fpl.. kitche n an d den, fu ll basem en t, larg e carp o rt, heat p u m p , cen^tral a ir, О А Г ^ Т Е Ъ з Т Ш ^ '- У е ^ ^ Л ^ П В Щ I'A ^ I h b ric k veneer hom e i oi land. L .R . D en, large k itchen, g arage. . , A D V A N C E - B e autiful 5 B .R ., SVi B ath ho m e on M , acres ot lan d . L .R . D e n & M aster B .R . w-fpl. F u ll b ase m e n t w-fpl. & p lay ro om . H ouse has 4,175 sq. ft. liv in g area. 5.000 sq. ft. b a rn , 4,000 sq. ft. u tility b idg. plus •^other bldBs. _ " C O M M E R C IA L M A IN STREET-2200 sq. If . store b u ild in g , lot 22x240. ex cellent business location. $34,900. B E A r c r e e k c h u r c h RD.-1800 Sq. ft. buU dbig w ith 400 sq. ft. finished office, b ath , w arehouse. 1.64 acres of lan d. Id e a l for m a in te n an ce facility . A ny r easonable offer w ill be considered. C O O L E E M E E - E x c e lle n t bu sin e ss^ op p o rtu n ity ! M ove rig h t in to ow n business. S inger franchise a v a ila b le , stock and m e rch an dise, com plete for fa b ric shop! W IL K E S B O R O ST.-Good business location, now operated as a grocery store. P ric e includes b u ild in g , a ll e q u ip m en t, except w h at belongs to d airy distrib u to r, a li stock th at Is left a t tim e o f sale to buy er! E X C E L L E N T O P P O R T U N IT Y - C A L L T O D A Y !!!!! 601 SOUTH-18 acrcs of good business property for sale or lease. 601 N O R T H -B usiness lot 150-300, ideal location ne ar 1-40. C ity w ate r and sew er. D E P O T ST R E E T -G ood business lot 141x368. 1-40 & 64 IN T E R S E C T IO N - G o od busm ess location. G ro ce ry & service station w ith ap p rox im ately $2.500 w orth of stock. 3 gas tanks, p riv ate bath roo m inside, com plete kitchen, & one bedroo m . Nine- tenths acre lo t. B E A R C R E E K C A M P G R O U N D -45 cam psites, fish pond, sw im m in g lake on a p p ro x im a te ly 13 acres w ith very nice h om e. R eady to m ove in & operate own business. F A R M S A N D L A N D 601 SO U T H -17.96 A c re s - E x c e lle n t b u s in e s s property. W O O D LA N D -2 acre lot 9ГмЧп&СТ 0 a n d assum e a loan of ap p ro x ’r .u Q t n CyJlJ, o n e r good for a very short tim e . _____ N E A R N E W R E Y N O L D S PLANT- 2 nice acre tracts. $2,000 per acre. N E A R SO U T H Y d g io N T B f tC lR .D a v ie Co.-fll A cres & large UNh ? J 'nouse. $62,000. W O O D R U N - B eautlful wooded lot $7,900.______ P IN E R ID G E R''AD-12.67 acres for 12,700. Por- perty has a lot of paved ro ad frontage. ON 158-Past S m ith G rove School- 14 Acres, b e au tiful hom e site, p a rt open and p a rt wooded " b e a r C R E E K C H U R C H RD.-V ery good location, 10 acres for $10,000. 4.23 acres for $6,250.00. 601 SOUTH -Nice w ooded lot w ith 1.6 acres of lan d . W ith 10 percent dow n, ow ner w ill finance at 9 percent. W iU consider letting buU der b u ild on lot. $5.500. R O C K F O R D -65 A cres in S urry C ounty w ith 2 log tobacco b arns, several creeks & stream s. O nly J 4 9 .0 0 0 .______ H W Y . N O . «4 EAST-46 acres of pasture and w oodland w ith large stream . F O S T E R RD.-99 acre fa rm w ith livab le house. A pprox . 60 acres cleared b alaice w ooded. A pprox. 2,000 ft. p a ved road frontage. _____ IN T E R S E C T IO N 601 & 801-50 acres of lan d w ith house & service station or can be bought as follow s: house & service station w-2 acres of la n d ; house & service station w ith 10 acres of la n d ; 40 acres of lan d (ex cluding house and service s ta tio n ); 1 acre lot next to end on 801 or 601 w-175’ frontaee. N E A R 1-40 & 601-65 Acres id e al for residential dev elop m e nt or for Industry. H E M L O C K STREET -1.6 acrcs eith 220 ft. frontage on S. R a ilw a y .N E A R A D V A N C E -A pprox. 15 acres left a t $1,650 per acre. C O U N T Y L IN E ROAD-221 acres w ith p a through property. 83 acres in one tra c t v aved ro ad w ith lake. C an b’e sold* separately. $850.00 p e r acre O F F 801 N E A R F A R M lN G T O N - L o t No. 3 S tlm M ii P a rk . $4.500. WE BUY EQUITIES m s INFORMATION Manha Edwards HoUand ChaffinPhone 634-2244 Graham Madison Phone 634-5176 E.D. Flowers Phone 492-7761 Phone 634-5186 Eugene Bennett Phone 998-»742 Same Howell Phone 634-5424 Insurance Dept: DarreU Edwards/Phone 634-3889 B R A N T L E Y R E A L T Y 8^ I N S U R A N C E C O . . I N C . 503 Avon Street MocksviUe, NC PHONE:634-2105 725-9291 I 10В DAVIE COUNTY líNTKRPRISU R liC O R D , TH U RSD A Y. M ARCH 1, 1979 Public Notices PUBLIC NOTICE There will be a meeting of the Davie County Board of A djustm ent on M onday, March 5, 1979 al 7:30 P.M . In the Grand Jury Room of the D avie County Courthouse. The following applications for zoning com pliances con­ cerning Special Use Permits to place mobile homes in Residential (R-20) zoned districts have been received by the zoning officer and are scheduled to be heard: A-O.E. Driver submitted an application to place one mobile home on the West side of Hwy. 601 approximately one m ile North of W illiam R. Davie School. The adjoining property owners are Richard E. Pierce, John B. Driver, Lesa G. Driver, R. L. Peoples and D. A. Harris. B - Timothy Young sub­ mitted a request to place one mobile home on the East side of Hwy. 801 approximately .5 of a mile North of Fulton Methodist Church. The ad­ joining property owners are Jerry N. Young and the T. Lester Young Heirs. Signs will be posted on each of the above locations to advertise the public hearing. All parties and interested citizens are invited to attend said public hearing at which time they shall have an op­ portunity to be heard in favor of or in opposition to the foregoing proposed changes. Prior to the hearing, all persons interested may obtain any additional information on these proposals which are in the possession of the Davie County Zoning Enforcement Officer by inquiring at my office in the Courthouse in MocksviUe, N.C. on weekdays between the hours of 8:30 A.M. and 5:00 P.M . or by telephone at 634-3340. Jesse A. Boyce, Jr. Davie County Zoning Officer 2-22-2tnp i l Cornatzer News Ju dy W hittaker is un­ dergoing treatment in Davie County Hospital where she has been a patient for the past two weeks. Mrs. Elm er Day returned home from Davie County Hospital Saturday after un­ dergoing surgery on her leg. M rs. Bobby W inters is scheduled for surgery on Thursday at Medical Park Hospital in Winston-Salem. Rym an Shoaf of Marion, S.C. was a recent weekend guest of Mr. and Mrs. Homer Potts. Eva Potts visited M r. and M rs. A rthur L aird last Saturday. Bessie Jones has been confined to her room for two weeks because of illness. The Cornatzer and Dulin Ladies Auxiliary will meet at the fire station Tuesday, March 6 at 7 o’clock. Marsha Farrar, P.A. will show a film on breast cancer. All m em ­ bers are urged to come and visitors are welcome. M r. and Mrs. Bob Sparks visited and vacationed in Florida last week. While there they attended the race at Daytona and toured Disney World. They visited M r. and Mrs. J.C . Bronson in M iam i, M r. and Mrs. Gene Jones in M elbum , and M r. and Mrs. Loyd Boger in Okeechobee. Ruth Abeeof Hickory was a weekend guest of M r. and Mrs. Jack Jones. Mr. and Mrs. Jam es Shoaf of Marion, S.C. visited Mr. and M rs. W arren D ay recently. M r. and Mrs. Aaron Carter visited their son Rickey in Homestead. Florida recently. ADMINISTRATORS NOTICE NORTH CAROLINA DAVIE COUNTY Having qualified as Ad­ ministrator of the estate of Terry Eugene Spach, deceased, late of D avie County, this is to notify all persons having claim s against said estate to present them to the undersigned on or before the 1 day of August, 1979 or this notice will be pleaded in bar of their recovery. A ll persons in ­ debted to said estate will please m ake im m ediate payment to the undersigned. This the 22nd day of February, 1979. D.W. Spach, Administrator of the estate of Terry Eugene Spach, deceased. Brock and McClamrock Attorneys 3-1 4tn NORTH CAROLINA DAVIE COUNTY Executrix NOTICE H aving q ualified as Executrix of the estate of Otis R. Hoots, deceased, late of Davie County, this is to notify all persons having claims against said estate to present them to the undersigned on or before the 22nd day of August 1979, or this notice will be pleaded in bar of their recovery. All persons in­ debted to said estate will please m ake im m ediate payment to the undersigned. This the 15th day of February, 1979. Faye H. Stroud, Executrix of the estate of Otis R. Hoots, deceased M artin and Van Hoy Attorneys 2-22-4tn Ш NORTH CAROLINA DAVIE COUNTY Administrator NOTICE ' Having qualified as Ad­ ministrator of the estate of R uffus R ich ard Peebles, deceased, late of D avie County, this is to notify all persons having claim s against said estate to present Uiem to the undersigned on or before the 22nd day of August 1979, or this notice will be pleaded in bar of their recovery. All persons In­ debted to said estate will please m ake im m ediate payment to the undersigned. This the 16th day of February, 1979. Madison Peebles, Ad­ ministrator of the estate of Ruffus Richard Peebles, deceased M artin and Van Hoy Attorneys 2-22-4tn Cedar Creek A thought for the day.... Give to others a bit of yourself A thoughtful act, a helpful idea. A work of appreciation A lift over a rough spot A sense of understanding A Umely suggestion. Take something out of your m ind garnish in kindness and out of your heart, and put it into another fellow's mind and heart. Fallow these steps for Higher Christ-like living and thou shalt live abundantly. Kate B. Wilkins Sunday was a wet rainly day. However a good at­ tendance was at Sunday School and worship service here at Cedar Grove Baptist Church. Rev. Hay brought a spiritual message. Mrs. Hay and her sister accompanied him here. M r. and Mrs. Ben West and fam ily of Florida were recent dinner guests of Mr. and Mrs. Allen Transou and Thomas Smith. They called while here at tlie home of M r. and Mrs. Odell Eaton. Sgt. Donald Eaton enjoyed hig visit home here with his family and friends enroute from West Germany where he was stationed in route to California where he is now stationed. Mrs. Perlie Brock has been a shutin for a few days however she is better now and her neighbors are glad to know. Callers Sunday evening at the home of M r. and Mrs. Arthur Scott were their sons and daughters,-ln-laws and children, Mr. and Mrs. Gene Scott and boys of Winston- Salem and M r. and Mrs. George Scott and children- skbnneth Eaton was home for the weekend. Mrs. Lucy Tatum and Mrs. Grace Ridgell enjoyed a fried chicken supper at the Ken­ tucky Fried Chicken Place on 601 Saturday evening. M rs. Lucy T atum and chUdren w o i^ip p ed at the Cedar Grove Baptist Church Sunday night. Some of our sen ior citizens are nut and we pray that our shutins will soon be able to come back to. church very soon. We don’t have but one body and the Lord wants us to be temperate with it. Our deepest sumpathy goes out lo all tbe bereaved families. The Lord knows whats best for us all. Carolina Review Four Corners NOTICE OF PUBLIC H EA RIN G B E FO R E THE BOARD O F COUNTY COM M ISSIONERS FO R THE FOLLOW ING ZONING AM ENDM ENT NOTICE IS H E R E B Y G I­ V E N , of A rticle 20-B of Chapter 153 of the General Status of North Carolina and Section 20 of the Davie County Zoning Ordinance that the Board of County C om ­ missioners of Davie County will hold a public hearing at the Davie County Courthouse, Mocksville, NC on Monday, March 19, 1979 at 7:30 p.m. The foUowing proposed zoning am endm ent to the official zoning m ap of Davie County wUl be considered: (a) M r. Cleo Pruitt has submitted a request to rezone a 4.68 acre tract of land from Residential-Agricultural R-A to Highway Business H-B. This land is located on the North side of Hudson Road being S. R . no. 1123 and is shown as parcel no. 1 of Davie County Tax M ap M-5. The adjoining property owners are L.V. Pruitti Calvin D. S p illm an , Livingston J . P ru itt, Jam e s T. P ru itt, Alfred Coble and J.G . Pruitt. A sign wiU be posted on the above listed location to ad­ vertise the public hearing. All parties and interested citizens are invited to attend said public hearing at which Ume they shaU have an op­ portunity to be heard in favor of or in opposiUon to the foregoing proposed change. Prior to the hearing aU per­ sons interested m ay obtain any additional informaUon on this proposal which is in Uie possession of the D avie County Zoning Enforcement Officer by inquiring at my office , in the Courthouse in Mocksville, NC on weekdays between the hours of 8:30 a.m . and 5:00 p.m . or by telephone at 634-3340. Jesse A. Boyce, Jr. Davie Cqunty Zoning & Planning Officer 3-l-2tn M r. and M rs. G aither M ark land are the proud parents of a baby boy. Mr. and Mrs, Bobby Shelton and children, M r. and Mrs. Tom Anderson and Sandra Shelton were Sunday night supper guests of M r. and Mrs. Joe Shelton. Mr. and Mrs. Jack Parrish Jr . of K ernersville were Saturday night supper guests of M r. and Mrs. Jack Parrish Sr. Mr. and Mrs. Joe White and M ark, M r. and Mrs. Vernon DuU and Tina enjoyed a birUi- day supper at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Joe Carr Harpe Saturday night. Mrs. Terry H am m visited M r. and M rs. C lifford Flem ing and L.S. Shelton, Sr. Sunday. HEW VISIT...Last week’s negaUve reacUon by visiting HEW officials could mean "bad times arising" for the state’s ability to keep federal money in the UNC system. The visitors toured eight different campuses in the state and determined that the black and white facilities were clearly "unequal.” According to the HEW officials, the traditionally black cam puses have inferior libraries, laboratories, and classroom faciliUes. Joe Califano, Secretary of Health, EducaUon and Welfare, (HEW ) has said Uiat if Uie state did not soon eliminate segregaUonist policies and duplication of services, as well as upgrade Uie traditionally black campuses, then he would start court proceedings to cut off all federal funds now being appropriated to the university system. Such a cutoff could mean a loss of up to $90 m illion in the coming year. U N C avoided sim ila r cutoff proceedings a year ago by striking a compromise with Califano and agreeing to study Uie situaUon. After the study, the state was supposed to correct any shortcomings that were found. RecenUy, UNC President, WiUiam Friday, issued a statement questioning Uie need for any great acUon since the completion of the study. . Citing the study just completed by UNC officials, Friday admitted that duplication of services did exist at the black and white campuses but said such duplication was necessary. F riday questioned w hether e linim atio n of certain areas of study al the white schools would strengthen the same areas of study at Uie black schools. A pparently, the H EW officials disagree with Friday. One official called Uie state's behavior in dealing with the H EW “open defiance” while another said that H EW would sUU try to get a negoUated setUement by the M arch 14 court taposed deadline. Should Uie deadline come without a setUement, then the H EW could use its auU iorilylinilefT Itle^I of the 1964 Civil Rights Act to have the federal funds cut off. Fortunately, the state would not be by .lerry МоЫсу caught totally unprepared should the court proceedings take place. State officials and attorneys have reportedly been putting together a substantial court case of their own should the arguments reach the courts. . Either way, the UNC-HEW con- frontaUon is going to be with us for a long Ume to come. And right now, it would seem that the state has the upper hand. Because, in spite of what Uie HEW visitors from Washington have found, Uie fact remains Uiat Uie state is now spending more money per student for black campuses Uian for white cam ­ puses. CRAN E CONTINUED...ApparenUy, preparations to rem ove the giant containerized freight crane from Morehead City port to Uie W ilmington will continue and m ight even take place in the next several weeks. However, opponents of the crane’s removal m ight sUll get Uie last laugh or rather, last crane. Last week, a House bUl sponsored by Rep. Malcolm Fulcher, designed to deep the crane in Morehead, was effecUvely tabled« because keeping the crane in Morehead would require the state to back out of a contract. That contract has already been signed by the state wiUi an independent company to have the crane dismanUed and moved to W ilmington. Breaking Uie contract Uirough state legislaUon would be unconsUtuUonal. Senator Joe Thomas, recognizing the same possible fate for a simUar bUl he was sponsoring in the Senate, offered two very slight amendments to his bill. Instead of arguing to keep the crane in Morehead and break a state contract, he was wiUing to aUow the contracted work to continue~as long as a new crane is built to replace the one removed. The am ended b ill was reported favorably out of the Natural and Economic Resources Committee and is now in the C om m ittee on Ap- propriations-where is m ight possibly emergy unscathed in the closing days of Uie session. Alcohol Information Report By: WILUAMF. WEANT, M.S. ALCOHOLISM EDUCATION CONSULTANT 25 W AYS TO R EFU SE A D R IN K - It’s not a big deal to refuse a drink. Try one of the light-hearted ways coUected from teens across the coun­ try. NO THANKS I feel good enough already. I want a clear head to ap­ preciate you. I ’m on the wagon. Pete can’t stand m e any giddier, I don’t drink. I can get the same effect just taking off my glasses. SO RRY My analyst won’t let me. I never drink on Mondays (Fridays, etc.). I promised m y parents I wouldn’t. It makes me sleepy. I ’m aUergic to alcohol and fresh air. NOT NOW I’m testing m y wUl power. The party’s happy enough as it is. I ’m out for (footbaU) this year. I ’m back-seat driving. I ’ve given it up for (M other’s D ay, Lent, money...fill in your own). I ’D LOVE ONE BUT I get high on grape juice. I ’m counUng calories. I prefer to watch. It irritates m y ulcer. I really don’t Uke the taste. WHAT I ’D R E A LL Y LOVE IS Seven-up straight, please. A Coke. A horse’s neck (any bar­ tender knows it: ginger ale, lemon peel). A litUe water on the rocks for now. Peer pressure is something Uiat aU of us encounter at one Ume or another. In relaUon to drinking, it is a very evident and real provlem, e s ^ ia U y am ong teens, who really strive to belong to or “go along” with a certain group or gang. Giving-in seems to be a sure-fire method of gaining acceptance. Use your head; make your own decisions about alcohol. Many teens are addicted, permanenUy disabled, and even dead because they let som eone else m ake their decision about drinking. (This is the sixty-sixth in a series of articles about “alcohol” provided by BiU Weant, Alcoholism EducaUon Consultant w ith the Tri- County M ental H ealth Complex. These arUcles are designed to create u n ­ derstanding about sensible drinking, alcohol abuse, and alcoholism in our society. If you have a question con­ cerning alcohol that you would like answered in a future column, phone 634- 2195). VFW M eeting V .F .W . w ill have their regular m onthly m eeting, March 13, at 7:30 p.m . at Uie V .F .W . H ut on S anfo rd Avenue. VA Insurance The Veterans A d­ ministration operates one of Uie largest life insurance programs in the world, ad­ ministering some $97 biUion in Ufe insurance policies for 7.9 miUion veterans and mUitary service personnel. Carl Russell To Speak At Shiloh F orm er Mayor- pro-tem Carl H. RusseU of Winston- Salem w ill speak Sunday evening, M arch 4, at 6 o’clock at Shiloh Baptist Church. Also appearing on Uie program wiU be The Gospel Chorus from W inston-Salem State University. This is the Negro Heritage program Uiat has been re­ scheduled because of bad weather. The public is invited to •attend. Bus M inistry Fijm A film on Bus Ministry wlU be shown at Davie BapUst Tabernacle church Saturday, M arch 3, at 7:30 p.m . The pastor, T.A. Shoaf extends an invitaUon to other churches and public as weU to attend Uiis special showing on bus ministry. M ocksville PTA M eeting Cancelled M ocksville E lem entary PTA meeUng is canceUed this month. Thé program that was planned wiU be scheduled for another Ume through another organizaUon. North Davie C om m unity W atch North Davie Community Watch wiU meet Tuesday, March 6, at 7:30 p.m . at Uie W illiam R . D avie F ire Department, Jerusalem W atch Jeru sale m C om m unity Watch meeUng is scheduled for Saturday, M arch 3, at 7:30 p.m. at the Cooleemee gym. All interested persons are urged to attend. SHADY G ROVE The Shady Grove 4-H Club met Tuesday, February 13, 1979, for Uieir regular mon­ thly club meeUng. The meeting was caUed to order by President, Angela Cope. The devoUons were given by Linda Faulkner. We had a craft workshop on m aking flowers out of bread, glue, and food coloring. SHEFFIELD-CALAHALN ’ The Sheffield Calahaln 4-H Club held their regular monthly meeting February 22, 1979 at 7 p.m . at Uie Sheffield-Calahain Com ­ munity BuUding. K athy R e illy , P resident, called the meeUng to order. Steven K eller, Secretary, caUed the roU and read Uie T reasurer’s report. We welcomed three new m em ­ bers ~ Melissa White, Wendy Reavis, and Chad AUcins. Mrs. Pat ReiUy introduced the speaker. JU N IO R LEA D ERS The 4-H Junior Leaders met on Wednesday, February 21, 1979, at 3:30 p.m . in Uie County Office BuUding. The meeUng was caUed to order by president, R ita White. In the order of old business, Uie skiing trip which the group took in January was discussed. Those members of the club who had completed long Ume record books were congratulated for their ef­ forts. The Junior leader Retreat which is to be in March, was discussed and Uiose planning to attend were urged to get Uieir deposits in as soon as possible. As a last order of business,, Uie club discussed a 4-H Bloodmobile Day. The meeUng was then adjourned. I V ■( V 1 < < t 11 !• r, I IK |(‘ 1 и I Qzrkmc 7 6 6 - 9 1 1 4 2 1 и MLS CLEM M ON S VILLAGE J<iIh> и Mb' J..IM li-., I I .. Cyntlii.i r\J, Hobv V. -.t Ji, М.И Kii U lll If.IM U Ы Ш иЛ1ГТ T T - IIIU TAKE A GOOD LOOK Over three acres surrounds this charming farm house. Two fireplaces. Storm windows and doors. Several outbuildings. IDEAL RANCHER Sparkling new Contemporary home In Creekwood. Large Great room with Cathedral celling and brick fireplace. Three bedrooms, deck off dining room. Full drive*ln basement. A must to see. INFLA'nON FIGHTER Priced under $40,000.00. Like new rancher has large living room witli fireplace. Uiree bedrooms, modern kitchen, utility room. Sundeck. Let us show you this home today. ALOT FOR VOU and your family! Spacious rancher features three bedrooms, flreplace In living room. Screened porch. Detached garage apartment for teenagen or extra Income. Good location in Davie County. BALTIMORE ROAD Cottage home with over 1 acre. Adjoining acre available. NEEDED Farms and Land...If you’re thinking of seUing call your Neigbborliood ProTMtlooal Today. 76M777. V№’re the Neighborhood Professionals:“ WHEN VOU HAVE THATSPEOALHOMEiNMIND, WECANHELPYOUnNDIT. Ся^УГт! BOXWOOD REAL ESTATE 333 Salisbury Street 634-5997 W e 'r e t h e N e ig h b o r h o o d P r o f e s s io n a ls " MILLING KUaD-4 BR home with IH baths. Living room, dining room with fireplace, den, recreation room. Fireplace in basement also. Deck and porch. Call today. SPRING ST.-Assumable loan on this very nice 2 BR starter home. Features nice kitchen-dining com­ bination, living room. Newly decorated. NEED A TAX SHELTER? How about a beautuui 18 hole golf course, club house, driving range, and all modern equipment situated on 178 acres ot rolling terrain. Call Dan Correll today. 17 ACRES 4 miles from Mocksville. Convenient to schools, shopping. This ate can be yours today. Old homflOER .^QsTanon potAitlal. Priced to selL___ MILLING ROAD^Qwners ready to sell. Price reduced oh this 3 BR, 1^ bath home. Features kitchen and breakfast room, living room, entrance hall, den w-flreplace. A must to see. CRAFTWOOD-3 BR home w-2^ baths. Living room, dining-kitchen combination, den downstairs and fireplace. Large patio, small deck, basement. Call today. Round House on 3 acre estate. Resort area. Located in Roaring Gap, N.C. Year round living In this 17 room home. Excellent buy. English Tudor house 1 mile off Blue Ridge Park­ way, Roaring Gap. Year round or vacation home. Mountain cottage partly furnished. Resort area in Roaring Gap. Reasonable price. HWY. 158-Thls 3BR, 2 Bath borne offers living room, dining-kitchen combination, large utility room. Fireplace w-heat-o-lator and double garage. Owners ready to sell. GLADSTONE RD.-Come see this 2 BR home with 1 bath, kitchen, living room, and oil heat. Call today! 601 NORTH-1966 Model, 12 x 60 mobile home. Double carport built onto the back. Air condition window unit. Must be moved soon. ____ JERICHO ROAD-3BR rancher. Large recreation room, 2 baths, utility building, 1 ^ acre lot. Priced in low 40's.SHEFFIELD PARK-The owners have loved this basement, and carpet. Paved drive. Just minutes from town.COOLEEMEE-This 3BR home ha« ’ baths, kitchen- breakfast rooi»„tMm'tí CONTRACT living room. Situated on 3.i,W ^oriknd. CROSS STREET-Recently remodeled 3BR home. Living room, family room, and new roofing. Let us show you the rest. GARDEN VALLEY-This cu«t»»n built home features ""«cfiPALLY REDUCED n, living room, basemenP^v^Bw, un neating and central air conditioning. Possession immediately. $84,900 CRAFTWOOD-Save nearly <1000 In closing costs Dy assuming the loan on this home. Dining-kitchen combination, Vé baths, workshop, and paved drive. Just minutes from town. HICKORY HILL-All the modern conveniences. 4BRs, 3 baths,,"“ ¿ pn'iuTRACT •'ecreatlon room, living aíJN^„CpNTRAU¿jj^gg overlooking 90 acre lake. Ownw ^Ires to sell. OFY' 601 SOUTH-Thls 2 BR home features kitchen- breakfast room combination, den, l bath. Carpet and vinyl floors. 2 car garage w-gravel drive. CaU today. ____ GLADSTONE ROAD-SBRs with freestanding fireplace In den, 2 full baths, carpeted and tiled floors. Electric furnace and air condition. Priced .to selL__________ ___ CAÑA ROAD-Lovely 3 BR, 2 bath home. Carpet and vinyl floors, living room, dining-kitchen combination, den. Do yourself a favor by making aii appointment to see this home. DAVIE ACADEMY ROAD-Rancher with 4 BRs, IVi baths, living and dining room. Central air con­ ditioning and oil forced heat. Beautiiul country setting. GREENWOOD LAKES-New home now under construction. This rustic farmhouse features 3 BR, ZVt baths, a great room with fireplace, and a 2 car garage all situated on 1.2 acres. Call now and finish the interior to fit your taste. HOME & 6.18 ACRES of land Just off 601 South. This property features a 2 car garage, living room with fireplace, 2 BR, greenhouse, and a bam. Ideal for the small farmer or someone Just looking for elbow room. Call today for more details. CRAFTWOOD-Thls 3BR;R^p features I'A baths, full basemenij|iiD£R CONTHAl«'j ¿own payment If all qualiflcat.».!» are met. PINE RIDGE RÓAD-2>/i yr. old home situated on pproxlmately 2 acres. Features great room, lining room, kitohen, 3 BRs, forced air heat and air Deck and screened in porch.Just for a I chickens. conditioning, beautiful. DAVIE CO.-Chicken house commercial egg business. Cwacli Situated on approx. 76Mi Fen quarters located on property acres w-brick home available. LAND FOR SALE OFF SANFORD ROAD-2.11 acres. Owner ready to sell. OAKLAND Heights-2 buUding lots. fully equipped , city W,4bO chi fenced areas. Livln|also. Additional VIRGINIA-‘4^ acres of commercial property. 1 mUe out of Galax. Real buy^ •ApproiHmately l acre located off Cana Road Priced to leU. __ Approximately 45 acres off Hwy. 801 across from Needmore Road. Priced to seU. Lot located on Lake Norman. Approximately 1 acre. Priced to sell._______________ We buy. seU, trade, and build. DANNY CORRELL • MANAGING BROKER Associate Broker Sbeiia OUver 492-5512 Louise Frost Daigle Associate Broker Phone 634-2846 Salesman Dick NaU Home 634-5462 Associate Broker Charles Evans office 284-2537 Office Manager Sandra Shelton E a c h o fflc * In cto p e n d e n tly o w n e d a n d o p e r a te d .CENTURY 21* Castle Hunting Ixochuie al patticipaling olfices 4-1976 CEN TU RV r e a l e s ta te CO RPO RATIO N • P R llJIE D IN U S A • e q u a l h o u s in g O P P O R T Jt.lK• iCI-NSfD »KACX MAH» 'Jl i'hlK. fS?A'£ I DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, THURSDAY, MARCH I, 1479 IIB Pets and Livestock Commercial e i A S s m p A P S ^ P O O D L E G room ing...A ll '▼ Breeds. 6 years experience. Contact: M ary Johnson at 492- 5192. 2-8-4tnpJ LOST: 2 Fem ale Blanket- back beagles...near Sugar V alley A irport, Thursday lU night. Collffta but no name. “ Please call: Charles Neese at 998-3770 If found. 2-22 anpN FO U N D: Black Poodle-Male. For Information call: 998- 8283. ^ 3 - 1 ItnpH “ LOST: Brow n and w hite pointer dog,' scar oir back. Lost in area of Sanford Road. Call: 634-3253. Reward of­ fered. 3-1 itnpJ Help Wanted E A R N E x tra incom e by wearing and selling Sarah Coventry Jew elry . F R E E T rain ing. T ransportation necessary. Call 998-4925 or 998-4832. 8-10 tfnH STEP INTO THE exciting world of nuclear security for a c h a lle n g in g c a r e e r . ^ W H E R E ; Lake N orm an •P.. area. If you have a clean police record, high school dip lom a, G E D equivalent. Southern Security wanU you. Starting pay 13.75 per hour with periodic Increase. 14.82 within one year. Apply in ^ p e r s o n to; 500 E ast “ Moorehead Street, Atlantic Building, Suite 316, Charlotte, N.C. (E O E ) 11-16 tfnSC W ANTED; A beauty operator at M ayfair Beauty Shop in Mocksville. To apply: call- 't|634-2022 or 634-3143. 1-25 tfnM ADD RESSERS - STUFFERS CSO - *250 weekly possible w orking a t hom e. Free details, rush self addressed ' stamped envelope: National, ^ Dept. 1722-C P . 0 . Box 8520, '^P e m b ro k e Pines, Fla. 33024. 2-15 4tp H O M EM AKERS CHOOSE Y O U R H O U R S...E am $5-»6 per hour. Have fun and meet people teaching hobby crafts. ^ N o experience necessary. W Advancement opportunities. CaU (704) 634-5282 between 9 a.m . and 6 p.m. 3-1 2tpH H E L P W A N T ED : E x ­ perienced w hite goods technician needed, 35 year old ^ firm , com pany truck, ^ benefiU, salary plus com­ mission. Elm ore’s T.V. & Appliance, 200 East Front Street, Statesville. Call: 873- 3959. 3-1 2tnpB AT O N C E ...R e liab le firm needs five homemakers to ^ w o r k part-tim e 15 hours, "a p p ro x im a te ly »75.00. Ideal for young mothers. See Mrs. Jarvis at Em ploym ent office Friday, M arch 2, from 10 a.m . until 1 p.m . No phone calls, please! 3-1 itp J #H B L P W A N T E D : M ature adult for light housework and child care...2-3 days week from 8 a.m . until 2 p.m . Call: 998-5068 before 7 p.m. 3-1 itnpF N E E D E X P E R IE N C E D M ETAL MAN. Apply 8:00 to 12:00 noon, Monday through F riday at CAROLINA HOM ES. Hwy. 52 8, Rockwell, N.C. 3-1 ItnCH O PEN IN G SUITABLE for a reliable retired person doing Janitorial service part-time. ^ C a U : (704) 634-5991 Ext. 13; ▼ after 5 p.m . (919) 998^202. E .O .E . 3-1 ItnpW D R IV E R W ANTED: SmaU ICC specialized carrier needs q u alifie d personnel w ith experience. Good op- lity. Apply in person to BuUders Transport, 181 , Winston- ^ portunii ^ R o a d B FayettevUle Street Salem, N.C. 3-1 ItnpR Situationi Wanted W ILL keep chUdren in my home on Davie Academy Road. All ages accepted. C all: aM-2742. 2-8 tfnB D E PE N D A B LE chUd care in I m y home. Redland Road near creekwood. Convenient to 801 and 1S8.105.00 week includes 1 m eal and snack. CaU 996-5730 anytime. 3-1 itnpR NEW AND USED O FFIC E furniture, fireproof fUes and safes. R O W A N O F F IC E FU RN IT U RE, 118 N. Main Street, Salisbury, phone 636- 8022. tfnR Home FO R SALE: All types un­ finished chairs, stools, of aU sizes-upholstered, swivels, deacon benches, aU kinds used furniture. CaU W. A. Ellis at 634-5227. 4-13 tfnE FO R SALE: 36” Magic Chef stove with timer. $75.00. In good condition, Medit- teranean bedroom suite witb triple dresser, 4-drawer chest, night stand mattress and box springs in pecan finish, »400.00. CaU: 634-3461. 3-1 itpH MISCELLANEOUS F O R SA LE ... Custom fram es...any size...expert w o rk m a n s h ip ...o v e r 35 samples on display...see at C A U D E L L L U M B E R C O M PA N Y . 1238 B ingham Street. MocksvUle, Phone 634- 2167. 4-24 tfnC W ILL B U Y diamonds and gold. Don’s Music Center, 124 N orth M ain Street, MocksvUle, N.C. Phone 634- 3822. 11-23 tfnD APPLIA N CE SERV ICES Co. Inc, 998-2480, P arts and Service. New on Hwy. 64 East ■ next to Fork Fire Dept. Store hours 4 p.m . - 6 p.m . Mon., Tues., Thurs., and F ri. 8:30 a.m.-12 a.m . on Saturday. 24 hour answering service. 2-1 tfnAS R E A V IS M U SIC C E N ­ T E R ...g u ita r s , b a n jo s , mandolins, base, am ps, and all accessories for sale. In ­ strum ent repairs, piano tuning and repairs; also guitar and banjo lessons. Open from 12 noon until 9 p.m . Tuesday through Saturday. Call: 492-7302 or 492-7359. 2-8 8tnpR- NOW you can make clothes that reaUy fit! Patterns made to your indiv idual measurements. CaU: 998-3365 after 4 p.m . Farm ington area. 2-22 4tnpH W A N T ED : O ld M uzzle Loading Rifle with Patchbox. Any condition. W ill pay $1000.00 cash or more. CaU before you seU. 1-919-576-9451. Or write P.O. Box 528, Troy N.C. 27371. 3-1 tfn C W ANTED: Silver coins...aU denom inations...1964 and earUer. $3.50 to $4.00 per doUar face. Must be in good condition. CaU Jack Sanford at day-634-2851. night-634- 2415. 3-1 5tnpS TO WHOM IT M AY CON­ CERN : Hubert H. CranfiU and wife, Lois O anfU l of Route 1, Salisbury, N.C. are NOT divorced, there has been no change of address made and no separation papers signed and NO settlement made what-so-ever. 3-1 2tnpC FO R SALE; Good H ay...$1.00 per bale. Other hay for less. Telephone; 998-3106. 3-1 ItpH IZ Z Z Z Z Z iZ Z Z Z iZ Z Z T t WANTED Livestock A. L Beck & Son Wholesale Meats Thomasville, N.C. W ILL BUY 1 or 100 ' COW S..,alw. Bulli, Veali, FM deri, Cilvet. ...Wa Pay Caih For All CsttlaW han Picked Up. WE WILL Pick up • Kill • ProcMi Vour Locker Betf A. L. Beck, Jr. Rt.l, Thomasville, N.Cj Call Collect Anytim e Wlnston'Selem or 788-7524 Phone After 6:00 P.M. Early A.M . (8Ì9)476<«e8S n i i i M B f n i m H PERSONALS Cards of Thanks PROPERTY Acreage RENTALS ApartmenU SERVICES Automotive SERVICES Plumbing VEHICLES Automobiles BROW N Monday, February 5. fire com pletely destroyed our m obile hom e. F or every kindness and deed extended, I would lUce to express our heartfelt thanks and ap ­ preciation to the people of D avie County. The food, cloOilng and gifts of money have helped us so very much. May Gcid continue to bless each one of you is our prayer. Bobby Brown and son 3-1 itpB ROBERTSON We would like to express our appreciation and many thanks to everyone in Davie County who came to our aid in time of need. A very special thanks to a ll neighbors, friends, maUman and m er­ chants who donated so kincUy. May God richly bless each of you. Johnny and Brenda Robertson 3-1 itp R DAVIS I want to thank everyone for cards, flowers and food for m y fam ily and me whUe I was in the hospital and con­ valescing at home. A thank you to the doctors, nurses and aU of those at staUon 3 for aU shifts for their m any kind deeds and words. M any thanks to the ladies In the kitchen for my birthday cake. Thank you neighbors, for caUs, food and visits and most of aU for prayers. M y stay at the hospital was m ade even more pleasant by kindnesses shown by those who helped in anyway with the sick at the hospital. Bert Davis 3-1 ItpD FO R SALE: 3.88 acres land off 601 on Rlverdale Road just outside Cooleemee. Has septic tank and water. $1800 per acre. CaU John Young 284- 2S02. 3-1 ItpY Homes AIR WELL DRILLING CO. Route 9, Box 127 StatesviUe, N.C. 28677 Phone 872-7614 Advance; N.C. Phone 998-4141 'To teach il to learn twice." Joseph Joubert FO R SALE...Three bedroom fram e house with 5.6 acres ot land. Several storage buildings, $15,000. A p­ proximately tw a mUes from MocksviUe. CaU 634-5640. 11-19 tfnS FO R SALE...House and 11.33 acres on County Line Road near N.S. 901. Lizzie Gaither hom eplace. $17,500.00. See WiUiam E . HaU, MocksviUe, N.C. Phone: 634-5214. 2-22 4tnpH Mobile Homes Now~available at Bonanza MobUe Homes...VA Finan­ cing on aU new homes up to $35.000...low down payment. Contact BONANZA M O BILE H O M ES, 722 W ilkesboro Street, M ocksville, N.C. Phone 634-5959. 10-26 tfnB F O R SA LE...2 MobUe homes, ’69 and '76 models. New 3 ton central air system. Phone: 634-3l48after 6 p.m . or before 634-3596 2/I5/4tpS F O R S A L E ...12 x 70, 2 bedroom mobUe home, fully furnished, 2 baths, central air, oil heat and blocks for setting up. CaU; 634-2239 after 5:00 p.m. 2-22 tfnY ____ FO R SALE: 12 x 65 2 bedroom mobUe home, 2 baths. Blocks, 2 sets of steps, oil drum and stand window air condiUon and a Leonard out buUding. Very clean. Call Betty Godbey at 919-787-4804. 3-1 ItpG F O R R E N T ; Crestview Apartmente, U.S. 64 East. A nice 3-room apartment with paUo and bath for adults. Call: 634-5420. 2-8 4tnpG Mobile Homes T R A IL E R SPA C ES F O R RENT...W ater and garbage pickup furnished. CaU 634- 2105. 10-26 tfnW B O B ’S AUTO S E R ­ V IC E ...A u to m a tic tr a n ­ sm ission, radiato r and general auto repairs. 10 a.m . + 8 p.m . Monday-Friday. 10 a.m . + 2 p.m . Saturdays. CaU: 998-4005. Mocks Church Road, Advance, N.C. 1-4 tfnB SO U T H E R N A utom otive Creations offers m ajor, minor body repairs, clean-up service and F R E E esU m ates. Located at corner of Hwy. 64 and Cornatzer Road. Call; Rooms 1-4 tfnS ROCIMS FO R RENT...Apply at Don’s Jewelry and Music C enter...124 N orth M ain Street, M ocksviiie, N.C. Phone: 634-3822. 1-11 tfnD Carpet Cleaning SALES Give your old CARPET a new lease on Ufe with the do it yourself steam cleaner ... rinse and vac from DAVIE S U P P L Y C O M P A N Y . 634- 2859. tfnD PBUM BING ++ Call Mike Whitaker after 5 p.m. at 634- 2789, License number 6988-P. New instaUation and repair work. 2-15 BtnW Septic Tenk SEPTIC TANK CLEANING S E R V IC E ... certified to pum p septic tanks ... large truck for full time, efficient service ... also rent sanitary toUets ... caU 284-4362, Robert Page, Cooleemee. 4-24 tfnP SEPTIC TANK CLEANING If your Septic Tank hasn’t been pumped within Uie last 5 years, it probably needs CLEANING, CaU 998-3770 tor fast, efficient service. N E E S E ’S SE P T IC TANK SERVICE. 10-26 tfnN Yard Electrical Tax H A N N A H ’S Y A R D SA LE Everyday...at the TRADING POST, 2 m iles west of MocksvUle, Hwy. 64. Good Used Cars and Trucks at GOOD prices. Open from 9 a.m . untU 9 p.m . CaU 634-5735. 10-5 tfnH For fast and efficient service on aU electrical needs, large or smaU, caU Karl Osborne, owner of O SB O R N E ELECT RIC COM PANY 634- 3398 520 East Maple Avenue, MocksviUe. 5-11 tfnO Garbage Pick Up IN PIC T U R E S A seventh of earth's land surface is dry desert. Heeeeeeeeere^ Ed McMahon demonstrating the easy care of Mannington Mills’ resilient sheet flooring. Mr. McMahon is Mannington’s star spokes­person for 1979. He will be featured in all their radio, tele­vision and print campaigns. “Where There's Smoke, There's Fire"... Not Necessarily!! Introdiiciiiii the “Black Bart” wood and coal heatinji systi’in l'riu ““Black B ait” system is so tastefully desij^ned and efficiently affordable you m ifiht think it’s a stove... IT ’S NOT! “Black Bart” Models available for existing fireplace setting and/or contenijjo- rary free standiniii models. Don’t wait until winter to find out the difference “Black Bart” can make in peiformance and savings. PRICED AS LOW AS.... $4 4 9 0 0 BOXWOOD REAL ESTATE 333 Salisbury Street Mocksville, N.C. 27028 OPEN DAILY FROM 9:00 A.M. UNTIL 5:00 P.M. EXCEPT ON SUNDAYS Black Bart FO R W E E K L Y garbage pick­ up anyw here in D avie C o u n t y .. . c a l l B E C K B R O T H E R S G A R B A G E DISPOSAL SERV IC E, 284- 2917 or 284-2823 Cooleemee, or County M an ag er’s Office, MocksviUe. 6-12 tfnB Home Repairs & Painting W ILL DO aU types of home im provem ent work, room addiU ons, siding, storm windows and doors. CaU 284- 2045 after 5 p.m. 12-28 tfnS PAINTING, home repairs, smaU or large jobs. For free esUmates caU Jam es MiUer at 998-8340. 12-28 tfnM LET US H E LP YOU get ready for spring...W e can paint the interior of your home now. Just caU: 634-5750. Prices reasonable. 2 - 2 2 ^ t n g M ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ INCOM E TAX SERV ICE ... See Peggy Joyner for your incom e tax service, fast, efficient and confidential. Rates reasonable. Have had 9 years of experience. Monday - Friday from 9 a.m . untU 9 p.m .. Sat. from 9 to 5 p.m. Phone 492-5559. R t. 1, M ocksville, (G reen Hill- Prison Cam p Rd.) Assisted by Sue Gobble. 2-15 tfnJ INCOME TAXES P R E P A R E D ... .Reasonable rates. CaU: Gene Hendrix at 998-5845. 3-1 StnpH Upholstery O F FE R IN G you Uie finest in custom upholstery...Large selection of QuaUty Fabric and vinyls. Free Estimates. Quick, efficient service. CaU J. T. SMITH FU RN IT U RE CO., INC. 492-T780. Located 10 miles west of MocksvUle on Sheffield R oad. 30 years experience. 1-18 tfnS Wall Covering F O R S A L E ; 1972 P into, R unabout 4-speed. Only $500.00 CaU; (704 ) 492-7716. 3-1 4tpT F O R S A L E ...'68 T rium ph Bonneville 650 chopped motor rebuilt 2 years ago, header pipes, new paint, battery, lights, wiring and much more. CaU; 634-5282. 3-1 ItpH Camper FO R SALE ... Ten and half ft. Cab over cam per Wolverine. CaU 998-3092. 2-15 4tpB Motorcycle & Painting FO R SALE...19T7 Yam aha 100 motorcycle. Bought new in 1978, low mileage, overaU exceUent condition. (^11 634- 5415 after 3:30 p.m. 2-22 tfnK CUSTOM P A IN ­ T IN G ...C om plete custom painting...Motorcycle tank and side covers from $75.00. Glass finish over professional air-brushing. Van scenes from $100.00. McBride 634- 5193. 3-1 4tnpM Tractors FO R SALE...Tractor Ford 601 Workmaster...New paint, live power, 5-speed in good con­ ation with cqlUvator. Call: (919) 874-2492. 3-1 ItnpS Trucks FO R SALE: 1978 Ford pickup F-150, 351 engine, automatic transmission, 30,000 mUes. In good condition. CaU; 998-3585. 3-1 2tpC Some people claimed to have had the "great” idea of developing a dimple device in 1896. They said it could produce dimples on any part of the body and maintain and nurture those already there. A V O N Representatives Never Looked So Good. Y ou w ill too. selling w orld la m o u s p ro ­ ducts Flexible hours H igh earnings Audrey Pott» 998-8448 Ethel Richardson 634-3854 Peegy Church 634-3826 Filth Harris 998-5389 Old walls need a new face.. See complete selecUon of newest w all coverings at DA V IE SU PPLY COM PANY at 634-2859. 3-25 tfnD "When people hear good music, it makes them home­sick for something they never had, and never will have."E. W. Howe OFFICE MACHINES Typewriters Adding Machines Service On All Makes Earle’s )FFICE SU PPLIES Dial 636-2341 Salisbury, N.C. Kessler’s Furniture & Upholstery (Formerly Joe’s Upholstery) OPEN DAILY Mon. - Sat. — 9:00 - 5:30 •Free Estimates > *Wide Variety of Samples ^ *Presented in Homes * 'Financing Available Phone: 284-2512 Cooleemee P r id e M a r k R o o f in g C o . Tear Off - Wood Shingles - Composition FREE ESTIMATES ASK ABOUT OUR GUARANTEE MIKE PERKINS AdvancePhone 998-5040. DOUG COLBERT Mocksville Phona 634-3981 FOR SALE Truck Accessories for Sale for 2wd and 4wd Trucks. Chrome and Aluminium Running Boards. Grill & Brush Guards Chrome Ralls Winches M X J IE THESE INSTALLED Call 998-4428 After 6 PM ^777777777777777777T777TlTTTS!TSTSST!!!TSTTSSST^TFfTT7 i NOWINSTOCKI! Wtd« AMortmenf of• I • Fruit Trees & Pecan Trees READY FOR SPRING PLANTING! MURPHY'SNURSEW I Six Miles Outside Mocksville On Hwy. 601 North i PHONE 492-5414 NOTICE WANTED TO BUY LIVESTOCK Beef cattle, hogs, veals, feeder cattle, I have an order for all types of cattle. or WIII pay market price for • 'i c k , r i g r - aymant check or cash, which everfarm. Payment InriiChe.you perfer. PROMPT PICK UP SERVICE I will buy one head or a whole herd. Give me e calllll FredO. Ellis Livestock & Auctioneering Rt. 4, MockiviUe, N.C. 634 5227 or 998-8744 Lifelong resident pf Oavie к i:n DAVII-: ( o i'N n - i;n t i;i<i>r is i- k it o u d . Tiirusn,\ Y. m a r c h i , I‘»7'i Score Yourself On Heart Attack Risk This test was devised by the Chronic Disease Branch of the Division of Health Services so that individuals could decide how great is the risk of their developing cardiovascular disease (CVD) which includes heart attack, stroke and high blood pressure. To score yourself, circle the letter that best describes you. For each "A ” give yourself one point: for each “B ” give yourself three points; and for each "C " give yourself five points. Add up all your points when you have completed the lest. How Well Do You Take Care Of Your Heart? Important things you cannot change; 1. Are you: "A ” female and white; "B '' female and balck or make and white; “C ” male and black? Fam ily background 2. Has a closc relative died from a serious disease before reaching 70? (heart disease, diabetes, stroke?) "A ” No.; "B ” Yes Personal illnesses 3. Do you have diabetes? "A ” No.; “C” Yes 4. Do you have high blood pressure? “A " No.; "B " Yes, under control; “C” Yes, but not always under control. 5. Do you have other heart or cir­ culation problems? "A ” No.; “ B ” Yes. Im portant things you can control: Diet 6. Do you eat a variety of foods, something from each food group? 1) meat, fish, poultry, beans, eggs or nuts; 2) m ilk and cheeses; 3) breads and cereals; 4) fruits; 5) vegetables? “ A” Yes, daily; “B ” Three times a week; “C” Seldom or never. 7. Do you eat food cooked in anim al fat or fatty meats, organ meats, shellfish or lots of eggs or cheese? “A ” never or seldom; “B ” Some; “C” Regularly. 8. Do you eat extra salt or salty foods? “A ” No; “B ” Some; “C” Regularly. 9. How much alcohol do you drink per week (beers, wine glasses, shots per week)? “A” 0-7; “B ” 8-15; “C ” 16 or more. 10. Are you overweight by: “A” 0-4 pounds; “B ” 5-19 pounds; “C ” 20 or more pounds. 11. Physical activity; how active are you in your job or free hours? “A ” lots of heavy labor on your job or very active three or more days a week; “B ” light work, walking or housework; “C ” mostly sitting or standing. Habits 12. Do you smoke or chew tobacco? "A ” No; "B ” Chews tobacco or smokes 5-9 cigarettes a day, or two to four cigars a day, or one pouch of pipe tobacco a day; “C” Smokes over ten cigarettes a day, or over five cigars or over two pouches of pipe tobacco. 13. Do you use tranquilizers, pain killers or m arijuana? “A ” No; “B ” Seldom; “C” Regularly. 14. Do you sleep well? “A ” Yes; “B ” Usually: “C ” No. Other conditions: 15. Do you feel under pressure or stress at home or at work “A " No; “B ” Sometimes: “C” often. 16. Do you regularly see close friends or relatives? “A” Yes; “C " No. 17. Are you living with your husband or wife.or long time partner? “A ” Yes; "C ” No. 18. How long ago did you have a medical check up? "A ” 0-3 years ago; “B ” 4-e years ago; “C” 7 or more years ago. What Your Score Means.... 18-25 Excellent: You have a good family background and are taking ex­ cellent care of your heart and blood vessels and good personal habits and life style. Try to keep this low score. 26-33 Good: You have a good family background or you have good personal habits and life style with only a few areas which you can improve. See which these are and what you would need to do to move into the “Excellent" category. 34-40 Risky: You arc not taking good care of your heart because of certain personal habits. See which tliese are and what you would need to change to move into the “Good” category. 40 or more Hazardous: You are abusing your heart by following a number of injurious personal habits. You need to understand these and how you m ight change them . Consider m aking the easiest changes first and know where you can get more detailed information and help.According to Jim Boehm of the Chronic Disease Branch, CVD is the leading cause of death in the nation and in North Carolina. “In recent years» there has been a decline in the number of deaths, but the number is still far greater than from any other disease,” Boehm said. In 1976, there were 997,766 deaths in Fred Edward Redmon, Jr. celebrated his 9th birthday, February 22, with a party at his home. Birthday cake, ice cream, potato chips and cokes were served to his guests. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Redmon, Sr. He wishes his sister, Beatrice, a happy birthday. Ihe United Stales from CVD. In the same year there were 377,312 deaths in the United States from cancer, the second leading cause of death. In North Carolina in 1977. there were 6,200 premature deaths due to CVD-deaths among people 20-64 years old. “ National health experts have found certain habits and family background increase the chances of a person developing C V D ," Boehm said. Studies have shown that smoking, lack of exercise, unmanaged stress, over­ weight and.other personal habits play a m ajor part In the development of CVD. “For those who already have a strike against them because of fam ily background, it is even more important that they do everything they can to care for themselves in other ways,” Boehm said. The first set of questions in the test has to do with race, sex and fam ily background. Studies have shown that these factors play a m ajor role in developing chronic illness. The nexl set of questions deals with basic healthy living practices. Good basic health comes from adequate sleep (at least seven hours), three balanced m eals a day, m a in tain in g norm al weight, keeping physically fit, not smoking, adequate ways of handling stress, and occasional checkups by doctors and dentists. Everyone wanting to begin a serious diet or exercise program should see his or her doctor first, Boehm said. A regular medical checkup is a sign of healthy living practices. And those that visit regularly with close friends and live with a spouse or other supporting adult tend to have more help in dealing with stressful situations as they arise. “Those who make a poor score on the test and want to improve their chances shouldn't try to change everything at once. They should choose one thing, the easiest to change, and work on that first. Trying not to overwhelm yourself with good intentions only to becom e frustrated and discouraged, is a good rule to follow,” Boehm said. He pointed out that there are several places lo go for help in habit changing: the private doctor, the health depart­ ment, mental health centers (for stress m anagem ent and alcohol). Lung Association and Seventh Day Adventists (for anti-smoking clinics), the YM CA or YW CA for exercise, Weight Watchers or O vereaters A nonym ous, A lcoholics Anonymous, the Heart Association, Cancer Society, Arthritis Foundation, and the Diabetes Association. M any of these organizations also have printed information which is helpful, Boehm concluded. A d v a n c e S y s t e m s O p e n s U p N e w F o r s y t h B u r g e r I n n Advance Systems Inc. of Advance has opened a Burger Inn restaurant on Silas O e ek Parkway at Lockland Avenue and Link Road in Winston-Salem. Mike M cM illan Jr., president of the company, said it is the first of several he hopes to open in the area. It is fran­ chised by Burger Inns of America, with headquarters in Atlanta. M cM illan said it differs from many other fast-food restaurants in that ^ t ^ c o w n l iA le ^ c A € in .d i& e L.ocated in the Ellis Center on Hwy. 601, 3 miles south of Mocksville . TWIN SIZE MATTRESS COVER •1.79 FIRST QUALITY PANTYHOSE SPr.for *1.99 MEN’S SPRING & SUMMER CAPS *1.50 FREEZOR BAG (pkg. of 25) pts. 2 9 * IRONING BOARD PAD &COVER (Reg. $2.20) *1.39 PECANS 51b. bag *3.89CIGARETTES *3.50 & »3.60 , Per Carton PET MILK *1.79 gal. MARSHMELLOWS iib.bag 49« AJAX CLEANSER 29« SCOTTIES 200size 59* CHATHAM BLANKETS *5.50 1 DON'T “MONKEV" AROUND W hen You See A Good Buy... TAKE IT! HEATING PAD CORDLESS VIBRATORS CREST TOOTHPASTE 5oz. MEN’S SOCKS 3Pr.for *6.29 BUFFERIN *2.49 KNEE HIGHS 100 size *1.49 3 Pr.for *1.0 0 ’ 88 « 1 LOT PANTY HOSE 3Pr. for *1.19Í *1.00 CROQUET SETS *3.98 1 8 8 « KENDALL MOTOR OIL qt.69*^ *3.50 CHILDREN’S OVER SHOES PURE SOURWOOD HONEY SSoz.jar PURE STRAINED SOURWOOD HONEY 22 oz. jar DUNCAN HINES YELLOW CAKE MIX U.S. NO. 1 EATING POTATOES 50 Ib. bag SEED POTATOES (KENNEBEC) 501b. bag I CHECKER BOARD & CHECKERS 87« HI DRI LARGE ROLL PAPER TOWELS 59« MEN’S & LADIES COATS (Reg. >29.95 Highest Quality Made By Elliot Now Just * 12.95 I MEN’S SHORTS (Fruit of the Loom) Pkg. of 3 (Reg. *5.49) our price *4.29 IVe Appreciate Your Business! Dorlhy C. Howard, Manager J'redO. tliis, Owner Mon.-Thur*.- 11:00-8:00 pjn. Store Hours: Fri.— 10:00 a.m.-9:00 p.m.Sit.— 9:00 «.m.-6:00 p.m. customers’ orders are cooked to their order as the orders are turned in. M cM illan was one of the owners of the 27-store M cM illan Minute Market chain of convenience stores that was sold a couple of years ago to another chain. Before going into that business, he operated two restaurants in Virginia. M cM illan, his wife and two sons live at Bermuda Run. Louisiana Is Tops In Industrial Expansion In Nation Louisiana became the No. 1 slate in the nation this year in industrial expansion with a total investm ent of $2.5 billion, Lt. Gov. Jam es Fitz- morris said Wednesday. “It puts more Louisiana people on the p ay ro lls,” Fitzm orris told a news con­ ference prior to a routine session of the state Board of Commerce and Industry. “You can talk all you want about giveaway programs but they don’t pay the bill. Jobs do.” Gov. Edwin Edwards gave Fitzmorris the job of beading the state's industrial in­ ducement program when the Legislature reorganized the e\e>;utive branch of govern­ ment. Fitzmorris said the state was given the No. 1 ranking by “ the prestigious national p u b lic a tio n . In d u s tr ia l Development Magazine.” He said 67 new plants located in Louisiana this year while 442 resident industries expanded creating a total of 8,200 new permanent jobs and 31,000 construction jobs. It was difficult, he said, to top 1977, which was a banner year for Louisiana with in­ dustrial expansions totaling »2.3 billion. “The 19T7 total was a 100 percent increase over the previous five years,” he added. “We expect 1979 to be even better because we are not only going to continue our programs, but we are going to intensify our efforts to keep Louisiana on top,” he said. *3.69 *4.39 We may not know what ancient people uwd lo clean their glass umuleu. but, to­day, many homemakers use Class*Plus- glass, appliance and cabinet cleaner to clean glass and many washable sur­faces—painted walls, counter­tops, plastic, vinyl, chrome and small appliances — all around Ihe house. Just spray this versatile cleaner on soiled surfaces and wipe dry with a paper towel ur lint-l'ree cloth. Pvt. Richard Revels Training In Georgia Pvt. Richard G. Revels, whose wife, Essie May, lives on Route 1, Boonville, N.C., recently completed One Station Unit Training, (OSUT) al Fort Henning, Ga. OSUT is a 12-week period which combines basic combat training and advanced individual training. The training included weapons qualifications, squad tactics, patrolling, landm ine w arfare, field com ­ munications and combat operations. This qualifies the soldier as a light weapons infantryman and as an indirect fire crewman. Soldiers were taught to perform any of the duties in a rifle or m ortar squad. The private’s mother, Mrs. C.B. Revels, lives on Route 1, Mocksville, N.C. Truck Wrecks On 1-40 A 1974 Ford truck was involved in a wreck on Interstate 40 last Saturday aboul 9:40 a.m . The vehicle, operated by Paul Foster Dwiggins, 61, of R l. 1 Mocksville, suf­ fered an estimated $1200 in damages. Slate Highway Patrolm an W. D. Grooms said Dwiggins told him lhal an unknown vehicle pulling a U-Haul trailer passed him and came back into the right lane prior to clearing his vehicle. Dwiggins applied brakes to avoid hitting this vehicle, lost control on the wet pavement, and struck the guardrail on the right shoulder wilh left front and slid backwards down the side of the guardrail before coming lo rest. . Dam age lo the guardrail was estimated at $200. There were no injuries and no charges. Pinebrook Junior Beta Club On February 16, Pinebrook School held their Junior Beta Club In­ ductions. Sixteen new members were inducted. The new members are- Ut row i-r, Tonya Bowman, MeUssa SmUey, Uia Welch, Traci Dorsett, Tina Bowman, Rhonda Salmons, Tracy Parker, Kenny Bowles; 2nd Cammie Paige. Penny Allen. Deanna Plott. Monica Simpson. Michelle Morgan and Jennifer Hodges. Not pictured: Jennifer Hall and Monica Harper. D a ir y R e f e r e n d u m Is T u e s d a y ADA referendum for dairymen will be held Tuesday, March 6 statewide. The Davie County polling places will be: ASCS O ffice, County Office Building; Farm and Garden Service, Yadkinville Hwy; E d Johnson's Gulf, Farm ington; West Davie Farm and Garden, 64W near Hwy. 901. Hours will be the norm al business hours up to 5 p.m. Voting will be on the 6 cents per hundred weight self assessment to last for three years with the money lo be used to support the prom otion, education and research programs of the American Dairy Assn. of N.C. Those eligible to vole are all North Carolina farmers who own or share in the ownership of the cows on dairy farms engaged in the production of grade A m ilk on a commercial basis. This would include the wife and children, if they own or share in the ownership of the anim als. For information call Ronnie Thomp­ son, Associate Agriculture Extension R C A C o l o r T V S a l e ! 3 D A Y ? 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C olonial cabinet with m aple or pine finish on hardboard and select hardw ood solids. Sim ulated wood trim. Concealed casters. W /T •589’» W /T DANIEL Furniture & Electric Co., Inc. Phone 634-2492At The OvarhMd Bridyc-South Main StfMt Mockiville, N.C. To Make Television Cabinets Multi-Million Dollar Plant Announced For Davie Crown Wood Products, In c., a ^ Delaware Corporation and subsidary of ^ the Radio Corporation of America (RCA), will build a multi-million dollar plant on Bethel Road, just outside of Mocksville. The company will manufacture wood cabinets for television receivers and other wood related products. An em­ ployment of 250 to 300 persons is ex- M pected when the plant is in full . operation. The official announcement of the plant was made Tuesday by officials of Crown Wood Products, Inc. through Richard A. Beck, chairm an of the local industrial development team and president of the Mocksville-Davie Chamber of Com­ merce. Mr. Beck said he had been working with officials of the company to secure a site for the past twelve months. The site chosen for the plant is located east of the Bethel Church Road (across from Bethel Church) at it’s intersection with the John Crotts paved road. The 25 acre site was purchased from the heirs of Dr. Lathan T. Moose of Winston- Salem (brothers and sisters of Iredell County) and Lonnie R. Wooten, ad­ ministrator of the estate. Dr. Moose died in 1976 without having a will. Last fall, options to purchase several sites around Mocksville were taken out by Cushman and Wakefield, a real estate firm of Atlanta, Ga. Deeds uf the purchase of the Bethel Road site were recorded in the Davie County Register of Deeds office February 28th. Purchase price was $5,000 an acre. A spur railroad siding will be built to serve the plant from the Southern Railway tracks. The area in which the plant is to be constructed has been already zoned for industrial development, and the town and county have guaranteed the ex­ tension of water and sewer services to the site. RCA, the parent corporation, ranked 41st in size among corporations in the United States last year and is a leading m anufacturer of television sets. The corporation also owns the National Broadcasting Company. Crown Wood Products, Inc. is a separate subsidary of RCA that supplies cabinetry for products within that corporation. It also often supplies companies other than RCA with both wood and related products. Officials of Crown Wood Products, Inc. said Tuesday that further details concerning construction schedules and other matters will be announced in the near future. A Crown Wood Products official said that “North Carolina was selected as the site for the new facility due to the state's abundant supply of raw materials as well as being an established center of furniture manufacturing.” The announcement of the new in­ dustry was happily received by local officials. Richard Beck, who has worked with the company in a confidential position for the past year, said: “ I am extremely proud to have this corporation select Davie County and feel it will be a great asset to our county in the coming years. Economics and the labor market in Davie County will benefit as the opportunity for em ­ ployment nearer home is offered to m any.” Glenn Howard, chairm an of the Davie County Board of Commissioners, said: “We are proud to have Crown Products locate in Davie County. It is a good decision. Davie County has hard working people that will make a good product and will be an asset to Crown Wood Products.” Mayor R.C. Smith of Mocksville also welcomed the new industry saying; “The decision of this industry to locate here is good news for the residents of Mocksville and the entire county. We take pleasure in extending a welcome hand and our full cooperation.” The above is an aeria'. photo enlargement of the site of the new In- dustrial plant of Crown Wood Products, Inc. located at the intersection of the Bethel Church Road, running left to right, and the John Crotts Road, running right to left as per top blacic iine marking site. The Skyline plant is shown in the lower right comer. A portion of Bethel Church, which fronts the property on the west side of Bethel Road, may be seen over the treetops on the right, Tbe site represents 25 acres of the total tract of 74.24 acres owned by the Lathan Moose estate. lli| Industrial Site Richard A. Becl< points out the property off the Bethel Road on which Crown Wood Products, Inc. has purchased to build a multi-million dollar industrial plant for the construction of television cabinets. The site comprises 25 acres, fronting Bethel Road, purchased from the 74.24 owned there by the Lathan Moose estate. Mr. Beck, president of the Mocksville-Davie Chamber of Com­ merce, handled the local negotiations for the company. (Photo by Garry Foster). (USPS 149-160) D A V I B C O U N T Y P.O. Box 525, MocksvUle, N.C. 27028 $10.00 Per Year in Norlh Carolina $15.00 Per Year Outside North Carolina THURSDAY, MARCH 8, 1979 32 PAGES Single Copy 25 cents Xontracts Awarded For Jr. High Schools . N orth C arolina D epartm ent of A T ransportation officials held a public bearing at the Davie County Courthouse on Monday evening, March 5, and presented a list of priorities for state secondary road construction in Davle County during the upcoming year. The state proposes to spend 1316,984 on secondary road construction and Im- Hlprovement within the county during the ■upcoming year. The priority list for this construction and improvement work is as follows: -Cedar Creelt Road, 2.7 miles, add base and pave from N.C. 801 to Puddin’ Ridge Road; -Howardtown Road, 2.3 miles, grade, drain and stabilize from WiU Allen Road to Cornatzer Road; -Mocks Church Road, 1.1 miles, grade, drain and stabilize from Cor­ natzer Road to the paved portion of Mocics Church Road', -Cornatzer Road, 2.2 miles, widen pavement from 16-feet to 20-feet and ^ resurface from 1 m ile south of Milling ^ R o a d then south 2.2 miles; -Dyson Road, .3 mile, correct the alignm ent and stabilize and also replace 30-inch pipe with 48-inch pipe; -Log Cabin Road, .3 mile, correct the alignm ent and stabilize and also replace the existing pipe with 42-inch pipe; ^ -Boger Road, widen for 3-lane road V ^ t i o n and stabilize .2 mile; and -Pleasant Acre Drive, revise two intersections that are hazardous. In developing local secondary road priorities, state Department of Tran­ sportation and county officials consider ; 1) the need for paving unpaved roads; 2) ^th e need to improve unpaved roads to JP 'a ll weather” standards; 3) the need to widen narrow, heavily travelled paved roads; 4) the need to strengthen and resurface paved roads and, thereby, remove weight restrictions; 5) the need to Improve and replace substandard bridges; 6) the need to continue to help local schools, rural fire and rescue ^ll^u a d facilities; and 7) the need to 'continue safety projects through Im ­ provement of bad curves and proper alignment. The Davle County commissioners normally pass a resolution approving the list of projects presented by the state officials. But at Monday night's meeting A e commissioners delayed passing such % resolution because the state officials agreed with some of the residents on M errill’s Fish Pond Road to further study whether this road should not be placed higher on the priority list to have needed Improvements completed on this road. A total of 166 roads are on the state’s priority list for needed improvement within Davie County. Courtesy Warniñg Chief of Police Alton Carter this ' week issued the followbig courtesy warning: “Due to the increased amount ot traffic on Water and Clement StreeU the NO PARKIN G around the post office and bank will have to be strictly enforced. This may be your only warning.” Davie To Get ^316,984 On Secondary Road Construction S p e c ia l P r o g r a m O n B u s in e s s C r im e O f f e r e d M a r c h 1 4 At its meeting Monday night, the Davie County Board of Education ac­ cepted low bids and awarded contracts to contractors to begin construction work on two Junior high schools in the county. The schools will be located on F ar­ mington Road, just north of 1-40, and between Sanford Avenue and Jericho Road in Mocksville. Construction of the shcools was made possible when county voters last year approved a school construction bond referendum in the amount of $5.5 million. In its action Monday night, the board of education awarded combined con­ tracts totaling $4,594,203 to contractors for general construction, plumbing, mechanical and electrical work and for food service equipment for the two new schools. The board had received and opened bids in these categories from several contractors in a bid opening last Thursday at the board of education offices in Mocksville. The board had earlier spent ap­ proximately $600,000 for architects’ fees, acquisition of school sites and survey and site development work necessary for the schools construction. The general construction contract for The MocksvUle Police Department wlUi Uie aid of the Winston-Salem Police Department Crime Prevention Unit wlU be presenting a program for the business community of MocksvlUe. The program wiU take place on M arch 14 at 7:30 p.m . In the Davle County Cour­ thouse. The program wUl be oriented toward Uie problems Uiat most often involve businessmen (and their employees) Three Vehicles In Accident On W ilkesboro St. Three vehicles were Involved In an accident Friday about 10:55 a.m . on WUkesboro Sb-eet. Involved was a 1973 Chevrolet operated by M ary Jam es Holman, 51, of 324 Church St., MocksvUle; a 1966 In- ternaUonal truck operated by Donald Gaston AUen, 42, of WUkesboro; Uie Uiird vehicle was unidentified as It conUnued on after the traffic passed. Capt. R.W . Groce of Uie MocksvUle P olice D epartm ent said his in ­ vesUgaUon showed that a vehicle had sto p p ^ on WUkesboro Street walUng to turn left onto Hospital Street. The Holman vehicle had stopped for a stop sign on a side street. The Allen truck could not get stopped behind the vehicle on WUkesboro Street, ran off the road to avoid coUlsing wiUi it and struck a utUity pole, colvert and proceeded on to strike Uie Holman vehicle. Dam age to the Holman vehicle was estimated at $1000, $1300 to Uie truck owned by HoUy Farm s, and $150 to Uie pole of Central Telephone Company. failure to with the crim inal jusUce system. These problem s include: shoplifting, till tapping, disorderly custom ers, etc. (Time wUl be aUowed for questions on related topics not covered in the program ). The discussion wiU include how to help prevent, what to do if the situaUon arises, and what the laws are concerning the different situations. It is the intent of the presentaUon to provide the business community with informaUon Uiat wUl help it and Uie Police Department work together more efficienUy for a better MocksvUle. All business owners, operators and employees are urged to come and the general public is welcome. Pre-School Registration During Ute week of March 12-16, parents of children who will be eligible to attend tbe kindergarten program in the public schools during the 1979-80 school year should go by their local elementary school and complete registration forms. Eligible children must be 5 years of age on or before October 16, 1979, in order to enroll. Parents of eligible children should take their chUd's birth certificate and im m unization record with them to their local school and obtain the school physical examination form at that time. Other vital Information con­ cerning the kindergarten will be given to parents during this visU. All parents of chUdren eligible for the 1979-80 public school kin­ dergarten program are requested to visit their focal elementary school during Uie week of March 12-16 and register their child. Alien was charged reduce speed. with Local CETA Program To Receive ’407,949 The Department of Labor, Uirough Uie ^ D iv is io n of Community Employment In "R a le ig h has granted Uie Davie County CETA Program $407,949.00 in Federal funds to be used to create public service posiUons throughout the County. The Individual usuages wiU be $72,270.00 in CETA TiUe 6, $172,832.00 In CETA TiUe 2, and $72,270.00 in a CETA TlUe 6, ê“ Special P ro je ct” . The "S pecial Project” wiU be renovations on Uie Group Home for the mentally retarded. The purpose of Uie CETA Program is lo employ people who are having dif­ ficulty obtaininig employment, and who might oUierwise find Uiemselves on public assistance, unemployment in­ surance, or in other unsatisfactory financial situations. This helps Uie various county agencies using Uie positions as weU as Uiose employed in Uiem. Additional positions to be created wUl be available AprU 1. AppUcaUons wUI be taken by Mrs. Dare W. Sanford, county CETA Coordinator, after March 12th In Uie CETA office located in Uie County Office Building, room 302. Those in­ terested should caU Mrs. Sanford at 634- 5582 lo arrange an appointment. the two schools was awarded to C.J. Kern Inc. of Greensboro, at a combined base bid cost of $3,139,000. The plumbing contract tor the two schools was awarded to Landingham Plum bing & HeaUng Co. of Winston-Salem, at a combined base bid cost of $293,000. At a combined base bid cost of $414,860, the school board awarded the mechanical contract for boUi schools to Piedmont Sheet Metal Co. of Winston-Salem. And Uie board awarded Uie electrical con- U-acl for the two schools to Overcash Electric Co. of MooresvUle, at a com­ bined base bid cost of $454,868. The food service equipment contract was awarded to Foodcraft Equipm ent Co. of Winston-Salem, at a combined base bid cost of $147,200. The board of educaUon also decided to accept bids and award contracts for some alternate construcUon work to be completed at boUi schools. This alter­ nate construcUon wUl involve buUding student and reading plazas at boUi schools, adding covered walkways at both schools, constructing physical educaUon fields at both schools and adding carpet to ten classrooms at both schools. These alternates in construcUon wlU add a combined total cost of $145,275 to the costs of the schools construction, for a combined total cost of $4,594,203. The board rejected the idea of adding four extra classrooms at each school, at a combined cost of $158,580. Superin­ tendent of Davie County & hools Jam es Everidge had said al Uie bid op Uiat he would recommend to the I Uiat they nol build the extra classrooms al Uiis Ume because Uiis exU-a space was nol needed al this Ume. Under the present setup, each school wiU have 28 classrooms. Everidge said at Uie bid opening, he was recommending Uiat the board use Uie money left over after accepting the low bids, approximately $300,000, to buy equipment and furnishings for the Ubraries of Uie two schools’ gym ­ nasiums and on furniture and other items needed lo have the schools ready for “turn key” operaUon. Everidge and oUier school officials had been shooting for a target date of Uie beginning of the faU semester of 1980 as Uie Ume the new schools would be ready for occupancy. However, the consUniction Ume frame for the schools construction, <s esUmated by Uie low bidding general conU'acUir, Is 547 days, which when added to the day the contractor was advised of being awarded the contract, March 6, would give a target date of September 2, 1980 as Uie date con- sU-ucUon Is completed. Everidge said Tuesday Uiat "con­ tingency plans” would be made as Uie date of contrucUon compleUon nears to determine precisely when Uie new schools wUI be avaUable for occupancy. Rural Hoads Flooded A number of rural roads were flooded Monday as creeks and branches over-' ' ; land. Tbe above Is tbe Monday morning. Tbehowed tbeir banits to cover the roadway and adjoining land. Tbe above Is tbengton area looked 1 arrow points out the bridge on tills road. See feature on PagM-D concerning the way the HoweU Road in tbe Farmington area arrow points out the bridge on tills road. See featii nash Hoods In Davie County last weekend. (Photo by Garry Foster). : D AV Ii: С О И М Л i n t i RPRISI R IC O K D . T IIUH SDAV. m a r c h K, \P r o p o s e d Im p r o v e m e n t s T o 3 L o c a l S t r e e t s T o B e D is c u s s e d A t P u b lic H e a r in g DL-Methionine is unloaded for the first time in a bitlk load delivery manner nt the Holly Farms plant in Mocksville. (Photo by Garry Foster) M o c k s v ille F e e d M i l l Is F ir s t I n N a t io n T o R e c e iv e F e e d S u p p le m e n t B y S p e c ia l M e t h o d The Mocksville Feed M ill Division of Holly Farm s Poultry Industries became the first facility in the United States to receive a special feed supplement by a full pneumatic bulk delivery system. On Monday, the Degussa Corporation of Alabam a, delivered the feed sup­ plement DL-Methionine by this new system. This method of delivery will end the local company’s problem of disposing of 40,000 empty paper sacks each year. DL-Methionine is a pure, synthetic amino acid used as a protein supplement in the poultry feed produced and mixed at the Mocksville facility. Holly Farm s is the biggest consumer of DL- Methionine in the United States. M onday m arked the first bulk deUvery of Di-Methionine to a facility specifically converted to accomodate it, and it came through the collaboration of Holly Farm s and Degussa, Inc., a corporation based in Frankfurt, West Germany. Heretofore the chemical compound had been delivered in 50-pound paper sacks of which disposition had to be made. The Mocksville plant uses about 200,000 lbs. of the m aterial each month. At $1.40 a pound, this amounts to a cost to Holly Farm s of $280,000 each month, or almost $3.4 m illion a year, at the Mocksville plant. Jam es N. Andrews of Wilkesboro, a former resident of Mocksville and now vice-president for feed manufacturing and nutrition, said the bulk deliveries should mean considerable savings to Holly Farm s. Bulk delivery will reduce the cost of handling, reduce the need for storage space, and elim inate the problem of disposing of empty sacks. An official for Degussa, whose prin­ cipal office is at Teterboro, New Jersey, said Holly Farm s is not only its largest Judge Tentatively Approves Joint Plan For Cartners P art of the real property owned by Jerry W. Cartner and his wife, Joan G. Cartner, of Mocksville, will be sold later this year to pay debts totalling about $247,000. A plan for the disposition of the Cartner’s assets, filed earlier this year by the Cartners and their creditors, was . tenatively approved by Judge Rufus W. Reynolds in U .S. M iddle D istrict Bankruptcy Court at Winston-Salem, North Carolina, on February 27.. The Cartners petitioned in federal bankruptcy court last year for protection, as individuals, under Chapter 12 of the Federal Bankruptcy Act, which permitted them to retain possession of their property. Since that time, the Cartners and their creditors have worked together to formulate a plan which would allow an orderly sale of the property and paymentof the debts. Such was the plan submitted to Judge Reynolds. Also last year, the J. Wayne Cafeteria Corporation that the Cartners had formed - he was president and treasurer, she was vice president and secretary - was declared bankrupt. Claims against the cafeteria corporation totaled about $45,000, $15,000 of which were nullified and the remaining $30,000 of debt transferred to the Cartners in­ dividually. Judge Reynolds was told by the C artners’ attorney, G rady L. M c­ Clamrock, Jr., that the plan of arrangem ent, w hich contains a timetable for the Cartners’ property to be sold to realize the highest price possible, has been accepted by a sub­ stantial m ajority of the creditors. The property owned by the Cartners, valued at $346,000, is estimated to be more than enough to pay off all their secured Two Arrested For C onsum ing Beer Two employees of the Yadkin Valley : Economic Development District Inc., an anti-poverty agency with headquarters ■ in Boonville, were arrested in ; Mocksville about noon last Thursday ’ and charged with consuming beer in : public. They were identified in warrants as - Garland Calvin Gorham , 24, of Mount ; Airy and Debra Ann Kiser, 22, of Dob­ son. They were charged under a • Mocksville town ordinance prohibiting ; alcohol consumption in public. - This is a misdeameanor offense that does not require a court appearance if ' defendants choose to waive a trail - ■ which they did. They paid Magistrate ■ Sam Howell the court costs - $27 in each - case - and left the courthouse. . Capt. R. W. Groce of the Mocksville Police Department said both Gorham and Miss Kiser turned up beer bottles end drank from them as the car in which they were riding, owned by Yadkin Valley, passed in front of the police station. They were stopped a short distance away on Salisbury Street, headed in the direction of Yadkin County, and Groce sais they told him they had Ьм п working at Cooleemee, "checking on some houses of one kind or the other." Groce s a ^ each of them had an open quart bottle or beer in the car when they were stopped and added that they told him they had purchased the alcoholic beverage across the river in Rowan County. The Y adkin Valley E conom ic D evelopm ent D istrict adm inisters government programs and distributes anti-poverty funds in four counties - Yadkin, Oavie. Stokes and Surry. obligations. Reynolds set another hearing for March 27 in the Federal Building in Winston-Salem. He said that he expects to enter on that date an order confirming the plan of arrangem ent submitted to the court for liquidating the Cartners’ assets. At that time the Cartners aré to turn over the funds accumulated in a special bankruptcy account since the filing of the proceeding. Approximately $1200 was indicated to be in the account by M r. McClamrock. Jam es Frenzel, of Winston-Salem, an attorney representing some of the creditors in the bankruptcy proceeding, said at the hearing last week that under the plan the secured creditors should receive full paym ent and the unsecured creditors will get 50 cents on the dollar. The m ajor creditors in the Chapter 12 proceeding are Central Carolina Bank, h04,000 owed on the cafeteria; First Federal Savings & Loan, $44,300 owed on the home; and $35,000 owed to Jordan Gallos and Piedmont Sheet Metal, both of Winston-Salem, for construction work on the cafeteria. The m ajor feature of the plan is that the cafeteria, a farm tract and some building lots will be sold through a realtor until enough money had been raised to pay the secured creditors. If enough private sales are not con­ summated, then the balance of the money owed to the secured creditors will be raised by public auction of the remaining lots. Any sale, private or at public auction, must be approved by the bankruptcy court to insure that the value of the property is protected. customer but also the largest consumer of the synthetic compound in the United States. The shipment delivered by truck to Mocksville on Monday weighed 43,000 pounds. In less than two hours $60,200 worth of the protein supplement was fed pneumatically into the storage tank at the plant. The Division of Highways of the North Carolina Department of Transportation (NCDOT) will conduct a public hearing on Wednesday, March 21, to discuss proposed safety improvements to the Sanford Avenue-Salisbury Street- Lexington Street intersection in Mocksville. The hearing will be heid at 7:30 p.m. in the courtroom of the Davie County Courthouse In Mocksville. D uring the hearing, slate tra n ­ sportation officials will explain the proposed design which calls for aligning Sanford Avenue and Lexington Street opposite one another and for adding left turn lanes to all Ihree streets. Some right-of-way acquisition w ill be necessary. NCDOT officials will also explain right-of-way procedures, housing relocation assistance and the in ­ volvement of the Federal Highwat Administration in highway projects receiving federal aid. • A map of the improvement project and a copy of the project import and the environmental im pact statement are available for public review and copying at the Davie County Courthouse. The public is encouraged to attend and ask questions and submit comments during the hearing. Additional written comments may be submitted until March 31 to M r. George E. Wells, Manager of Highway Design, NCDOT, Division of Highways, P.O. Box 25201, Raleigh, N.C 27611 The Davie County project is included in the state’s 1979-1985 Transportation Improvement Program. Interested persons m ay obtain more inform ation about the hearing by writing Mr. W.A. Garrett, Jr., Ad­ ministrative Assistant, Highway Design Branch, NCDOT, Division of Highways, P.O. Box 25201, Raleigh N.C. 27611. C o u n t y R e p u b lic a n C o n v e n t io n T o B e H e ld H e r e S a t u r d a y The Davie County Republican Party will hold its County Convention on Saturday, M arch 10, 1979, at 7:30 in the court house. At this time delegates to the district and state conventions will be elected. Also, officers of the Republican Party will be chosen who will lead the party for the next two years. Edward L. Powell, of Winston-Salem, will address the convention. A native of Davie County, M r. Powell is the son of Harrell and Margaret Powell of the Center Community. He is a 1959 graduate of the Davie County High School; UNC-Chapel Hill in 1963; and the Wake Forest Law School in 1967. From 1967-1969 he was on active duty with the United States Arm y in Vietnam. In 1972-74 he served as representative from Forsyth County in the N.C. House; he was a member of the board of the N.C. Department of Transportation; from 1975-1977 he was Commissioner of Motor Vehicles; since 1977 he has served as county chairm an of the Forsyth County R epublican. P arty . At the present time he is an attorney in W in­ ston-Salem with the firm of Yeager and Powell. He is married to M ary Elizabeth Bales of Thomasville. They have two children. Ed Powell Sen. Childers Opposes Any Plan Of Interbasin Water Transfer From The Yadkin M ill Cathy Ann Masten has made tbe High H onon L ilt at Forsyth Technical Institute, where the li enrolled io Police Science. Miss Masten has a cumulative average of 3.91 out of a possible 4.0. She Is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Charles E. Masten of Houle 2, Mocksville. Tractor-Trailer Hits Bridge A bridge on the Green Grass Road, 8 miles north of Mocksville, was damaged February 28th when it was hit by a tractor-trailer. State Highway Patrolm an Jam es M. Newton said his investigation showed that the 1977 International tractor- trailer, operated by BiUy FrankUn White, 38, of MocksviUe, was going south on the Green Grass Road. A 1973 GMC tractor-traUer, operated by McArthur TyndaU, 36, of Winston-Salem, was proceeding north. White slowed to cross Ihe narrow bridge. TyndaU, unable to stop, struck the bridge and the other tractor-traUer. Dam age to each of the tractor-traUers was estimated at $500 and at $500 to the bridge. There were no injuries and no charges. Senator Jack Childers of the 21st District, went on record last week as firm ly opposed to interbasin transfer of water. In a letter to Ms. Jean Davis of the Public Involvement Unit of the N.C. Department of Natural Resources and Community Development, he made the following comments: “Dear Ms. Davis: ‘‘The fact that the General Assembly will be in session wUl make it impossible for me to attend any of the public meetings to comment on the draft plan to be proposed to the governor on water pollution control programs. However, Uiis is a matter in which I have interests and I would lUte to make the comments which are included in the paragraphs which follow. ‘‘F irst, I com pletely support achieving and m aintaining appropriate Vehicle Hits li^ b ile Hom e A vehicle went out of control and hit a mobUe home off US 158, 7-mUes east of MocksviUe, last ’Thursday about 1:55 p.m. Terry Scott Johnson, 18, of Rt. 3 MocksviUe was identified as the driver of the 1972 Ford that hit Ute mobile home owned by Oscar A. Smith, Jr., of R t. 1 Advance. SUte Highway Patrolam n Jam es M. Newton said his invesUgation showed Uiat Johnson was proceeding west on US 158 when Uie left front tire went down. The vehicle went out of control, ran off the left side of the road, struck a traffic island, hit a stop sign at tbe June Beauchamp Road, crossed back over US 158, ran off right side of road, and struck Uie mobUe home. Dam age to Uie vehicle was estimated at $200. Dam age to the mobile home and stop sign was not esUmated. There were no charges. Genealogy W orkshop Offered At Ubrary "EveryUiing you ever wanted to know about the Census-but didn't know how to ask” is Uie topic of a genealogy workshop to be held at Forsyth County Public Library. SU ff of Uie Main Library's NorUi CaroUna Room wiU give advice on usuig Federal Census records in genealogical research. ‘Hie workshop is scheduled for Sun­ day, March 18, at 3 p.m . in Uie auditorium of Uie M ain U brary, 660 W, 5Ui Street. Admission is free. From Raleigh by Rep. Ramey F. Kem p protection of our water quality. “Second, I am becoming concerned about Uie high cost of government regulaUons at aU levels which are often unreasonable and which are m aking a significant contribution to inflaUon-4>ur number one problem. In fact, I served as a panelist on this subject at the recent "Governor's Conference on Inflation." I urge Uiat in this, as weU as all oUier government regulations, the cost be measured against the expected ef­ fectiveness. "Third, I am firm ly opposed to the proposition of interbasin transfers. For instance, there are many undeveloped counUes in the basin of Uie Yadkin River which have great need for industrial development. I am opposed to tran­ sferring water from the Yadkin Basin to encourage industrial expansion in other areas Uiat are already heavUy in­ dustrialized. This is in keeping with Governor Hunt's “balanced gorwth plan" for our state. “ If it is possible, I would like to be able to comment on the revised plan before it is presented to the Environmental Management Commission for adop- Uon." Sincerely yours. Jack Childers M arijuana Possession Is Charged To Two Two Davie County men have been charged by Uie Davie County Sheriff's Dept. wiUi felonious possession of m arijuana with intent to sell and are being held in Uie county jaU under $5,000 bond apiece. According to reports from the sheriff's deparUnent, Dennis Clark rang, 29, of Duke St. in Cooleemee and Robert Brainard, 18, of Rt. 4, MocksvUle, were s t o p ^ in a car March S on Highway 601 north of MocksvUle and aUegedly found to bave ten one-ounce packages of m arijuana in Uie car and also one staUt of m arijuana in Uie vehicle. Their court appearance in Davie County DisUlct Court has been set for March 26. Potatoes At 45 to 50 degrees F. potatoes wiU keep weU for several weeks. At tem- perabires over that, potatoes should not be stored for more Uian one week. W arm er tem peratures encourage sprouting and shriveling. On Monday evening, February 26, tHi" House passed a BUl which would allow any county which financially supports ambulance service to garnishee wages to coUect payment for these services. If Uiis BUl passes Uie Senate and is enacted into Law, each county which has Uiis problem of coUecting for ambulance fees could adopt this State Law for county use. On Tuesday a BUl was passed by the House which would stagger the ex- piraUon dates of automobUe licenses. If enacted into Law, one-twelfth of aU automobUe Ucenses would expire and become due on the first day of each month of the year. This would certainly be an aid to the Ucense bureaus since Uiey would not then be required to seU replacement licenses for aU vehicles over a two-month period as is now the case.■ On Wednesday, I introduced two bUls, one at the request of the Board of EducaUon and the other at the request of the County Commissioners. Each dealt with conveyance of public property, and I will explain them to you further when M otorcyclist Injured A motorcyclist was injured in an accident last Saturday about 5:12 p.m. on Uie Fairfield Road, 4.5 mUes south of MocksviUe. Donald Wayne CranfUl, 39, of Rt. 7 MocksviUe was taken by the ambulance to Uie Davie County Hospital and was Uien transferred to Uie Baptist Hospital. State H ighw ay P atro lm an L.W . Bjorkland said his invesUgation showed Uiat CranfUl ran off Uie road on Uie right, crossing two private drives, flipping over and throwing the rider into a b a r M wire fMce. Juvenile Picked Up Here For Taking Car E dw ard Yost, 15, of N orthboro, Massachusetts was picked up at the 1-40 rest area east of MocksvUle late last Saturday night and held by officials of Uie Davie County Sheriff's Dept, on charges to be fUed against him in Massachusetts Uiat he aUegedly stole a car Uiere. He was released March 4 into Uie custody of his parents.____________________ И they are enacted into law. The House, also on W ednesday, passed a BiU which would mal(e tne turUe Uie State repUle. A lot of good- natured fun was had over this BUl, but it did pass the House and is now in the Senate. A I am proud to be serving on the Committee of MUiUry Affairs and am happy to report that our Committee approved, and the House also approved, a BUl which would guarantee re­ employment for persons serving in the NaUonal Guard if called into active duty by Uie State of North Carolina. ^ Several pieces of legislaUon continuer^ to create quite a bit of controversy. One, of course, concerns foxhunters and trappers. We are trying desperately to pass legislation which wUl be agreeable to boUi the hunters and Uie trappers. It is difficult but we hope not impossible. Since I serve on the A ppropriaU ons^ Sub-committee for Hum an R esources^ and CorrecUons and, also, Uie fuU Ap- propriaUons Committee, much of my time whUe in Raleigh is now fUled with attending Uie meetings of Uiese com­ mittees. Each day we meet from 8:30 unUl 10:00 a.m . and from 3:00 unUl 4:30 p.m. Again we are striving to arrive at a ^ budget which wiU be fair to aU who arelF/ requesting appropriations. If you have anyUiing at all that you wish to discuss with me concerning legislaUon, please do not hesitate to caU. Car and Truck Collide Two vehicles coUided February 27th ^ about 2:45 p.m . on US 64,1.3 mUes east of MocksviUe. Involved was a 1970 P lym outh operated by Flossie LandreUi Mc- aam rock, 77, of Rt. 6 MocksviUe and a 1969 Chevrolet truck operated by Elton Lee DiUiard, 24, of Rt. 7 MocksvUle. State Highway Patrolm an A.C. S to k e s « said his investigation showed that the McClamrock vehicle pulled from a private drive and failed to see the truck, owned by J.P . Green MUling Company, approaching. As the M cC lam rock vehicle began to turn right onto US 64 it was struck by Uie truck. Damage to Uie McClamrock v e h icle ^, was esUmated at $600 and $400 to the truck. There were no injuries and no charges. COUNTY 124 South Main Street Mocksville, N.C. Published every Thursday by the DAVIE PUBLISHING COMPANY MOCKSVILLE ENTERPRISE 1916-1958 DAVIE RECORD 1899 1958 COOLEEMEE JOURNAL 1906-1971 » Gordon Tomlinson............................Editor-Publisher Becky Snyder Director of Advertising Second Class Postage Paid in Mocksville, N.C. 27028 SUBSCRIPTION RATES »10.00 ptr yssr in North Csrollnsi $15.00 psr yssr out of sUts. SIngIs Copy 2S csntt Poitmsftsr: Ssnd «ddrsu chsngsf to DsvIs County Entsrpriis Rscord, P,O.Bo»i 525, M QcKfvlllS.I^.C.270l2 DAVIF. COUNTY I-NTtRPRISU RUrORO. THURSDAY, MARCH 8. 1979 Photo by Garry Foster Caro! Groom-Public Health Scrvice Nutritionist D a v ie H a s N e w H e a lt h N u t r i t i o n i s t two summers, one ot which was spent in Cabarrus County in a hypertension project for teenagers. She has also worked for the March of Dimes, the Well Child Clinic and the WIC Clinic in Cleveland, Ohio, and for the Health and Hospital Corporation in Indianapolis, Indianna. Some of the programs in the Health Department Ms. Croom will be involved in include WIC, Chronic Disease, and Home Health. Her work plans include com m unity education, nutrition education in the schools and she will also be accepting patient referrals from physicians in the county. Carol Croom, the new U.S. Public Health Service Nutritionist arrived in Davie County February 20. She will be working in this county for the next two years. Ms. Croom, a native of North Carolina, received her undergraduate degree in Home Economics majoring in foods and nutrition from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. She also received a Masters Degree in Public Health Nutrition from Case Western Reserve in Cleveland, Ohio. She has worked for the Nutrition Branch, Division of Health Services, Department of Hum an Resources, for Jane Bullard, director of Feeding the Elderly program at the Brock Center, ch^ks her meal for proper nuMents. This Is National Nutrition Week “Set the Pace! Take the Food Way for Good Nutrition” is the theme that Davie County Dietitians and Nutritionists are emphasizing during the seventh annual National Nutrition Week, M arch 4-10. Exercise and a Sound Diet are the cornerstones of good health. Dietitians and Nutritionists explain that good nutrition and regular exercise can cut the cost of Health Care. Your know-how about foods and their nutrients can multiply the benefits of physical activity in keeping fit,” said Jane Bullard, director of feeding the elderly program- For starters, begin with m inim um servings of the essen­ tials; miUc and m ilk products; meat or an alternate, such as dried beans and peas, chili, eggs or fish; fruits and vegetables-one deep green or yellow, and a source of Vitamin C; and wholegrain or enriched bread and cereals. NaUonal Nutrition Week is sponsored by the american Dietetic AssociaUon and its affiliates in the fifty (50) states, the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico. N U T RIBIRD, Uie Association’s symbol of good nutrition, helps to carry tiie message. This year he’s running wiU> it. Efforts are being made by local DieUUans and NuUriUonists to inform Uie public of the continuous Nutritional AcUviUes in Uie county. One program of importance is the Elderly Nutrition Program held at tiie B.C. Brock Center. This program serves Older Adults five (5) days a week, one hot nutritional meal in a Congregate S e lli^ . Eligible Individuals are those who are 60 years of age and older or Uie spouse of such individuals. Priority Is given to those; (1) Cannot afford to eat adequately (or> (2) Lack Uie skills or knowledge (3) Have limited mobility im pairing one's abUity to shop or cook (4) Have feelings of rejection or loneliness which obliterates Uie in­ centive to eat alone. “ Individuals are recruited who meei Ibis criteria. T ransportation is a problem and care must be taken in recruiting those individuals who can be trw sportkl wiUUn Uie budget of Uie no g raro or Uiose who can U-ansport Uiemselves,” said Mrs. BuUard. Supportive Services are an important com ponent of the P ro g ram . The foUowing supportive social services are provided to Uie parUcipants fo Uie extent Uiat such services are needed and are not already avaUable and accesssible; (1) TransportaUon and Escort Service (2) Information and Referral Service. (3) HealUi and Welfare Counseling (4) Nutrition Education (5) Shopping Assistance (6) RecreaUonal AcUvities These Services can serve to help remove some of the barriers to attaining bitter nutrition. Nub-ition EducaUon is an important and required aspect of the Program. Sara Wood, a local Home Economist, presents EducaUonal Program s to Uie group weekly through Davidson Com­ munity College. Various Programs are presented regarding Consumer and HealUi related informaUon on foods and nutrition. Kathy Pendergraft, Davie Oiunty Hospital Registered Dietitian, presents Programs regarding therapeutic areas. The meals are catered and are served hot. A typical meal includes a 3 oz. portion of meat, poultry, or fish; H cup each of two different vegetables; bread, margarine; V« cup of fntit or dessert and mUk. Every meal supplies at least one-third of Uie current daUy recom­ mended dietary allowances, including 100 percent of the adult requirements of Vitamin A and C. The parUcipants are given Uie opportunity to contfibute toward the cost of the meal. The nutritionally adequate meals are served U> some 229 Senior Citizens. This is about n percent of Uie 2706 Senior CiUzens in Davie County. EnroIIees are encouraged to participate regularly to take advantage of Uie nutritious meals. DieU of buUi younger and older people have been found to be low In the minerals, calcium and iron, and the vitam ins rib oflav in, ascorbic acid (Vitam in C), Uiiamine and V iuim in A. The National needs of Uie older people are not, as far as is presenUy known, significanUy different from tbe needs of younger adults except for calories. Tbe decrease in caloric needs increases the vulnerabUlty U> obesity and nutrition deficiencies. s a v e 2 0 % on all g irl’s Carrousel®dresses 3 days only THURSDAY, FRIDAY & SATURDAY S p e c ia l s a v in g s fo r little p r in c fe s s e s w h o lo v e t o d r e s s u p . C h o o s e fr o m o u r e n t ir e C a r r o u s e l" c o lle c t io n o f a c J o r a b le (d re s s e s . A ll a r e m a c h in e w a s h a b le fo r e a s y c a r e . In s o ft, p a s te l p r in ts — ju s t r ig h t f o r S p r in g . S iz e s 4 t o 6 x a n d 7 to 1 4 . W ith 2 0 % s a v in g s , y o u 'll w a n t s e v e r a l s ty le s fo r y o u r little m is s , r e g . $ 1 3 s a le 1 0 .4 0 r e g , $ 1 5 s a le 1 2 .0 0 r e g . $ 1 7 s a le 1 3 .6 0 r u n a r x i j u m p lik e n e v e r b e f o r e in S p id e r - M a n S n e a k e r s * 1 3 W ear the sneakers featuring every kid's favorite supierhero. They're red and blue and covered with Spldey's fam ous web design. There's even Spider-oian's face o n the side. W rap-around traction sole, cushion-padded collar, tricol lined. 5-12. c' 1979 ti^arvel C om ics G roup IFDWl ^©¥0®Gil OM ©Kl m e n s, $17.95 r ig h t f o r a n y s p o r t : b a s k e t b a ll, t e n n i s , s q u a s h , h a n d b a l l , r a c q u e t b a ll w om en's 5 ,7 Sturdy can vas uppers, cush io ned insole lined with absorbent terry. P added topline, instep-protecting soft-padded tongue. Q uick stop all surface sole Ask for All Court', 4 DAVIU COUNTY HNTRRPRISU RUCORD. THURSDAY. MARCH «. 1Ч7Ч At New Store Oren Heffner Presented Plaque For Energy Conservation Methods Oren J. Heffner, owner of Heffner’s Land of Pood, was presented a plaque from Q.A. Brown Refrigeration Com­ pany of Salisbury commending energy conservation methods achieved in the new Willow Oak location. The presentation was made Monday by Edwin Goodwin, local Duke Power Company manager. J. David Morris, sales representative for Brown’s Refrigeration Company was on hand for the presentation and com­ mented “There is no supermarket nationwide to m y knowledge that can top the energy conservation methods featured in the new Heffner’s Land of Food facility.” Through the use of the most modern equipment, Heffner has utilized every possible aspect of fuel loss in the con­ ventional store, and transformed them into fuel conservation assets for this store.” The 19,000 square feet facility is totally energy efficient and features the installation of environmental control and energy management systems. The first system will annually cut $10,000- $12,000 off the fuel bill of a conventional supermarket of comparable size. The energy management system will assure an additional 10-15 percent reduction in this already reduced bill. Reflecting on his efforts to conserve energy, Oren Heffner said, “The cost of energy is such a factor in tbe operating expense of a supermarket, that this alone causes us to investigate every possible means of keeping cost in line.” “ A ll of us, as citizens and businessmen, must strive to conserve, energy in an effort to relieve an already critical situation.” The environmental control system assures o p tim al refrigeration case performance and customer comfort. Temperatures are maintained at 72 degrees and relative humidity at 55 percent. The system also assures the proper circulation of w arm air throughout the store obtained by the placement of intake and discharge vents. The warm air created by the refrigeration units is also recycled into the store as heat. This utilization results in free heating of the store in terms of energy consumption, free defrosting, partially free hot water, and reduced air conditioning loads. The energy m anagem ent system allows the operator to m aintain the m inim um am ount of energy necessary for the store to operate efficiently. The system has a pre-set point that keeps Davie Has 30 Students At N.C. State Students from all of the state’s 100 counties are studying the sciences, technologies, humanities and arts in a record spring semester enrollment of 17,737 at North Carolina State Univer­ sity. Thirty of these are from Davie County. ‘ Every county from Currituck to Cherokee and from Brunswick to Ashe is represented in the spring enrollment. As customary, the NCSU spring enrollment has dropped below the fall sem ester registration, when 18,476 students enrolled. However, this sem ester's registration tops the previous record spring enrollment of a year ago by 737 students. In addition to students from each of North Carolina's 100 counties, men and women from all but two of the other 49 states and from 77 other countries are studying at NCSU. (The two missing states are Alaska and Hawaii.) Included in the record enrollment are 5,821 women. Some 3,810 men and women are studying in the graduate programs, indicating the importance of NCSU as a center for advanced studies. Follow ing is the enrollm ent by schools; Agricultute and Life Sciences (in­ cluding the two-year Agricultural In­ stitute), 3,385; Design, 444; Education, 1,036; E ngineering, 4,150; Forest Resources, 861; Humanities and Social Sciences, 3,400; P hysical and M athem atical Sciences, 1,260; and Textiles. 550. Continents Continentfi are masses of granite "floating” on denser basalt. Geologists believe once there was only a single landmass, which broke up and began drifting apart some 180 miUion years edges of these ^ w landmasses, the continental shelves were built up. National Geographic says. killowatts used at the desired level. When usage exceeds this, point the system automatically search¿s the store for means of reducing the energy load. This is achieved by an automatic cut off of a light, hot water heaters, com­ pressors, etc. for a short period until the energy level returns to the desired point. Heffner’s Land of Food located in Clemmons is equipped with the en­ vironmental control system and has proven effective in the reduction of power usage. It is not equipped with the new feature of energy management. The most modern in energy con­ servation methods, the new systems were made available to businesses in the m id 1970’s. Davie CETA Program Has lyiore Tlian Doubled While Comprehensive Em ployment Training Act (CETA) programs in surrounding counties have been plagued by the threat of cutbacks recently, Davie County's CETA program has more than doubled since Jan. 1, county commissioners learned Monday. Thirty-eight new CETA slots were allocated to the program, bringing the total num ber of CETA employees here to 59, Mrs. Dare Sanford, program coordinator, said in an interview Tuesday. The county learned it would receive $407,949 in federal TiUe Two and TlUe Six CETA funds to fund the 38 new jobs from April 1 through Sept. i; Mrs. Sanford said. The money will be used to hire a variety of workers, including office personnel, chauffeurs, and loborers. All the workers will be employed by non­ profit, public service agencies. “The new positions cover just about every phase of public service em ­ ployment,” Mrs. Sanford said. “This is the most CETA workers Davie County has ever had...it ought to help out the county a lot.” Nine of the CETA slots will be used to hire laborers to help renovate tbe building purchased for the county’s newly-organized group hom e for retarded adults. D avie County joined the CETA program in 1975, Mrs. Sanford said, and since then, bas received money for about 35 employees. The num ber of slots each county gets is based on the unemployment rate in the county,” Mrs. Sanford explained. “The period the Department of labor decided to evaluate Davie County happened to be during the win­ ter...Da vie County has a lot of textile industries and during the winter, the work drops back and they lay off...that put us up in unemployment.” Not only has Davie County’s CETA program fared well this year, but it escaped many of the financial problems that plagued sister programs in other counties last fall, Mrs. Sanford says. CETA officials became concerned about the possibility of cutbacks alter Congress delayed deciding how nuch money the program was to receive during last fall’s session. “The federal government has been terrible for waiting until the last minute to do anything,” Mrs. Sanford com­ mented. “The Congress thought that there was no rush to renew the program, and that CETA had enough money...that wasn’t true. Everybody was running out of money...For awhile there, we only knew for about three weeks at a time if we had money for our workers...” N evertheless, the D avie County program never had to lay off CETA employees, Mrs. Sanford said. "W e had about $20,000 extra, which was used to help out those departments in the red...Some people believed that they could overspend and that the state would come bail them out, but I operated my CETA budget like I do my budget at home...I just don’t get in the red that way.” After learning of the new slots available this spring, various public agencies in the county, such as the public library, sheriff’s department, and county and city offices, sent in requests for CETA workers. “After that, I went through and evaluated the requests...we tried to determine which jobs were the most needed and would offer the most em­ ployment to the worker,” Mrs. Sanford said. “We also wanted to pick positions that would help the worker actually Ieam something useful and maybe offer an opportunity for advancement.” Job applicants will be reviewed this month, with final approval coming from Davie County manager Ron Vogler. The CETA program was set up to help find jobs and training for the unem­ ployed, particularly minorities and the poor. In order to qualify, applicants must have been out of work for 15 of the 20 previous weeks and be within the federal poverty guidelines. Interested a p ­ plicants should contact Mrs. Sanford at the CETA office in the Davie County office building in Mocksville. B e r m u d a R u n P u b lic C o r p o r a t io n C a n c e lle d F o r L a c k O f I n t e r e s t A public corporation, organized by members of the Bermuda Run Golf and Country Club to buy the club from Billy R. Satterfield, has cancelled its stock offering because of insufficient interest. To finance the proposed purchase, the new corporation, Bermuda Run Golf & Country Coub, Inc., was attempting to sell SOO shares of stock at $5,000 a share now and an additional 200 shares later, for a total purchase price of $3.5 million. But when the directors of the cor­ poration met last week, only about half of the shares had been subscribed for and, as a result of this, the directors then voted to cancel the stock offering. An offering circular had been distributed by McManeus & Co. Inc., which has offices in the First Center Building in Winston-Salem. McManeus is a member of the National Association of Securities Dealers. The circular said the corporation was organized in December to acquire the amenities at Bermuda Run from Ber­ muda Run Ltd., owned by Satterfield, and entered into an agreement wilh Bermuda Run Ltd., on January 3, to purchase the various amenities, in­ cluding an 18-hold golf course and clubhouse, for $3.5 million. Because of the uncertainly of being able to raise sufficient capital from the sale of slock exclusively lo residents of Bermuda Run and members of ite country club, directors of the cor­ poration decided to m ake shares available to the public, the circular said. Club members had the right of first refusal of the offer. The deadline was extended from February го lo February William D. Bowen Honored For Service To Education Photo by Garry Foster Edwin Goodwin, local Duke Power manager presents Oren Heffner with a plaque commending him on energy conservation methods in the new store. Tommy Garver (1 to r) energy management specialist with W.A. Brown & Son, Inc. J. David Morris, sales representative and Jake Walton, commercial representative for Duke Power observe the presentaUon. 28 and there was a provision to extend il to March 30. Present and future members of the country club who were not shareholders were to be required to "pay such initial assessment to the company as m ay be • fixed from time lo time by the com­ pany," the circular said. The circular listed the officers of the new corporation as Carl N. Boon, president; Larry F. Habegger, vice president; Lloyd H. Abbot, Jr ., secretary and treasurer; and Charles L. Roediger, director. Driver Injured In Wreck The driver of a 1970 Dodge was taken by ambulance lo the Davie County Hospital following an accident last Friday aboul 7 a.m . on US 64, 3.1 miles west of Mocksville. Richard Claude Tutterow, 25, of Rt. 1 Mocksville was injured when his vehicle went out of control and wrecked. State Highway Patrolm an W. D. Grooms said his investigation showed that Tutterow ran onto the right shoulder and he lost control. The vehicle continued down the right »lioulder and into the ditch. The vehicle then slid sideways until it struck a tree with ils left side and came lo rest. Dam age lo the vehicle was estimated at $1000. There were no charges. Skim Milk Skim m ilk contains less than O.s percent m ilk fat. Most lowfat and skim milk is fortified with both Vitamin A and D. An 8 ounce glass has bout 90 calories. At its meeting Monday night the Davie County Board of Education passed a resolution honoring board m em ber W illiam D. (BUI) Bowen for his more Uian 8 years of service on the board. Bowen chose not to seek re-election to Uie board and wUI go off the board at its regularly scheduled meeting April 2. Taking Bowen's seat on the board in April will be Luther Potts, who was elected last year to begin serving a 6- year term as a board member beginning Uiis year. Re-elected to the board to begin serving an additional 6-year term on Uie board beginning in AprU was Mrs. Frances (Pan) Beck, Uie current vice- chairm an of the board. The resoluUon passed Monday night honoring Bowen read as follows; BE IT RESO LVED; “That whereas, WUliam D. Bowen, has completed eight plus years of ser­ vice to this board as a member Ihereof- and, whereas, he has been faithful and dUigent in attendance upon the said board and In attending to the business of Uie board; and whereas, due to his ef­ forts Uie schools of Davie County have been greaUy benefited; and whereas, Uie progress made in education in Davie County in the last several years is in a large measure due to his leadership and interest; and, whereas, his knowledge, counsel, and guidance have been in- M an Charged In Robbing Service Station Alvin Shaver, 19, of Uie Lakewood Motel in Davie County, was charged Feb. 27 by Davie County Sheriff’s Dept, officials wiUi Uie aUeged larceny of $88 from Uie Phipps Exxon Station on Uie Farm ington Rd. on Sunday, Feb. 25. Shaver is being held in Uie county jaU under $300 bond and his court ap­ pearance in Davie District Court is set for M arch 19. Vehicles Collide Two vehicles were involved in a coUision last Wednesday about 4:45 p.m. at Uie intersecUon of North M ain and GaiUier Streets in MocksvUle. Involved was a 1974 Ford operated by Marie Wood Haynes of Mocksville and a vehicle operated by O a ig Charles MiUer of Lexington. MocksvUle Policeman B.A. Foster said his invesUgation showed that Mrs. Haynes was m aking a left turn at the intersecUon when the M iller vehicle faUed to stop for the stoplight and hit the Ford. There were no injuires and no charges. Bill Bowen valuable to the board over the years; NOW T H E R E FO R E , be it resolved that the board go on record as ex­ pressing its graUtude to WUliam D. Bowen for his years of service, his ad­ vice and his leadership, and further that Uie board directs that a copy of Uiis resoluUon be spread upon the minutes, a copy forwarded to Uie said WiUiam D. Bowen, and a copy forwarded to Uie public press of Davie County that Uie people of the county m ay be apprised of this action.” Candice Renee Steele celebrated her first birthday with a party at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. David Steele, Jr. Special guests were her grand­ parents. David Steele. Sr.. Helen Steele, W Walter Ray and Betty Bennett and great • grandparents, Sam and Lois Boger. Candice wants to (hank all her friends and relatives for the gifts. Breakin Reported M artin’s Hardware ant^E quipm ent A Company was reported broien into over “ Uie weekend and an undertermined amount of merchandise taken. The MocksviUe Police Department is in­ vesUgating. WEEKLY NEWS... from N orth Ja m e s E L a m b e th lina Legislature, 3 0 “) District North Caiollna Legistad-л BuUdlng.Raleigh. ЧС 2W119t9-7M-5843I Greetings! I am Jam es Lambetn, your representative from the 30th District, and I wiU be visiUng with you every week bringing you items of in­ terest from your State House in Raleigh. PresenUy serving a second term as a legislator I am chairm an of Uie wUdlife committee, vice chairm an of the high­ way safety committee, and sit on the approporations on general government and transportaUon, commissions and insUtutions for Uie blind and deaf, corporations, and public libraries committees. Public hearings that have been held in conjuncUon with the proposed WUdlife Resources BUI (HB 302, SB 226) ended Tuesday and the sun came out Wed­ nesday. We are surely happy to have clear w eather and w arm er tem ­ peratures after aU the snow and rain we 'have had here in Raleigh. And it would be deUghtful if we could interpret Uie break in the weather as a sign lhat we win soon reach a saUsfactory com- . ’ ■ promise on the biU. ^ We introduced a biU which has been sent to Uie AppropriaUons Committee seeking funds to provide a Park Ranger for Boone’s {^ve State Park. We are requesting Uiat Uie amount of $20,676 for. Uie Fiscal Year 1979-1980 and $16,086 for' Fiscal Year 1980-1981 be directed bo th.e ^ Department of Natural Resources a n d .'V C om m unity Developm ent for a Ranger’s employment. We have m uch praise for M r. Joe 'Hoffm an, son of Dr. and Mrs. Victor H offm an of Spring Street in T hom asville; M iss E llen P arker, ■ daughter of M r. and Mrs. A.L. Parker of - Route 5 in Lexington; and M r. David A WiUiams, son of Dr. and Mrs. J.H . . W illiam s of Lynella Lane 'in 1 Thomasville. AU of these young people ; did a superb job as pages, and it was a ' pleasure to have Uiem in Raleigh with ' us. O ffé rin ) P e rs o n a lize d , P ro fe s s io n a l S e rvle e • MODERN PRESCRIPTION DEPARTMENT II • LOW, DISCOUNT PRICES • PRESCRIPTION Ш RECORDS BILL FOSTER Registered Pharmacist • FREE BLOOD PRESSURE CHECKS Л • CHARGEACOUNTS BOB RAUCH Registered Pharmacist F ostor-R aaeh D ru o C om pany W ilkesboro Street Phone 634-2141 M ocksville, N.C. DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, THURSDAY. MARCH 8. l')74 'Г П о с Ш , J U B I L E E S A L E S D A Y S YakketySaxl County manager Ron Vogler (right) gets a music lesson from Robert Patillo, band director. (Photos by Robin Carter) ______________ Events Scheduled At Hiffh School Band Day Is Saturday Women’s Breezy Canvas Pumps Reg. $5.99 $ ^ 2 7 Mayor R.C. Smith and the Davie County commissioners have proclaimed Sahirday, M arch 10 as Band Day. ^ The event is a fund raising effort to ^ s e é u re funds necessary for the DCHS Band to participate in National Music Festival in May at Daytona Beach, Flòrida. Approximately $17,000 is needed for the 102 mem ber group to attend the festival. To date, $7,000 has been raised. Ф To be held in the Davie High parking lot rain or shine, activities wiU begin Saturday at 10:00 a.m . Included in the schedule is an aU day flea m arket sponsored by the Davie Band Boasters and live performances by the jazz Band and Jazz Ensemble. ^ ^ Also, an item with an esUmated value Of $50 wUl be auctioned per hour. D onated by local m erchants and citizens, items include a hand-made afgban, chain saw, table, plus many others. ' À radio-a-thon sponsored by WDSL l|L4|vill also )>e held. Beginning at 8:00 a.m . -Davie students wiU m an telephones to record donations. People wishing to pledge money for the trip are urged to caU 634-5905 or 634-2177. Throughout the day interviews with band officials and members wUl be aired, and live per­ formances by the jazz band and en- ,¡0 semble are scheduled. A ctivities w ill culm in ate w ith a barbecue chicken supper in the school cafeteria. Beginning at 4:30 p.m ., chicken wUl be grUled on the spot over hot coals. For $2.50, plates wiU consist of a half chicken, slaw, potato salad and t iroU. DesserU are extra. Serving wUl continue until 6:30 p.m. • This is the first time that the DCHS band has had the opportunity to par­ ticipate in the national music festival. ■Tbe 102-member group wUl consist of 81 'members of the marching band, 18 i niem bers of the dancing boots and 4 Ф 'majorettes. : In order to attend national com­ petition, the group must raise eno money so that funds secured from ¡dividual contestants will be m inim al. ■ ; Roger Staley, assistant band dbrector Isaid, “The support of the county has ;been tremendous in this very whort- ^ '-whUe cause. Students have worked hard w ;t o m ake the dream of national com­ petition a reaUty." ; "W e hope," he said, “that community support wUl be strong Saturday.” With the cooperation of the Band Booster Club and the Davie Arts Council, students have sponsored several fund raising events. “Rent-a- Kid programs and firewood sales were carried out along with a variety show in February. AU proceeds from the band day celebration will go to the com- vention fund. Ladies Tops Women’s Briefs & Bikini’sReg. $1.00 W om en’s Duster Reg. $10.99 Johmiy Roberts of WDSL radio (right, standing) discusses plans for the upcoming radio-«-thon with (I to r) Robert Patillo, Martha Kontos and Susan Wall.Ladies Pants Reg. $13.90 $ О 44 Ladies Panty Hose N O W e Reg. 79c N O WReg.: W om en's GownsReg. $7.99 N O W 50 $ 5 8 8 8 Pc. Cast A lum inum Cookware Set Reg. $3 9 .9 9 One Group Of Polester Knits N O W $ О О в 7 N O W 97* to 4*^ Robert Patillo (center) shows the agenda for the Florida trip to county commissioners Lawrence Reavis and Buddy Alexander. Men’s Work Shoes Reg. $25.99 $ 0 1 8 8 MOW ^ ■ Men’s Casual Dress Pants Values To $11.99 $ E 8 8 ^ AN D Men’s Work Boats Reg. $28.99 Men’s & Boys Athletic Shoes Reg. $10.99 MOV* Mayor R.C. Smith and Suun Wall (right) evamiiie tbe afgban made byÀfahnn T n R ii À m ^ tin n o t! Betty Smith (toft) that will be aucOoiedduring Saturday’s lestlvitle». AJf^nan юаел uctionea tor the alghan was donated by Mr*. Doe Wood. M en's Fruit O f The Loom Briefs 3 for $3.99 M en's Fruit O f The Loom Tee Shirts Reg. 3 for $4.99 3 FOR * 2 ” Men’s 3 Piece Vested Suits <S9«s * 1 lb « « 11 Tee ShirtsReg. 3 for $3.49 W ^ M en's Short Sleeve Coveralls Reg. $14.99 $1 2 * 8 Boy's Briefs Refl 3 for $3.19 3 f o r » 2 * ^ Boy’s Vested Suits Reg. $34.95 $9 р в 8 DAVIL COUNTY FNTliRl’RISI'. RB ORD. THURSDAY. MARCH 8. I*)?*) S e a f f e r - B r o o k s Mr. and Mrs. Jerry Seager of Rt. 3, Hickory HUls announce the engapm ent of their daughter LuAnne Marie to Larry Dale Brooks son of Mr. and Mrs. Rol)ie Brooks of Rt. 4 Mocksville.Miss Seager is a graduate of Davie High and Winslam Business College. She is employed at Funder America, Inc. M r. Brooks is a graduate of Davie High and is employed at Ingersoll-Rand ^TTirwedding is planned for April Uth, at the First Presbyterian Church in Mocksville. Arts Council Awards Banquet Is June 2nd The Davie County Arts CouncU, continuing to “Keep the Arte Alive” , wiU host the Annual Awards Banquet at Bermuda Run Country Club, Saturday, June 2, 1979. “Planning the affair was the most exciting item of business at the February Board meeting” , sayd Mrs, Roberta Goodwin, Board memlier. For your enjoyment, Uie festivities Miss Anne Barber Given Recipe Party M iss Anne B arber of North WUkesboro, April 7th bride-elect of Ron Cannon, was entertained Sunday, af­ ternoon, M arch 4th, with a recipe party hosted by Mrs. Jam es Everidge and Miss Candy Kveridge at Uieir home on Halander Drive. Upon a rriv a l, the honoree was presented with a corsage of shasta daisies. Miss Barber also received a recipe box and a wicker basket as hostess gifte. Nineteen gueste were served Russian Tea and spiced pumpkin cake. Special guest were Mrs. John Barber, of NorUi WUkesboro and Miss Jean Brady of StatesviUe. Miss Jerome Honored At Luncheon A wedding luncheon was given March 3, at Bermuda Run Country Club honoring Miss M artha Louise Jerome and Jeffery Hart Ward. Hoste for the courtesy were George Drysdale of St. Louis, Mo., Henry L. Jerome of Wilmington and M r. and Mrs. Fred D. Jerome of Raleigh, aU uncles of Uie bride-elect. The tables were covered with white linen cIoUis and an arrangement of yeUow and white daisies, snapdragons and baby’s breath centered the honored couple’s table. Gueste were members of the wedding party and out-of-town gueste. Some of Uie special gueste included: Mrs. Henry G. Seigrist of Bordentown, New Jersey, Mrs. Pierre J. Lair of Somerset, New Jersey, M r. and Mrs. Fred S. H art of Virginia Beach, Va., and M r. and Mrs. Edgar Hart of Decatur, Ga. wUl begin in Uie Grand BaU Room at 7 p,m. with champagne and music to add to the social hour. There will be a gallery of paintings furnished by members of Uie Davie Art Guild. From the buffet you wUl help your­ selves with rounds of beef, chicken A la King, au gratin potatoes, green beans, a salad display, pastries and coffee. Follow ing dinner w ill be the presentation of awards and listening to Uie “Sweet Adalines” . The evening wiU end with dancing to a “live band” cafefully selected for you. “Right now, we’re torn between Tony Dibianca and Smyle” , says Roberta Goodwin. Vou are cordlaUy Invited to help us celebrate anoUier successful year of the arte. Please place your reservations by calling the Arte CouncU Office between Uie hours of 8:30 and 5 Monday through Friday. M a r t h a L o u i s e J e r o m e I s W e d T o L t , J e f f r e y H a r t W a r d Miss Martha Louise Jerome became Uie bride of Lt. Jeffery Hart Ward on Saturday, March 3, at 3:30 p.m. in the Episcopal Church of the Good Shepherd in Cooleemee. The Reverend WiUis M. Rosenthal, rector, officiated. P h ilip A. D eadm on presented a program of classical music with works of H andel and Bach. F or the processional, the Trumpet Voluntary by Purcell was played and Psalm X IX by Marcella was used as the recessional. The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John London Jerome of Ruffin Street, Cooleemee. She is a graduate of Davie High School and NorUi Carolina State University where she earned her B.S. degree in Medical Technology. She was formerly employed by Rowan M em orial H ospital as a M edical Technologist. The bridegroom, son of M r. and Mrs. Jack Stewart W ard of 909 Holly Lane in Mocksville, is a graduate of Davie High School and A ppalachian State University with a degree in Business AdministraUon. He was a member of Uie Army R.O.T.C. for four years and received his commission as an Army Lieutenant. He is presenUy serving at Fort Polk, La. Given in marriage by her father, the bride wore a formal ivory gown of silk finish satin trimm ed with jlencon lace appliques and featured a Vneckline, raised waisted bodice and long tapered sleeves. The skirl had ¡ilencon appliques wiUi attached chapel train and lace edged the gown hemline. The fam ily heirloom Brussels lace cathedral mantilla was attached to a bandeau headpiece and she carried her paternal grandmother’s prayer book which was topped with a m iniature cascade of white roses, stephanatis and baby’s breath with ivory satin streamers. M iss Ann M auger Jerom e of Cooleemee, sister of the bride, was m aid of honor. She wore a floor-length shrimp colored gown of q iana, bloussrai crocheted bodice with scoop neckline shoulder ties, wing sleeves and a fuU circular skirt wiUi Ue belt. She carried a nosegay of yeUow and white daisies, baby's breath and accented w ith talism an roses and ivory satin streamers. B ridesm aids were M iss C am élia London Jerom e of Raleigh, cousin of the bride; Mrs. Alan Crowle, Jr. of Melbourne, Florida ; Miss Susan Bullick of Durham and Miss Katherine Tatum of Cooleemee. Their gowns and flowers were idenUcal to Uiat of the honor at­ MRS. JEFFREY HART WARD tendant. The bridegroom had his father as best m an. Ushers were Craig Stewart Ward, Brent Stanley W ard and Scott Edward W ard all of Mocksville, brothers of the bridegroom and John London Jerome, Jr. of Cooleemee, brother of the bride. The wedding was under the direction of Mrs. PhUip A. Deadmon. For their wedding trip, the bride chose was Martha Louise Jerome a suit of cream chaUis to which she added a corsage of white roses lifted from her bouquet. FoUowing the wedding trip to Disney World in Orlando, Florida, Uie couple wUl make their home in Fort Polk, La. Mrs. H .E. W ard of ThomasvUle, grandmother of Uie bridegroom, was among the honored gueste. OUier special out of town gueste included: Mrs. Sheldon Mitchell of High Point, Mrs. Dolan Calhoun and Miss Jean Calhoun both of ’ThomasviUe, Mr. and Mrs. Raym ond Hart, Mr. and Mrs. Charles M. SmlUi, Mrs. John Trexler and Miss Rhonda Trexler all of Salisbury, Mrs. W .P. Holt, Jr. of Erwin, M r. and Mrs. Robert C. Rapp of High Point, Mr. and Mrs. Paul G. Parker of Tarboro, Mrs. Lewis H. Parham , Jr. of Charlotte and Mrs. W.B. Lewis, Jr. of Monroe. REH EA RSA L D IN N E R FoUowing Uie rehearsal on Friday evening the bridegroom’s parente, Mr. and Mrs. Jack Stewart Ward, en­ tertained members of the wedding party and special gueste wiUi a rehearsal dinner at the Red House Inn in Lexington. The tables were covered with while linen cloths and an arrangement of yellow and white daisies, snap­ dragons and baby's breaUi centered the table of Uie honored couple. Silver candelabra holding lighted tapers were used. The Reverend WUlls M. Rosenthal, rector. The Church of Uie Good Shepherd, E piscopal gave the in vocaUon. Jack Ward, father of the bridegroom , and also best m an, proposed a toast to the bridal couple and welcomed Miss Jerome into the Ward family. J.L . Jerome, father of the bride, responded wiUi a toast to Uie honored couple and their famUies. RECEPTION Im m ediately foUowing the wedding, Uie bride’s parente, M r. and Mrs. John L. Jerome, entertained at a recepUon at Hickory HUl Golf and Country Club. M r. and Mrs. John R. Barber of NorUi WUkesboro greeted gueste and Mrs. Craig Stewart W ard presided at the guest register. The bride’s table, centered with an arrangem ent of yellow and w hite daisies, snapdragons, snowflake pom­ poms and baby’s breath and flanked by sUver candelabra holding lighted ivory tapers, held the Uered wedding cake and champagne punch. Mrs. ^ e d D. Jerome, godmother and aunt of the bride, cut and served Uie cake which was decorated with yellow, rosebuds and topped with a miniature; nosegay of fresh flowers. Assisting with' the serving were; Mrs. WiUiam D. Bowen, Mrs. Charles E. Alexander, Mrs. Hudson Hoyle, Mrs. E.C. Tatum, Mrs. John P. Spargo, Mrs. V.G. Prim , and Mrs. WiUiam Gales. Goodbyes were said to M r. and Mrs. WiUiam Frederick Pierce. McClamrock - Craven Vows Are Spoken Miss Hazel McClamrock and Clarence Craven were united in m arriage February 24 at the home of the bride. The Reverend HayW ood H yatt of ThomasviUe N.C. officiated at the double ring ceremony. FoUowing the ceremony, a reception was held for the gueste. The home was decorated with yellow roses, white daisies, and yeilow spring flowers. The couple wiU make their home at Route 6, MocksviUe, foUowing a brief honeymoon. Dinner Party Honors Candy Everidge Miss Candy Everidge and David Poplin, who wUl be married Satiu-day, March 24, were honored Saturday evening M arch 3rd at a dinner party at the home of M r. and Mrs. Robert B. HaU on Halander Drive. Joining the Halls in entertaining were Mr. and Mrs. Robert B. HaU, Jr. and Mr. and Mrs. D .J. Mando. Upon her arrival the bride-elect was presented a corsage of daisies. A four course dinner was served buffet style from the dining room and then the Mabe - Young Mr. and Mrs. Stanley J. Mabe of Route 1, Stakesdale, N.C. announce the engagement of their daughter, Teresa Gayle, to Timothy Scott Young, son of Mr. and M rs. Jerry Nelson Voung of Route 2, Advance, N.C. H ie bride-elect is a 1975 graduate of Madison-Mayodan Senior High School; also a 1977 graduate of Forsyth Technical Institute, Winston-Salem, N.C. She is employed as a Radiologic Technologist at North CaroUna Baptist Hoepltal. M r. Young is a 1975 graduate of Davie County High School. He is employed wiUi the R . J . Reynolds Tobacco Company In Winston-Salem, N.C. The wedding is planned for July 8, at 3 p.m . at the First Baptist Church In Madison, N.C. room of Uie home. Decorations include silk flowers and boxwood. Among Uie gueste were M r. and Mrs. Jim Everidge and M r. and Mrs. Russel Poplin, bridal parente. Out-of-town gueste were M r. and Mrs. Grady Lakey of Lexington and Miss Ann Barber and Ron Cannon of North WUkesboro. The hostesses’ gift was a crystal relish dish. Marsha V. Anders will celebrate ber first birthday with a party at her home Saturday, March 10. To share the oc­ casion with her will be her parente, Mr. and Mrs. Dale Anders of Fulton Street, Mocksville. grandmother, Mrs. Choe Seong of Seoul, Korea and.grandparents, M r. and M rs. L.M . Anders of Mocksville. Melissa Lynn Bracken, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Tommy Bracken of Route 6, MocksvUle celebrated her 6th bir­ thday with a welner roast at Uie home of her aunt uncle, Mr. and Mrs. Jerry Cornelison. Guests Included her grand­ parents M r. and Mrs. Charles Burgess. Linda Burgess. M r. and Mrs. Dennis Foster and Chris, her sister. Michelle and friends. Andria Elm ore and K im ­ berly Hattaway. Campbell College Alumni Meet March 13 C am pbell CoUege alu m n i of the Davidson and Davie County area wiU have Uieir annual chapter meeting on Tuesday, March 13, in the parlor of ttie F irst B aptist C hurch, W est T hird Avenue. Lexington. The meeting, as announced by Edgar A. Thomas. Jr.. chapter president, is scheduled for 7 ^ As principal speaker Dr. A.R. Burkot. its vice-president and provost. wiU discuss the past, present and anticipated future of CampbeU CoUege. Gueste at Uie meeting wiU be high school studente and parente interested in informaUon of Uie coUege. Miss Everidßre Is Honored At Dinner Mr. and Mrs. M .H. Grose, M r. and Mrs. M ark Alspaugh and Mrs. Richard Potte entertained Miss Candy Everidge and David Poplin wiUi a dinner at the Grose hom e on H alander D rive, Tuesday, February 13th. A Valentine motif was carried out in Uie decoraUons. The bride was presented a corsage of white carnations witti tiny red hearte. Included among ttie gueste were ttie bridal parente, Mr. and Mrs. Jim Everidge and M r. and Mrs. Harold Poplin. The hoste presented a gift of china in ttieir chosen pattern to ttie couple. Aroimd And About N EW C OM ER TO M OCKSVILLE The Reverend and Mrs. Jim m y D. Hinson are happy to welcome ttieir son, Jim m y D. Hinson, Jr. home. He wUl now reside witti them at Route 7, South O rcle Drive. He is a member of the Forest HUls Baptist Church of R a le ^ . , N C He is a graduate of the Sanderson High School of Raleigh, N.C. He has been employed for the past two years by the Budget Car RenU l Services of ttie W' Ralei^i-Durham M unicipal Airport. PATIENT AT BAPTIST HOSPITAL Nolan "Canuck” W right of MUUng Road is a patient at Bapttet H ospiul in Winston-Salem, where he wiU undergo surgery som etimethlsweek. M AKES D EA N ’S LIST AT FORSYTH TECH M artha Bodsford Naylor has made ttie Dean’s List at Forsyth Technical K iiool in Winston-Salem for the winter quarter in the A.D. Nursing program. She is the daughter of M r. and Mrs. Grady Bodsford and is m arried to Terry Naylor. ■ : ATTENDS NATIONAL CHOW HONOR COUNCIL IN CALIFORNIA Mr. and Mrs. Verious AngeU, owner of Farm and Garden Service, Inc., at-^w tended the National Oiow Honor CouncU of the Ralston Purina Co. held ttiis year in San Francisco, California February 27 Uirough M arch 3. Accom panjing tti« AngeUs on this trip were Mr. and Mrs. Clyde Brewer. Clyde has been a ' salesman for Farm and Garden Service since ite beginning here. WhUe in California, they were gueste at the Hotel St. Francis in downtown San Francisco along witti 348 other Purina Dealers from Uie entire USA. To be eUgible for Uiis honorable trip. Farm and Garden Service had to ship a m inim um requirem ent; in tons of feed and also have an increase over the previous year. m Riding the cable cars and subway were a new experience - Seeing ttie Golden Gate Bridge and Alcatraz were also among the attractions. Next year’s Honor CouncU wiU be held in Disney World, Fla. so they will make every effort to be there in March, 1980. Joel Kevin Anders will celebrate hli 12th birthday wlUi a party at his home In MocksvUle, Saturday. March lO. His cake was baked and decorated by an aunt. M n . Mildred Pollard. He Is the son of Mr. and Mrs. L.M. Anders Kimberly Hutchens, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. David Hutchens celebrated ber third birthday February 26. with a party at her home In MocksvUle. Several guests attending were: Mr. and Mrs. Bill Hutchens. Cathy Cornatser. Mrs. Cindy Melton and her great grand­ parents. M r. and Mrs. Leonard Salmons ol East Bend. N.C. Refreshments served consisted of cake, potato chips, sweet pickles, sandwiches and Cokes. K im ­ berly received loU of nice gifU. FruiU la Tin Cans You can leave fruits and fruit juices in opened tin cans if you cover and store them in ttie refrigerator. But use ttiem wittiin two or ttu-ee days after opening. S * . C iie m / i is p le a s e d to a n n o u n c e t h a t S . ¡sn o w asso ciate d w ith h im in th e p ractice o f C h iro p ra c tic a t 6 0 0 W ilkesboro S treet, M ock sv ille, N .C. O ffice H ours 9 a .m . to 6 p .m . ■ M o n d a y th ru S a tu rd a y T e le p h o n e 6 3 4 - 2 5 1 2 POLAROID Buy Now For Upcoming H olidays!!! 108 Color Film. SX 70Film , ’4.99 Reg. 7 .3 0 !5.49 Reg. >8.09 WE HAVE EASTER BASKETS, CARDS A N D C A H O Yillill! Wilkin's HOSPITAL PHARMACY 713 HOSPITAL ST. PHONE 634-3300 WILKINS DRUG CO. 20 COURT so. PHONE 634-2121 “ Snow W orld” Origiiul 7 coloi etching signed and numbered by the aniit on handmade Twin Rockei 1U0% rag paper with natural dedcled edges. Edition of 300 plus SO arnst proofs. Available Through T-F: 9-S SAT. 10-5 II CLOSED MONDAYCustom framii 101 WEST 3rd. AVENUE LEXINGTON, N.C.(704) 249<4428 Trotman's of Winiton-Salem IMVIIi ( OUNTY l.NTl-Rl’RISh RbCOKU. IIU KSDAV MARl 11 b, 1070 Davie Republicans Renew An Old Friendship At Annual Dinner - _ imitA fnr vinlnrv ” “With fi RpniihllrAiiDavie County Republicans turned out in force March 3 lo hear Congressman Jam es T. Broyhill at the annual Lincoln Day Dinner. Held at the DCHS cafeteria at 7:00 p.m ., the annual event was deemed a succcss with 250 in at­ tendance. Betsy Cochrane, county vice- chairm an extended a welcome to the "p a rty fa ith fu ls” and John Brock recognized clected Republican officials In attendance. Included were Kermit Smith, register of deeds; Delores Jor­ dan, clerk of court; George Smith, sheriff; Mayor R. C. Sm ith; Buster Cleary, town commissioner; and Glenn H ow ard, Joe Long and Lawrence Reavis, county commissioners. BUI HaU introduced guest speaker Congressm an Jam es T. Broyhill commenting that “ 1 have never been engaged in a campaign or worked with a candidate as well organized as Jam es ” BroyhUI. Davie was the pilot county for his election, and from the beginning he endeared us." Broyhill was accompanied by his wife Louise and Sbn Edgar to the meeting. ■ Currently serving as member of the 10th Congressional District of N. C., BroyhUI was first elected to congress in 1962. He served in the I960’s in Uie old Eighth Congressional District which included Davie County. He has been elected to each succeeding congress since 1962. Reflecting on the Lincoln Day y, celebration BroyhUI said, “ In honoring ■I Abraham Lincoln we recognize the m an who was the first Republican president and the m an who established the party in Uie 1850’s." "H e is Uiought of as rugged, honest, fair in dealings with fellow men, hard working and with perserverance," he said,” These are qualities that w r~ % The Head Table our country lacks in 1979.” BroyhUI also expressed concerns about the present Carter administration citing promises made by Carter as a candidate that have not been carried out during his term in office. "As a candidate. President Carter stated that if elected he would work with Uie DemocraUc consress and set Uiis Members of the Head table were (I to r) Mr. and Mrs. Bill Hall, Mrs. Louise Broyhill, Rep. Broyhill, H.R. Hendrix, county chairman; Mr. and Mrs. F ra n k Stroud and Mrs. Alvin Richardson. Wade Groce (right) discussed points of interest with Congressman Broyhill. __________________________________________________________ country moving again,” said BroyhUI. He promised to balance the budget and keep our defense program strong.” "Carter, as president, has gotten Uie country moving,” said Broyhill, “but in Uie wrong direcUon. He promised a lot, but as president has delivered little.” “When sworn in in 1976, inflaUon was less than 5 percent and now has doubled. With inflation Increasing daily it is evident that Uie voluntary wage and price control guide imposed by Carter will not work as long as the country piles deficit on deficit.”B royhill also cited governm ent regulations passed daily on businesses Uiat increase costs of products for consumers. He reflected on measures now in congress that wUI caU for Uie possible review and veto of such regulations the application of the sunset principal to programs. This would put limitations on Uie life of regulatory agencies so that congress would be required to review their effecUveness. Discussing foreign policies, BroyhiU said that “People are concerned and Uiat President Carter has let the public down in leading the fight to give away the Panam a Canal.” He also expressed concerns over the President’s actions in Tiawan and in the implications sent by the administration to America and the world in the CSiinese-Vietnam conflict. Concerning the SALT policy (Strategic Arms Limitations Treaty) BroyhUI said, “We have to remember Uiat we live Ui a danserous world and must maintain our defense program .’ “1 am concerned that America wiU sign a treaty Uiat will lim it the nuclear arms of Uiis country and not that of another.” In preparation of the 1980 campaign, BroyhUI urged Davie Republicans to unite for victory.” “With a Republican government,” he said, "W e can give tax relief to working people and allow them lo keep more dollars in their pockets where they belong.” “The American peoples future would be much brighter with a Republican majority government, and 1 urge Uie party to unite and organize to become Uie majority party in N. C.,” he said. H. R. Hendrix, Davie Republican Party Chairm an said, “Broyhill made an excellent speech and expressed many of the conservative views held in this county.” "Davie Republicans feel as if they cast the deciding vote In first electing Broyhill to Congress. I would love to see a Republican victory in 1980, said Hendrix. The 51-year-old Broyhill is currenUy Uie second ranking Republican member of Uie House Interstate and Foreign Commerce Committee and the second ranking Republican member of the House Budget Committee. He is Uie ranking Republican member of the Consumer Protection and Finance subcommittee of the ftterstate and Foreign Commerce Committee and the ranking Republican member of the Tax E x p e n d it u r e s , G o v e r n m e n t O rganization and R egulation sub­ committee of the Budget Committee. Born in Lenior and stUl a resident of that city, BroyhiU graduate from the University of NorUi Carolina in 1950 with a B. S. degree in business ad- minisb'ation. He was associated with BroyhUI Furniture Factories of Lenior from 1945-62. Story by Kathy Tomlinson Photos by Robin Carter Renewing old friendships are (I tor) Bill Hall, Mr. and Mrs. Broyhill and H .R . Hendrix, chairm an of thr Republican Party In Davle. Old Friends Chat Congressman Broyhill recalled memories of his flrst election in Davie and of the many friends he has made here. H ig h w a y P a t r o l B a s e S t a t io n Reg. Price ’169.95 Don’s Price ’119.95 Total Price »217** i Total Price »109’® (All Crystals Included!) D O N 'S J E W E L R Y & M U S IC 124 NORTH MAINSTREET C E N T E R MOCKSVILLE H DAVIH rOUNTY HNTI-PRRISI- RI-CORD. THURSDAY. MARCH 8. Some months back Folk­ ways discussed a number of coffee substitutes employed by early Appalachian settlers. A W lnston-salem reader recalling the series, also remembers that It failed to ¡1st one of the more common substitutes: sweet potatoes. She writes: “In none of your columns about ‘making do’ In grand­ m a’s day have you mentioned making coffee from sweet potatoes or the use of hops in making bread. “I, as a local history buff, am interviewing Mrs. Eliza Tuttle Speas, now 90 years old, 60 years a country doc­ tor’s wife. She tells that when she was growing up on a large farm near Rural Hall their drink for adults and children was made by cutting up sweet potatoes in sm all cubes, drying them In the sun, parching them brown in the oven, grinding It Into coffee to make a drink served with top cream.” Mrs. Lielnbach also makes note of the early use of hops as a substitute for baking powder. “When I asked her what they bought at the store (she had said they raised everything they used), she said ‘baking powder, soda, thread,’ then added, ‘not much baking powder, we made bread with hops!’ " I hope som e of your readers can enlighten me on the use of hops In bread. My m other (1877-1942) saved yeast from one baking to the next by stirring some of the yeast mixture into corn meal to make a thick pudding-like mixture which was dropped from a spoon (same as drop cookies are made) and dried in the sun until next bread- making day, whereupon the night before she put her ‘rivvels’ to soak in warm water and had growing yeast the next morning. “I would like to know where the pioneer woman got her ‘starter’ and what hops had to do with It. M y older sister remembers that when the yeast was weak and my mother had no hops she would scald peach leaves and use them in some way. I ’d like to hear what your readers can add to this.” A lfred E . M cThenia of Glade Spring, Virginia, has a question and comment about Yonkepia, a supposed mountain herb and a vital ingredient of Yonkepia Blood Bitters, a patent medicine of the 1890’s. He writes: “ D o you have any in ­ form ation on the herb Yonkepia? Ever hear of it? I don’t know the true bontanical name of this plant, but it was supposed to have been discovered on W hite Top Mountain in 1852 by one Cam pbeU Snapp, a slave ‘cure m aster' of wide reputation for his treatment of blood disorders and venerial diseases. “Prior to its discovery by CampbeU Snapp, it had been known and used as a medicine by the Creek and Seminole Indians.” According to newspaper ads of the day (August 14, 1891), the herb was supplied by root- diggers in the Glade Spring area, and the patent medicine itself sold for two doUars per bottle. Information from readers who know of this preparation or about Yonkepia will be appreciated. Readers are invited to send foUc materials to Folk-Ways and Folk-Speech, A p­ palachian State University, Box 376, Boone, N.C. 28608 Y o u m a y fe d m o re assured a b o u t w in in g a n d d in in g n e w frie n d s I f y o u k n o w th a t c o o k in g e va po ra te s th e a lc o ­ h o l in w in e . A n d w h e n th e a lc o h o l goes, so does m o s t o f its ca lo rie s. A ll th a t is le ft o f th e w in e Is th e fla v o r, a ro m a — a n d s o p h is tic a tio n — It Im p a rts to fo o d . M a n y A m e ric a n s are n o w a d o p tin g th e e le g a n t E u ro ­ pean c u s to m o f se rvin g b o t­ tle d m in e ra l w a te r w ith m eals a n d c o c k ta ils . F e rra re lle , Ita ly ’s la rg e s l-s e lliiig a cq ua m in é ra le , w ill s(ioj> be in lro - liu c e d h ere . Its lig lile r le ve l uf c a rb o n a tio n is c o n sid e re d per- fe e t w ith w in e s a n d liq u o rs . SAVE UP TO c o o i E E f f l e e BE A ... WE .welcome FOOD STAMP SHOPPERS COOLEEMEE, N.C. OPEN FRIDAY NITES TIL 8:30 P.M. WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT S U P E R M A R K E T SERVE ICE COLD COKES 6 3 3 . 8 0 z . $ T 49 BTLS. I « WITH ONE FILIED SUPER SAVER CARD OFFER GOOD THRU MARCH 10, 1979 YOUR CHOICE SUGAR 89^5-LB. 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A M E R IC A N C H E E S E 12-OZ.PKG. $ ] 1 9 PET RITI FROIEN P IE S H E L L S PKG.OFrS 6 9 * RUSSnCRINKlE-CUT F R E N C H F R IE S 2-LB.BAG 6 9 * HORIOA C E L E R Y ; LARGESTALK 2 7 * IDAHO RUSSr P O T A T O E S 5-LB.BAG 6 9 * YEUOW S W E E T P O T A T O E S lb. 1 5 *nmui L A U N D R Y D E T E R G E N T 9 9 * COBLE'S STICK OR SA N D W IC H ICE- ^ Jim Mony. manager of the WUlow Oak location, checks inventory in Ip preparation for grand opening. The new Heffner’s L«nd of Food is an ultra-modern facUtty located In the Willow Oak Shopping Center on Highway 601 North. Opens In Mocksville^s Willow Oak Shopping Center H e f f n e r ’ s N e w S t o r e Preparing for the opening of the WUlow Oak location are (I to r) Lester Parris, supervisor of meat operations; Randy Miiier, supervisor of dairy and frozen foods: Oren Heffner, owner; and Harold Allen, grocery supervisor. * Heffner’s Departments And Managers Produce Dept.Manager Jim Mony of Rt. 1 Advance will be manager of the new Heffner’s Land of Food in Willow Oak. M r. Mony has served as m anager of the Heffner store in Yadkinville for the past year and half. For 15 years he served as manager of a Winn-Dixie store in Durham . As manager, he will oversee all departments, keeping things running smoothly. Approximately 30 people will be employed in this store. M r, Mony termed the new store in WUlow Oak as “the best and most modernly equipped store I have ever worked in. The layout ot the store provides the best in customer con­ venience.” "As the nicest store of the entire area, with the latest equipment and facUities, we wUI strive to provide courteous and efficient service to all customers,” said M r. Mony. Deli-Bakery Dept. An expanded m odem deli-bakery wiU be one of the m any outstanding features of the Heffner’s WUlow Oaks store. Mrs. PauUne Hendrix of Rt. 2 Advance (Fork) wUl serve as manager of Uiis department. She has ten years of ex­ perience wiUi the deU operation of Heffner’s NorUi M ain Street store. She will be assisted by Opal Poplin and Patty York. The deli at the Willow Oak store will feature the serving of plate lunches, including meats and vegetables; freshly baked breads, doughnuts and honiemade desserts, salads, sandwich loaves, cold cuts, etc. “I can’t wait to get started” , said M rs.. Hendrix. " I believe the people wUl be weU pleased with the service and variety our deli wUl offer.” The deli at the Nortti M ain Street store wUl rem ain open and operate as usual. Cashiers Linda MUler of Rt. 6 MocksviUe wiU serve as head cashier for the new Heffner Store in WiUow Oak. For the past two years she has worked in this position wiOi Uie Heffner store in YadkinvUle and has been in the grocery business for 9 years. Mrs. MUler wUI be in charge of aU cashier transactions and responsible for balancing Uie registers at the end of the day. She wUl be assisted by three fuU-time cashiers: Dianne Blackwelder, Paula Shoffner and Luray Shoffner; four part- time cashiers, Cindy WUkerson, Carla WUIiams, Valerie WUIiams and Dana Jones. The new checkout system at the WiUow Oak store wUl feature the most modern and computerized equipment. In this store the cart wUl be unloaded by the cashier as the items are checked out. The expanded produce section of the Heffner store in WiUow Oak will make possible for a greater variety of items. Mike Johnson of R t. 1 MocksvUle wiU serve as produce manager of the new store. For the past year he has served in Uiis position at the North M ain Street location. BiU Russ of Rt. 7 MocksviUe serves as supervisor of fhe produce departments for aU seven stores. M r. Russ has 15 years of experience with Heffners. He does all produce buying and sets the prices. The refrigeration cases in the new Heffner store are 24 feet longer than those of the North M ain Street location. This wiU allow for the stocking of a larger variety of produce items. “We want to stock anything that the customer m ight want and at the lowest price possible” , said M r. Russ. Meat Department The m eat department of the new WiUow Oak store is also considerably larger than that of the North M ain Street store. The new store wiU carry a fuU line of quaUty meats including pork, red meat (beef), chicken, hams etc. All m eat will be delivered to the store fresh (continued on page 6B) With the opening of the ultra-modern store in WiUow Oak Shopping Center, there are seven stores In Uie super­ market chain owned by Oren J. Heffner of MocksvUle. In addition lo the two stores in M ocksville, there are stores in Y ad k inv ille, C lem m ons, Lexington, LewisviUe and the Cardinal Shopping Center in Forsyth County, Oren Heffner gained experience in the retaU grocery business at an early age, working at his father’s store after school and on weekends. His father was the leading grocer in Maiden for many years, FoUowing service in the Air Force during World W ar II, Heffner returned to Maiden and went to work for the Heffner & Bolick Grocery Store Uiere. In 1948, this com pany expanded to MocksviUe and opened ttie Heffner & Bolick Grocery at the site now occupied by the B.C, Moores & Sons Cpmpany. The H effner & Bolick Com pany operated stores in both Maiden and MocksviUe until the death of Heffner’s father. Heffner then traded his interest in the Maiden store and acquired full ownership of ttie MocksvUle business. In 1952 Heffner’s moved into larger quarters, ttie store now occupied by Belk’s of MocksvUle. This was foUowed by the opening of a store in YadkinviUe in 1956. In December 1960 Heffner’s opened a store in Clemmons. Soon outgrowing his original facilities, he moved into a larger buUding. Last year, 1978, Heff­ ner’s of Clemmons moved for the third time into a stUi larger and more modern faciUty. In 1963, Heffner’s of MocksviUe moved from ttie Belk site into their present quarters on North M ain Street. Behind this store a large warehouse, with headquarters for the chain of stores, was constructed. In 1970 Heffner’s opened a store in Lexington. In September of 1975 the LewisviUe store was opened. In April of 1977, Heffner purchased a grocery store in the Cardinal Shopping Center of Winston.Salem which since that time has been another Heffner’s Land of Food. This store is located on West Clemmonsville Road. Mr. Heffner is an active member of Uie First Baptist Church of MocksvUle. He is a m ember of the North Carolina Milk Commission, having been ap­ pointed to his second four-year term on this body in December 1977 by Governor Jam es Hunt. Mfs. Pauline Hendrix, deli-bakery manager, checks equipment in anticipation of the March 6th opening. Linda MUler, head cashier, (center) discusses the new computerized checkout system with other cashiers. They are (1 to r) Luray Shoffner, Paula Shoffner, Cindy Wilkerson and Dianne Blackwelder. Feature UB March 8,1979 Tiie frozen food section ii larger tiian otiier Heffner’s ttores and tlie decor privides an appealing display. Mike Johnson, produce manager (left) and BUl Russ, produce super­ visor, price inventory on the Selves. Russ is in charge of buying and pricing produce for aU seven Heffner Land of Food locations. 2В DAVIE COUNTY ENTIiRPRISH RECORD, THURSDAY, MARCtI S, » 'sn t You Ии» В ш Wa!Ha§ h r C E X v E B R A n O I^ ' Ot Keffàer's Hew MoeksviHe Shre O n H t f l m f Ш M e r ik i n Л * A ir JMKw 0 $ k i k e ^ h i f C e e h f ROISTER FOR 900.000 2 2 W IN N E R S O F 3 0 , 0 0 0 S T A M P S ( 2 5 B O O K S ) 11 WINNERS EACH WEEK FOR 2 WEEKS 2 W IN N E R S O F 1 2 0 , 0 0 0 S T A M P S ( 1 0 0 B O O K S ) 1 WINNER EACH WEEK FOR 2 WEEKS STORE HOURS M o n d a y th ru F rid a y 8:30-9 S a tu rd a y 8:30 >7 TO Be m m / Ш Come in ОАоя and Rogister hf fhe FRBE Gifh fe he Ghfen Amnf 1 - GE 100)( Solid Stale 10 ineh Portable C fi» Then^O^\ HhreiM 12 OZ. GLASS JAR OLD VIRGINIA APPLE SAUCE 2 4 0 TO B F G IV E N AW AY Grand O ^ n l n s М бг Т У e O C P S e t e n h f O a t f M g f e h t o n KNEE-HIHOSERY 300 PAIR TO BE GIVEN AWAY 1 • B A B Y P L A Y P E N 1 - G l . C L O C K R A D IO 1 - L o u is v ille B a s e b a ll B A T & B A L L 1 • J U G L E R A L L P U R P O S E T H E R M O S 1 - 2Vi G a llo n J a r M T . O L IV E D IL L P IC K L E S 1 - T O A S T M A S J E R T O A S T E R 1 - P r o c t o r S ile x T O A S T E R O V E N JF-G PEANUT BUTTER $ | 8 9 3 LB. JAR I ★ SAVE 70! ROSEPINK SALMON $ 1 2 5 TALL CAN ■ REDD! MIX 2 5 ’ fwTus COTTAGE CHEESE 120Z.MIIT0N FEATURED IN OUR MLI-BAKERY FRIED CHICK^ENAIw^ Crisp and Good Hot Fresh Baked M U G H l ir u f S P L A fT u iN C H 1 Meat^JMf^Mjes and Roll w iH A v V A T u L L L H iiO F CHEESES AND SANDWICH LOAVES7«i’"FiNElSAUiDrAND ^ HOME MADE DESSERTS 100 FOOT ROLL rU Y one gtT o N t ONKEY DESIGNREFILL CUPS 100 COUNT 50Z.CUPS w w i k h A á S o o d U t t h i M » w М о в М И ф S b n O M l V f e i h f f e w Ш й ш I n k C e n t i f t i \л М . DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RHCORD, THURSDAY. MARCH 8, 1479 3B X \ VALLEYDALE'S TASTYFRANKS. 12 O Z. PKG., 9 9 « 6 0 Z . PKG. VALLEYDALE B O L O G N A W ITH YOUR PURCHASE OF A N Y 12 0 Z .P K G . VALLEYDALE VALLEYDALE'S DRY CURED BACON 9 9 / HEFFNER’S LAND OF FOOD COUPON I p O F i t E E " ' 1 W ith This Coupon j and th e Purchase O f 2 o r M o r e WHOLf FRYERS Good Only At Heffner’s New Mocksville Store In the Willow Oak Shopping Centey ONLY through March 10, 1979 г Т.\. ¡.'-Ъ LAND RIQHTTO RESERVE quantities [i j OF FOOD NONE SOLD TO DEALERS 12 O Z. PKG. CHEF BOYAR DEE, SPAGHEni SAUCI HOLLY FARM'S Y O U N C p i CUT-UP e . A 'FRYERS HOLLY FARM'S SPLIT FRYER BREAST^^C B O L O G H A к**- В HOLLY FARM'S FAM ILY PAK MIXED FRYER PARTS 5 9 * h^'^i^^^^%HOLLY FARM'S D R U M S T IC K S - T H IG H S P IC o f t h e C H IC9 9 «LB. 16 oz., JAR IJESSE JONES MEAT Ч B«NQUErS O O U G H 3ROLi7 PACK 09 F R A N K S $ 12 0 Z .P K G . O N E P A C K A G E O F 8 r K E E MERITA FRfSH HAMBURGER BUNS W ITH EACH 3 LB. PKG. G R O U N D B E E F JESSE JONES PURE PORK W HOLE HOG • -4 9 S A U S A G E LB. EVER FRESH GLAZED D O U G H N U T S . PACKAGE OF 12 ★ SAVE 30* THOMPSON'S CORN MUFFIN MIX 2 0 *70Z.PKG. BUY ONE g et o ne free TEMPT ICE CREAM CONESС E X T R A |S&H Green Stamps| WKh tlili Coupon and Pur^M of One 19.95 or More Food Order I NOTE;JUnilt of one Food Boniu Coupon wlUi each order ■ I Good Only at Heffner’a through I March 14j 1979 I- — — ■■ ■■ — — ■■ — r MUELLER'S ELBO MACARONI IVS O Z. PKG. 48 COUNT TONYDOG FOOD 15 oz. S CANS8ir SAVE 45* F IE L D T R I A L D O G F O O D 25 LB. BAG CHUNK ★ SAVE40‘ 50 LB. BAG CHUNK $jl m o ★ SAVE 50* 25 LB. BAG RATION fsm .★SAVE 20’ B U Y A 5 L B .B A G DAISY FLOUI^v FOR ^ J ^ L B e B A G S WINNER ^ g e t a c o r n Q M E A L FRITOSSNACK?^ a^DORITOS^ E O C70Z.PKG. ★ SAVE 30 WISE POTATO CHIPS ★ SAVE 30« HEFTY T R A S H B A G S ' 0 COUNT " F A C 30 GALLON SIZE ★ SAVE40‘ ^ ^ HEFTY TALL_ K IT C H E N B A G S 59^15 COUNT ★ SAVE 50* -4 5 SWEET FLORJDA ORANGES LB. BAG К 5 FLORIDA WHITE GRAPEFRUIT^V 7 9 * LB. BAG N 0 .1 ALL PURPOSE COBBLER f t Ш COBBLER P0TAT0£S2U ‘ * 1 » I m M M A t П 9 M e w l l h e l t t m 0 S k n m i I I I Н и H t w ¥ m w Л M S h p f l i i f е ш 4B - DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, THURSDAY, MARCH 8, 1979 12 0 Z . PKG. VALLEYDALE TASTY FRANKS9 9 « VALLEYDALE DRY CUREDmm p 1 2 0 Z . P K G . JESSE JONES SLICED BOLOGNA _ $ |4 9 FRYERS HOLLY FARM'S YO U N G CUT-UP FRYERS .A«,avPAKppYER PARTSi^ C LB. ARMOUR'S 12 OZ. SIZE SPir.F.n t.UNCH MEAT $1.67ARMOUR’STANNED HAM ARMÜUR^S л 9 r\7 PKf« <fhi m.FRANKS 12OZ.PKG. $1.15 3 LB. CAN $6.99 LB.59 HOLLY FARM'S SPLIT FRYER BREAST . 9 9 < "Tofaf Shopping"Value Nc Limit Specials -Valuable Trading Stamps Dim oilnt Piices l l HEFFNER'S PRICES DiscountPrice YOU SA VE Royal Pink Salmon 15'/2 Oz. Can ’1.49 Lipton*8 Lite Lunch 2 Pack Pkg.57* 23’ :|| Heinz II Polish Dill Pickles 89*40* J-F-G Smooth il Peanut Butter 3 Lb. Jar *2.19 40‘ il Country Kitchen il Syrup 24 Oz. Size 99*10’ Nescafe Decafínated Coffee 2 Oz. Jar ’1.23 12* Nescafe Decafínated Coffee 4 Oz. Jar ’2.19 30* J-F-G Tea Bags 100 Count,’1.59 10* Baker’s Chocolate Chips 12 Oz. Pkg.99*34* Log Cabin Regular Pancake Mix 32 Oz. Size 73‘ 16* Bes-Pak Extra Heavy Trash Bags 8 Count 99*36‘ Scrunge Cleaning Pads Pkg. of 2 59*10* 12 O Z. PKG. JESSE JONES PURE PORK vvH O LEH O G j SAUSAGE n JESSE JONES MEAT FRANKS $|09 FOR YOUR LAUNDRY TOSS & SOFT $ |2 9 ★ SAVE 36' PUREX HEAVY DUTY LAUNDRY LIQUID DETERGENT $ |8 9 ★ SAVE 20* o o o a » " ® ® " ' » n s r- " MIRACLE FRESH LEA GROUND i I V3 LB. PK OR MOÍ HOLLY FARM'S Margarine DRUMSTIÇ THIGHS - PIC «ííb 9LB. GORTON'S FRcftr I PÍPO Rl 24 oz. SIZE 40 COUNT 64 OZ. SIZE BRAWNY' i WHITE OR COLORS PAPER EIW f l l I ¡Hit ' ' - 4 ^ / ч л Л w ’( A <4--- i f â h A :Л ••• • PUREX UtUNDRY DETERGENT 1 f i- * ' GIANT SIZE 89 ★ SAVE 20' LAND ^ H T T O R e S E R V E . OUANTITIEf ш /Ё т ш т Ё Ё Ш ш ш т SWEET FLORIDA OF FOOn NONE SOLD TO DEALERS ORANGES 9 9 < pi .........r* r/»* KRAFT'S DELUXE MACARONI DINNERS M 140Z.B0X ★ SAVE20‘ GREEN GIANT DELMONTE TOMATO CATSUP 7 9 " 32 OZ. SIZE ★ SAVE 30* NIBLET C0RN€3 9 112 OZ. SIZE ■ ★ SAVE 23*^Sk ^ w»tou«t«n^<èotDefiec0 iVA . A . DOLE JUICE PACK .SLICED-CRUSHED-CHUNK LUCK'S CANNED Pinto Beans PINEAPPLE 5 3 : J ^ e NO. 2 CANS » • 9 < mo* ITRIED 3 . . . J“"T • SAVE 35c ir SAVE 16* DEL M O ilTE HALVES PEARS NO. 2^ CAN 69 * ★ SAVE 24* LAND RIGHT TO RESÉRVE ‘OÜANTITIES OF FOOD NONE SOLD TO DEALERS [GREEN GIANT FRENCH STYLE GREEN BEANS 1303 CANS $ SAVE 23* EXTRA jS&H Green Stamps|^ - with this Coupon and Purchasa of . I One $9.95 or More Food Order | I ; NOTE; Limit of one Food Bonus Coupon with eacli order' | I Good Only at Heffner’s through | I March 14,1979 II------------------- -----------------------J INSTANT NESCAFE NESCAFE NESCAFE COFFEE 100Z.JAR $ 3 9 9 l'^ n a K h S tñ ^ M S ★ SAVE 50* INSTANT COFFEE DECAFINATED NESCAFE $ PACK 80Z.JAR G R E E NJSTAM PS ★ SAVE 46* PHOTO i PROCESSING SPECIAL ON COLOR PRINTS SyO_ES&MVP r KODACOLOR ROLLSI DEVELOPED AND PRINTED i CLOSE UP TOOTH PASTE T 3 ^M % #^SAVE36* -'M-esKaaumLv- , BIG 4.6 OZ. TUBE AIM TOOTH PASTE BIG 6.4 OZ. TUBE CORN CHIPS OR CHEETOS ^ FRITOSANCKS REGULAR 89 PACKAGE I Shopping” Value I No Limit Specials I ^ In valuable Trading Stamps 3 Discount Prices * SAVE 40' 12 EXPOSURE $1.99 20 EXPOSURE $2.99 j___2A _$3.49 I" MOViS'aTsIlDESl I ( HOOACHROME EKTACHA OR COMPATIBLE Fli . 8M M &SUPER8M O VIE^10f « A 20 EXPOSURE SLIDES 0 I ■ I «1 L 36 EXP. SLIDES___$2«30_ • â - i . i^ B B L E A LLP U R P O S E ! m o is |5 9 CARTON OF 8 epsi Colas 16 OZ. BOTTLES I».-:.IB . BAG FLORIDA WHITE GRAPEFRUIT 5 in g !~ T g '~ h r V - * ~ M n HEFFNER'S PRICES DiscountPrice YOU SAVE Green Giant Pieces-Stems Mushrooms 47* Shasta Canned Assorted Flavors Diet Drinks 12 oz. can 6 /> r 16* 7 Assorted Flavors If Shasta Drinks 39*4* Assorted Flavors Hi-C Drinks 46 0*. Size 53*1 0 * Assorted Flavors Diet SegO 10 Oz. Cans 3 /’l 41* Big Tate Instant Potatoes 83*26* Chicken of the Sea Chunk Light Tuna Fish oz. can 75‘ 18* Gaines 6og Food Gravy Train 25 Lb. Bag *4.99 ’1.30 Kozy Kitten Ciiicken Cat Food 15 0Z.O«.4/79*1 0 * Armour's ConMdBMfHash 87*6 * dioppeiBeef ‘1.29 1 2 * Armour's Beef Stew 24 0i Si^e n.17 1 0 * (,n DAVII; COUNTY I.NTl RrRlSli KltCORD, THURSDAY, MARCH 8, 107') . .«nr* Coy B ro ad w ay , m a rk e t m a n a g e r, and Inez Coe pre p are to cut and package m eats for display in tiie cases. Opp.ns In MocksvUle... Raiph Randall, stock clerk (standing) and Ralph Luck, stocking crew, checks inventory on tlie shelves. Heffner’s Warehouse The m odern warehouse facilities behind Heffner's Land of Food’s North M ain Street location was built in 1974. During the past five years the building has grown from 10,000 sq. ft. to 30,000 sq. ft. Expansion was conducted in 1B76 and 1977. The warehouse is the central shipping center for the seven stores in the Heff­ ner's L and ot Food chain. A p ­ proximately ten traUer loads of m er­ chandise are received and shipped from the facility weekly. David Heffner, vice-president of the company and resident legal counselor said, “The warehouse concept was established to allow volume buying directly from m anufacturers. This enables us to m aintain competitive prices.” The warehouse operation is com­ pletely computerized, wiht the first computer installation in July 1976. A new system was installed in December 1978 allowing electronic ordering of m erchandise by indlvi(lual store managers. Through the new system , store managers are able to log needed stock into a portable computer. This In turn is transmitted to the main, warehouse via telephone and fed into the m ain system. “This method of stock inventory and ordering," said Heffner, "Is m uch more rapid, efficient, and cuts operation costs.” The operation m aintains buying hours .M onday through Thursday mornings. Chuck Danner, warehouse manager (forklift) and Oren Heffner check inventory in the warehouse located behind the North Main St. Store. Willow Oak Shopping Center The opening of Heffner’s Land of Food marks the beginning of business in the Willow Oak Shopping Center. Crown Drug Company is scheduled to open a 7500 sq. ft. facility adjacent to Heffner's on March 21. Other businesses under contract for openings include Ben Franklin and Colony Linen. No dates liave yet been released concerning projected openings of these stores. Located on Highway 601 north on approximately ten acres of land, con­ struction began in May 1978. Upon completion the facility will have more lhan 100,000 square feet and represent an investment of approximately $2 million. Construction of the center will bo completed in two phases. Willow Oak Shopping Center was built by the Shelton Companies of Winston- Salem , industrial buiiders and developers, and a projected opening was first for November 1978. Land of the site was purchased from Mrs. Ruby Purvis and owners of the Angell Brothers Farm . The Shelton Companies is operated as a partnership by brothers R . Edwin Shelton and Ciiarles M. Shelton. They have recently completed The Colony Shopping Center inK inn and at present are constructing an office building in Winston-Salem. The Shelton Companies are also responsible for construction of Bermuda Quay in Advance located near the in­ tersections of U.S. 158 and N.C. 801. The 40 acre development site is carefully planned and developed to include professional buildings, a “cluster” type shopping center, warehouses, and office space. Already under construction in Bermuda Quay is a 2,400 sq. ft. doctor's office. The office is being built for Dr. Jerome Davis who is currently serving as an emergency room physician at Rowan Memorial Hospital in Salisbury. The Shelton Companies plans an announcemsnt in mid-March concerning other businesses contracting space in Willow Oaks Shopping Center. Upon the announcem ent of con­ struction of the shopping center in May 1978, R . Edwin Shelton said "W e are in the process of negotiating with many and hope to have several more mer­ chants signed witliin the next few weeks. We want to get as m any local m er­ chants from the Mocksville area as possible.” Approximately 20 companies call on the firm presenting various lines of mer­ chandise. (3iuck Danner is m anager of warehouse operations. The m ain offices are also housed within the facility. Office personnel Meat Dept, (continued from page 1B) ' twice each week. Coy Broadway of Rt. 4 Mocksville will serve as m arket manager. For the past Ш years he has served in this position at the Clemmons store. He will be assisted by Inez Coe of R t. 4 Advance and John Howell. Ms. Coe has been with Heffner for the past 8 years and has a total of 11 years in supermarket work. M r. Broadway will do all the buying of m eat, and supervise the cutting, wrapping, and stocking of the cases. Strict sanitation requirements are maintained in the working area of the m arket with a crisp temperature of 55 to 60 degrees. Special cuts of meat will be available for customers on request. consists of six people with Betty Strickland as office manager. Before construction of the warehouse . in 1974, storage was maintained beneath the H effner’s N orth M ain Street ^ location. ' V ‘Herbie Ш Betty Strickland, office manager works at the new computer located in the office and warehouse facility behind the North Main Street store. Photos by Robin Carter and Garry Foster % ConttratHlations HEFFNER'S LAND OF FOOD On The Nmr Mlkrar Oak Location. BROWN SINCE 1910 Wo Are Proud To Haw l^ignod And Intlallod Tho Enorgy EfReiont Syiloni In Thit Sloro Ai Woll At Providing All The Refrigeration RMaret. W. A. Browrn ft Son, Inc Salitbary., N.C. ♦ Davie county enturprise r e c o r d, Th u r s d a y, m arch «, i>)7‘) vb HEFFNER'S LAND OF FOOD Oh Your March 6th Opening And To The Other Merchants In The Willow Oak Shopping Center " ' i ">■ ★ Crown Drugs ★ Colony Linen ★ Ben Franklin That Wil Be Opening Soon! 'W e - S ' € i4 : € 4 it ^ , ^ o u / n t u . iThe ^ e l t o n m o m p a n ie s REAL ESTATE D EV ELO PERS C O M M E R C IA L , IN D U ST RIA L B U ILD ERS AN D INVESTORSKING, NORTH CAROLINA M!DAVIK (OUN1Y I NTUHPRISl-: RUCORD. TIIURSDAY. MARCH 8. to H E F F N E R ' LAND OF FOOD W e A r e P r o u d T o H a v e S e r v e d A s G e n e r a l C o n t r a c t o r F o r T h i s M o d e r n F a c i l i t y . I t ’ s U l i t i m a t e D e s i g n M a k e s I t O n e O f T h e F i n e s t S u p e r m a r k e t s I n T h e E n t i r e A r e a . HENDRIX & CORRIHER CONSTRUCTION CO. Quality Builders Estimates Given Industrial — Commercial — Residential N.C. Contractors License No. 4 4 2 8 • Salisbury Road Mocksville, N. C.Phone (704) 634-5972 DAVIECQMMONICATIONS The Davie County Communications Center is tlie lifeline for the entire •Icounty.' Housed in the Davie County Jail building, the communcatlon center serves as the communication line for the Davie Sheriff’s office. State Highway Patrol, Mocksville Police Department, Davie Ambulance Service, Davie ^Rescue Squad, Fire Control for all i^departments in the county, and the dog and game warden.“And J.T. Dunn”, according to MocksviUe Police Chief Alton Carter, “is sitting in the hot seat."‘No county could function without communications of some sort”, said Carter, “In fact, communications is ''ikvltal to the entire world.”* Dunn, the chief dispatcher is responsible for keeping everything in operating condition. Any of the other dispatchers can call a repair service, but Dunn is also notified...and it is his responsibility.^ A dispatcher must never lose his cool. ■(HNd matter how great the emergency, Dunn says it is imperative that they obtain as much information as possible from the caller. By pinpointing the location of the emergency, whether it be fire, accident or whatever, help will dispatched to the scene much quicker if proper information is obtained..and it is ^u p to the dispatcher to get the answers to Wthrae vital questions.‘It could be a matter of life and death”, Dunn said. “We seldom ever get many good calls, -most are bad news.”Ounn is well aware of the tremendous responsibiUty of his job and the other 'our dispatchers do not take their jobs itly. They, too, reaUze the great responsibility that lies in their ability to do their job.In addition to the seven telephones and six radios in the communications con­sole, the center also bas a hook-up to the Police Information Network in Raleigh ^(P.'I.N.). PIN provides a great deal*of «information much quicker than by phone, however should the computer malfunction, there is always the telephone as a back-up.The center also has some alarm systems for the local banks and there are even some systems in individual ^residences. In case of a burgulary, the 9ralarm is triggered and dispatched to the proper department.Prior to November, 1976, there was a type of communications system in the sheriff’s office. However, it was not as complete as the present system.Dunn was hired at the time the new ^system was installed and attended WKihool on the operation of the PIN computer, which requires a certified operator.AU caUs are logged so the dispatcher knows where to reach someone of each of the afore mentioned departments at aU times.We’ve got to take all calls and ipatch to the proper department,” Dunn said. Many caUs may depend on Ufe or death and we show no partiality. ^1 are handled properly and as prompt ais possible.”“Your house could be on fire and maybe someone trapped inside,” he explained, “so we have to be on the jobtt aU times.”The Communications Center never closes. There is always someone on duty 24-hours a day, seven days a week in- at one time and everything is out.” For example, he said a really bad wreck could tie up the fire department, sheriff’s department, ambulance, patrol and they only have one mike (microphone)...This means the dispatcher can only answer one call at a time”. All in all. Smith says the system is stiU the best ever for Davie County.Chief Carter says the town pays one man's salary per year to dispatch for the department. “We are seldom in the office and at night everyone is in cars patrolling. That is a salary well worth paying.” Carter said that there is very little turn over in the Communications Center. “The people have been here long enough to know what they are doing and after a while they have general knowledge of the law although it is not their job.”“We just think the taxpayer should get their moneys worth,” Dunn said in conclusion. “No matter who caUs we dispatch it to the proper channel....“To be a good dispatcher you've got to be concerned about the safety of both the calller and the department, and con­sider their well being and state of mind” -and it doesn’t cost any more to have a good .attitude and be courteous,” he added. D A V IE C O U N T Y Fire Department, top photo, Police Department, Ambulance Service, Sheriff’s office and Highway Patrol, Davie Rescue Squad, Dog and Game Warden all depend on the Davie Communications Center -the lifeline of the cpimty. S.T. Dujt]^|i,.jf>eloyCi obtains information from PIN computer for which he is a certified operator. eluding hoUdays.“I have seen it so busy when two couldn’t handle it,” Dunn continued, “but generaUy speaking one can do a pretty good job."Dunn is responsible for setting up the work schedule of the other dispatchers, also the vacation and sick days.He explained how aU fire caUs are logged - such as time received, time dispatched, time arrived on scene and time caU was completed. He also says they log the time on caUs received for the ambulance service, police depart­ment and sheriff’s department.The units are sent out and coded from the information received in the com­ munications center.’The center also monitors the caUs to the sheriff’s office, police department and ambulance. If someone is in one of these stations, they wiU probably an­swer immediately, if not, Dunn or one of the dispatchers are on the job.“We probably handle 50 percent or more of the ambulance calls, about 98 percent of the caUs to the police department, most to tbe sheriff’s department and aU fire caUs for the entire county.“For the size of the county, I don’t think we would take second place to anyone,” Dunn added. He says they also have very good working relations with all departments and “my boss (Ron Vogler, County Manager) is the best boss in the world."I’m glad I live in a county that has a job for the handicapped.” Dunn, con­fined to a wheelchair for 31-years after being stricken with polio, was given an equal opportunity when he applied for the job. This was aU he wanted and he is well known and admired for the work he does.Dunn says the center handles caUs for the highway patrol and they have a very good working relationship with the Salisbury dispatchers. They can also dispatch caUs (C code) to more than 40 counties in the surrounding area.Dunn checks aU fire alarms systems in the county at 12 noon each Saturday. Each station is checked individuaUy and someone has to go to the station to an­swer the caU. This is a precautionary measure to be assured that all is working properly.“We couldn’t do anything without them,” (Dunn and his staff). Chief Carter said, “They should be paid as much as the highest paid deputy in the county.”Dwayne Smith of the Davie Am­bulance Service says the only problem he forsees is when “everything goes bad Story by Marlene Benson — Photos by James Barringer f i ' Part of the fire and burgular alarm located in the Communications Center. Mrs. Sadie WilUams, the first female dispatcher, checlu tbe tape pant*]. 2C DAVIK COliNTY fiNTl-RPRISF, RIÌCORD, THURSDAY, MARCH S, 1«70 A ВЧП Nancy Hartman (right) presents a check from the Davie Craft Association to u a v i e L ir a j l vvalden, secretary of the organization. Ruth Preston and Pernle Holcomb, J • 1 area delegates observe. The New Generation is a group of senior citizens that■ЛШЯ „,eet at the Brock Center. The money wlll be used to promote craft activities **N eW G e n e r a t i o n ” throughout the year. Frank Stroud Is Honored By Lions C. Frank Stroud, Jr. was honored at the regular MocksviUe Lions Club meeting, March 1st.Robert I. Smith, immediate past District Governor of the N.C. Lion Association for the BUnd, presented a pin to Stroud for securing in excess of $10,000 for the Lions Club State Association. Only two pins were presented in the SUte. Stroud was the only one to receive a pin in District 3lD. Explorer Post Is Proposed An Explorer Post wUl be formed in the MocksvUle area if enough interest is shown. Must be age 14 and completed grade 9 and through age 20.The primary interest of the Explorer Post wiU be police science and criminal justice issues.If interested caU Lynn Troutman at 634-5547 or write in care of the Sheriff’s Department as soon as possible.A meeting date wUl be set if enough interest is shown. C r a f t A s s n . A i d s A R C Nancy Hartman, president of the Davie Craft Association presents a check to Cindy Glasscock, president of the Davie AssociaUon for Retarded Citizens. The check represents part of the proceeds from the Sth Annual Davie Craft Comer which is held each year to benefit retarded citizens. The nest Craft Comer will be Oct. 26-27 at the National Guard Armory. (Photos by Garry Foster) Jerome-Ward Bridesmaids Luncheon Given By Mrs. Bowen Mrs. WiUiam D. Bowen and Mrs. John Barber were hostesses to a bridesmaids Luncheon at the Bowen home on Ruffin Street, Cooleemee Friday evening honoring Miss Martha Louise Jerome, bride-elect of Jeffery Hart Ward.Guests included the bridesmaids; the bridal mothers, Mrs. John L. Jerome and Mrs. Jack S. Ward, and Mrs. Fred D. Jerome of Raleigh, aunt and god­ mother of the bride-elect.Miss Jerome chose the occasion to Cooleemee Homemakers Meet With Mrs. Frye The Cooleemee Home Makers met Tuesday with Mrs. Eleanor Frye at her home on Main Street. There were nine members and two visitors, Mrs. Sadie Taylor and Mrs. MUdred Cherryholms, Mrs. Frye’s sister, attending.At the conclusion of the business, Mrs. Betty Smith gave reading and led a discussion on “Listening and Learning”. The hostess invited the guests into the diningroom where she served refresh­ments immediately after the program. The PotatoThe potato is one of the few vegetables that originated in the Western hemisphere. Potatoes were grown in England and continental Europe as a curiosity, but the Irish were the first to recognize Uieir food value. present gifts to her attendants.The hostesses presented the honoree with a gift of a cut glass celery dish.The tables were covered with white cloths and centered with goblets holding yeUow and white daisies and babies breaUi. J * 1 Bradley Kyle Lagle celebrated his 3rd birthday on March 4 with a party at his home. Guests enjoyed hamburgers and hotdogs and a cake decorated with Sesame Street characters. Brad Is the grandson of Mr. and Mrs. Calvin Barney of Route 3, Mocksville and Mrs. Blanche Ugle of Route 7, Mocksville. His parents are Mr. and Mrs. Rickie Lagle ot Route 7. Shannon Combs celebrated his 4th birthday. Saturday, February 24, with a party at his home at Route 7, MocksvUle. His parents are Mr. and Mrs. Tommy Combs. His little sister. Heather, and several friends and relatives helped him celebrate. His birthday cake was baked by his mother and was decorated with cowboys and Indians. Shannon’s grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. Harold Byrd of Route 1, Advance and Mr. and Mrs. Nelson Combs of Asheboro. District 6 Nurses To Meet Thursday North Carolina Nurses Association, District 6, wiU meet Thursday, March 8, at 7:30 p.m. at the Stanley County Health Center in Albemarle, N.C.The program wUl be on membership recruitment. AU members are urged to attend and bring with them a nurse friend. Home Health Program Serves 1 0 9 People staying at home If you arc sick Is a lot better boUi financially and emotionally for many people. Of course, it isn’t always possible; but for many, especially Uiose with chronic diseases, Uiere Is a service in Davie County which makes it possible to avoid Uie cost of nursing homes and to stay with their own famiUes.Home Health in Davie County serves 109 people. The program is designed for Uiose who need skilled nursing care or oUier professional assistance to help wlUi chronic diseases or disabling conditions who don’t need medical supervision 24 hours a day."The program sends a skilled nurse or other professional into a home however often a patient needs skilled nursing assistance. Often the paUent’s needs are minimal. Sometimes they need catheritizaUon or physical therapy, but the home health professional can per­form these services in the home and teach Uie other members of the family how to care for the paUent, thus avoiding the high cost of an extended stay in nursing homes and hospitals,” Ms. Connie Stafford, Davie County Health Director said. “It is well documented Uiat quality paUent care can be given in the home at a lower cost than the comparable care in an instiditional setUng. The patient is generally happier and more secure in his or her own home and has an op- Mlsty Dianne Boger celebrated her second birthday March 3, at her home with a party given by her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Franklbi Boger, Gamer St. Mocksville. Misty and guest enjoyed a clown cake, potato chips. Ice cream and punch. Games were played and Misty received many nice gifts. Friends and relatives helping Misty celebrate were; Brother Bryan, Kenny Brown, Casey McDaniel, Andrea Woodward, Peggy Lynn Richie, Todd and Angela Boger, Charlene and Johnna HUboum. Misty’s grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. J.G. Snow Rt. 5 MocksvUle and the late Hal and Charlotte Boger, Route 3, portunity to expérience Ufe In relation to famUy, friends and community in ways not possible in an insUtuUon, no maUer how well Uie instltuUon is run.” "Expensive hospital stays can be shortened or eliminated altogether when home healUi is used. It can benefit Uie whole community, both in terms of Uie health care dollar and in terms of care,” Ms. Stafford continued."Nursing homes are needed to care for those WiUiout family support and for Uiose whose care can’t be managed at home.” "The number of nursing home beds in Uie Piedmont area continually grows, and this growth is seen by many as the soluUon to care for Uie increasing number of elderly persons in our society. Nursing home care is costly and robs the community not only of money, but of Uie valuable experience and in­fluence of Uie elderly. Each generaUon needs to know what it is to grow old and die. We hide our collecUve heads in Uie sand of insUtuUonal care so as not to be reminded of our own human fraUties and mortality. Although instituUonal Local Students To Attend District Science Meet The NC Student Academy of Science, Disfri ct IV, wiU meet on March 17 at High Point College in a day-long program for high school science students and their teachers. Selected students wiU present papers on original research. Students from Guilford, Randolph, Caswell, Alamance, Surry, Yadkin, Davie, Stokes, Forsyth, Davidson and Rockingham counUes are expected to attend the semi-annual meeting.The papers and proiects displayed wiU be judged. Winners in the various categories wiU be eligible to compete at Uie state level.Papers in biological science, earth and space science, environmental science, behavioral science, physical science, technology and engineering, and mathematics may be submitted for Uie compeUUon. Projects from science clubs wiU also be accepted for compeUUon.After lunch in the Holt McPherson Campus Center, the Academy wUl elect officers and announce winners of in­dividual and club projects.AU visitors wiU be given opportunity to tour the science facUlUes at the CoUege at the conclusion of the meeUng.The North Carolina Student Academy of Science is co-sponsored by the Senior academy and the State Department of I^ibUc Instruction. Co-dlrectors of District IV are Ms. MarUia Lomax, science teacher at NorUieast Junior High, and Dr. John E. Ward Jr., professor of biology at High Point CoUege.Membership in the Academy is open to aU math- and science-related clubs In grades 7-12 and to any other interested individual. care may be the most appropriate form of care ofr some ill paOents, oUiers may benefit from remaining at home and receiving care there."We, as a country, need to promote healUiy life styles and encourage in­dividuals to take an acUve part in promoUng and maintaining their own health and the health of Uieir family members. Home health care can play a vital part In such a system,” Ms. Stafford concluded.In order to qualify tor home health care, Uie patient must be referred by his or her doctor.In Davie County, home healUi care is offered through the Health Department. For more information call 634-S98S. Scott Dwiggins celebrated his ,6th bh-thday Saturday, March 3, with a Ronald McDonald party in Winston- Salem, hosted by his mother, Mrs. Sheila Dwiggins. Ten of his little friend»^ enjoyed lunch, party favors and games. ^ The exclUng part of the party was a Ronald Mclionald birthday cake decorated with 6 lighted candles!!! Among the guests was his sister, Brandi. Art Guild To Meet Tuesday The Davie Art GuUd wUl meet Tuesday, March 13, at 7 p.m. at the B.C. Brock BuUding; as members work “to keep Uie Arts Alive in Davie County.’’Glenda Beard, art in- sü^ctor, wUl be conducUng a class in "Pen and Ink.” This class wUl be in conjuncUon with a “Note Card” contest sponsored by the Davie Art CouncU for Davie clUzens.“Come, and hear rules and guidelines to be followed in this county-wide project,” says Mrs. Roberta Goodwin. Barbecue The WUUam R. Davie Fire Department wUl hold a Pork Barbecue, Saturday, March 10 at Uie fire staUon and wUl begin at 10 a.m.Barbecue trays and sand­wiches wUl be avaUable.Anyone interested in or­dering a whole shoulder must call 998-3043 by March 6Ui.Proceeds wlU go toward the fire department building fund. A ll Tim ex Watches... Largest Selection In Mocksville To Choose From d 6 1 ^j e w e l i ^ & MUSIC CENTER 124 NORTH MAIN STREET MOCKSVILLE, N.C. PHONE 634 3822 Cooleemee News Mrs. KaUiy Holden was Uie Monday guest of her grand- moUier, Mrs. Carl Mays. Mrs. Holden, a resident of Durham for Uie past two years, wiU visit her parenU, Mr. and Mrs. GUbert Mays in Forest City before joining her husband in Dur lium South Africa. She wiU leave Forest City Thursday.Rob Hampton is hoping to return home this week from Davie Hospital after two weeks of treatment. He is improving.Mrs. Ruth Bivins was released from Davie Hospital Friday where she was a patient for Uie past week. She had to undergo surgery for a borken arm she sustained in a faU more Uian a week ago. She is recuperaUng at Uie home of her father, W.T. Sechrest on Route 7 MocksviUe.Doyle Spry and children, Louise and Toby, of Raleigh, were the Sunday visitors here wiUi his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Grady Sprly, Sr.The Women of the (^leeipee Episcopal Church of Uie Good Shepherd wUl not meet this monUi due to Lenten services Wednesday night at 7 p.m. Everyone is encourage to attend Uie services durbig March.The Cooleemee Senior Citizens will hold their regular meeUng on Monday, March 12, in Uie feUowship haU of Uie First BapUst Church at 10 a.m. MARCH 910-11,1970 ALL EXHIBITS FOR SALE W IN S T O N -S A L E M , A N T IQ U E S S H O W & SA LE -SPONSOR-D.A.R.Cui. Joteph Wintton Cèaptei •The Show You Know & Trust”Fri. 1:00 p.m.-SiOO p.m. Sat. I iOO p.m.-9:00 p.m. Sun. 1:00 p.m.*6:00 p.m. CONVENTION CENTER WINSTON SALEM,N.C. '^Admltsion with] CHAPMAN SHOWS P.O. Box 70 tot Cave, N.C. 28710 Fireplace Equipment Reduced for Clearance Antique Brass With Screen Four Sizes $ 9 ^ 9 5 S p e c i a l S i z e s O r d e r e d A t S l i g h t l y H i g h e r P r i c e s ! Satin Blacic With Screen Four Sizes $ 3 9 9 5 Black And Brass $ 2 5 0 0 3 8 x 3 1 ...'1 8 .7 S 4 4 x 3 1 ...*2 9 .9 5 Other Specials in Fireplace Equipment such as Spark Guards, Andirons, Wood Grates, Pokers,: and Shovel Sets. C a u d e ll L u m b e r C o . 1238 Bingham St. Phone634-2167 Mocksville, N.C. I D a v ie G ir ls M e e t W e s t C a r t e r e t In H i c k o r y j h u r s d a y N ig h t Davie County’s girls, wlio won the District Five Tournament championship last week, will moet West Carteret, the District Two winner, at 7:00 p.m. Thursday in the North Carolina High School Athletic Association 3-A girls’ basketball state tournament in Hickory. Coach Bill Peeler’s North Piedmont Conference regular-season and tour­nament champions drew the toughest first-round op^nent-based on won-losl records. West Carteret, the Coastal Conference champion, has a 26-1 mark. Davie (24-3) is riding an ii-game winning streak. The War Eagles downed North Stanly, 49-33, for the district title on February 27. The girls’ tourney opens on Wed­nesday at ifickory High School wilh Western Harnett (22-3) playing Lin- colnton (22¿) at 7;00 p.m. Clyde Erwin (22-7) meeWGraham (22-2) at 8:30 p.m. On Thursday, the second game matches Southwest Edgecombe (24-4) against South Stokes (23-3) at 8:30 p.m. If Davie wins on Thursday, it would play the Southwest Edgecombe-South Stokes winner in Friday’s semifinal round. A first-round win would assure Davie of playing three tournament games. A consolation (third place) and championship game are on Saturday's Girls 3-A— at Hickory' WESTERN HARNETT (№3) Wed. 7:00 UNCOLNTON Fri. 7:00 CLYDE ERWIN (22-7) Wed. 8:30 GRAHAM (22-2) Sat. R:00 DAVIE COIINTY Thur. 7:00 WEST CARTERET (26-1) Fri. 8:30 SW EDGECOMBE (24-4) Thur. 8:30 SOUTH STOKES agenda.This is the first time Davie County or any local team has competed in the girls' state tournament. Thomasville represented District Five last year, finishing thrid in the state. With all of the starters from that team returning, \ Thomasville finished third in the North Piedmont Conference regular season, I lost out in the North Piedmont Con-1 ference tourney semi-finals, then fell to j Davie, 54-47, in the district semi-finals.! p Longhorn Rodeo In Winston-Salem Professional rodeo returns to the ‘Winston-Salem Coliseum March 23-24- 25.The 9th annual appearance of Longharn World Championship Rodeo#will include all six of the major world championship contests: bareback bronc riding, steer wrestling, saddle bronc elding, cowgirls barrel racing, calf iroping and bull riding.The rodeo is sanctioned by the Oklahoma based International Rodeo lAssociation (IRA) and cowboys and cowgirls from across America will be ^ competing here.; jn addition to rugged competition, U>nghorn Bodeo is noted for ex- Tradorinary production affects and the rodeo this year will feature a spw- tacular opening with full grown, genuine Texas longhorn'cattle as part of the pageantry.I|| ' ‘ Due to expense and special tran- ‘sportation equipment required for the longhorned steers, they are only Uken on the national rodeo curcuit every five years. The animals weigh an average of 1^600 pounds and have horn spreads as ■wide as seven feet.The three performance rodeo begins M with a Bargain Night at 8 p.m. on Friday ^ with all seats $4.50. Saturday at 8 p.m. and Sunday at 2 p.m. tickets are $7, $6 and $5 with kids 12 years and under half price on Sunday. Tickets can be pur­chased at the main box office and all normal ticket outlets. Bareback bronc riding will be the first tough contest each ( of tbe Longhorn World Championship Rodeo in the Wi Coliseum March 23-24-2S. Dragway Announces Plan At a driver's banquet, attended by Farmington comp erformanceiston-Salem Some people once believed that mountains were formed by an enormout under­ground serpent moving about. banquet, attended by over 125 drag racers from NC and Va at Pilot Mountain, N.C., plans were an­nounced for the '79 drag racing season at Farmington Dragway. One of the major changes announced was reverting to a Saturday night schedule from the Friday nights which has predominated at the track for several years. Track managers Norman Drouillard and Jerry Joyce said they felt this would be a boost for the fans. “A lot of fans work a second shift on Fridays preventing them from attending the race and Saturdays are also a popular race day,” said Drouillard. Farmington competitor will also get the chance to compete in the IHRA Professional Drag Racers Assn. drag event at Darlington in October. The top 20 drivers, decided from the tracks point standings, will go to Darlington for a shot at the 40,000 purse in the event. In addition, Farmington has established a $2500.00 point fund for this season along with an increase in purse money for each event. Drouillard said-a $1350.00 purse is planned for each event representing a $400.00 increase from last season The track will also weigh all winning vehicles this season : ■ MOCKSVILLE, N.C. 2702^^ LONGHORN MARCH 2 3 - 2 5 IW INSTON SA LEM GOUSEUM I S A V E > 1 ^ M A R .2 5 S U N .2 P m . COURTESY OF: Rlf./tOUU YourAOUlT Nc.ADUH CHIIJ_ Nt.CHIlO AMOUNTPRICE PRICE TICKETS PRICE TICKCTS Ewcios» Г 550 450 11“ :i CHILD TICKETS AUlUOY V: PRICE HO FURTHER DISCOUNT Chock or money order (payable to Memorial Coliseum) Send Self• Addressed Stamped Envelope To: LONGHORN RODEO Tickets, WIHSIM SnEM MEMOItlAlCOllStUM, PO fciies.WinstiKi-Siltni.NC 27,02 NAME--- AOORESS- OTY----------STATI.-ZIP--PHONE- ORDER NO W !!! C ap acity L im ite d Oiler good while capacity lasts DNIY! The Silver Spurs 4-H Horse Club held their monthly meeting March 1, 1979 at tbe Shady Grove School Cafeteria. The meeting was called to order by &indra Cline. Pledges were done by Kathy Willard. Devotions were done by Catherine and EUie Johnson. We discussed old business which consisted of activities at Horse Retreat held February 2,3, and 4. New business was as follows; March 17 - there will be a clinic at the Piedmont Saddle Club and at 12 noon there will be a covered salad dinner and at 1 p.m. Richard Schräke will give a demonstration; March 24 - chicken stew and trailride starting at 1 p.m.; March 31 - Forsyth 4-H and Open Horse Show at the Tarheel Riding Oub in KernersviUe; April 1 - Hunter-Jumper Show at Tangiewood; June 2 - Silver Spurs are having their annual Open Horse Show.Our guests for the meeting were Doug Lee, 4-H Agent who gave a demonstration on "How to Give 8 Demon­stration”, Uz Hillebrand who gave a demonstration on "Hunter-Jumpers", and Robin Brock who gave a Public Speaking Speech.Silver Spurs have five new members. They are Darren Colbert, Nancy Osborne, Derek Baker, Wendy Baker, and Robby Shell.We invite anyone interested to attend our next meeting, April 5, 1979 at 7 p.m. at tbe Shady Grove School Cafeteria.Refreshments were served and the meeting was ad­journed. "Old wine and an old friend are good provisions."Georae Herbert DAVII: COUNl'i I N II Rl’RISl K|(O R I). THURSDAY. MARCH H. I‘)7>) .H’ Davie 4 -H Horse Teams To Compete For State Titles A Al Bin Walker TV Newscaster To Speak At Advance Bill Walker, newscaster tor WSOC Television, Ch. 9, (Siarlotte, will be the guest speaker at the Shady Grove School Parent-Teacher Organization meeting Tuesday evening, March 13 at 7:30 p.m.The topic of Mr. Walker’s talk will be the positive influence that a community and parents canhaveon school children. While serving as a newscaster in (3iarlotte for many years, Mr. Walker has been involved in various situations that will allow him to speak with first­hand knowledge regarding student's attitude toward school.Following Mr. Walker’s presentation there will be a short business session. Refreshments will be served.Anyone desiring to hear Mr. Walker is welcomed and urged to attend. Pro Soccer In Charlotte March 24th Professional Soccer comes to the area on Saturday, March 24th, 7:30 p.m., when the Atlanta Chiefs meet the Minnesota Kicks in a North American Soccer League (NASD exhibition game at Memorial Stadium in CSiarlotte.Sharing the spotlight to make it a Soccer weekend will be an indoor tournament March 24th and 25th at Park Center Arena in Charlotte. Press Box of Charlotte and Datagraphicp of Atlanta, the South’s best independents, will compete with fourteen top area college teams including: Appalachian, Camp­bell, Davidson, Duke, UNC and UNCC. Indoor soccer is a wildly exciting combination of basketball and ice hockey.Ticket prices for the professional match are $3.00 adults and $2.00 for children. The amateur tournament is priced at $3.00 adults for both days and $2.00 for one day. Children will be half price. Proceeds will go to area youth sports.For information write to; Charlotte Soccer ’79 - 212 South Tryon Street, Charlotte, N.C. 28281. For information, call 704-372-3331. There are special rales for groups of twenty-five or more....More information will follow. Panama Canal Panama Canal locks 1,000 feet long, 110 feet wide and 70 feet deep cannot take giant tankers that draw 90 feet of water and are 200 feet wide and 1,300 feet long, National Geographic points out. But though the big ships must make a 9,600-mile detour around Africa, they carry so much oil that it is cheaper than using smaller vessels able to sail through the canal. Davie County 4-H was represented by four 4-H Horse Bowl Teams at the Western Regional Horse Bowl Contest in Statesville Saturday, March 3. The Senior Division Team, composed of Robin Brock, Liz Hillebrand, Mnry Lashley, and Kim McKnight qualified to compete in the State Contest. This team is from the Trailblazers 4-H Horse Club in Farmington.Also, the Mixed Division Team composed of Kathy Willard, John Howard, Sandra Cline, nnd April Russell of the Silver Spurs 4-H 1 Un si- Club in Advance qualified for the State Contest.According to Douglas Lee, 4-H Agent, these two teams along with the other teams in the Western Regional will travel to Raleigh for the State Contest on Saturday, March 17 to conipctc with the Eastern Regional Teams for the state titles.Davie County was represented by two Junior Division Teams from the Trailblazers Club. The two teams were composed of Ashlyn Hillebrand, Allison Sell, Phillip Ivey, BreenaaOliver. Kerri Wilson, Toni McClamrock, Dell Ellis, and Christina Furches. These two teams represented Davie County very well, but were defeated in the second round in a field of 16 teams.The objective for the 4-H Horse Bowl is to offer an opportunity for youth in­terested in horses to display the knowledge they have gained In a competitive and friendly atmosphere. The Horse Bowl Contest will encourage youth and leaders to study and obtain a more thorough and complete knowledge and be rewarded and recognized for their achievements.In addition to the 16 4-H members participating in the contest, Davie County was represented by 20 en­thusiastic adults who attended the Regional Contest to support the Davie 4- H members. The Trailblazers’ teams were coached by leaders Marie Sagraves, Jeep Wilson, Nora Naylor, Ann Hillebrand, and parents who of­ fered their time and knowledge to help prepare the teams. The Silver Spurs teams was coached by leaders, Mr. and Mrs. Jim Russell and Mr. and Mrs Dallas Willard. Larry Riddle of the East Davie Jaycees presents Championship Flight 'Trophy to Dave Shelton, team captain of Shelton Roofing and Gutter Works; winner of the 1978 - First Annual Business and Industry for Cystic Fibrosis Golf Tournament. East Oavie Jaycees To Sponsor Benefit Golf Tournament The East Davie Jaycees will sponsor their Second Annual Business and In­dustry for Cystic Fibrosis <3olf Tour­nament on April 28 and 29 at the Tangiewood Golf Course.The format of the tournament will be a four man team bunny hop, with the first day of paly on the PGA course and the second round on the East course. Based on thirty teams, trophies and prizes will be awarded in excess of $1200.The entry feie per team is $160 which covers green fees, carts, general tournament expense, and Cystic Fibrosis donation. Promotional con- Davie On Dean's ListAtWFUThree Davie County students have qualified for the fall semester dean’s list at Wake Forest University.Those from Advance are Stephen Matthew Amidon, son of Mr. and Mrs. William C. Amidon of Bermuda Run, and Lindsey CMrbia Puryear Jr., son of Mr. and Mrs. Londsey C. Puryear Sr. of 102 Forest Dr.Also qualifying is Mrs. Stephanie Foster Hudson, daughter of Dr. and Mrs. Bob Foster of Wandering Lane, Mocksville.Mrs. Hudson is a senior and is majoring in education.Amison is a sophomore and Puryear is a freshman. sidération will be given to business interested donating merchandise, sponsoring trophies, or Cystic Fibrosis donations.For further information please con­tact any East Davie Jaycee or call Henry Johnson at (919) 998-5621. Registration At PinebrookRegistration Is continuing for those persons interested in participating in the Pinebrook Little League and Girls’ Softball Association play this spring and summer.Registration times and places for the association will be as follows: Far­mington Community Center- Wednesday, March 7, from 7:30 p.m.- 9;30p.m.; and Smith Grove Community Center-Wednesday, March 7, from 7:30 p.m.-9:30 p.m. and Saturday, March 10, from 10:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m.Programs avaUable this season in the association will be Little League baseball (major and minor leagues) for ages 8-12; Pee Wee basebaU for ages 5-8; and girls’ softbaU for girls aged 10-12 in the major leagues and girls aged 5-9 in the minor leagues. The Pinebrook Little League area comprises what used to be known as the old Pinebrook School District, which now includes Bermuda Run. ■ A D V A N C IJ ^ fo u r n itu r e ,to com e by i » “ • ■ " • I.,..— - '” : : ; , . , . „ a a n d S E E .T H O M A S V iU '« .И О О К Б В . ‘o i - » « “ “ * “ '” 3 L-------- l> Fine f иг..И«р "I To V»“ ' T r « " - * “ “; C O M E B Y O R C A L L 9 9 8 .2 4 3 6 * i . 4C DAVII (Ol'N lY I NTI RI’RISI RECORD. THURSDAY, MARCH S. I')74 Life In Iran-Everyday Was A New Adventure (Editor's Note: Bobbie Robison ot Winston-8alcm. a native of Mocksvilie and daughter of Mrs. C.J. Angell Sr. of Country Lane, Mocksvilie, recently returned lo Winston-Salem after having worked for the past year with American Beil International Incorporated (ABII) in Tehran. Iran. While working with ABII in Iran Mrs. Robison was on leave of absence from Western Electric in Winston-Salem, her home company.With 27 years of Bell System service, Ms. Robison went to Tehran in 197« and served 9 months on a temporary assignment with ABII, returning there in 1978 for an indefinite assignment. Her job was technical editor specialist, editing documents on telecom­munications requirements contracted for delivery to the Iranian government.Ms. Robison's assignment ended February I when all ABII employees In Tehran were terminated and returned to tlieir home company in the States.After returning to the United States Ms. Robison reminisced about her ex­periences there in the following article) “I left Tehran in late December with a group of ABII people on a 15-day safari to Kenya in East Africa, with a 2-day stopover in Cairo, Egypt. Throughout the tour we kept up with activities in Tehran through the U.S. Embassy in Nairobi and Cairo. At the end of the tour we found out that Iran Air was on strike and the airport in Tehran was closed.“After a call to headquarters in New Jersey we were told that due to the latest political situation we were not allowed to return to Tehran and that we were to fly to Athens, Greece for further in­ structions. Since we had just vacationed in 85-degree temperatures, my suitcase held only summer clothes. The weather in Athens was cold so I had to buy boots, a coat and a sweather.“I couldn’t return to Tehran and I couldn't go to the States because of the tax exemption rule. So the company put us up in a downtown hotel while we were in our ‘holding pattern.’ I waited and waited and after 11 days in Athens I received a phone call from my boss in Tehran saying ‘It’s all over-all jobs in Tehran have been terminated. You will not return to Tehran, but will return to the States immediately.’“One hour later I had a ticket to New York so 1 didn’t get back to my apart­ment in Tehran. I returned to the U.S with one suitcase of summer clothes, leaving behind all my clothes, jewelry (including Iranian gold), paintings, Persian carpets, Iranian handicrafts and household goods."With the present situation in Iran I don’t know if I’ll ever get my shipment or not.” (Ms. Robison had previously made trips home to the States during which she brought home numerous valuable items she acquired in Iran and other countries visited by her during her time overseas).Continued Ms. Robison, “In spite of all the frustrations and anxieties and the present ‘turmoil in Iran,’ I loved it there.I was thankful that the Bell System gave me the opportunity to accept such an assignment. “What an experience-every day was a new adventure. Even before all the trouble started, many people just couldn’t make it there. After the initial elation and excitement of being in a new, exotic country, the realities of daily life became apparent. They began to reject the new environment-everything was bad because it wasn't the way things were done 'back home.’“But I was determined that I was going to stay busy, stay involved and make it!“While on my previous tour I traveled aU through Europe, the Middle East and the Par East, completing a trip around the world. On my way over during this tour I stopped in Ireland, Holland, Belgium, Switzerland and East Africa.” The foUowing letter was written by Ms. Robison to friends in the States while she was still living in Tehran: “It took a lot ol time and effort to buy everything to furnish my apartment. The company furnished and installed all appliances and bedroom furniture. We ordered our drapes custom-made and charged them to the company. But we were given an allowance to buy living room, dining room and patio furniture, stereo, carpets and other household items that we couldn’t purchase within Hanging baskets made in many foreign nations tine the walls of the apartment of Bobbie Robison, photos by Garry Foster our budget.“It was a real hassle running all over the city after hours, in taxis with drivers who spoke no English, trying to find these items. But my apartment was beautiful and I was very happy with it.“Like all Persian apartments it was very largeandvery expensive. All of the floors were marble-beautiful, but a pain to keep clean because of all of the dust.“My rent was 65,000 rials ($920 per month) with no utilities included. It normally rented for $1,100 but the lan­dlord let me have it because I was single. My landlord was Iranian and could not speak a word of English. However, we managed to communicate, especially when the bills were due.“The company paid our rent, of course, but the $920 was added to my monthly salary and I had to pay federal and North Carolina taxes on that amount. All of my airline tickets and certain other expenses were also added to my salary and I paid the taxes.“I lived in a very nice neighborhood near all of the gold shops. And I was only a block away from a ‘chello kabab’ restaurant. Chello means rice and when served with lamb is the national Iranian dish. I was really ‘hooked’ on that dish and just had to eat it at least once a week.“The rice was served steaming hot with butter and a raw egg. On the same plate was served one piece of broiled lamb, one piece of minced lamb and broiled tomatoes. Side dishes were yogurt, Iranian sour pickles, thin bread called lavash or sahngak, and raw purple onion wedges. It was delicious.“In such a restaurant I might have sat next to another American, a German or a Moslem woman covered with the traditional black chador. I enjoyed going to the Iranian restaurants-I could go to the Sheraton or Hilton in the States. I missed the good American food. What I wouldn’t have given at times for an Egg McMuffin, some Stamey’s Bar-B- Que, a salad from a salad bar, a Shasta diet cola...“The weather was beautiful, as usual. The air was dry and limpid and clouds were rare and appeared as mere decorations. Summer was hot and dry. But in November it finally rained-the first time since April. And every time it rained the phones were out for days throughout the city. There was snow on the beautiful 13,600-feet Alborz Moun­tains just a few kilometers north of the city-a view I could see from my living room balcony and kitchen window.“My department at work (Technical Services) consisted of 60people (editors, translators, illustrators, typists. Xerox Thii Persian tablecloth wm j , Y«getable dyes by an Iranian craftsman. t a wooden «tamp and 4< operators). And there were 5 phones in the building, with as many as 25 people sharing one phone. Our offices were in a large apartment building and my office was in the first bedroom on the third floor. “Until the weeks in November we were very busy publishing hundreds of documents, which were delivered to the Iranian government. We would publish a document in English and then it would be translated and published in Farsi (the Iranian language). We had Farsi typists and illustrators, so we handled all of the Farsi illustrations, as well as the English versions.“All of the translators were Iranian and, of course, all had degrees in English or had lived in the States or were educated in Europe.“Most of the girls were beautiful and the men were very handsome. It was interesting to see them come in each morning with the long sheets of bread under their arm, wrapped in a newspaper or unwrapped, and with a chunk of goat cheese or butter.“They spoke Farsi to each and then would speak English to us when we would walk into their area. We greeted each other in Farsi. We were all located on the same floor and shared the ‘tea room.’ 1 really enjoyed working with them. They always invited us to share in their celebrations and they would bring in Iranian goodies for any ‘happy’ occasion.“I didn’t have time to tak« Farsi courses while they were offered. But I did manage to learn a few words and phrases of the language-at least enough so that I could get where I wanted to go and buy anything I needed with no problems.“Most drivers spoke no English, so we were forced to learn some of the language. And they didn’t know many of the streets, so we had to know how to get where we were going or we were in trouble, f almost always had to direct my driver to my apartment or to work, street by street. Even my minibus driver spoke no English and he could not even read or write Farsi.“But I managed to get to work and back each day and sometimes even had my driver stop at one of the bread shops on the way to work. Usually we stopped for sahngak-bread baked on hot tab­bies. There was no extra charge for the pebbles...some of them would get ‘buried’ into the dough and baked into the bread. It was not too funny when you bit into a hot pebble or found one in the palm of your hand.“Some of the translators were my friends, so that when I needed to make a phone call to a non-English speaking Iranian regarding a bill, etc., one would make the call for me. I took a translator with me when I was negotiating for my apartment and when I signed the lease.“The traffic was horrendous. You would have had to see it to believe it. And the drivers were not well disciplined and disregarded the laws. For a while I thought a red light meant ‘go.’ Then treading through the dense traffic were pedestrians, bicycles, motorcycles, motorbikes, donkeys, etc.“One morning my minibus came down a one-way street to pick me up because he was running late. And then he turned around in the middle of the very busy street. Another day he turned onto the busy Shahanshah! Expressway by mistake and then he just backed down to get off.“We had some wild rides as you can imagine. Once on a trip to the British Embassy a friend and I were in two wrecks and came close to about four others. I had my international driver’s license, but I didn’t drive. I just got it so I could apply for the loan of a company- leased vehicle for a weekend, somebody else did the driving.“Most of the turmoil in Iran started in early September. Tens of thousands of demonstrators, from students in jeans, women in the black chador, peasants, merchants, Muslim mullahs (religious leaders wearing beards and black robes) marched through the streets of Tehran for days. Some were protesting against the policies of the Shah, carrying signs demanding his ouster. Others wanted civil and political liberties, enforcement of Islamic laws and even the legalization of a com­ munity party. “All of this stunned the Shah and he said it was against military honor to stand for this situation. So he por- claimed martial law for 6 months with curfew from 9:00 p.m. to 4:30 a.m. Marchers did not take this too seriously and a group gathered one Friday morning in downtown Tehran ana tne demonstrations started again.“When these demonstrators were asked to disperse that Friday morning they refused. Squads of soldiers came and after repeated warnings they threw tear gas into the crowd and shot into the air. Then they lowered their guns and fired into the crowd and by the end of that day 86 were dead and 205 wounded.“On that Friday I was spending a leisurely day by my pool watching the military copters flying about and the clouds of smoke rising from burning buildings toward the sky in the city just a few kilometers away. By the end of the next day the report was that over 200 were dead. Cinemas, banks, liquor stores, Tehran's largest department store and other public buildings were destroyed after the demonstrations started.“Living under martial law with a 9:00 p.m. to 4:30 a.m. curfew created many problems, of course, not to mention the inconveniences. And Iranians were known for eating quite late so most restaurants did not open until late. But after the curfew was imposed this was no more and some opened early and some just closed. “It was almost impossible to go home, get dressed, go out to dinner at some of the better restaurants and get back home before the curfew. Taxi com­panies would not dispatch a car after 8:00 p.m. and we had to start calling for a car shortly after 7:00 p.m.“I went to a birthday party early in November and it started at 3:00 in the afternoon and everyone had to leave at 7:30 p.m, Only a couple of night clubs were open. You could just picture me in my black party dress, leaving at 3:00 in the afternoon for a dinner and a show, and then out before 8:00 p.m. When the announcement for the company Christmas party came the hours were from 3:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.!“It was somewhat startling to ride down a street and have a jeep in front of you, with a soldier sitting behind a machine gun pointed directly at you, and the soldier wasn't even smiUng. In some areas there were huge tanks on duty, with soldiers manning with turret guns (which looked large enough to blow the entire city away) and soldiers carrying rifles, with bayonets attached, walking patrol. There were many soldiers stationed throughout the city guarding all police stations, public buildings, army installations, etc. “It was unlawful to take photos of anything or anybody associated with the military. Two ABII women (one was our administrative director's wife) took photos of tanks and troops and were arrested and taken to jail. By November 1 had not taken any outdoors photos for a long time because it seemed everytime I raised my camera a soldier would appear in a jeep driving by. The company provided film service for us but then Kodak was burned and the film service could not be provided.“A public gathering of more than 3 'people was unlawful. In the fall we had a going-away party for an employee. We had to get permission from the police department and we had to have a police guard posted infrontof the building.“All weekend minibus trips to places outside Tehran were cancelled. I was just glad I had the opportunity to make a trip to the Caspian Sea earlier in the year.“We were told to stay away from the southern part of the city where the 100- year-old ‘Bazorg Bazaar’ (big bazaar) was located. In fact, we hadn’t been allowed to go there since July.“To me this largest bazaar in the world was one of the most fascinating A scrapbook contains photographs and memories for Bobbie Robison places in the city. Here was an ex­traordinary abundance of goods- dealers were grouped by specialty, with carpets, goldsmiths, ironmongers and antique dealers being some of the specialties. Visitors were offered tea, even if you did not buy anything. You accepted the tea~it was the custom-and I really missed going there.“In tbe fall there were demonstrations all over the city, with demonstrators numbering from a few thousands. In Tehran there were mostly minor clashes between the police and civilians. Three apartments occupied by Americans were firebombed.“I think the American newspapers covered most of the news, but in the fall a sniper killed a police chief and wounded the martial law administrator in one small city. In another city a policeman was killed during demon­strations and in Ham two policemen and 8 civilians were killed during demon­strations.“Bell Helicopter (an American company) was really 'hit hard.’ It seemed that every week we would hear about an employee being injured and their vehicles destroyed. In one in­stance, two of their vehicles were burned and a fire bomb was thrown at the apartment door of an employee in Tehran. In Esfahan, two vehicles were firebombed.“In November all ABII offices were closed and we were given two days off from work because of demonstrations. Days off under these conditions weren't so much fun because there was no gas, no meat, no milk, no booze, no taxis and we had to 'keep a low profile.'“We hadn't been aUowed to work overtime for some time. During the fall aU handbags, briefcases, etc., had to be searched before we could enter restaurants, superstores, public buUdings, etc. Later, the guards at all work locations were required to search these before we could enter a buUding for work, lunch or during regular A prize possession of Ms. Robison is a painting on bleached camel bone done by an Iranian painter portraying a scene from one of Omar Khayyam’s poems. business hours.“All of us sent to Security a map of the location of our apartment and they were beginning in the fall to set up an emergency evacuation plan, although there was no indication at that time Uiat Uie situation would deteriorate to this point.“The post office was on strike and there was no mail to or from the States M for awhUe. Also, at times, there was no ■ mail delivery because customs was on strike. We sometimes maUed items by someone who was traveUng to the States on vacaUon.‘ 'There was very litUe botUe gas for our cook stoves and dryers because the gas workers were on strike. We were asked to use electricity as much as'4F possible. I was Uiankful that I had ; brought a smaU electric baker-broiler with me to Iran.“We turned off aU of our pUot lights :to save gas and we imng our clothes out to save gas which would have loeen used In Uie dryer. The company finaUy located ^ several hundred tanks and took them.to^ our maintenance location. We we^e aUowed one tank each. I brought my empty tank, which weighed about 25 lbs. empty, to work with me on my minibus.But before I could get to maintenance Uiey were out and didn't know when they would get more. There was also a shortage of fuel oU and we had beenW asked to keep our radiators turned off as much as possible.“ABII leased two direct circuits to the States. One had been out for weeks and Uie second one was out for more than a week. Because of this none of us were able to contact Uie States unless we were j lucky enough to get through on Uie in- ^ ternaUonal line. Apparently every expatriate in Iran was trying to dial Uirough. And mere was no telephone repair service. TCI was on strike and would not aUow ABII people into Uieir buildings to make necessary repairs. “In Uie fall Uie gas workers (fiUing staUons, called Benzines in Iran) wenU# on strike and Uiere was very little gas in Uie city. The litUe amount that did come into Uie city was brought in by Uie military. People waited hours in lines (sometimes 2-3 miles long) just to get 10 liters of benzine.“There were many fights and . disturbances because of the unorganized 0 lines and tbe soldiers moved in to keep order.“During this shortage my minibus could not pick me up for work and there , were only a few available taxis. My phone was out of order and the nearest phone booth was two mUes away. What could I do! I waited in my apartment^ until somebody with fuel came after mel W ’ One day I waited unUl 12:30 p.m. The gas shortage in the States was never like it was in Iran.“I did not see a newspaper for weeks because none were being published.. Freedom ot Uie press was proclaimed wiUi much fanfare after Uie newspapers^ went on strike for it. But then rumor haa^ it Uiat some of Uie editors of Uie twp papers were arrested and then we had (continued on page 5-C) P h a r m a c is ts B i l l F o s te r & B o b R a u c h ------S a y - 700 Wilkesboro St.. Mocksvilie, NC, Tel. 634-2141 D a ily v it a m in c h a r t F R E E Question: Do long-term . While supplies last, clip medication patients need this article and vitamins? Answer: Usual- your address to Nutrient ly. For example, you may 27650need to increase your vita-min in-take of B-complex ^y Clipping Service will while on antibiotic therapy, gladly fill yourOral contraceptive users Checklist is designed to postmay find a need to increase on your refrigerator door, folic acid, B-complex, andC. Pregnant women shouldsupplement with these samevitamins as well as A. Tel. 634-2141Your Pharmacists, KMnry W. Block “We can help save you money on taxes” We are income tax specialists. We asl< the right questions. We dig for every honest deduction and credit because we want to be sure you pay the smallest legitimate tax. That's another reason why we should do your taxes... whichever form you use short or long. Appneiatg Your fiuaineaa H»R BLOCK' THE INCOME TAX PEOPLE 201 DEPOT sr. MOCKSVILLE. N C.Phona 634 3203 Op«n 8:30 ».m.— 9 D.m. wsekoiy» 8:30 - a S*t. NO APPOINTMENT NECESSAHV DAVIK COUNn I NTKRI’RISl-; RICORD, THURSDAY, MARCH 8,107.1 In her travels around the world Ms. Robison has collected many valuable sculptures and carvings. Life In Iran store, gather up all of the booze they could find, take it outside and set fire to it. Then they would throw it back into the store. Most places got to the point they would simply refuse to sell liquor anymore and booze became hard to find and the prices for it went up.“We were not in any physical danger.Most Iranians did not show any animosity to us. However, we were warned not to go to the big bazaar area or any place where there might be crowds.“We were reminded to keep a ‘low profile.’ The month of December, particularly the first two weeks, had many very sad holy days for the Moslem faith. That was the time of the year for penitence and the faithful would walk down the streets flogging themselves with chains. We had been instructed to ‘keep a low profile’ during these two weelb.“The American Embassy told us they expected trouble in December. Security published a bulletin telling us to expect curfew to be changed to 7:00 p.m. until 6:00 a.m.“During the month of Ramadan, (continued from page 4-C) no newspapers again.“The NIRT (National Iranian Radio and Television) went on strike and we had about two minutes worth of Iranian news at 6:30 p.m. and again at 10:00 p.m. But the 10:00 p.m. news had to be taped so the reporters could get home before the 9:00 p.m. curfew.“Occasionally we got news from other countries over NIRT, but seldom anything about what was happening in Iran. People in the United States heard more about what was happening in Iran than we did living there.“The schools were closed in the fall and stayed closed for two weeks. The elementary and high schools later opened up again, but the universities and colleges remained closed. It was at Tehran University that much of the unrest and rioting started. Our office was near enough to the university that we were able to hear gun shots.. “Most stores removed the liquor and wine from their shelves. It seemed the stores that carried ‘spirits’ were the hardest hit by the Moslems who were opposed to liquor. They’d overrun a which was also a holy month, there was much trouble. Moslems were supposed to fast all day, eating and drinking only after sundown. We found ourselves referring to the ‘Irascible Iranians.’ And they really were. Traffic was horrendous at any time, but was even worse then. And feeing hungiy all day in lOOHlegree heat was not conductive to good temper. They had a right to be irascible.“Thanksgiving came on Thursday and it was not a holiday for us because Thursday was our weekend in Iran. But we celebrated it in as much the traditional way as possible. I had Thanksgiving dinner with an ABII friend who was married to an Iranian. He was a retired officer with com­missary privileges so we were fortunate that we had a real American Butterball turkey, along with Iranian dishes.“One night I stepped out onto my balcony and looked across the city a little after the 9:00 p.m. curfew. The silence was almost frightening-not a sound, not a movement-in a city of 5 million people. NCSU Study On How To Build New Food Products By Bob Cairns Instant breakfasts, TV dinners, freeze dried coffee - _where are the new food ^¡products coming from?Traditionally, new food ideas are created and developed by experienced scientists in commercial laboratories. But the basics that foods are built on is being♦taught at North Carolina State University. There students in the Department of Food Science are learning how to build new food products from the original idea right to the gorcery shelf.Dr. Tyre Lanier, a food ^scientist teaching NCSU’s iPfood research and develop­ment course says, “A few basic ingredients are found in all food products but there are numerous options for ad­ditives. Our objective is to teach the student to develop ^the new products with a sense ▼of responsibility.”In industry the food : research and development process often begins with a request for the specific . product from a company’s marketing division.“Today when a request for a new food is made, the food scientists’s responsibilities are many. The product must be safe, tasty, nutritious and 4-H Baking Contest Saturday The Annual 4-H Baking Contest will be held Saturday, March 10, beginning at 1:30 p.m. in the County Office Building. Four-H’ers throughout the county will be showing their baking skills as they enter cakes, pies, muffins, yeast breads, biscuits, and cookies.Age divisions will include Pre-Teen, Early Teen, and Senior Teen with winners to be declared in each category and age division. Judging entries will be Gin Duncan, Peggy Cornatzer, Agnes Wooten, Jane Bullard, Terri Dunn, OUie Ward, Shirley Cornatzer, and Doris MiUer. Awards for the annual contest are sponsored by Davie County United Way and Martha White Kitchens. then sell at a reasonable price,” Lanier said.The NCSU class is learning the Importance of additives like colors, flavors, starches, gums and emulsifiers to the resulting product. A strong emphasis is placed on the risk-benefit aspect of food additives.“The Federal Food and Drug Administration (F.D.A.) does an exceUent job of policing the food industry. Our students are learning that additives aren’t just put into a food. The F.D.A. demands that it have a positive pur­pose,” Lanier said.The course’s emphasis is on product development but includes some important insights into the realities of food business.“Only about one out of a hundred new food ideas gets to the development stage. Then through extensive test marketing over 80 percent of that group are cuUed. Of those that make it to the supermarket shelf, only a smaU percentage achieve any degree of success.” Lanier C4RQ ^ OIL CHANG -SPECIAL 5QTS. VALVOLINEAll-climate Motor Oil and a WIX OIL FILTERpopular sizes for most cars. SPARK YOUR LAWN- MOWER FREE FREE J'17LM Lawn Mower spark Plug with every seit of Champion^ you buy for yourcar, truck, van... Good at partldpatlna CARQUEST Auto Parts stor« thru March ii. 1879. MOCKSVILLE AUTOMOTIVE 727 SOUTH MAIN STREET MOCKSVILLE 634-2944 Special Scholarships Open To Japan For Students In an effort to foster greater un­derstanding between the U.S. and Japan, more than 40 Japanese and American corporations and foundations have provided special scholarships for cultural exchange programs for American high school students.More than 100 partial scholarships are now available for American teenagers aged 14 through 18 who apply for sum­mer homestay programs to Japan through Youth for Understanding, an international, non-profit high school student exchange program, the largest in the world.Sponsors of the Japan Scholarship Program include many well-known American and Japanese concerns, among them Datsun Motor Co., Ltd.; Toyota Motor Co.; Toshiba; Honda Motor Co., Ltd.; Sony; Seiko Watch Co.; Panasonic; the Rockfeller Brothers Fund; Weyerhaeuser Co.; the Japan Bankers Association; the Japan Foreign Trade CouncU; the Expo Fund; and the Japan Foundation.AccordinR to Youth for Understanding President John Richardson, Jr., former Assistant Secretary of Stale for Educational and Cultural Affairs, the sponsoring corporations believe that greater understanding between nations may be achieved by exposing young people to the experience of living wilh a family in a different culture."Prior to departure, students par­ticipate in an intensive, tlvee^ay orientation at Stanford University which introduces them to the culture and traditions of Japan and the experience of living with a Japanese family,” Richardson explains. “For three years following the summer exchange, students meet for an expense paid fall workshop for further study of Japanese life.” Applications must be submitted by April 1,1979. Information and ap­pUcations are available from the Youth for Understanding office, 3501 Newark St., N.W., Washington, D.C., (202) 966- 8808 (call coUect) or students may call (800 ) 424-3691 toll-free. said.Aware of the remendous odds against developing another “dry roasted nut” or “Captain Crunch Ceareal,” the NCSU students are coming up with their own ideas. Those with potential wUl be developed into food products.“I won’t predict that our Squeeze-JeUy, Low Cal Yogim or Frozen Banana Bread wiU take the market by storm, but th6y are exceUent working models and wiU provide a wealth of experience for the students who have developed them,” Lanier concluded. Child Care Credit Break For Working Families With more and more mothers finding U necessary to work to help make ends meet, it’s nice to know that there is a tax break which could help the family budget under certain conditions. It’s caUed the Child Care Credit and is avaUable on Federal income tax returns for parents who pay someone to watch their chUdren so the parents can work. The credit aUows working parents to reduce their income taxes by as much as $400 if they have one chUd and up to $800 if they have two or more children.To quaUfy, you must: have maintained a household that included at least one child under IS or a disabled dependent of any age, have paid the expenses to enable you to be gainfuUy employed or actively seeking em­ployment, fUe a Joint return, if married, and have made the payments to persons other than your dependent relatives. You may also qualify if you paid someone to care for your chUd or disabled dependent so you could work part-time or go to school fuU- time. In this case, however, you must have a spouse who was gainfully employed during Utis time.The child care credit is claimed on Form 2441 and filed with Form 1040. However, it is not necessary for you to itemize deductions to quaUfy. Revival Set For Liberty MethodistLiEirty United Methodist Church will bold a revival beginnin|i Friday March 18, and conunue through Sunday, March >8. Services wUI begin each evening at 7:30.Guest speaker wiU be the Rev. A.B. Weaver.‘The Rev. James Lochridge will lead the singing each evening.The public Is Invited to attend. There wUl be a nur- provided for the young In a forerunner of today’s “State of the Union” messages, Prolemy II assured Egypt’s taxpayers more Uian 2,200 years ago that things would get better.They didn't. Tax piled upon tax until, under the Romans, instead of Proposition XIII the Egyptians got a surtax coUected on top of their taxes.AU this is known because scholars can read the “royal indulgences,” as the periodic proclamations of the pharaohs were called, and compare them with tax records for those years.If the Egyptians and Romans had used some of today’s cheaper paper, however, probably none of this in­formation would be avaUable. It would long since have crumbled to dust.The paper in many of the books now being printed isn't likely to survive much more than 30 years. In contrast, some papyrus schroUs have survived more than 5,000 years.Papyrus, the world’s oldest form of writing paper, was invented some 30 centuries before Christ. Scholars visiting the library at Egypt's capital of Alexandria in the fourth century B.C. could take down from its shelves papyrus “books” that were already more Uian 2,000 years old.Papyrus, made from a long-stemmed plant that grew in Uie shaUows of the NUe, was light and flexible, as weU as durable. Its use spread Uirough the ancient world, replacing the bulky clay tablets formerly used for writing.“So vital was papyrus to Uie Romans Uiat Tiberius raUoned it during a shortage,” observes the National Geographic Society’s recent book, “Ancient Egypt.”The shortage resulted from a failure in the Egyptian papyrus crop and threatened to cripple Rome’s in- ternaUonal trade and governance, since paperwork already had become the lifeblood of bureaucracy.Even after the introduction of par­chment, made from animal skins, papyrus continued to be used for legal documents. Pulp paper, originally developed in China, was known as the sixUi century, but papyrus was used for deeds in France as late as the eighth century and in Italy untU the lOUi cen­tury.Thoutti the Vatican was stiU inscribing papal buUs on papyrus in the 12th century, lighter and cheaper paper had won out nearly everywhere else by then. Paper in old books-as weU as some books produced today-may prove as long-lasting as papyrus. What bibliophiles term the "era of bad paper” started around 1850, when wood pulp began replacing rags in the manufac­turing process.UntU then, fine quality paper had been made from linen rags and coated with gelaUn. Then less expensive processes were found that used wood pulp coated with alum-rosin compounds.It is Uie acidic action of the compound Uiat helps break down the wood fibers so they can be formed into sheets of paper. But not aU the sulfuric acid is washed out, and the residue ultimately destroys the paper.This is why books 200 or 600 years old can be in better shape than a book printed less than 100 years ago. Although paper Uiat can survive for centuries is still t>eing produced, many publishers are reluctant to use it because it is so expensive.Even papyrus is now being made again, in limited quantities, but it’s not suitable for bound books and no one expects to revert to scroUs.In 1962, when an Egyptian engineer and former diplomat, Hassan Ragab, sought to revive the lost art of making papyrus, he found that the plant no longer grew in Egypt.Ragab had to learn to read the hieroglyphs from Pharaonic times to discover how to cultivate the plant, slice its stem into thin strips, then lay them in a crosshatch pattern and pound them into sheets.The Papyrus Institute he founded in Cairo is Uie only place in Uie world that makes this paper today. In order to include samples of papyrus in its “Ancient Egypt” book, the National Geographic Society bought an entire year’s production from Ragab’s in­stitute.The papyrus is attached to one page of the book's chapter on Egyptian writing. The page, made of high-quality paper, should last as long as Uie papyrus itself. Air TemperaturesScientists have found people can endure air temperatures of up to 240 F for about 23 minutes. AlUiough the air is hot enough to sear the lungs, when inhaled it is cooled as much as 100 degrees as it passes over the mucous membranes of the nose, mouth, and Uiroat. GREAT GE1ÀWAY SALE! WALLCOVERINGS Lowest prices ever 3 0 % O F F Thru March 24 0^ CAUDELL LUMBER CO. 123B Bingham Street Mocliwille.N.C.Phone 634-2167 THE TRAVELERS Modern Books Turn To Dust, But Papyrus Lasts Forever Bauder Fashion CoUege of Atlanta ts proud to announce that Valerie Gal) WUliams. the daughter ot Mr. and Mrs. Nathaniel Williams from Mocksville, North Carolina has been accepted by Bauder Fashion College (or the Fashion Merchandising Program beginning September of 1979. Miss Williams will be studying fashion merchandising and plans a career In that field upon her graduation. During her year at Bauder Fashion College of Atlanta. Miss WiUiams will be active in Civic and College ActiviUes such as: field trips to museums, manufacturers, display or advertising departments In retaU stores, fashion and trade shows, modeling trainee assignments. Seasonal proms and monthly social activiUes complete her busy schedule. Sgt. Elizabeth Finney With U.S. Air Force Staff Seargeant Morris D. and Sergeant EUzabeth D. Finney, a U.S. Air Force husband and wife team, have arrived for duty at Beale AFB, Calif.Morris, son of Mr. and Mrs. WUey M. Finney of 6316 Morningstar Drive, Seffner, Fla., serves as a command and control specialist. He is a graduate of Brandon (Fla.) High School.ElizabeUi, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Junior Norman of Rt. 2, Advance, N.C. serves as an aircraft maintenance specialist. She graduated from Davie County High School, Mocksville, N.C.The sergeants, who previously served at Hahn AB, Germany, now serve with a unit of the Strategic Air Command. DividentJ Increased By Northwestern At its regular meeUng last week, the board of directors of Northwestern Financial CorporaUon voted to raise the corporation’s quarterly cash dividend to 12.5 cents per share, an increase of 13.6 percent over the previous quarterly rate of 11 cents. The dividend is payable AprU 2, 1979, to shareholders of record as of the close of business on March 15.This is the second dividend increase declared in the past six monUis. The corporation’s dividend was raised to 11 cents with the October, 1978 payment from Uie previous rate of 10 cents.NorUiwestern Financial CorporaUon is a one-bank holding company whose major subsidiary, The Northwestern Bank, has $1.4 bUlion in total assets and operates 178 offices in Piedmont and western NorUi CaroUna. Other sub­sidiaries are: M&J Financial Cor­poration, a consumer finance company; First AUantic Corporation, a mortgage banking firm; and Northwestern Factors, Inc. FlatwormsComprised almost entirely of digestive sac, flatworms swallow animals up to half Uieir own size, Uie NaUonal Geographic Society savs^ YES WE DO! SELL ALL TYPES OF INSURANCE W e H a v e P r e m i u m F i n a n c i n g F o r E a s y M o n t h l y P a y m e n t s YES THEY DO! Y o u r I n d e p e n d e n t A g e n t S e r v e s Y o u F ir s t . C o m p an ies: T h e T ra v e le r« H a rfo rd M u tu a l O h io C a s u a lty G ro u p B a y S ta te O c c id e n ta l__________W e tt A m e rican BRANTLEY- EDWARDS INSURANCE AGENCY 503 Avon Street Mocksville, NC AGENTS DARRELL EDWARDS Ike Our Easy Monthly flremium Financing Fians ,1 t 5 S I Ü ^ r iA PHONE 634-2] OS I DAVIi; COUNIY I NTF.RPRISH RtrORD, THURSDAY, MARCH T a le n t S h o w W i n n e r s The students of Mocksville Middle School held a talent show at the P.T.S.A. meeting Monday evening. Pictured alMve are the winners of the talent show. (Back row, L to R) Mistie Clontz • 2nd place, Sheila Anderson and Janell Potts - 4th place, (front row L to R) LaRhonda Ketner - 3rd place and Jill Walker - 1st place. C a r o l i n a R e v i e w WIN OR LOSE...Senators Bob Davis of Salisbury and Henson Barnes of Goldsboro have introduced a bill which would provide four-year terms for all members of the General Assembly.The bill, SB 134, calls for a con­stitutional amendment that would eliminate the current two-year terms. The legislation, if it passes scrutiny by tJie full Senate (it may have already failed by the time this column is prin­ted), would still require passage in the House and by the people.Win or lose, however, the pros and cons of longer terms for our state legislators deserve discussion and, hopefully, understanding by the voters. Ultimately, the voter would decide, via a statewide referendum, on the need for such an amendment to the state con­stitution.As is so often the case in governmental and political decisions, there are valid arguments for both sides of this issue. Should we keep the two-year term for legislators or extend it to four years?The most practical argument in support of this bill is the enormous time, effort, and money, required of a can­didate who must run for reelection every two years. After spending 6 to 9 months in Raleigh during Assembly sessions and committee meetings, the legislator must then spend 6 more months cam­ paigning to keep his seat. And virtually all of the legislators hold down fulltime jobs in addition to Oieir work in the General Assembly.The future results of such high costs in time and money could be extremely detrimental to the workings of our state government. It stands to reason that as costs continue to rise, fewer and fewer citizens of average income will be able to seek office in the Legislature. Many who already hold office and have valuable experience that our state sorely needs could be forced to quit and stay home to work at their regular jobs. Holding public office might become too expensive .for people without great personal wealth.Another reason that should be con­sidered is that too often Assembly members are forced to spend all of their time looking out for themselves and reelection rather than working for their constituents and the best interests of North Carolina.The two-year term also causes some difficulty for the voter. Lawmakers are only involved in one short sesssion and one long sesssion before each election. Ckmsequently, the voters have little opportunity for feedback as to their candidate's performance before voting again.The arguments against longer terms, while perhaps not as extensive, are equally persuasive. Foremost in the arguments against longer terms, is the fact that the in­dividual vote is the most effective means of expression in a democratic republic. We should never lesson this authority without careful consideration of the possible results.One should also be mindful that longer terms would make it even more difficult to unseat incumbents even if they were doing a poor job.A positive aspect of the extensive campaigning required by the two-year by Jerry Mobley term is that legislators are forced~ti remain close to the people they represent. They cannot long ignore their constituent’s wishes.Obviously, many more points will evolve and surface if the debate ever reaches the electorate for a final decision. Still, it is not too early to begin consideration of what we have and. what we hight have.HEW CONTINUED...After the celebrated tour of UNC black and white campuses by HEW officials. North Carolina must now sit back and wait again. The work could come at any time as to whether Secretary Joe Califano is willing to accept the university’s plan to eliminate segregation and upgrade facilities at balck schools in the state.SUte Budget Director John Williams, who calls himself an “eternal optimist”, says he has high hopes that agreement can be reached between UNC and HEW by the arbitrary deadline of March 14.There has been some speculation that HEW would rather deal with Governor Hunt than UNC President, Bill Friday, who has taken a hardline recently with HEW. But according to Williams, the Feds would do just as well with Friday. Williams said that "Jim Hunt and Bill Friday are together 100 percent on this issue and the governor has completeconfidence in President Friday’s ability handlingand the way he is negotiations.”So much for HEW’s conquer” theory. the “divide and Local Jailers Complete Special S.O.P. Course Billy E. McDaniels, Jr. and Dorsette L. Viliitaker, of the Davie County Sheriff’s Department, recently com­pleted a course in “Standard Operating Procedures for Jailers” in Greensboro and offered by the North Carolina Justice Academy. This training is required for all jailers under North Carolina law.Martie Walter, coordinator for the course and a member of the Justice Academy staff, stated that the course is designed to acquaint jailers with the requirements for minimum standards under North Carolina law. These include inmate supervision, safety and security, records, contraband control, and health care. The training program was a joint effort between the Justice Academy and the Jail and Detention Service Division of the Department of Human Resources. The Jail and Detention Service Division is responsible for inspection and stan­dardization of aU jaU facilities in the state.Training for all individuals in the criminal justice system is provided by the Academy which is located in Salemburg and is a part of the Attorney (^neral’s office. Eucalyptus Leaves Eucalyptus leaves provide all the nourishment and water that koala bears need. National Geographic World magazine says. The work Koala means “no drink” in the language of native Australians. Dr. William M. Long Named Diplomate Of American Board Of Family Practice Dr. William M. Long of Salisbury Street has been named a diplomate of the American Board of Family Practice (ABFP). The announcement was made this week by William R. DeLay of Kansas City, Missouri, director of public relations and communications for the American Academy of Family Physicians.Long was named diplomate as a result of passing a certification examination offered by the ABFP and is certified in the medical speciality of family prac­tice.The intensive 2-day written examination is designed to prove the candidate's ability in areas of internal medicine, surgery,' obstetrics, gynecology, pediatrics, psychiatry and community medicine.To qualify for thé examination a physician must have completed either a 3 year family practice residence or have been in family practice a minimum of six years. Candidates also must have successfully completed 300 hours of continuing education approved by the American Academy of Family Physicians.Dr. William M. Long has been a family physician in Davie County since 1934, and is the county's oldest prac­ticing physician.Born November 2«. 1907, he is one of thirteen children burn to the late Dr. and Mrs. Henry Fletcher Long of Statesville. His father founded Long's Sanitorium in Statesville later to become Long's Hospital.After completing undergraduate work at Davidson in 1929, Long entered Tulane in New Orleans where he served one year at the City Hospital in Mobile, Alabama and at the Charity Hospital in New Orleans.Young Dr. Bill Long opened his first office as general practitioner in Davie County in 1934. He was located on the second floor of the Sanford Building in what had previously been the office of Dr. John William Rodwell.He remained in this location until opening a 14-bed clinic known as Mocksville Hospital in 1939. It was located in what was the old Southern March Is Membership Month For ARC March is membership month for the Davie County Association for Retarded Citizens. The Davie County ARC will join with other associations in North Carolina concerned with serving the 165,000 mentally retarded children and adults in this state.Developed in the early I960’s to provide services and programs for the mentally retarded, the Davie County ARC has led the way in advancing ac­tivities and improved services for the special population it serves.Although the kickoff campaign to increase membership will begin in March, ARC groups hope to impact upon the community all through the year as it is of vital importance to each organization to have a strong volunteer group involved in and supportive of their projects.For some people membership may only mean their support through a yearly membership fee and these donations are certainly needed if the Davie County ARC is to continue its valuable work. However, the group would gratefully welcome full par­ticipation of individuals who can attend meetings, assist in volunteer programs and help alert other citizens to their needs and efforts in the community.Those interested in helping the Davie County ARC, can contact Christine Jones at 634-3395 or Carol Warchol at 998-5817. Davie Democrats To Hold Precinct Meetings Davie County Democrats will hold precinct meetings April 18 at 8 p.m. at individual polling places. A make-up date for the meetings is set for April 26. This is a statewide effort.The Democratic County Convention will be held May 19 at 12 noon. All of­ficers for the upcoming two year term will be elected at this meeting.For further information contact Bill Ijames at 634-5919.___________________ I» STOP L O O K IN G F O R A U S E D P IA N O . o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o OOOOOOOOOO^i^OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO Throughout The Month Of March S o l a K t e n d r i i l o l i o l W W i l » w i > l a n e * / « r u i n s a n H s a v « o n C u i t a r « w i t r jifm rn iw 'ii MtJWMioMfi PiMcm [ Whitf itld 9 mile UwuviUc- IÌpÌihÌiv ^ OPEN MON.-SAT 10:D0-6:00 p.m. i i . / Dr. Will. M. Long Bank building on Couil Square.After service in the ITS. Army during World War II, Long resumed practice in Davie and later moved his office to the present South Main Street site in 1950.Through the years. Long has remained active in medical organizations. He served as chief of staff at Rowan Memorial Hospital in 1955 and was instrumental in founding the N.C. Chapter ot the American Academy of (Seneral Practice In 1946. Now referred to as Family Physicians he served as president in 1965.Long has served several terms as chief of staff at Davie Hospital. He is currently a member of the Rowan-Davie Medical Society, Tri-State Medical Society, American Medical Society, N.C. Slate Medical Society, and the Assn of Military Surgeons.As an ABFP diplomate, he must continue to show proof of competence in the field of comprehensive, continuing care of the family by being certified every six years. No other specialty required diplomates to prove com­petence on a continuing basis.The latest group of diplomates brings the total number to more than 19,000. Most are members of the Academy of Family Physicians, tbe national association of family doctors. The Academy was the firsl national M.D. group to require members to lake continuing medical study, and was chiefly responsible for securing specialty status for family practice. This year is the tenth anniversary of the specialty. Betsy Helm», daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Joe Helms, of Route 3, Advance, and eighth grade student at Shady Grove School, won first place honors hi the Area 8 competition of the Soil and Watery Conservation Speech Contest held In” Dallas, North Carolina on March 2. She was selected to represent Davie District in local competition which was held February 26 In the Auditorium of Mocksville Middle School. Area 8 comprises 12 Districts In the North Carolina Association of Soil and Wateni^. Conservation Districts. Winners from# each of the eight areas In North Carolhia; will compete In the state contest In early May. Statewide topic for the speech: contest is “Conservation, The Choice Is Ours.” Alcohol Information Report By:WILLIAM F. WEANT, M.S. ALCOHOLISM EDUCATION CONSULTANT How to Decide if you’re aicohoiic-How can a person tell if he-or she-has a drinking problem?Help in answering the question is offered in the booklet, “Alcoholic in the Family:”, available free at your Tri-County Mental Health office.An alcohol problem cannot be measured merely by the number of drinks consumed, the number of years one hasi been drinking, or by what or ’ where one drinks.Ask yourself how and why you drink and what alcohol is doing to you. If you sometimes get drunk when you fully intend to stay sober, if you no longer get as much pleasure from drinking as you once did, if your reliance on drinking has become progressively greater, you may be heading for the illness called alcoholism.It is important to consider the effect drinking is having on one's health, physical safety, emotional well-being, family and personal relationships, and functioning at work.Results from the 1978 Gallup Poll show 71 percent of adults, 18 and older, saying they use alcoholic beverages. Only 29 percent are total abstainers. The percentage of drinkers in 1974 was 68 per­cent. The rise in the per­ centage of drinkers over the past three years is found almost entirely among women. While the proportion among male drinkers has remained at about the same level, men continue to bp more likely to drink than do women. The latest survey shows 77 percent drink. The proportion of women who drink is now 66 percent.Roughly, one American in five (18 percent) says alcohol has been a cause of trouble in their families. The com­parable figure in the earlier surveys of 1966 and 1974 was 12 percent.Social observers have expressed alarm at excessive drinking in the American society, citing figures that show alcohol to be involved in about half of all homicides. The Kettering Foundation found 55 percent saying that they believed drinking to be a “serious” problem among youth in their communities. An overwhelming 84 percent favored a required course on the effects of drugs and alcohol.Additionally, the latest poll shows that one person among five (19 percent) favors a return to national prohibition, meaning outlawing the sale of all beer, wine, and liquor.“Alcoholic In The Family?” ... a guide for dealing with drinking problems...also explains alcoholism as a family illness, suggests how family members can improve their own well-being, and lists where individuals can seek help for their problem.(This is the sixty-seventh in a series of articles about “alcohol” provided by Bill Weant, Alcoholism Education Consultant with the Tri- County Mental Health Complex. These articles are designed to creat un­ derstanding about sensible drinking, alcohol abuse, and alcoholism in our society. If you have a q^iestion con­cerning alcohol that you would like answered in a future column, phone 634- 2195.) Farmington News »ctois ftom Wiliwn-PlesKmts Mr. and Mrs. Grady Smith left last Friday, March 2 for Apex, N.C. where they will be the guests of Mrs. E.C. Smith and family. While there Mr. and Mrs. Smith attended the wedding of Miss Rebecca Sue CHement to Brian Clayton Wingler in the College Grove Baptist Church near Apex on Saturday morning. The reception followed in the Olive Chapel Baptist Church near Apex. The Smith’s returned home last Sunday.Larry James, a student at Wake Forest University of Winston-Salem was the guest of his grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Odell James last weekend at their home on Rt. 5 MocksvilleMrs. Hattie Wood visited her parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Freeman last weekend at their home near Ker­nersville, N.C.Mr. and Mrs. Harold Wood and daughter, Donna and Mrs. Gladys Gwyn visited relatives in Florence, S.C. recently.Mr. and Mrs. Berlin Bownan and their 5 children of Boone's Mill, Va. were visitors for the worship service last Sunday morning at 10 a.m. in the Farmington Methodist Church. They also visited Mr. and Mrs. Otis Holt and their family later at their home.Mrs. Majorie Scholtes of Winston-Salem and Mrs. Evelyn Spracklin and daughter Ann of Charlotte, N.C. were last Sunday's guests of Mr. and Mrs. Charles I..ashley and Mrs. Nell Ldshley.The United Methodist Queen Bees met in the fellowship hall of the Far­mington Methodist Church on Tuesday evening, February 27. There were 19 members present. Mrs. Betty Jo Hartman, president, presided over the meeting. Minutes were read and approved by Mrs. Louise Walker. Mrs. Rose Caudle gave the devotions. The business session followed and reports were given. Refreshments were served by the hostesses, Mrs. Mary Ruth Seats and Mrs. Helen Boger. Mrs. Rose Caudle and Mrs. Nannie Sue Harp will be hostesses for the March meeting.There will be a revival at Farmington Methodist Church beginning on April 15 through April 19. The Rev. Alex Alvord will be the preacher for that week. We cordially invite everyone to come out and worship with us for this revival. Four Corners Mrs. Judy Wall of Winston- Salem spent Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. Jack Parrish.Mr. and Mrs. Darrell Murray and children of Ckimellus spent the weekend with their parents, Mr. and Mrs. Clyde Murray.Mr. and Mrs. Joe Shelton attended a birthday dinner Sunday for Sandra Shelton at her home in Southwood Acres MocksviUe.Mr. Terry Craft of Atlantic Christian CoUege visited his ¡randfather, L.S. Shelton, Sr., >ne day last week.Mrs. Bettie Fleming was honored on her birthday niursday night at Ihe home of her daughter Mrs. Terry Hamm. Those present in addition to these were Clifford Fleming, Terry Hamm, and Mr. and Mrs. Jei Shane.Mr. and Mrs. Waldon Reavis of Clemmons visited Mr. and Mrs. Bon May and L.S. Shelton Sr. Monday.We extend our sincere sympathy to the Spillman famUy in the loss of Dean SpUlman recenUy. Jerry PotU and DAVIDSON COUNTY COMMUNITY COLLEGE ADULT & CONTINUINO EDUCATION Spring Quarter (Non-Credit (Curses '5.00 per course *Accountlng for the Non- Accountant Supervisor/ Manager *AduIt Basic Education (ABE; Grades 1-8FREE-No. Registration Fee *Adult High School (AHS) *Amateur Radio *Art of Motivating & Lead-Ing People llvet (I*Auto Mechanics for Women *AssertIveness Training ♦Auto Mechanics (Basic) (Basic)* Basic Medical Terminology Basket Weavlng-Beg. & Adv. ‘ Brick Masonry *Cake Decorating Beg. 8i Adv. ♦Chinese Cooking ♦Clock Making 8i Repair ♦Clothing Construction ♦Ceramics♦Choking Prevention-Helm- llch Maneuver♦Commercial Art, LetterlngSi Printing♦Cost Accounting for the Non-Financial Supervisor ♦Counted Cross Stitch ♦Country Painting ♦CPR-Cardio Pulmonary Resus citation ♦Creative Stitchery (croch­eting, Knitting, embroidery,It other “needle'^ crafts) ♦Dancing (Ballroom/Soclai)- Adv. & Beg.Drapery Wordshop Driver Education ♦Electronics Adv. (Ham Radio)♦EMT Recertification ♦Estate Planning & Under­standing Use of Life In­surance♦Executive Health Clinic ♦First Aid-Standard ♦Goal Setting 8i Personal Motivation♦Guitar (Group Lesson) ♦Handbullt & Wheel-Thrown Pottery♦Hardwood Luihber Grading Improved Communication In Employee-Employer Relation Ljimpshade Reflnlshing ♦Learn to Like Yourself and Others Through Applied Psychology ♦Macramè'♦Management-Labor Re­lations♦Nursing Assistant ♦oil & Acrylic Painting ♦Photography♦Plano (Group Lessons) Adv. & Beg.♦Pine Needle Basketry ♦Principles of Supervision II ♦Private Pilot Ground School RiOblem Solving & Decision Maklna Real Estate Math ♦Real Estate Principles (pre- licensing course)♦Roots of North American Music » ¥ ♦Sales Development Tralnln ♦Single Life: M for You rralnlng laking It Work ♦Smaii Business Management ♦Small Engine Repair ♦Smoke Stoppers (KIck-the- Habit) Sion C®"'P™*'en- ♦Stress-Tenslon Management &.Relaxation Therapy ♦Taxldermy-Small (lame ♦Tolepalntlng-Beg. & Int. ♦Wallpapering ♦Watercolor Painting Generally, Spring Quarter Classes Will Begin The Week Of March 5 Or Later. Many Classes Listed Above Are Offered At Several Times And Dates And At Different Locations Throughout Davidson And Davie Counties. Registration is Generally Held At The First Class Session And The ’5.00 Fee Collected. Certain Classes Are Restricted To LIMITED Number Of Students Who Are Accepted On A First-Come, First-Served Basis. For This Reason It Is Recommeded That Interested Persons PRE-REGISTER By Calling The Adult Division To Assure That There Is Space In The Class. F o r A d d itio n a l in fo r m a tio n C o m e B y O r C a ll D a v ld fo n C o u n ty C o m m u n ity C o lle g e . The Individualized Learning Center Offers Preparation For The GED Test And GED Testing. Call Extension 232 For Information. P H O N E 919—475-7181 704—249>8186 Davidson Couty Commiinity Colltge-An Equil ______Opportunity Educrtion inititution. DAVlli COUNTY i;nti;r pr isi; ri-.c o r d . Th u r sd a y , m arch 8, i'n<> -( C a r i n g F o r t h e L a n d % GIRL SCOUTS Girl Scx)uts of the U .S.A. learn to respect their envi­ ronm ent by being energy m inded. T hank you, girls! • • • J.P. Green Milling Co. ^Mocksville, N.C^ ^ T a l e n t e d M Y o u n g W o m e r ^ GIRL SCOUTS Girl Scouts of the U .S.A . are skilled in the area of c o m m u n ity le a d e rs h ip . Let’s salute these girls! • • • Anderson Chip & Pulpwood Co. Jioute 4, Mocksville, N .^ • • • * p*' /-i t nf///// j r C rD MARCH 11-17 '¿ib V j i,\nt ' ifesi ^Jumping m T o T h e T o p ! GIRL SCOUTS Girl S couts of the U .S.A. ta k e fe w fa lls o n th e ir clim b to s u c c e s s . T hey have got w hat it takes! H & R Block Depot Street, Mocksville D o i n g i G o o d D e e d s k . GIRL SCOUTS W e adm ire the m any Girl S c o u ts of the U .S .A . for a lw a y s g iv in g a p art of them selves to help others. • • • Howard Realty Julia C. Howard Office 634-3538 Home 634-3754 ^ S a l u t e m O u r G i r l s ! GIRLSCOUTS Sharing and caring are the p r o m is e s th a t th e G irl Scouts of the U .S.A . prac­ tice in their encounters. • • • Daniel's Furniture & Electric Co. Inc. At The Overhead Bridge Mocksville, N.C. W o m e n ^ O f T o m o r r o u ^ •GIRLSCOUTS^ Enjoy Life More! W e salute the Girl S couts of the U .S.A . for teaching girls to fc)0 their very best! Ingersoll-Rand Mocksville, N.C. • • • < • • • • G r o w i n g U p R i g h t ! GIRLSCOUTS T h e G irl S c o u ts of the United S tates of A m erica g r o o m o u r g irls to b e responsible, happ y adults. • • • Foster-Rauch Drug Company Lowes Shopping Center Mocksville, N.C., > • • • H a p p y S i s t e r h o o d № GIRLSCOUTS T h e G irl S c o u ts of the U .S.A . work together and e n jo y s h a r in g e x p e r i­ ence s, crafts, skills, fun! • • • Yadkin Valley Telephone Membership Corp. J(idkinville, N.C^ 8C DAVII-; ( O lis n KNTI KI’KISI KIX'OKO. THURSDAY. MARCH H, 1<)7‘) Davie Countians Help Build Missionary Home In Guatemala Three persons from Davie County Joined five others from neighboring counties in early February lo journey lo the Central American country of Guatemala to help wilh the construction of a home there for Baptist missionaries.The Rev. Archie V. Jones Sr. of Mocksville, paslor of the Robinhood Rd. Baptist Church in Forsyth County, and his daughter and son-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Russell Angell of Rt 6, Mocksville, were the Davie Countians making the journey lo GuatemalaThe group traveled (o Guatemala as participants in the North Carolina Baptist Men Overseas Involvement Program. Approximately 2,000 men and women from the slate will journey to foreign countries all over the world this year on work and preaching missions as participants in the Overseas In­volvement Program.Participants in this ministry to foreign countries pay their own expenses on these overseas junkets.The Rev. Jones and Mr. and Mrs. AngeU and other members ot their group spent two weeks in Guatemala on their work project, leaving the States on February 5 and returning February 17.The group’s luggage was delayed a day in being transported from Miami, Florida to Guatemala City and this first day in Guatemala was spent on sight­seeing excursions by the North Carolinians.The Presidential Palace, the National Cathedral, the local marketplace and Baptist Seminary were among the sights visited by the group during their stay in Guatemala City. After spending the day in Guatemala City the group took a 5-hours overland drive the next day to the town of Coban in the interior of Guatemala. Coban is a trade and commerce town where the Guatemalan Indians come trom the rural countryside lo sell corn and bananas.Jones described Coban as "sort of the jumping off point into the Petan Plains, which is geographically the southern part of the Yucatan Peninsula. Ac­cording to Jones, the area there is "a very productive agricultural area” which produces corn, coffee and bananas and which recently also started to produce oil in some quantities.While in Coban ihe Norlh Carolinians visited a regional hospital there which had been equipped by a sister4:ity in the state of Alabama in the United States.From Coban the group from the States flew on a Missionary Aviation Fellowship plane to Las Casas, Guatemala, where they would spend the next ten days working on the missionary house to be constructed there.Jones said the group's living ac- Russell Angell of Davie County (1) and Tim Tucker of Yadkin County (r) work on missionary home in Guatemala. Thatched-roof hut where most of the party from the United States lived while in Guatemala. comodalions in Las Casas consisted of a ‘‘thatched-roofcd Indian-s|^le house” which served as a dormitory, tool shed, cement storage area and kitchen. Mr. and Mrs. Angell lived outside the thatched-roofed house in a lent they took to Guatemala."When we got to Las Casas we found the foundations already poured and the upright steel already in place tor the missionary house because another group trom the States had earlier traveled lo Guatemala to aid in the construction efforts there,” noted Jones.He continued, “During the six working days we had there al Las Casas we got the block walls of the house up lo the roof-level on all of the outside walls and up to the 4-ft.-levei on the inside walls."Jones commented lhat all good con­struction in Guatemala is done by using reinforced concrete t>ecause of the need for “earthquake protection” in that Central American country. Jones and his group constructed reinforced con­crete beams in the missionary home.While in Guatemala, Jones said he and his cohorts had the opportunity “to get lo know a little about iocal life” with occasional sidetrips lo neighboring towns and a large “hacienda, known as the hacienda of Cebol, as “sort of an agricultural complex with small stores, a garage, tool sheds and a market place.”Commented Jones, “Thursday was the market day for the hacienda so we knocked off from work that day about noon and went sight-seeing in the hacienda.”Also during their stay in Guatemala, the North Carolinians, led by Jones, participated in the dedication services of a new Baptist church in that country one Sunday.“I preached in Spanish and the local pastor translated my sermon into the local Indian dialect. There are 22 dif­ferent dialects for the Indians in Guatemala,” he said. Jones, himself, is a former Southern Baptist Missionary to several Central and South American countries.Jones noted that after the dedication of the new church that he and his group were feted at “a feast” of turkey, turkey broth, rice, bart)ecued beef and a “mountain of tortillas.”He said turkey is “a must” food in the observance of any festive occasion in Guatemala.One “point ot curiosity” which Jones related aboul his group’s travels in Guatemala was that whenever they would buy a Coca-Cola in the rural areas of the country they would have to place the liquid drink in a plastic bag if they look it out of a store because store owners were guarding against persons stealing the glass botUes containing the drink. These glass bottles “are more valuable to the Guatemalans than the actual drink,” remarked Jones.Jones said he and his group found the Guatemalans "to be very friendly, very open people” who are “most cordial lo North Americans” because the United States had aided the country of Guatemala so much during past ear­thquake recovery situations."They don’t even demand a passport from North Americans, just proof of North American citizenship,” said Jones. The wralls of the missionary home rose rapidly after construction work began on them.Guatemalan Indians come down river to market. Dr. Jaime Emilio Trujillo Dr. Trujillo Opens ^ Forsyth Office Dr. Jaime Bmilio Trujillo will open a private practice in internal medicine at 3111 Maplewood Ave. in Suite 101 of thtfif Maplewood Professional Bldg. on March”5 He was formerly on staff at Winston- Salem Health Care.He is married to the former Ilene Sink, a native ot Davidson County, and they are the parents ot two children.Dr. Trujillo was born in Colombia, ^ South America and was educated al.l^, University ot Antioquia in Medellin, Colombia. His postgraduate training and experience included: Fellowship in Endocrinology at Case Western Reserve University, University Hospital of Cleveland, internal medicine residency at Case Western Reserve and also his straight medical internship was earnec^ there. ^Dr. Trujillo is a member of the Association of American College of Physicians and ot the American Association for the Advancement of Science.Dr. Trujillo is currently a clinical instructor of medicine specializing injj endocrinology at Bowman Gray School- of Medicine. In 17th century Holland, the passion for tulips was so great a single root of one plant sold for the equivalent of about $1,500. Farm Market Summary Report * (Farm Market Summary Week of February 26-March 2, 1979, Federal State Market News Service North Carolina Department ot Agriculture Division of Marketing)A total ot 17,793 fe^er pigs were sold on 13 state graded sales during week ot February 26, according to the Market News Service of the North Carolina Department of Agriculture. Prices were mosUy $1.75 to $4 lower. U.S. 1-2 pigs weighing 40-50 pounds averaged $114.33 per hundred pounds with No. 38 $107.16; 50- 60 pound l-2s averaged $103.04, No. 3s $90.05 ; 60-70 pound l-2s $91.65, No. 3s $79.60; 70-80 pound l-2s $80.50 per hundred pounds with No. 3s $73.77.At weekly livestock auc­tions held within the stale the week of February 26, prices for slaughter cows and veals ranged about steady and feeder calves $1 to $3 higher. Utility and commercial slaughter cows brought $50.50 to $62.50 per hundred pounds, (Sood and choice veal calves $90 to $126; Good and choice slaughter steers above 800 pounds $65.50 to $67.50 at one market; Choice slaughter heifers above 700 pounds $62 to $66.50, Good grade $58.50 to $64.25; Good feeder steers 300- 600 pounds $72 to $103 and Good feeder heifers 300-500 pounds $71 to $85; feeder cows $48 lo $60 per hundred pounds. Baby calves brought $36 to $130 per head. Market hogs brought mostly $51.30 lo $53.10 and sows 300-600 pounds $42.50 to $49 per hundred weight.Corn prices were steady and soybeans 15 to 17 cents lower through Thursday, March 1, as compared to the same period of the previous week. No. 2 yellow shelled corn ranged mostly $2.50 to $2.60 in the Eastern part of the state and $2.55 to $2.65 in the Piedmont. No. 1 yellow soybeans ranged mostly $7.20 to $7.54 in the East and ^.10 to $7.41 in the Piedmont; No. 2 red winter wheat $3.60 to $4.10; New crop prices quoted for harvest delivery corn $2.41 to $2.47, soybeans $6.72 to $6.96Mi, Wheat $3.04 to $3.17, oats $1.16 to $1.17.Egg prices were higher on mediums and steady on large and smalls to those of the previous week. Supplies were adequate. Demand was good. The North Carolina weighted average price quoted on March 1 for small lot sales of cartoned grade A eggs delivered to stores was 70.16 cents per dozen for Large, Medium 66.75 and Smalls 46.18. Sweet potato prices were steady this past week with a firm undertone. Supplies are adequate and demand good. Fifty pound cartons of uuied U.S. No. is on March 1 were quoted at $6.00 to $6.75, some at $7.00.The broiler-fryer market is 4 cents lower tor next week’s trading. Supplies are adequate. Demand is good. The North Carolina dock weighted average price is 46.33 cents per pound for less than truckloads picked up at processing plants during the week of March 5. This week 7.2 million birds were processed in North Carolina with an average live bird weight ot 4.06 pounds per bird on February 28.Heavy type hens were lower this past week. Supplies were moderate and demand good. Heavy type prices 25 to 25'/4, mostly 25 cents per pound at the farm with buyers loading. Our community wishes to express sympathy to Ronnie Burton in the death ot his mother Mrs. Annie Davis who passed away last Tuesday.Mrs. Helen Myers and Mrs. Alec Alvord, members of the United Methodist Women, attend the “Day Apart" Sunday afternoon at the First Church at Lexington.Our community wishes to express sympathy to Mrs. Sandy Baity in the death of her grandmother, Mrs. Oiarlie Myers, who passed away Saturday morning at Forsyth Hospital.Those visiting Miss Ethel Jones last week were Mr. and Mrs. Paul G. Jones and Mr. and Mrs. Henry Miller and Rodney. Mr. and Mrs. Tommie Mock and Gena visitea Mr. and Mrs. Zeno Adams near Farmington on Sunday.Mr. and Mrs. David Miller spent last Saturday with his grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. G.O. Carrigan of Troutman. Paul W. Jones, who is a patient at Davie County hospital for the past five weeks, is slowly imporving.Mr. and Mrs. Lonnie Hughes and Joe were Saturday Supper guests of Mr. and Mrs. Rickey Green of KernersviUe.Mrs. Margaret Carter spent last Monday with her mother, Mrs. Lydia AUen ot Courtney.Miss Caren Alvord, a student at Phiffer CoUege. has been at home the past week iU with a virus. CROP-HAIL yT INSURANCE W A l l T y p e s O f C r o p s TOBACCO ORIENTED PROGRAMS T O B A C C O W A R E H O U S E S A N D C O N T E N T S T O B A C C O B A R N S £ a s i/ M o n th ly P re m iu m F in a n c in g P ro g ra m BRANTLEY-EDWARDS IN S U R A N C E A G E N C Y AGENT; OARRELL EDWARDS 503 Avon Street Momiiiy PremiumMocksvill». NC 1-mancmg Plans PHONE 634-2 IOS BIRQ S p rin g Is J u s t A r o u n d th e C o rn e r — G e t R e a d y fo r W a rm W e a th e r D riv in g by T aking A d v a n ta g e o f T hese S p e c ia l S a le P ric e s NOW! /^ 30,000^ MILE DUNLOP Elite Seventy STEEL BELTED RADIALS*50,000 mile limited warranty BR70X13 .................. 4 8 .0 0 ER70X14...................5 4 .0 0 FR70X14.................6 0 .0 0 GR70X14 ................... 6 2 .0 0 FR70X15 .................. 6 0 .0 0 GR70X15 .................. 6 4 .0 0 HR70x15...................6 6 .0 0 LR 70X15................7 2 .0 0 560x16. 600x15 600x12 A78XI3. 878x13. 078x13 C78X14. Dunlop Gold Seal Polyester WHITE WALLS E78X14.. 29.00 24.00 F78X14..30.00 25.00 078x14. 31.00 23.00 H78X14. 34.00 24.00 678X1S..32.00 26.00 N78x15..34.00 27.00 J78X1S..36.00 27.00 178x15 . 37.00 BR78X13...... 0R78X14...... DUNLOP Gold Seal Steel Belted RADIAL Whitewalls ER78X14. ^ 4 4 .0 0 FR78X14.. 4 6 .0 0 6R78X14.. 4 8 .0 0 HR78X14.. 5 2 .0 0 FR78X15.. 4 8 .0 0 GR78X15.. 5 0 .0 0 HR78X15.. 5 3 .0 0 3 8 .0 0 JR78X15..........5 5 .0 0 4 3 .0 0 LR78X15...........5 7 .0 0 •It your Dunlop Gold Seal or Elite Seventy Steel Belted Radial Tire wears evenly across the tread down to the tread wear Indicators 12/32" tread depth) before delivering 30.000 or SO.OOO miles, Dunlop will, upon presentation the Dunlop mileage booklet and In exchange for the worn out tire, give credit toward the purchase of a comparable new Dunlop tire based on Dunlop's Mileage Unit Price and the mile­age nol received. The Mileage Unit Charge reasonably reflects the tire prices being charge at retail for the replacement tire, t^ileage will be determined by the odometer reading. DUNLOP GT OUALIFIER STEEL BELTED RADIAL 7 0 SERIES BR70X13... ^ 4 4 .0 0 ER70X14.....5 0 .0 0 FR70X14.....5 4 .0 0 GR70X14.....5 7 .0 0 6R70X15.....5 8 .0 0 6 0 SERIES FRßOx14....*60.00 GR60X14 ....6 2 .0 0 FR60X15.... 6 2 .0 0 FR70X15......6 1 .0 0 CLEMMONS TIRE and AUTOMOTIVE L e w is v ille « C le m m o n c R o a d , C le m m o n s . N .C . P h . 7 6 6 -5 4 5 0 HOURS: DAILY 7:30-6:30, SAT. 8 1 NEW TIRES-BRAKE WORK-FRONT END ALIGNMENT- AIR CONDITIONING-HIGH SPEED BALANCING-TIRE TRUING » ALL PIMCiS INCLUDC > FID. TAX • моиилмс • BALANCINC HR70X15.....6 2 .0 0 GB60X15 ....6 4 .0 0 LR70X15.... 6 8 .0 0 LR60X15.....7 4 .0 0 OI^LIFIER Fiberglass Belted I 2 + 2 White Letter 6 0 SERIES „ „ , ” “ « 0 0 E“ « » ’3 6 .0 0 m ! 1 3 0 0 3 9 .5 0 H i i 060.14.......4 1 .0 0 till T o r r e n t i a l R a i n s H i t D a v i e m Hunting Creek raged like a river following the heavy rains of Sunday and Monday which caused it to overflow it’s banks. Bear Creek was well out of it’s banks as a result of the heavy rains. iAfi' f , JL. U ', ■ ■ •<- Rushing torrents of water gushed from pipes following weekend rains in Davie County. This pipe was recently installed under Duke Whittaker Road to alleviate flooding pro­ blems which often halted traffic. A r k T i m e ! A weather system that caused flooding and forced evacuation of families in the western portion of the state on Sunday moved eastward later that day and early Monday, adding water to already full rivers and streams in the Piedmont.More than two inches of rain fell on the Piedmont during the watery deluge and, according to C.F. Meroney Jr., official precipitation statistician for Davie Count, 2.33 inches of rain fell locally Sunday and early Monday.Many of the low-lying areas in Davie and surrounding counties were flooded as the Yadkin River and smaller streams and creeks overflowed their banks, covering some secondary roads and bridges.In Davie County the Underpass, Murchison, Howell, Godbey, Ratledge, Howardtown, Bobbitt, Dixon, Whitaker, Essie, Dyson, and Log Cabin roads were reported underwater Monday morning as a result of the rainfall over the weekend.However, by Tuesday afternoon, these roads were no longer covered with water, said Les Bowles, area foreman for Davie County for the Division of Highways for the North Carolina Department of Transportation.“We had some really bad problems with washouts, particularly around pipes," noted Bowles.He said his department would be hauling dirt and rock to replace in these washed out places and most of the repair work to these areas had already been completed by Tuesday afternoon.Bowles said there were "a lot” of drainage pipes in the county "stopped up" because of the amount of trash and other debris washed into them during the heavy rainfall.Civil preparedness authorities in Davie said the flooding in the county did not create any emergency situations.Much of the bottom and low-lying lands in teh county suffered some damage from "scouring" (erosion) during the time they were covered with so much water fron\ overflowing streams.No major power outages or problems with phone service were reported In Davie as the result of the rainfall over the weekend. Two spectators view the result of torrential rains in the county. This newly formed “lake” on the Duke Wliittakcr Road had already lowered several feet from what it was early Monday morning. The bridge on Howell Road was impassable most of the day Monday because of the water over the road there. D AVIE C O U N T Y F e a t u r e 1 - D M a r c h 8 , 1 9 7 9 P h o t o s b y J a m e s B a r r i n g e r a n d G a r r y F o s t e r Hooded lowlands were common sighti in Davie County following the torrential rains Sunday and Monday. This scene was photographed along 801 North near Farmington, on Cedar Creek. 2D IMVIL CO IM V I NTl.RPKISl- Kl.( ORD. THURSDAY. MARCH H, l')7<) ANNIE E. DAVISMrs. Annie Elizabeth Davis, 69, of Guardian Care Rest Home in Clemmons was born in Davie County June 27, 1909, lo William and Beatrice Johnson Brewbaker.She was a member of the Advance United Methodist Church.She was married to Clarence Davis who died in 1970.Surviving are three daughters, Mrs. Charlie F. Corzart of Mocksville, Mrs. Charles R. Chrenshaw of Moclcsville, Mrs. Phill Hopkins of Powellsville, S.C.; six sons, Frank Burton of Pawleys Island, S.C., Bob Burton and Herbert Burton, both of Winston-Salem, Kenneth Burton of Saudi Arabia, Ronnie Burton and Bill Burton, both of Advance; four step-daughters, Mrs. Bill Chrestan of Charlotte, Miss Phyllis Davis, Mrs. Dan Mclver of Winston-Salem, Mrs. John Bedford of Davidson County; one sister, Mrs. Ruth Wyatt of Advance; 33 grandchildren and 13 great grandchildren. MRS. ESTER W.TUTTEROWMrs. Ester White Tutterow, 74, of Rt. 7 died Saturday at Davie County Hospital. She was the widow of Duke Tut­ terow.The funeral was held Monday at Eaton’s Funeral Home Chapel conducted by the Rev. Kenneth Eller. Burial was in Concord United Methodist Church cemetery. Memorials may be made to the church building fund.Bom Jan. 7, 1905, in Davie County, she was a daughter of the late J.C. and Samantha Boyd White. She was a former employee of Lynn Haven Nursing Home, and was a member of Concord Methodist Church.Survivors include two daughters, Mrs. Katherine Crotte of Rt. 4, and Mrs. Sandra Vance of Rt. 7, both of MocksviUe: two sons, J.N. Tutterow of Rt. 7, MocksviUe, and Jack Tutterow of Rt. 2, Advance; six sisters, Mrs. Clois Gobble and Mrs. Audrey Gobble of Rt. 1, Mrs. Rachel Call of Rt. 4, Mrs. Annabelle Ingram of Rt. 5, all of MocksviUe, and Mrs. Naomi Ijames of Harmony and Mrs. Vernell Bodenhammer of Winston-Salem; four brothers, Carmen and Fletcher White of Winston- Salem and Aaron and John White of Rt. 2, MocksviUe; 12 grandchildren and eight great-grandchildren. MRS, IVA P. MYERSMrs. Iva Poindexter Myers, 76, of Mocks Church Road, died Saturday morning at Forsyth Memorial Hospital,The funeral was conducted at 2 p,m, Monday at Vogler’s Clemmons Chapel, Burial was in Montview Memorial Park.Mrs. Myers was born in Surry County to Richard and Susie Holfield Myers. She had lived in Advance for the last eight years and was a member of Mocks United Methodist Church.She retired from Taylor Brothers Tobacco Company in 1968, after 33 years of service.Surviving are one daughter, Mrs. Jesse (Mary) Thompson of Kinney Road, LewisvUle; six grandchUdren; 14 great­grandchildren; two sisters, Mrs. HoUy Jenkins and Mrs. Mamie Ledman both of Asheboro; two brothers, Emmette Poindexter of Fairview, N.C. and Floyd Poindexter of Greensboro; one half-brother, Hayden Poindexter of ThomasvUle W.J. PARKER WaUace James Parker, 63, of Charlotte, a native of Ck>oleemee, died Friday at a Charlotte hospital.The funeral was Sunday at 3 p.m. at Hickory Grove United Methodist Church in Charlotte. Burial was at Sunset Memory Garden.Mr. Parker was born November 6, 1915, in Davie County, a son of the late John Hancock and Effie Miller Parker. He was a graduate of Cooleemee High School and the Charlotte Center of N.C. State University in eneineering. He retired from Duke Power Co. after 42 years of service.Surviving are his wife, Emma Elizabeth Wilson Parker; three daughters, Mrs. Judy Long, Mrs, Jane Thompson and Mrs, Mary Shoupe, all of Charlotte; five sisters, Mrs, Blanche Stephenson of Salisbury, Mrs. Sadie Wood of Moorpark. Calif,, Mrs, Vermilla Mella Bashforth of Dearborn, Mich,, Mrs, Cody Parker of Cooleemee, and Mrs, NeUie Hnatio of Boston, Mass, and four grandchildren, MRS, MARIE JOHNSON Mrs, Marie Allison Johnson, 89, formerly of 430 Maple Ave,, widow of PhiUip J, Johnson, died at Wesley Nursing Center in Charlotte Thursday night.Graveside services were conducted at 2 p,m, Saturday at Rose Cemetery in Mocksville by the Rev, George Auman,The family requests that all memorials be made to the First United Methodist Church of Mocksville,She was born in Rowan County to the late Gustave A, and Henrie E, Morris Allison, She was a graduate of Davenport CoUege and was a memt)er of Mocksville United Metliodist Church.Surviving are two daughters, Mrs. Robert S. McNeill of Bowie, Md., and Mrs. Walter Hargett of Greenup, Kty.; two sisters. Miss Ossie Allison and Mrs. Margaret LeGrand, both of MocksviUe; one brother, W.G. Allison of Wilmington, N.C.; and three grandchildren. MRS. W.H. EATON Mrs. Laura Peoples Eaton of Route 2, Mocksville, widow of Wade H. Eaton, died Thursday morning at the Davie County Hospital.She was a member of the Chestnut Grove United Methodist Church.She was born in Davie County, daughter of Thomas Monroe Peoples and Louisa Catherine Munday Peoples.Surviving are three daughters, Mrs. Louise Oeh- man and Mrs. Mary NeU Hanes, both of Winston- Salem, and Mrs. Elaine Foster of Route 1, Advance; two sons, W.H. Eaton, Jr., of Marietla, Ga„ and Thomas L, Eaton of Woodstock, Ga.; two brothers, Linney Peoples and John Peoples, both of Route 2, Mocksville; 12 grandchUdren and four great-grandchildren. The funeral was held Saturday at 11:00 a,m, at Eaton’s Funeral Home Chapel by the Rev, Larry Staples, Burial was in the Chestnut Grove United Methodist Church Cemetery, MOTT PADGETT Mott Henry Padgett, 67, of Route 4, died Thursday in Davie County Hospital,A private graveside service was held at 10:30 a,m, Saturday in Rowan Memorial Park, . Padgett was born in IredeU County Oct, 8,1912, and was a son of the late Charlie and Bernice Steele Padgett, Survivors include his wife, Eva Rodden Padgett; two brothers, Harold and Ralph Padgett, both of Rt, 1, Woodleaf; and two sisters, Mrs, Addie Beam of Rt, 1, Woodleaf and Mrs, Harold Raby of MooresviUe, DEWEY P,RUARK Dewey Preston Ruark, 67, of 620 Gwyn St., Mocksville, died Monday afternoon at Lynn Haven Nursing Home.The funeral was conducted Wednesday at Eaton’s Funeral Home Chapel at 2:00 p.m. by the Rev. Grady Tutterow and the Rev. Lind­sey Walters. Burial was in Clemmons Memorial Gardens. In lieu of flowers, the family requests that donations may be made to the Heart Fund.Mr. Ruark was born January 17, 1912, in Morgan County, Ga. He was a retired fixer of the Hanes Corp. He was a member of the Bear Creek Baptist Church.Surviving are his wife, Norma Payne Ruark; one foster son, Charles Payne of Pfafftown; two grand­daughters, Miss Marcia Payne and Miss Lori Payne; two brothers, Irvin 0. Ruark of Winston-Salem and WUey Ruark of Bostwick, Ga. Fork Baptist To Hold Spring Revival March 11-16 Fork Baptist Church of Route 3, MocksviUe wUl be holding Spring Revival March 11-16. Services wiU begin at 7:15 each evening.Dr, Homer Martinez, visiting Evangelist from DaUas, Texas, wiU be con­ducting the services. He has conducted over 1,000 crusades throughout the United States, He is a graduate of Georgetown College in Kentucky. He did his graduate work at South­western Baptist Theological Seminary. Fort Worth, Texas. In 1978 he was awarded a doctorate from Shenandoah Bible College. Roanoke, Virginia.He and his wife, Emily, have four children. Mrs. Mary Rebekah Wasson of Topeka, Kansas spent from Wednesday February 28 to Monday March 5 visiting her mother and aunt Mrs. Minnie Bryson and Miss Rebekah Talbert. During the week Mrs. Wasson’s children and grandchildren came for a visit. They were Mrs. Carol King and son Geoffrey of Charlotte, Mrs. Elizabeth Allen and daughter KeUy of Lewisville, Mr. and Mrs. Dickie Wood of Winston- Salem, Mr. and Mrs. Francis Greene and children Bryce and Trina of MocksvUle. Mrs. Wasson’s brother-in-law and sister Mr. and Mrs. Harold Brown of Winston-Salem also visited. On Sunday March 4, Mrs. Bryson and Miss Talbert had 11 luncheon guests which included Mrs. Wasson, her children and grandchUdren.Mrs. Tom Browder, Mrs. Paul Folmar and Mrs. Recie Sheets spent Wednesday visiting Mrs. Browder’s sister Mrs. Willie Campbell in Mooresvllle. Our community expresses sympathy to the Burton and Davis famUies in the death of their loved one, Mrs. Ann Burton Davis who died last Tuesdav. Also svmoathy to Albert Poole in the death of his mother Mrs. Ola Foster Poole who died Sunday night in Lexington. Albert had just lost his father. Cliff Poole, on February 11.Mrs. Margie Markland had the misfortune to faU at work last Friday and break an arm. She is employed at the Hanes Bixby Plant. A speedy recovery is wished for her. Mrs. Recie Sheets ac­companied her nephew J.C. Barney of Bixby on a Sunday afternoon visit to several Nursing Homes. They visited Mrs. Sheets sister and Mr. Barney’s mother, Mrs. Althaea Barney at Manor Care; at the Winston-Salem Convalescent Center they visited Mr. and Mrs. Brown Gilbert, Mrs. Annie Crews and Cicero Cornatzer; at Pellcare Nursing Home they visited Mrs. Pearl Hartman and at Guardian Care in Clemmons they visited Mrs. Luna Robertson and Mrs. Nan Bailey. VA Medical CareVA’s hospital and medical care system-the nation’s largest-provides inpatient and ambulatory care to some 185,000 beneficiaries each day, the greatest number in agency histroy. _________ Tommy Combs was ordained Sunday evening, March 4, to the gospel ministry. In a special service at Cornatzer Baptist Church by the Rev. Elmer Day, pastor of the church. He was presented with a Bible from the Rev. Ralph Byrd of Lexington, on behalf of the church. He Is married to the former Linda Byrd and they have two children, a son. Shannon and a daughter. Heather AUlson. They make their home on Route 7, Mocksville. Heart Risks The risks associated with heart attack and how to lower them are the subject of a booklet, “Reduce Your Risk of Heart Arrack,” which is available free of charge from Uie North CaroUna Heart Association, 1 Heart Circle, Chapel Hill, N.C. 27514. Farm Bureau Takes Applicants 4 In Scholarships The Davie County Farm Bureau is now taking ap­plications for scholarships at the local office,AppUcants must study in A collegeHome Economics or ▼ Agriculture, or related subjects. The two year Agricultural Institute at N.C.State qualifies also. Com­munity Colleges and Technical Institutes are excluded. ▲Applicants must complete a “ ' form, furnish photo, SAT score and transcript of high school grades.Applicants parents are required to fill out a statement giving financial data. This wUl be kept con- ^ fidential. jiThese grants can be made for up to four years for un­dergraduate work provided a student is regularly enroUed in coUege and is making satisfactory grades. Each grant wiU be in the amount of $500.00 per school year. 0 Anyone Interested, please contact the office at 634-2378 immediately as all ap­plications need to be in by March 19, 1979. Johannes Gutenberg, the father of printing, was originally a goldsmith. S E R V IC E S : JERICHO CHURCH OF CHRIST Route 7, Jericho Church Road Phone: 492-5291 Minister-Charles Isenberg Sunday: Bible Study and classes for all ages at 10:00 looming Worship at 11:00 a.m.Evening Worship at 6:00 p.m.Wednesday Night: iVlld-week Bible Study at 7:30 SERMON TOPICS FOR SUNDAY, Bible Study: "The Authority ot the Church” Morning Worship: “Divine Inspiration of the Bible" ^venin^WorsMp^^M^^Ver^n^ THOUGHT FOR THIS WEEK How many wives Did David Have? ANSWER TO LAST WEEKS: Jacob, Gen. 29:20 FARMINGTON METHODIST CHURCH Wonhip: 1st Sunday 10 a.m. 3rd Sunday' 11 ajn. - Sunday School 1st Sun. 11 a.m.3.2,4; SundayslO a.m. ____ WESLiai CHAPEL METHODIST CHURCH Worailp; 1st Sun. 11 a.m.3rd Sun* 10 a.m. - Sunday School 3rd Sun, 11 a.m., 1,2,4, Sundays 10 a.m. NO CREEK PRIMITIVE BAPnST CHURCH THE COOLEEMEE EPISCOPAL CHURCH Of The Good Shepherd The Rev. WtUis M. Rosenthal, Priest In Charge, Morning with Sermon 9:30 a.m., Sunday School 10:50 ajn. HUNTSVILLE METHODIST CHURCH WORSHIP: 2nd Sun. 10 a.m., 4th Sun. 11 a.m. "T H tR E IS A TIME F O R EV ER YT H IN G . . ." Ecclesiasiei 3:). The Living Bible, Tyndale House MiNUTes CAUDELL' LUMBERCO/ 1238 Bin^am Street Mockeville, NC PHONE 634-2167 EATON FUNERAL HOME 328 N. Main Street Mocksville, NC PHONÉ 634-2148 ADVANCE BAPTIST CHURCH CEDAR CREEK BAPTIST CHURCH FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH Rev. George Auman , Sunday School 10 a.m.-Worship Service 11 a.m. MOCKS UNITED METHODIST CHURCH .YADKIN VALLEY BAPTIST CHURCH CHINQUAPIN GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH EDGEWOOD BAPTIST CHURCH SMITH GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH CORNATZER BAPTIST CHURCH FORK BAPTIST CHURCH 6 miles East on Hwy 64, Rev. Yates K. Wilkinson, Pastor, Sunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship Service 11:00 a.m.-Evening ‘ Worship 7:20 p.m. МШтНАНбИАНЕ Ì 6 ENERAL MERCHANDISEFeeds, Dry Goods Groceries, Fertilizer. PHONE 634-2126 CORNATZER UNITED JrfETHODIST CHURCH UNION CHAPEL UNITED METHODIST CHURCH ELBAVILLE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH OAK GROVE UNITED METHODIST OiURCH_ CENTER UNITED METHODIST CHURCH SALEM UNITED METHODIST CHURCH LIBERTY UNITED METHODIST CHURCH ADVANCE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH' BETHLEHEM UNITED METHODIST CHURCH HARDISON UNITED METHODIST CHURCH TRINITY BABTIST CHURCH, Route 4, MocksviUe, Pastor: Gene Blackburn, Sun­day School-10:00 a.m.. Worship Service- 11:00 a.m., Evening Service-7:00 p.m., Wednesday Scrvice-7 p.m.A.M.E. ZION METHODIST CHURCH DAVIE TRACTOR ( ÌMPLEMENTCO. Ford Farmlna-Sales »nd iServioe-New HoUand'ßguiR МШигу RmiI a Complete PHONE 634-S96l( RMoir COBLE UME & FERTILIZER SERVICE CoolNinee, NC - Hwy 168 Buiineti Phone 284-4364 Home Phone 284-2782 DULIN UNITED METHODIST CHURCH COOLEEMEE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH-Rev. John F. Edwards DUTCHMAN CREEK BAPTIST CHURCH NORTH MAIN STREET CHURCH OF CHRIST Donald Freeman, Minister, Sunday School 10 a.m.-Worship Service 11 a.m.-Evening Worship Service 7 p.m.-Wed. Service 7:30 FARMINGTON BAPTIST CHURCH LIBERTY WESLEYAN CHURCH Tioy C. Vaughn, Pastor MOCKSVILLE WESLEYAN CHURCH , Hospital St., MocksviUe, NC Rev. Lindsay Walters , Sunday School 9:'4Sa.m.^orning Worship 11 a.m.-Evenhig Worship 7 a.m. BEAR CREEK BAPTIST CHURCH REDLAND PENTECOSTAL HOLINESS CHURCH Rev. Paul C. Ledbetter,Sunday Scho­ol 10 a.m.-Worship 11 a.m.-Ufeliners 6 p.m.-Evangelistic Service 7 p.m. - Wed. Bible Study 7 p.m. GOD LOOKS WITHIN An employer was asked to write a letter of recommendation. After mucfi soul-searchmg, he wrote: "Gentleman: When you come to know him, you will come to appreciate him as we appreciate him." Does God have to dismiss you from active service with such double talk? The Scripture contains no more disturbing statement for the slacker than, "Man looks on the outside, but God looks within." We should so strive in His vineyard that he would say of us, "Thou hast been faithful over a few things, now I will give thee many." ATTEND CHURCH THIS WEEK The Acropolis in Athens, Greece OCommun.lv Adviflit.na MACEDONIA MORAVIAN CHURCH Rev. John Kapp, pastor-Sunday School10 a.m.-Worship Service 11 a.m.-Youth FeUowship 6:30 p.m.-Evenfaig Worship 7:30 p.m. MOUNT OLIVE METHODIST CHURCH Worship: 2nd Sunday 11 a.m.. 4th Sun.10 a.m.-Sunday School: 4th Sun. 11 a.m 2,1,3 Sundays 10 a.m. JERICHO CHURCH OF CHRIST Jericho Road. Office: 492-5291 Home: 492-5257. Charles C. Isenberg 7257 ST. FRANQS CATHOLIS MISSION Sundays at 10 a.m. - Sunday obUgation fulfUled also at anticipatory mass on Saturdays at 8 p.m.634-2667 or 246-2463 BLAISE BAPTIST CHURCH Rev Jimmy Martin Pastor, Sunday Service y:50 a.m.-Worship Service 11 a.m.-Sunday Evenhig 7 p.m.-Wed. Evenhig 7:30 p.m. CHESTNUT GROVE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH BAILEY’S CHAPEL UNITED METHODIST CHURCH FULTON UNITED METHODIST CHURCH BETHEL UNITED METHODIST CHURCH SMITH GROVE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH ZION UNITED METHODIST CHURCH NEW UNION UNITED METHODISTCHURClJ EATONS BAPTIST CHURCH Sunday School 10 a.m.-Moming Worship 1.1 a.m.-Training Union 7 p.m. DAVIE BAPTIST TABERNACLERev. T. A. Shoaf, Pastor, On Fork BUby Rd.Sunday School 9:45 p.m.-Morning Worship Wilkins Hospital Pharmacy Located beside Davie Family Clinic BUl CoUette, R. Ph. Full Prescription Service At Discount Prices 713 Hospital Street J1 io n e j^ 6 3 4 ^ 3 0 ^ i^ ^ 601 Shell Joe Thompson, Owner 7 Days a Week 1-40 at Hwy. 601 N. MocksviUe, N.C. Phone: 634-3211 C.A.SEAroRD LUMBER COMPANY }ericho Road Mockeville, NC PHONE 634-5148 I. P. GREEN MILUNG CO. ik;. Daisy Flour We Custom Blend 524 Depot Street Phone 634-2126 GREEN MEADOWS BAPTIST CHURCH Rev. David E. Roberts, Sunday School 10 a.m.-Worship Service 11 a.m,-B,T.U 6:30 p.m.-Evening Worship 7:30 p.m. Evening Worship 7:30 p.m.-Prayer Meet­hig Wed. 7:30 p.m. CHURCH OF GOD, Cooleemee, NC CLEMENT GROVE CHURCH OF GOD I. W. Ijames, Pastor, Sabbath School 10 a.m.-Worship Service 1 p.m.-Prayer Meeting Wed. 8 p.m. SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST ON MILUNG ROADBarry Mahomey Pastor, Sabbath School 10 a.m.-Morning Worship 11 a.m. Betty’s Florist Rowers For All Occasions Call 634-3136 If No Answer 284-2629 927 YadkinviUe Rd. MocksvUle. N.C. COMMUNITY BAPTIST CHURCH Gladstone Road.Sunday School10 a.m.-Worship Service 11 a.m.HOPE BAPTIST TABERNACLE Norman S. Frye, Pastor. Sunday School 9:45 a.m.-Worship Service 10:45 a.m.-EvangeUstic Service 7:30 p.m.-Wed. Service 7:30 p.m. HOLY CROSS LUTHERAN CHURCH Sunday School 9:45-Worship 11 a.m.t MCiCKSVILLE PENTECOSTAL HOLINESS CHURCH James C. Hodnett, Minister Sunday School 10 A.M.Worship Service 11A.M.Evangelistic Service 7:00 p.m. FamUy Night Wed. 7:30 p.m. 11 a.m.-Evening Worship 7:30 p.m.-Blble Study Wed. 7:30 p.m.-Evening Wonhip 7 p.m_ JERUSALEM BAPTIST CHURCH Sunday School 10 a.m.-Worship Service11 a.m.-Evenhig Worship Service 7 p.m. FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH Cooleemee SHILOH BAPTIST CHURCH TURRENTINE BAPTIST CHURCH CHURCH OF THE LIVING GOD Bixby CHURCH OF GOD OF PROPHECY Rev. CharUe Talbert, MocksvUle, Rt. 4 (Epheaus) 284-4381 CONCORD UNITED METHODIST CHURCH CLARKESVILLE PENTECOSTAL HOLINESS CHURCH MocksviUe, Route 5, Rev. Albert Gentle Sunday School 10 a.m.-Worship Service11 a.m.THE EPISCOPAL CHURCHFork, N.C. The Church of the AscensionChurch School 10:00 a.m. Worship &Sermon 11:00 a.m. Prayer Meeting 7:15 p.m. on Wednesdays: Canon C.Nichols, Pastor. FARM & GARDEN SERVICE. INC. 961 YadkinviUe Road PHONE 634-2017 or 634-5964 FOSTER-RAUCH DRUG CO. Lawe* Shopping Center MocksviUe, NC PHONE 634-2141 DAVIE SUPPLY CO. ModuviUe, NC PHONE 634-2859 MARTIN EQUIPMENT & SERVICE 508 Depot St. MocksviUe, NC PHONE 634-2082 ENTERPRISE-RECORD 124 South Main Mocksville N.C. J.R. Campbell & Son Specializing in Commercial Buildings’ MUling Rd. MocksviUe, N.C. Phone: 634-5341' JEFFCO CO. JNC. ROUTE 1 - Advance "Our staff and employees encourage you to attend the church of your choice.' SHEFFIELD LUMBER & PALLET COMPANY Route 6 • Box 153 MocksviUe, NC PHONE 492-5565 (» DAVIi; со н м > IN lIK I’KISt Kl (ORD. IIIURSD.AY, MARCII .П) Richard Ferebee Has 4 3 Years Of Perfect Sunday School Attendance ^ Richard Ferebee was honored by Enton's Baptist Church on Sunday, February 25th, for 43 continuous years of perfect attendance in Sunday School.His 43rd perfect attendance pin was presented (o Ferebee by James A. Eaton, Music Director, and L. H.■ Downey, Sunday School Director. •■I The Rev. Benny Gibs, pastor-of .the church, said it was customary to present the perfect attendance pins in October and this is done for everyone except Richard Ferebee. He will not accept his pin unlil the third or fourth Sunday in February. His reason-he might miss a Sunday before then.Jk The 62-year-oId F’erebce received his "first pin the fourth Sunday in February, 1936, presented by the Rev. Laughridge. This established the February date for Ferebee to receive his pin.Ferebee, who lives at the homeplace in the Cana community abot^ three miles from the church, has braved all ^h e elements to attend Sunday School, " le tells of one cold Sunday morning in March, after an excessive amount of rainfall, he took off his shoes and socks, rolled up his britches and waded in freezing water across the branch to get to Sunday School.On two separate occasions he was Unadmitted to the hospital for surgery. One T time he was operated on Monday and let him go home on Saturday so he could go to Sunday School. Another time in the hospital the doctor wouldn't let him go home so his class went to the hospital and held Sunday School so he wouldn’t haye to miss. W a r y C lu b H as Forensic P ro g ram % An outline of the forensic program of the Davie High School was presented to members of the MocksviUe Rotary Club, Tuesday.Tim SeU, president of the'Davie High Forensic Society, described the program and explained how it had grown in six years at Davie from 5 |j|nembers participating in 3 tournaments 25 members today participating in 17 tournaments. He described the af- fUiation ot the Davie High Coub with both the state and national forensic assocations.“Forensic means a program ot speech”, said SeU. He went on to point f^ t'th a t forensic competition was ^vided into debate and individual events.“Tbe debates utilize and negative and atfirmative teams and usually debate a resolution”, said Sell. “Individual eyents include dramatic interpretations, oratory, extemperaneous speaking, ^-Avls Watkins presented a dramatic interpretation of "The Amen Comer” by James Baldwin. fleorge Kimberly Jr. presented an oration which he had composed and entitled, “Families of the Future”. In this 4>eech he compared the famUy life |||f former days with that of today and the *^n d into the future. He ended by swing:-The tamUy of tomorrow may bestronger than of yesterday.....becausewe have chosen to make it stronger”.praham Madison had charge of the program. In presenting the three«udents he praised the forensic group r the success it was achieving the various tournaments throughout the state. President Charles Bullock presided. Ricliiird Ferebee School Superintendents To Meet With Governor On School For The Gifted superintendents trom six school systems in Davie, Davidson and Rowan counties are scheduled to meet Thur­sday, March 8, with Governor James B. Hunt Jr. to discuss the governor’s proposal to establish a high school for students gifted in science and mathematics.The meeting was arranged by state Sen. Robert M. Davis Jr., D-Rowan, who also represents Davie and Davidson in Uie State Senate and who also plans to attend the meeting Thursday.The proposal to open a science and math high school at the old Watts Hospital site in Durham has come under increasing criticism from boards of education around the state and is being actively opposed by Lt. Gov. James C. Green. Three ot the school boards whose superintendents have been invited to the meeting have passed resolutions op­posing creation ot the school.None ot the six superintendents said last week he actively supports creation of the school.James E. Everidge, superintendent of Davie County schools, said last week Uiat a conflict wUl prevent his attending Uie meeting and E. Lawson Brown, superintendent ot Davidson County schools, said he might not be able to attend.School board members of the Davie County schools, Thomasville City schools and Salisbury City schools are on record as opposing the school. None ot the boards has voted to support creaUon ot the school. Davidson County, Lexington City and Rowan County school boards have taken no stance on Uie school.Brown, who is active in the state Association ot School administrators, said that organizatibn does not plan to take a posiUon.“We found we had a number of members in favor ot it and had a number who opposed it," he said. “We did not feel we could justify taking a position either way.“I don’t have any personal feelings (about the school) one way or another,” Brown said. "Our school system wiU t^ to cooperate with whatever decision Is ftnaUy reached.”The most posiUve statements con­cerning the school were made by Wade Mobley, Rowan County superintendent, who described his feelings about the school as “lukewarm”. He expressed stong personal support of Hunt however."The governor has been a strong supporter of education,” he said, "and he is a stronger supporter of this project. We (school administrators) are not enUiusiastic about it. I think eventuaUy we’U support it, though, not because it’s Uie best idea he’s ever had, but because we hate not to.”William Niven of Lexington City Schools said he has indicated privately to state officials that he is opposed to the school. “I hate to think ot losing aU our top talent trom Uie public schools,” Niven said. “With proper funding the public schools can handle the job ot chaUenging our gifted students.” Everidge said he had “mixed emoUons” about the school but would support the Davie board’s opposition to it. “My only real feeling is that if I had 15 miUion, is this what I would spend it on?” he said. "I doubt Uiat (Uie school) would be my tirst priority.”Derwood Hunneycutt superintendent ot Thomasville schools said he felt that Uie financing ot two teachers at each public high school to teach only gifted students would be less expensive than renovaUon of the Watts Hospital facUity. “We’re tor doing something for the gifted,” he said, "but we just would like to see it done within the schools.” Marcus Smith superintendent of Salisbury schools said that he wiU attend Uie meeUng with an open mind but that he has some misgivings about the proposed school. "I have a son who is a Morehead scholar and I look at him as potential tor this kind ot development,” SmiUi said. "I feel 1 would have been cheated as a father to have to send him away to a boarding school to get this kind of training."I hope at Uie meeUng the governor can give me some kind of rationale for supporting the school.” A g r c e a b le C h e c k in g It’s better than jRoee. Afirec;iblc Checking i.s the Nuriliwcstern liank's tio-seivice- ch;u-j>e checkuij; accoutn. Theic are two wa)’s you am gel it: IjJl ll'; c you a Mii.stcr Cli;irt;e card wtlli ( VcidiMlt IVneciioii. Or kee]-) $100 in a Northwestern ■xi.ssbixjk savings account — and et U6 pay you interest. Get nd of tlut disagreeable service charge. Open an Agreeable Checking account at The Northwestern liink tixlay. THEMORTHVIESTERN lA N K ^ U . William C. Carter, Assistaiu V'Sce President The Northwestern Bank, Clemmons The Flue-Cured Tobacco Warehouse Designation Program wiU again be in effect for the 1979 crop.It tobacco WiU be grown on a farm in 1979 it must be designated to . the warehouse(s) at which the producer wishes to obtain price support and indicate the number of pounds the producer plans to market at each warehouse. A list of warehouses is avaUable for designation in the Davie County ASCS Office.The designation period is March SUi Uirough AprU 6, 1979. The farm operator or someone to whom he has given written authorization may designate by visiting the ASCS Office wiUiin this period of time and filing the prescribed form. At Uie time of designation, producers should be prepared to indicate Uie number of marketing cards they expect to need and Uie number of pounds tor each card. The cards issued for Uie farm will identity the warehouse at which the producers may obiain price support.It wiU be to producer's advantage to have aU lease and transfer agreements executed and signed by boUi parties before making the designation, however, if these have not been completed, Uie poundage in effect at this time must be designated before cah be designated later.When producers come to designate, they need to be sure to know the warehouse(s) they want to designate, the number ot pounds to be designated to each and Uie number of marketing cards they expect U> need for each warehouse. 1 I "It it the rare piea»ur« th»t especially delight ui. -J Epictetui National Guard Offering Enlistees Cash And Educational Benefits Jim Sheek. owner of Sheek Auction and Realty In Mocksvillc, has recently completed studies at Fort Smith Auction School in Fort Smith, Arkansas. The two week course In auctioneering served as a means of continuing education in the profession. Sheek received hii> auc­tioneer's Ucense in 1975 from the Mendenhall School of Auctioneering in High Poiilt. He is a member ot both the North Carolina and National Associations of Auctioneers. Sheek Is licensed to conduct ail types of auctions including real estate and estate set­tlements. He also operates Sheek Tool Service, Inc. located at the corner of Depot and Salisbury Street. Young men and women who join the North Carolina Army National Guard during the next three months will be eligible for cash or educational benefits which range as high as $2,000.00.Guard members reenlisUng beyond Uieir inUtiai six-year enlistment are also eligible torbdTiuscs up lo $1,800.00 during this same period.. According to Maj. Gen. WiUiam E. Ingram, North Carolina Adjutant General, who made the announcement today, this is part of a nationwide program to strengthen the recruiting and retention efforts of Uie military’s reserve component.Gen. Ingram went on lo say, “The purpose ot the incentive program is to increase enlistments and retention of qualified people in Uie Army National Guard, providing more stability by reducing losses and keeping people active for longer periods of time."The program will last from March 15 Uirough June 15.. This new program supplements a program, tiegun Tast Decemt>er, which made the same benefits avaitable lo 36 selected NorUi Carolina National Guard units, according to Gen. Ingram."For the March 15-June 15 period,” he continued, “AU men and women are eligible, it they meet the qualifications, regardless of Uie uilit Uiey want to join or in which they want to reenlist.”The enlistment incentive is available only to men and women who have completed high school and who have not previously served in the military.Upon joining the Guard, these men and women may choose lo lake a payment of $1,500.00 payable over a six- year period, or lo obtain educational benefits up to a nuximuniof $500.00 per year to pay tor tuitition, fees and books.Those choosing this education option may obtain up to a total of $2,000.00 by Uie time the Guard member completes a baccaluareate degree or equivalent period of study.This program does nol affect educational benefits already in existance, added Gen. Ingram. The North Carolina NaUonal Guard, for example, has a state scholarship program. This will continue.Guard members who in Uie March 15- June 15 period extend their initial enlistment for an additional six-year period, wiU be eligible for a bonus payment ot $1,800.00 payable over the six-year period.Those who decide to extend for a three-year period, wiU be eligible for a $900.00 bonus, payable over a three-year period.The program aUows a number of contingencies, including continuation ot payments if a person transfers trom one unit to another.Recruiters and fulltime Guard members in aU the National Guard armories of the state are tamiUar with detaUs of the three-month program.Gen. Ingram cited efforts by tiie NaUonal Guard Association of the United SUtes, as well as the Nortii Carolina National Guard Associ^ion, in obtaining approval of the program from Congress,He added that some bonuses would continue fror selected units after this March-Junc period in which they apply tor all units. “We consider It," he added, “a step ih the right direction.”"The reason all units are not con­tinuously included is because funds currenUy allocated are not sufficient lo pay bonuses and educational grants lo all eligible individuals in the Guard. Efforts will be made lo encourage the Congress lo allocate enough funds to include aU Guard members,” Gen. Ingram said.Gen. Ingram noted that units are in two categories after June 15, some that can take part in both the enlistment and reenlislment programs while others are only eligible tor the enlistment in­centives, Specific units are determined by the Department of the Army, Rev. Calvin J. Banka will be officially installed as pastor ot Chinquapin Grove Baptist Church, Sunday, March II, in a special servicc at 3 p.m. Guest speakers for the in­stallation will be Dr. K.O.P. Goodwin of Mocksville and pastor emeritus of the Mount Zion Baptist Church, Winston- Salem. The public Is invited to attend. Mr. Banks ts a native of Winston-Salem, and the son of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Banks. Robert B. Hall Installed As Trustee At Campbell College Robert B. Hall of Mocksville was inducted into the Campbell College Board of Trustees in formal inslaUation ceremonies Thursday evening as the Uiirty-six member policy-making body of the college in Buies Creek convened for its annual late winter meeting March 1,The proceedings included a signing ot the coilegc charter, which defines the relationships of the school to the Baptist State Convention, its owner and sponsor. Dr. CecU Ray, executive secretary- Ireasurer of the convention extended Uie invitation for the signing. Dr. Ray read formal statements concerning the essentials of function, government, and administration ot the college and remarking the duties of trustees.Dr. N. A. Wiggins, president of the college, began the instaUation with a reading of Uie official statement of purposes of Campbell as a church- related college of the arts and sciences. According to President Wiggins, one purpose of the ceremony is to heighten awareness of the religious sanction overarching work done in good faith by trustees appointed to help achieve these purposes. The ceremony is intended to complement the school’s annual program of orientation for its new trustees. Since this was the first such ceremonial h<îginning of a new year for a board al CampbeU, aU ot its other active trustees signed the charter and were instaUed wiUi Uie newcomers.Installed as new trustees for a four- year term were Boyce Allen, Bladen- boro; Gerald Arnold, Raleigh; James H. Bearden, GreenvUle; A.C. Greene, Sr., Fayetteville; Rev. WUliam T. Mills, Hickory; Milford Quinn, Warsaw; Donald Sneeden, Wilmington; Robert C. Soles, Tabor City; and Martha Sue Todd, Windsor.Other administrators of the in- staUation ceremony were Clyde J. Rhyne of Sandord, retiring chairman of the Board; J. Leon Rumley of Winston- Salem, its chairman; Dr. T. Robert Bob HaU Mullinax, executive secretary of the Council on Cliristian Higher Education of Uie N.C. Baptist State Convention; Dr. Ben C. Fisher, recenUy retired director of Uie Education Commission ot the Southern Baptist Convention, now a visiUng professor at CampbeU, Dr. Jerry WaUace, chairman ot its depart­ ment ot religion, and other principal officers of Uie college staff.Serving with Rumley as officers ot the Board of Trustees are Raymond A. Bryan, Goldsboro, vice-chairman; Lonnie D. Small, Buies Creek, secretary-treasurer; W.A. Johnson, LiUington, counsel; and Blanton A. Hartness of HendersonvUle and Robert B. HaU of Mocksville, chairman and vice-chairman of the executive com­mittee, respectively. Timur the Lame Timur the lame, known in the Western world as Tamerlane, overcame his infirmity to conquer an empire that in the 14th century stretched from China to Europe, says Uie National Geographic Society's book "Journey Across Russia; The Soviet Union Today.” 300 You're Invited To Hear • • • DR.HOMER MARTINEZ Yates Wilkenson Minister Fork Baptist Church Rev. Homer Martinez, Evangelist ir CHAMPION ATHLETE (BOXING) i t BI-LINGUAL MISSIONARY TO LATIN AMERICA ir DYNAMIC AND GIFTED SPEi||CER i t HAS CONDUCTED OVER 1000 CRUSADES F o r k B a p t i s t C h u r c h M a r c h 1 1 - 1 6 , 1 9 7 9 7 : 1 5 - M i n i C o n c e r t 7 : 3 0 - W o r s h i p S e r v i c e Y a 4 l C o r n e l \ j Jimmy Snelen, Music Evangelist Fred Wilson, Minister of Music J » 4D DAVII- (t)l'N n I NTl Rl'KISI. Kl ( ORD, THURSDAY, MARC H K, 1Ч7Ч T r i a l A t C o o le e m e e Melinda Frye at right, Terry Teenager’s lawyer questions Tommy Tootlipaste (Tommy Daywalt) during tiie trial of “The Toothache Mystery” as Judge Elizabeth Crenshaw and clerk of court Crystall Walls look on. The play was presented at Cooleemee School in observance of Dental Health Month. (Photos by Jim Barringer) The Toothache Mystery The second and third year students of Cooleemee School presented a play in observance of Dental Health Month Wednesday in the media center for their parents and special invited guests.The play, ‘‘The Toothache Mystery - Trial of the Dental Health Six” centered on a teenager (played by Starr Vogler) who charged the dentist, (Ron Mc­Daniel), nurse (Renee Trexler), tooth­brush (David Clark), toothpaste (Tommy Daywalt), and candy sweets (Shawn Smoot) for conspiring to give her a tooUiache.The judge was played by Elizal»«nr Crenshaw, Crystal WaUs was clerk of court, Melinda Frye was the lawyer for Terry Teenager, and Kelly Brown was the teenager's mother.Set in a courtroom drama, complete with jurors, witnesses for the prosecution and defense, the play related to the proper way of caring for the teeth. The youngsters had spent the entire month of February studying dental health.Dr. Gary Prillaman visited the school and talked with the children and showed slides of healthy and decayed teeth. Using smaUer groups he also showed them the procedures carried out in the dentist office and gave them "disclosing tablets” to use at home.O t h e r s C h a r g e d other “prisoners” charged with conspiracy to cause toothache are L-R, David Clark, Ron McDaniel, Renee Trexler, Kelli Brown and Julie Bowles. Davie To Participate In Triad Medical Service Program Davie County commissioners agreed Monday to spend $800 to participate in the Piedmont Triad Council of Govern­ment’s Emergency Medical Service Council program again this year.The $800 in “dues” helps pay EMS Council overhead costs, and the Council, in turn, applies for federal grants for emergency medical equipment which it distributes to member-counties. Davie County has received a large amount of equipment in the past through the program, Ron Vogler, Davie County manager said. The county did not apply for much equlpn№nt this year, since it has nearly all itifeeds, Vogler said.Commissioners debated the economic wisdom of the move, since the county ■ will receive only training for EMS : workers and $350 in video tapes and- services from the program this year.The value of the equipment and training Davie County receives from the ; EMS Council this year may not equal- $800, but future grant applications could : be harmed if the county does not par­ticipate in the program this year, Vogler There is also a possibility that Davie County may not be eligible to receive any further EMS grants after the COG Region G. Splits into two smaller districts July 1, Vogler added.As of July 1, the western counties of . Region G, Including Yadkin, Surry, Davie and Forsyth Counties, will form a ' new planning Region I. The federal ! government will not accept EMS ' equipment requests from planning regions smaller than the current Region G, Vogler said.At present, the EMS Council is ad­ministered through COG Region G. If the new COG regions decide to split the EMS Council between them, Davie County will no longer be eligible to apply for the federal equipment grants.It has not yet been decided if the EMS the MocksviUe Middle School.The county agreed to appropriate the money for the county schools and let the school officials make the actual pur­chase.Commissioners also approved the Davie County Task Force's request to allow them to submit a grant application to the sUte. The $17,200 application, ifIt has not yet been decided if the EMS to the sUte. The $17,200 applicauon, if Council wlU be administered separately, approved by the state, wUl provide as if the COG Regions had not split, or if - salary and travel aUowance for a home-it too wiU be divided into eastern and western districts this summer.“It's a gamble either way,” Lawrence Reavis commented, moving to pay the $800 to the EMS CouncU. "I’m just afraid that if we don’t pay, we won’t ever be able to get more grants in the future.” In other business, the board learned the county must provide maternity benefits for all county employees, eliminating a 270-day waiting period previously required,March 10 was named Band Day, in support of the Davie County High School Marching War Eagles Band. The band plans to attend the National Band Competition in Daytona Beach, Fla., May 18, and will be conducting fun­draising activities i)etween now and then to help pay for the trip.Commissioners also agreed to aUocate $3,700 to the county schools to purchase six trash dumpsters.Four eight'yard containers wUl be purchased for Cooleemee, Shady Grove, Pinebrook, and Wm. R. Davie Schools, and six-yard containers wUl be pur­chased for MocksviUe BlemenUry and school coordinator for Davie County.The home-school coordinator would work with troubled youngsters and status offenders tn Davie County.In other business, Lynette Bouchard, Davie County Youth Encounters program, gave a report on the program’s work with status offenders.Youth Encounters, which celebrated its first anniversary last month, is ad­ministered through the state Com- Altei Davie County Hospital Board of Trustees to discuss the county’s efforts to submit proposed enabling legislation to the General Assembly to allow the county to pay board of trustees mem­bers some compensation for their service on that board.Also, according to county manager Vogler, the commissioners met with the hospital’s board to trustees in an executive session, to discuss a “per­sonnel matter” that concerns the hospital. No action was taken on this matter, he said. NW Development Awards ^ Banquet Set For March 2 2 Communities throughout Northwest North Carolina are gearing up for the annual Northwest North Carolina Development Association (NWNCDA) awards banquet March 22at 6:30 p.m, at Benton Convention Center, Winston- Salem, A winter snowstorm delayed judging ot the communities competing for the awards this week. But, W,B, (Bill) Austin, Jr., secretary-treasurer of the NWNCDA, told extension agents and Association directors Wednesday that the judging will lake place Feb, 26-28, “We’re sorry we couldn’t get to the communities,” said Austin, “But we wiU be foUowing the original schedule the extension people were given,”The meeting, the last one for 1978, was held af the Clemmons Civic Center, Herman Anderson, Economic Development Division chairman, reported that many small communities in North Carolina are participating in a balanced growth and economic development program developed by Governor James B, Hunt,“This program is just what we need to prepare our smaller towns for off-the- farm jobs,” Anderson said, noting the program emphasizes the development of new business where people are presenUy living. The growth of the pullet industry in the Northwest was reported by Atwell Alexander, vice chairman of the Agriculturp Division,“A neighbor ot mine is building two ' houses to grow breeder pullets. They will have In the neighborhood of $90,000 tied up in these houses,” he said,“They have no guarantee trom any company, but if they do a good job, they most certainly could interest companies in the broiler business,” he said, “The production of broilers is becoming a I tremendous business.”Alexander added that the quality of game tested bulls is also improving in North Carolina,“We may not be the world's best growing corn because our summers are dry and our land is sloping,” he said. But , we can grow grass, and we can grow i beef cattle.”Carol Myers, of Clemmons, par­ticipated this past summer in a 4-H youth exchange program in Hungary, and presented a program on her six months in the socialist country,“I spent my time living and workiiu on a state collective farm,” she saidTii “Living in a different society, 1 had my way of thinking questioned, and I now know why I feel the way I do about a lot ot things,” Davie High Students To View Demonstration On Energy A lively educational program on aU aspects of energy will be conducted by North Carolina State University’s School of Engineering during a special assembly at Davie County High School in Mocksvilie on March 15,The lecture-demonstration program on “Energy Today and Tomorrow” is a dramatic, fast-paced presentation that covers today’s energy issues on a level students understand and enjoy.Henry (Hank) Sanders of NCSU’s Industrial Extension Service is lecturer of the program and is touring high schools throughout North Carolina.High school students and their teachers are gaining insight into what energy really is, where it comes from, how it’s used, and why it’s getting so expensive.Sponsored by the North Carolina Engineering Foundation, the program is expected to reach more than a half- miUlon NorUi Carolina students within the next three years.A mechanical engineer, Sanders uses more than $25,000 worth of electronic teaching devices to demonstrate types of fuels, present and projected methods ot power generation, and en­ vironmental, social and economic problems. He also offers energy con­servation tips.The program is produced by the Oak Ridge Associated Universities, a non­profit consortium of 43 southern coUeges and universities engaged in energy research and education. V. Billions Of Seeds Deposited ** In Genetic Savings Account An obscure bank in Fort Collins, Colo, holds a savings account that pays dividends for aU Americans.A kind of Noah’s ark of seeds, the National Storage Seed Laboratory contains samples of almost everything that’s grown in the United States. Tiny petunias and giant sequoias, humble onions and exotic papaya, you name it and it’s on deposit in the seed bank.Established in 1957 to preserve and rebuUd America’s depleted reservoir of genetically pure and healthy seeds, the laboratory today contains several biUion seeds representing nearly 100,000 varieties of crops, forages, grasses, R e g i s t r a t i o n I s B e i n g T a k e n F o r trees, shrubs, and other horticultural A life.“Through the years many of these plants were modified and improved, but no adequate provisions were made for the preservation of original seed stocks,” Dr. Louis N. Bass, the National Seed Laboratory’s director, told the^ National Geographic News Service, w“Indeed, the early history of agriculture in this country reveals a continual yet virtually ignored loss ot valuable and often irreplaceable plant germplasm~the substance by wiiich plants transmit their hereditary characteristics. The seed bank came to the rescue by serving as a repository for this invaluable resource.”Other work deals with seed deterioration and genetic changes that take place during storage, which is inng s M e t h o d U t P r e - S c h o o l Registration is now being taken for enrollment in the First United Methodist Church Pre-School, MocksviUe, for the 1979-80 year.A child must be four years old by October 16,1979 to be eUgible. For more information and to enroU a child contact Phyllis Youngberg, 634-2388. Seeds from more than 140 crops have ' been stored in liquid nitrogen at minus A. 321 degrees Fahrenheit tor up to six” montiis at a time, and none of the seeds has lost its abUity to germinate. The liquid nitrogen needs no refrigeration to stay cold. Body’s Use Of Oxygen Is Under Special Study Based the Jtematives Act andmunltyprovides counseling for troubled youths, ages 10 through 17.The CBA program was set up after the General Assembly voted to bar status offenders - youths who have committed offenses, such as running away from home or skipping school, which would not be considered criminal if they were adults - from state training schools.Youth Encounters locates and trains adult volunteers to provide com­panionship and guidance for youths, similar to the ‘Big Brother’ programs in other areas. And, once a month, the cohnselors and youths participate in a group outing or project.It is hard to evaluate the progress made by the program over the last year, Ms. Bouchard told commissioners, “This isn't the sort of thing you can get statistics on,.,a lot of the benefits may not show up for the next five or ten years...”Response to the program, both on the part of participants and their parents, has been very positive, Ms, Mouchard said. There is a waiting list of youUis who want to join the group, which is Umited to 20 at a time,“We're short on volunteers", Ms, Bouchard said,,,“we could use SO easUy,”In executive session, the com­missioners met to discuss personnel matters involving the Oavie County Ambulance Service. They took no action on this matter.The commissioners also met with the An essential requirement of human cells is oxygen. Without it ceUs die. Yet there is much scientists do not know about the tran­sport ot oxygen to the ceUs or the manner or quantity in which cells take up oxygen and use it.Knowledge in this area, however, has been con­siderably increased through the research of Dr, Ian S. Longmuir, a North CaroUna State Univerwity biochemist. He has been studying the body's use of oxygen since 1948. Longmuir is now entering the second year ot a four-year study of oxygen in tissue and organs in cooperation with Dr. James A. Knopp, a biochemist at NCSU, and Dr. Frans Jobsls, a physiologist at Duke University. The study is being supported by a research grant in excess of $442,000 from the National Heart, Lung and Blood In­stitute.In his previous research, ' Longmuir developed a method of making the oxygen level within a Uving ceU Member of the N.C.& N A TIO NA L A U C TIO N EER S A SSO C IA TIO N • Al SHEEK AUCTION (R E tlT V CO. PHONE 634-3611 P.O. Box 903 Mocksvilie. NC 27028 NCAL 924 NCRL 40328 Bonded Res.-704 -872-0502 Route 12 'Statesville, NC 28677 visible. To do this he injects in the living tissue, pyremebutyric acid, which fluoresces in ultraviolet light, but is quenched by the presence of oxygen. When the acid-treated cells are viewed under a television microscope, a researcher can see them grow dimmer as they absorb oxygen.He has also devised a means of measuring by computer the amount of oxygen in different parts of the ceU.Through his most recent study, Longmuir believes he has found the channels through which oxygen is transported within the cell.He explained, “We know ceUs need a continuous supply of oxygen. At the same time there are systems in a ceU that are actually poisoned oxygen.“The question is how parts of a cell get a continuous supply pf oxygen, while other areas are protected from oxygen.”By indirect methods he had hypothesized the pesence of channels in cells through which oxygen is transported in order lo keep the other parts oxygen-free.Longmuir says he things the channel is along the en­doplasmic reticulum, a structure which is a basic part of every ceU.“We’ve developed one technique for increasing the channels for oxygen,” he A explained. “We’ve ex- r ' perimented with mice at high altitudes and find that we get a doubling of the amount of endoplasmic reticulum in the cells.“Conversely, we’ve found if we destroy the endoplasmic ^ reticulum animals are more W susceptible to problems caused by low oxygen levels,” he stated.Longmuir says his next step wUl be to formulate tests to prove Ihe oxygen route is identified with the en- ^ doplasmic reticulum. He W plans to use tissue culture from the heart of a type of toad whose heart ceUs have the endoplasmic reticulum localized in a particular part of the cell.Why is it important lo know ^ where the channels are which )P carry oxygen into ceUs?"If we knew, we’d know how cells take oxygen and hopefully could devise techniques to enhance the system and make it more efficient,” he stated, “Practically everybody 0 who dies, dies as a result of inadequate oxygen supply to tissue," he notes. I By Rev. Garold R. Carter Scouting in Davie County, as in all parts of the country, suffers from a common ailment known as “lack of adult leadership". This adult leadership is aimed par­ticularly at parents. Many Boy Scout Troops and Cub Packs never get off the ground because parents “don't have the time" to serve as leaders. In too many cases the boys, deprived of one activity, will look for other ways to spend their time, get their kicks, or otherwise express themselves. Before I get into a sermon titled “Never tell your son in words, thought, or deed, that you don’t have time for him”, let me conclude this portion and move to some local activities. Let me simply add one statement. I have never known a boy who had reached the rank of Eagle Scout to go bad.Speaking of Eagle Scouts let me tell you about Dennis Presnell. Dennis is not an Eagle Scout; not yet. He soon will be you can believe that. Part of the requirement for the Eagle rank is to plan and complete a project which reflects the Scouting spirit in community service. Just finding a project is sometimes a problem in itself; but it doesn't stop there. The Eagle candidate must: (1) make a plan which includes drawings or photographs; (2) get the plan and project approved by a board of review; (3) obtain necessary funding for the project; (4) recruit a crew; (5) supervise the work; and (5) make a report (including photographs) to the board of review who then recommends the boy for the rank of Eagle Scout. Iliat is a lot of work. It's also a lot of education.Dennis was passing the Brock Building one day and Cornatzer News Mrs. Bob Sparks has been confined to her room for the past week with sore throat ^ and cold." Linda and Crystal Barnette of Kernersville, N.C. visited Nora and Evenda Smith Saturday. Claude Williams visited his brother, Carl WiUiams at Davie County Hospital last ^ week. 9 Mr. and Mrs. Brady Barney Cen ter To Meet For ^W atch Program There will be an organizational meeting for a Community Watch program at Center community building, Monday, March 12, at 7:30 p.m.A The sheriff’s department will have some of their per­sonnel on hand to answer questions and set up guide rules for the organization. Representatives from the North Davie Community Watch program are also Mjp expected to attend.Members of the com­munity are urged to attend this special meeting visited Mr. and Mrs. Jack Jones Saturday night.Eva Potts and Alice Griffin visited Mable Head and Eula Hoffman in Cooleemee Sunday afternoon.Linda Barnette and Nora Smith visited Mr. and Mrs. Rodney Barney in Advance Saturday.Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Laird visited Mr. and Mrs. Homer Potts Sunday afternoon.Shirley Jacobs and son Bryan of Cooleemee visited Mr. and Mrs. Joe Jones last Tuesday.Cornatzer Extension Homemakers club met at the home of Gladys Jones on Tuesday, February 27.Ella Smith and Patsy Boger were welcomed as guests.Ruth Barney had devotions and Nora Smith, president, presided over the business session.Lucy Barney was in charge of the program on curbing the cost of living. Each member told of ways to save on spending.Family Life leader, Jesse Shanks, gave a report on listening to children and adults.Patsy Boger gave some household hints.Dottie Potts read an article commented to his companion that the gym was in bad need of repair. That started the ball rolling. His Eagle project would be to clean and repair the gym. He went through all of the steps of project ap­proval, financing, etc. and set oul to gather a crew. The Scouts on the crew consisted of Lonnie McCullough; Eddie, Albert, and David Tkach; John Wood; David McBride; Junior Roberson: Ed and Doug Kelly; Mark Chaffin; Brent Miller; Morris and Henry Horn; Timmy Still; and Don Cover. The adults on the crew who worked, not supervised, were Jimmy Roberson, Ed Tkach, Chris Smith, Henry Hunt, Jr., and Ray Presnell (Dennis' father). The general feeling of Ihe crew is that Dennis is a pretty good boss man. Our feeling for having the gym cleaned and repaired, “Thanks, Dennis".Some of the events coming up in Scouting include: A Council Camporee on May 4-6. The event will include a “See- N-Do" demonstration of Scouting skills; A special training session for all Cub leaders on April 7 at Camp Uwharrie (Note-this will be an all day event so make plans now); a “train the trainer” program for Cubbers who would like to learn how to train others. This event is planned for April 28; and summer camp for Scouts (includes day camp for Cubs).On the local level the ac­tivities calendar includes;March 13-Davie District Commiltee Meeting (includes SME) 7 p.m. at Holy Cross; Davie District Scouters Roundtable at Holy Cross at 8 p.m.March 16-17-18-Uwharrie Lodge Order of the Arrow, Spring Fellowship at Camp Uwharrie.March 19-Davie District Cub Leaders Roundtable, 7:30 p.m. at Holy Cross. (All Troops and Packs should be represented at respective Roundtables). The Rev. Garold R. Carter is the District Chairman for Davie District with Mr. Bennie Naylor serving as the Assistant District Chairman. Their assistants are Jimmy Roberson, Scouting Chair­ man; Steven Murdoch, Cubbing Chairman; and Bryan Sell, Sustaining Membership Enrollment. from the Tar Heel ....... Homemakers magazine and Q f00n n lll BdPtlSt an article on recipes. ~Lucille Potts received M pennies for friendship. Eacht Speak At Lighthouse Brannon To 'Bill Brannon of Mocksville will be guest speaker at the Ughthouse in Cooleemee, at the recreation center, Saturday, March 10, at 7:30 p.m. Mr. Brannon will speak on the dangers of alcohol. Statistics prove that the fdcohol problem causes 50 . percent of the car accidents in North Carolina.. The public is invited to attend. family that lost their home by fire.The club has been meeting in the basement at the home of Lucy Barney on Monday night for crocheting classes.The meeting was adjourned with the club collect.During the social hour, all gathered around the dining table and the hostess served coffee, iced drinks, sand­wiches, pickles, nuts, cheese, crackers and coconut cake. Yard & Bake Sale Green Hill Baptist Church youth is sponsoring a yard and bake sale at the Rotary Hut on Salisbury Street in Mocksville, Saturday, March 11, from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m.Proceeds from this sale will be used to send the youth to Caswell church camp this summer.Anyone desiring to donate items for this cause are asked to call Mrs. Retha Gaither at 634-5513 or 546-2291; or Mrs. Frances O’Neal at 492-7282. Evangelism News Why are social security^ taxes increasing so much? The increase seems to be at a rapid pace. Each year I'm amazed at how much social security tax is held out of my pay. The intent of the law is for social security contributions to be collected from almost all Jto wages paid nationwide each ^ year. As total wages paid nationally increase, the taxable wage base will in­ crease automatically. The tax rate increases are designed to maintain a stable relationship between income and benefits paid from social . security Trust Funds.I understand some of the requirement shave changed for getting benefits as a widow or divorced wife. What are some of these changes?In order to offer more m protection for widows who ™ might remarry after age 60, the new law provides that the widow's check will not be reduced, as it has been in the past. Divorced wives and surviving divorced wives who were married for ten years or ^ more will be entitled to W benefits on their ex-husband's record, if she meets other requirements. This provision Is effective starting January 197«.Will my social security widow's check be cut if I ^remarry?W The new law calls for no reduction in a widow's check if the widow remarries after age 60 and in or after January l»79 In 1978, a person earned a quarter of coverage under M social security for each t2S0 of annual earnings Has this amount been increased for 197»?Yes. In 197*. you cam one quarter of coverage for each IZW ol your covered annual earnings. No more than 4 ^quarters can be earned (or “ any year, however, regar­dless of your total earnings. Jimmy and Margaret Hinson of Reach Out Evangelism Ministries, Inc. conducted a Reach Out Family Life Enrichment Conference in the First Baptist Church of WaUace, N.C., February 16-18. Some 50 youth attended the banquet and sharing session on Friday evening. The Hinsons used skits, testimony and a Bible message in this session. Some 60 adult couples attended the Saturday evening session, and shared in tbe skit, feUowship and sermon on the FamUy.They conducted a Reach Out Evangelism Witnessing Training School in the First Baptist Church, WhitevUle, N.C., for the Columbus B a 011st Association, February 20-22. There were 185 adults and youth enroUed with 16 churches participating each evening. On Thursday evening, 125 people par­ticipated in the Witnessing Visitation in Uie homes of Oie church communities and people made decisions to accept Jesus Christ as Saviour and Lord, and to follow Him in bapUsm and church membership.The Hinsons conducted Reach Out Revival services in the Providence Baptist Church, Harrisburg, N.C., February 25-28. Some 125 people attend the services of revival, and the chUdren and youth parUcipated in the pre- revival feUowships evening. each Uiew-Wood-Johiison, Inc. Я CALL OR SEE, Don Wood-Hugh Larew Office 634-5933 Highway 601 South Established Mobile Home Park, 13 mobile homes, 11 acres wilh pond, nice 2 te^oom home, outbuildings. Excellent op­portunity. Hickory HUl Nice lot on PinevaUey Rd. Priced at ^,950. CooleemeeTwo story commercial building. 98 x 48. Only $20,000.00. JackBooeRd.North) - Small acreage tracts Southwood Acres We are selling agenu for the lots in Southwgod Acres, behind Davie County High SchooT>' Several loU available to fit abnost any style house. Let us show you today. Highway 601 NorUi and PosUU Dr.7 lots for sale, 6.8 mUes north of Interstate 40. CaU today for details. H o w a r d R e a l t y & I n s u r a n c e G}rncr of Lexington Road and Salisbury Street 315 Salisbury Street NEW LISTINGS GARDEN VALLEY-Graclous living In beautiful neiKhborhood. Extremely nice 4-bedroom rancher with many exclusive features, including tastefully decorated foyer, living room with fireplace, formal dining, large kitchen. attracUve famUy room. 2% baths and laundry. Full basement. Detached 2-car garage. Patio. Beautifully landscaped. Neat and well-kept. Must see this attractive home. DAVIli lOUNTV UNTERPRISE RECORD, THURSDAY. MARCH S, WOODLAND-2-story colonial. Almost new. Over 2.000 sq. ft. heated living area Including features of 4-bedrooms. 2^ baths, living, dining, kitchen with many conveniences, family room with fireplace and exposed beams. Full basement. Dual heat- pumps. Beautiful lot. 17 acres for sale off pasture with water. Sewer ACREAGE-Approximately Hwy. 158. Fenced-Qood pa! avaUable. Bam Good investment. WHITNEY ROAD-Spllt Level Home convenient to schools, churches and shopping. Three l>edrooms.Vh baths, living room, large kitchen-eating area. Lower level unfinished. Perfect for family- playroom. 100 percent Financing if you qualify. COUNTRY LIVING-Lovely rustic contemporary rancher. 1^ acres of privacy. 1500 sq. feet of heated area. Many nice features. 2 car garage. Practically new. Call today. MAIN CHURCH ROAD-Two bedroom home situated on two wooded lots perfect for small family to retirement home. Recently remodeled interior! and painted exterior. Fireplace, utility. Oil furnace. Plenty of privacy. Many features at affordable price. Good financing available. klOWAN COUNTY-Don't miss this one! Three bedrooms. 2 full baths. Extra large famUy room. Very nice kitchen with range included. Central air. This lovely home is situated on 4M: acres enhanced' by complete orchard of apple, plum, peach and_| pear trees. Also grape vines. Five miles from Fiber. NORTH MAIN STREET-3 bedroom frame home- Perfect for remodeling. Very nice family neigh­borhood. Approximately l ‘/i acres included in lot. Convenient to shopping. Priced to sell.100% FINANCING-3 bedroom brick veneer V/z baths. Large kitchen-dining. Livingroom. City water and sewer. ALL electric. No money down, if you qualify. ___________________________ CHERRY HILL RD.-Spacious brick ranchei with I full basement. Custom built with many features including warming oven and dishwasher in kitchen, i extra large family-dining room with fireplace, ) separate formal dining, study, or 4th bedroom. 2'^ bathrooms. Utility. 2-car garage. Extra large storage shelter. Finished basement with playroom ' and drive-in area. Private country location with t I room for gardening and family living. __ 416 FOREST LANE-Very nice location for 1300 sq., ft. Frame exterior home. Living room, kitchen- dining combination. 3 tiedrooms, bath. Outside utility. Carport. Lot 175 x 88. IVees and paved drive. Ciood starter home with privacy and in-townconvenienc^es. _____ f CRAFTWOOD-No down payment if you qualify. Three bedrooms, living «¡"«n carpeted, kitchen, dining combination. Fua”J:»ement. All electric. Nice lot. Priced to sell. _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ .. _CRAFTWOOD-All electric'3 bedroom brick home. Carpeted. Large kitchen with range. Full basement with drive in dSQVrxtra nice quiet lot on 4 ' dead end street. No down payment to qualified purchaser. SPLIT LiiVEL-Over 1500 so. feet heated area. Also air conditioned. 3 ' 0^1 Uving room, large kitchen and dining a . . /z baths, utility Lower level finished nicely with fireplace. All electric. Large lot. Priced to sell quickly.! RIDGETlVlONT-off Milling Road.“Very good buyliTJ bedroom, all electric home. Living-dining com­bination. Kitchen with storage room. Carport. Call today. No down payment if you qualify. „___i CRAFTWOOD-3 bedrc"^ "ving room, kitchen- dining. Full basement.SOLUort. Large lot. Ex- iceilent financing. _______________ ’SOUTHWDO0~5C'n£S'-№ce '1arge comer Tot, deeply wooded. Good residential section. City water. County taxes only. HWY 601 SOUTH-Call today for commercial land and buildings immediately available. Call today about business property now available near* Mocksville. __ ________ CaAFTWOOD-AIR CONDITIONED-3 bedroom' Brick Rancher. ii/i pLarge kitchen-dining. Carport utility. Rant,®^ .T.igerator,washer-dryer included. No down payment if you quaUfy.___ LAKEWOOD VlLLAGE-Very neat, 3 * bedroom brick and siding rancher. Living room, family room with fireplace. Nice kitchen with dishwasher. Air condition unit. Good lot with trees. Paved drive. LOTSWOODLAND-Lots for sale-Beautifully wooded homesites. Reasonably priced. County water. Exceptionally nice famUy neighborhood. Con­venient location wilh plenty of privacy. DANIEL RD-Residential lot~117 x 200 x 142 x 200. Trees. Good locaUon. LAND Lake lots now available at High Rock. Call today&2 acres plus in beautiful woooded residential section. Perfect for construction site of dream home.4.4 acres of 64 East and Cedar Creek Rd. State Rd. No. 1836. Priced to sell. RENTFOR RENT-3 bedroom brick rancher, 2 baths, den with fireplace. Very nice neigbboriiood. 1300.00 month. FOR RENT-Office spac^o-ound floor with private bath. Approx. 400 sq. ft. with good parklng-water furnished. fSOO.OO month. Julia C. Howard Office - 634-3538 Home - 634-3754 Myrtle Grimes Office • 98B-3W0 Home • e34'S797 C.C Chapman Office - 634-3538 Home - 634-2534 Ann F. Wands Office - U34-3538 Home - 634-3221» д а д а , Charlie Brown ' Office - 634-3538 Home - 634-5230 Henry Shore Office - 634-3538 Home - «34-5846 HOMEFINDER M U L T IP L E L IS T IN Q S .E R V IC E OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY- P.M CRAFTWOOff-New homes of <*'*' Ilable. Priced fromRanchers & SpUt Levp' Large lot«»25,900 t 8tV,\iSi: „-»cRIDGEMONT-New home Baths, Carport. Large 'sWSCV-.«®i»ercent Financing Available. eCV.V-^“ - i»'*y™eut t® quaUfled buyer.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . J . . » . . . . . - . . — WILKESBORO STREET-House & lot 150x200 located in front of Davie Auto Parts. Additional lot 150x100 adjoining property avaUabie-fronts on Gwyn St. FOSTHALL DRIVE-Nice 3 B.R. brick home, 2 baths, Den w-fpl., 2 car carport. 2 lots, one lot fenced with barn. ___________ FARMINGTON-New 3 B.R., 2 Bath home built tosell. L.R. Den w-fpl.. heat pump, central air. 1 acre. NORTH MAIN ^.-5. B.R. quaUty built home on beaiitiful wooded lot. ParUai basenuDt.SOUTH MOCKSVILLE-Very private location on quiet street. Nice brick home located on 4 lots. L.R. w-fpl.. glassed-in porch with heat, fenced-in back yard, large garden space. Home is furnished.Excellent buy! THI ■HOS^ITAL*I’tREET^¥.'R. Mobile Home & lot. HICKORYTHLLS-Very nice 3 B.R., 2 bath split level, L.R. w-fpl.. full basement, playroom w-fpl, s. Call Toda_y!_ HOMES WITH ACREAGE ON 801-Dutchman Creek-3 B.R. brick home on 1 acre of land. Priced to sell at |29,900. WOODWARD RD-3 B.R.. 1 bath home, oil hot air heat, attached garage, small bam. 3Mt acres of land. »29,900. 21 ACRES and beautiful home bi prestigious area. Home has L.R. formal D.R.. 2 fpls., 2^ baths,exposed beams. Call for more information.__ FOSTALL DRIVE-Very nice 3 B.R. 2 bath brick rancher on 1.25 acres. L.R. Den, den wilh fireplace in basement. Heat pumps, central air. AddiUonal lot maybe purchased.FARMlNttTON-Double wide mobile home with 3 B.R., 2 Bath, beautiful wooded lot of 1.2 acres. HWY. 64 WEST-Very nice 4 B.R., 2 Bath brick rancher on 11 acres of land. Kit. with Brk. Rm., Den w-fpl.. Formal D.R., Large L.R., glassed-in porch, full basement w-rec. rm., patio & carport. Priced to sell!CHESTNUT WAY-3 B.R., 2 Bath Tri-level on ap­prox. 2 acres of land. Large kitchen. Formal D.R., Den w-fpl. and rec. bar, partial basement & car- port. County Water! , ,LOOP ROAD-2.875 Acres with beautiful brick, 3 B R. 2 full baths, L.R. w-fpl., kitchen and den, fuU basement, large carport, heat pump, central ab-. ADVANCE-Beautiful 5 B.R., 3'/i Bath home un M. acres of land. L.R. Den & Master B.R. w-fpl. Full basement w-fpl. & playroom. House has 4,175 sq. ft. living area. 5,000 sq. ft. barn, 4,000 sq. ft. utility ■ ■ • • “ ■ - bids lot bldg. plus 2 other bldgs. COMMERCIAL MAIN STREET-2200 sq. 7i. store building, 22x240. excellent business location. »34,900. BEAR CREEK CHURCH RD.-1800 Sq. ft. bulldbig with 400 sq. ft. finished office, bath, warehouse. 1.64 acres of land. Ideal for maintenance facUlty. Anyreasonable offer will be considered._______ COOLEEMEE-Excellent business' opportunity! Move right in to own business. Singer franchise available, stock and merchandise, complete for fabric shop! WILKESBORO ST.-Good business location, now operated as a grocery store. Price includes building, all equipment, except what belongs to dairy distributor, all stock that is left at time of sale ^оЬи^ег! EXCELLENT OPPORTUNITY - CALL 601 SOUTH-is acres of good business property for sale or lease. 601 NORTH-Business lot 150-300, ideal location near 1-40. City water and sewer.DEPOT STREET-Good business lot 141x368.1-40 & 64 INTERSECTION-Good business location. Grocery & service station with approximately »2,500 worth of stock, 3 gas tanks, private bathroom inside, complete kitchen, & one bedroom. Nine- tenths acre lot.BEAR CREEK CAMPGR0UND-4S campsites, fish pond, swimmbig lake on approximately 13 acres with very nice home. Ready to move in & operate own business.FARMS AND LAND 601 SOUTH-17.96 Acres-Excellent business property. 801-21 Acres mostly wooded with some good timber. »1,000 per acre. OFF 801-Near Dutchman Creek-24 acres- This property borders Yadkin River, good bottom land with building site »1,125 per acre. ON 801-57 acres beautiful land. WiU seU aU or tract on either side. One tract off highway has older home that could be restored. NEAR NEW REYNOLDS PLANT- 2 nice acre tracts. »2,000 per acre. •NEAR SOUTH Y|g¥nji|TBftClR.Davle C0.-6I Acres & Jarge UNU.tn „gyge. »62,000. WOODRUN-Beautiful wooded lot 17,900. PINE RIDGE R'^AD-12.67 acres for 12,700. Por- perty has a lot of paved road frontage.ON 158-Past Smith Grove School- 14 Acres, beautiful home site, part open and part wooded BEAR CREEK CHURCH RD.-Vei7 good location. 10 acres for »10,000. 4.23 acres for fe,250.00. 601 SOUTH-Nlce wooded lot with 1.6 acres of land. With 10 percent down, owner will finance at 9 percent. WiU consider letting buUder build on lot. "iPwY^ NO. 64 EAST^i acres" df^pasture and woodland with large stream.FOSTER RD.-99 acre farm with Uvable house. Approx. 60 acres cleared balalce wooded. Approx.2,000 ft, paved road frontage.________________'INTERSECTION 601 & 801-50 acres of land with house & service station or can be bought as follows: house & service station w-2 acres of land; house & service station with 10 acres of land; 40 acres of land (excluding house and service station); 1 acre lotnexttoendon80lor60I>fcJ25’fn»nlaee.NEAR 1-40 & 601-es Acres ideal for residential development or for industry. HEMLOCK'S'mEET-l.e acres'eith 220 ft. frontage on S. RaUway. . . ^ ^COUNTY LINE ROAD-221 acres with paved road through property. 83 acres in one tract Can be sold sep OFF 801 NEAR Park. »4,500. with lake. 1Can b'e sold* separately. »850.00 per acre. IFARMIPJGTON-Lot No. 3 Stimsdn 503 Avon Street MocksviUe, NC WALKERS SHOP RITE WILKESBORO ST. LOT NO. 9 CHESTNOT WAY FOSTHALL DRIVE HIGHWAY 64 WEST SOUTH MOCKSVILLE MAIN STREET Farmington Highway 801 Dutchman's Creek INFORMATION we BUY' Martha Edwaidi Holland ChaffinEQUITIES Phone 634-2244 Phone 634-5186. , . Graham Madison Eugene Bennettm g i ^ Phone 634-5176 Phone 998-4742E.D. Flowen Same HoweUPhone 492-7761 Phone 634-5424 iniunnce Dept: DarreU Edwudi/Plione 634-3889 ■PRANTIEY BiALTY IN SU RAN CE C O .. IN C . i 40Л 64 INTfRSfCriON PHONE: 634-210ÍÍ 725-9291 (,t) DAVIU COUNTY l-NTUKl’RISl-; RIX O R D . THURSDAY, МЛКСМ S. 1‘ПЧ P u b lic N o t ic e s IN THE GENERAL COUUT OK JUSTICE SPECIAL PROCEEDING BEFORE THE CLERK 78 SP 75 NORTH CAROLINA PAVIE COUNTY ‘NOTICE OF SALE OF REAL PROPERTY PAUL DANIEL SPAUGH nnd wife, SARAH R. SPAUGH, CLEAVE S. BINKLEY (ALSO KNOWN AS CLEAVE S. BRINKLEY) (widow) and ALMIE S. SWEET and husband, AR­THUR RAY SWEET, Petitioners vs.JOHN WILLIAM SPAUGH and wife, IRENE M. SPAUGH, HARVEY LEE SPAUGH, and wife, FRANCES C. SPAUGH, ARTHUR COLUMBUS SPAUGH and wife ROSIE C. SPAUGH, ROBERT HARRISON SPAUGH and wife, LINDA C. SPAUGH, CLYDE RAY SPAUGH and wife JANICE M. SPAUGH, JAMES HENRY SPAUGH and wife, VIRGINIA D. SPAUGH, TROY EUGENE SPAUGH and wife, HELEN E. SPAUGH, JESSIE MARIE S. CAMPBELL (widow), RIDDLE’S STORE, IN­TERSTATE AUTOMOTIVE WHOLESALERS, MELVIN O’BRIEN PASCALL, MOCKSVILLE OIL COM­PANY, and the WESTERN AUTO ASSOCIATE STORE, Respondents Under and by virture of an Ol der of the Superior Court of Davie County, • North Carolina, made in the Special Proceeding entitled, “Paul D. Spaugh, et al, vs. John William Spaugh, et al”, dated February 16, 1979, the un­dersigned Commissioners will on Friday, March 30,1979, at 12 noon at the Courthouse door of the Davie County Cour­thouse, offer for sale to the highest bidder for cash upon the terms and conditions hereinafter set forth, that certain tract or parcel of real estate lying and being in Davie County, _ North Carolina, and more par­ticularly described as follows:DAVIE COUNTY BEGINNING at a stone in J.H. Hauser’s line and runs Eastward 12.75 ch. to a stone; thence South 4 variation 4.50 chs. to a black oak; thence West 4 deg. variation 5.00 chs. lo a stone; thence South 5 degs. variation 6.00 chs. to a stone; thence East 4 degs. variation 5.00 chs. to a stone; thencc South 6.00 chs. to a stone on North side of branch; thence Westward through middle of a spring near a large White Oak 12.90 chs. to a stone in J.H. Hauser's line; Uience North 4 degs. variation 18.00 chs. to the Beginning, Containing Twenty & One Half (20 V4) Acres, more or less, and being Lot No. 2 of the Faircloth division in the Farmington Township. See Deed Book 59 at page 501, Davie County Registry.SAVE AND EXCEPTED FROM THIS TRACT are the following two tracts described as follows:TRACT 1 BEGINNING at a point in the property line of Ted Hill, et al. the Northwest corner of MGM Farms and being the Southwest corner of the within described tract, runs thence with the line of said Ted Hill, et al, and continuing with Smith’s line North 8 deg. 20 mins. East 822.1 feet to a point in the South edge of a road­way; thence with the South edge of said roadway South 80 deg. 9 min. East 95 feet to a point, the intersection of the South edge of said roadway with the West edge of a farm road; thence with the West edge of said farm road the following calls: South 34 deg. 6 min. West 169.15 feet to a point, South 6 deg. 30 min. West 200 feet to a point. South 3 deg. 15 min. West 260 feet to a point. South 13 deg. 57 min. West 208.95 feet to a point in Ihe West edge of said road in MGM Farms properly line; thence with the said MGM Farms property line North 83 deg. 57 min. West 30.28 feet to the BEGINMNG, containing Eighty-Four Hundredths (.84) of an ACRE, more or less, as taken from a plat and survey by Joseph Parks Bennett, Jr., dated January 18, 1972. See Deed Book 86, Page 432. TRACT 2 BEGINNING at a point, an old iron in Wayne Smith’s line, Alma S. Sweet's Nor- Uiwest corner in said line, being the Southwest corner of U)e within tract, runs thence with said Smith line North 09 degs. 18 min. East 359.7 feet to a point, a stone In said line, Mack Smith’s corner: thence wilh the said Mack Smith’s I line South 86 degs. .04 min. East 95.15 feel to a point In said Mack Smith’s line, Henry H. Spaugh's new corner; thence South 04 degs. 08 min. West 373.14 feet to a point, and North 79 degs. 21 min. West 128.4 feet twssing through an uid Iron, common corner of Henry H. Spaugh and Almie S. Sweet, to the BEGINNING, containing .93 of an acre, more or less, as taken from a plat and survey prepared by Joseph Parks Bennett, Jr., Registered Surveyor, dated Aufiusi 5.1977. See Deed Book 102. i’agP 517.The Davic County Iraci is further identified as parcel 94 on Ihe Davie County Tax Map C-7 daled March 28, 1976.The terms and conditions of the said sale .shall be as followii:The above described land will be sold subject to Ihe confirmation of the Court and will sland open for increase bids as required by law. The terms of the sale are cash, and Ihe last and highest bidder at the sale is required to deposit, in cash, with the Commissioners, Ten (10) Percent of Ihe first $1,000.00, and Five (5) Percent of Ihe remainder of the bid, and the property will be immediately resold for failure lo do so.This 27th day of February, 1979. Grady L. McClamrock, Jr. BROCK & McCLAMROCK P.O. Box 347 Mocksville, N.C. 27028 704-634-5012 Mr. James M. Hayes, Jr. HAYES & SHEPARD P.O. Box 3012 Winston-Salem, N.C. 27102 919-723-5576 3-8 4tn IN THE GENERAL COURT OF JUSTICE SPECIAL PROCEEDING BEFORE THE CLERK • FILE NUMBER 78-SP-5 NORTH CAROLINA DAVIE COUNTYNORICE OF RESALE OF REAL PROPERTY F.N. SCOTT, JR. and wife, ESSIE H. SCOTT; EVA SCOTT DWIGGINS (widow); WILLIE MAE SCOTT WEST and husband, JOHN E. WEST; EMMA LEE SCOTT PENN and husband PERCY PENN,Petitionersvs.FRANCES SCOTT WESTBROOK, CLARA JEAN SCOTT, and DEVORIA ANN SCOTT CUNNINGHAM, Respondents UNDER AND BY VIRTUE of the power and authority contained in an Order entered by the Clerk of Superior Court of Davie County, North Carolina In the Above entitled Special Proceeding, E. Ed­ward Vogler, Jr., Com­missioner, will offer for sale at public auction to the highest bidder, for cash, on Friday, March 16, 1979, at 12:00 Noon at the Main Street entrance of the Davie County Courthouse, Mocksville, North'Carolina, the following described real estate lying and being in Davie County, North Carolina, and more particularly described as follows:BEGINNING at a marker in the Southern right-of-way of 1-40, a corner for Joe Hoover, then with Hoover’s , line South 16 degs. East 637.15 ft. to an Iron stake; thence Northwestwardly with T.G. Angell and B.L. Angell’s line to a marker at the Southern edge of the right-of-way of I- 40; thence with the Southern edge of 1-40 Northeastwardly 813.54 ft. to the Beginning, containing 5.86 acres, as surveyed by the State High­way Commission and shown on a map recorded in File No. 70-CVS-16 In the Office of the Clerk of Court of Davie County, to which reference Is hereby made and being all lands owned by F.N. Scott at the time of his death, which are now on the South side of I- 40.The terms and conditions of the said sale shall be as follows:The above described land will be sold subject to the confirmation of the Court and will stand open for Increase bids as required' by law. The terms of the sale are cash, and the Iast,highest bidder at the sale is required to deposit.In cash, with the Com­missioner, Ten (10) Percent of his bid and upon failure to do so, the land will be Im­mediately resold. Persons Interested may see plats of Ihe said property in the office of the undersigned.This the 28 day of February, 1979.Opening Bid: $4,250.00E. Edward Vogler, Jr., Commissioner HALL AND VOGLER, ATTORNEYS AT LAW P.O. Box 294, Mocksville, N.C. 27028 Telephone: 704-634-5214 3-8 2tnp EXECUTRIX NOTICE NORTH CAROLINA DAVIE COUNTY Having qualified as Executrix of the estate of Laura P. Eaton, deceased, late of Davie County, this is to notify all persons having claims against said estate to present them to the un­dersigned on or before the 8th day of September 1979 or this notice will be pleaded in bar of their recovery. All persons indebted to said estate will please make immediate payment to the undersigned.This the Sth day of March, l»79.Louise E. Oehman, Executrix of the estate of Laura P. Eaton, deceased. 3-8 4Ui NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING BEFORE THE BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS FOR THE FOLLOWING ZONING AMENDMENT NOTICE IS HEREBY GI­VEN, of Article 20-B of Chapter 153 Ihe General Status of North Carolina and Section 20 of the Davie County Zoning Ordinance lhal Ihe Board of County Com­missioners of Davie County will hold a public hearing at the Davie County Courthouse, Mocksville, NC on Monday, March 19, 1979 at 7:30 p.m. The following proposed zoning amendment lo the official zoning map of Davie County will be considered:(a) Mr. Cleo Pruitt has submitted a request to rezone a 4.68 acre tract of land from Residential-Agricultural R-A lo Highway Business H-B. This land is located on the North side of Hudson Road being S. R. no. 1123 and is shown as parcel no. 1 of Davie County Tax Map M-5. The adjoining properly owners . are L.V. Pruitt, Calvin D. Spillman, Livingston J. Pruitt, James T. Pruitt, Alfred Coble and J.G. Pruitt.A sign will be posted on the above listed location to ad­vertise the public hearing.All parties and interested citizens are Invited to attend said public hearing at which time they shall have an op­portunity to be heard in favor of or in opposition to the foregoing proposed change. Prior to the hearing all per­sons interested may obtain any additional information on this proposal which is in the . possession of the Davie County Zoning Enforcement Officer by Inquiring at my office in the Courthouse in Mocksville, NC on weekdays between the hours of 8:30 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. or by telephone at 6.34-3340.Jesse A. Boyce, Jr Davie County Zoning & Planning Officer 3-l-2tn NORTH CAROLINA DAVIE COUNTYAdministrator NOTICE Having qualified as Ad­ministrator of the estate of Ruffus Richard Peebles, deceased, late of Davie County, this Is to notify all persons having claims against said estate to present them to the undersigned on or before the 22nd day of August 1979, or this notice will be pleaded in bar of their recovery. All persons In­debted to said estate will please make Immediate payment to the undersigned.This the 16th day of February, 1979.Madison Peebles, Ad­ministrator of the estate of Ruffus Richard Peebles, deceased Martin and Van Hoy Attorneys 2-22-4tn NORTH CAROLINA DAVIE COUNTYExecutrix NOTICE Having qualified as Executrix of the estate of Otis R. Hoots, deceased, late of Davie County, this is to notify all persons having claims against said estate to present them to the undersigned on or before the 22nd day of August 1979, or this notice will be pleaded In bar of their recovery. All persons in­debted to said estate will please make immediate payment to the undersigned.This the ISth day of February, 1979.Faye H. Stroud, Executrix of the estate of Otis R. Hoots, deceased Martin and Van Hoy Attorneys • 2-22-4tn Woodleaf Patrons of the Woodleaf Post Office are glad to have their postmaster, Donald Barker, back on the job after several weeks absence. He underwent surgery recently in Rowan Memorial Hospital and has recovered nicely.Mrs. Williard Wilson returned home Saturday from Bakersville where she spent the week with relatives.The many friends of Spurgeon (Duck) Benson, former Woodleaf resident now of Salisbury, will be glad to hear that he is now at his home and Improving after undergoing spinal surgery at Mercy Hospital in Charlotte.Tom Waller is improving at his home after taking treatment and tesU several days last week in Rowan Memorial Hospital.Mrs. Madison McGarity is now at her home after a- month stay In Rowan Nursing Center in SaUsbury.C.H. Wetmore is confined to his home after being a patient for a week in Rowan Memorial Hospital with a heart ailment.George Waller is slowly improving in Iredell Memorial Hospital In Statesville where he un­derwent surgery Ust week.Mr. and Mrs. Wayne PotU are receiving congratulations on the arrival of a baby boy at Rowan Memorial Hoepital on Wed., February 28th. Green Meadows News This month is Home Missions Month In all Southern Baptist Churchcs. The theme this year Is “Dare lo Ask”. The Baptist Women of Green Meadows presented a program on Sunday night about mission work in one of our newest states, Hawaii. The Baptist Young Women were In charge of an ob­servance on Monday night.The March lo Revival at­tendance campaign got off to a good start on Sunday with an increase of 20 over the previous Sunday. Come on members lets all attend next Sunday and go over the set mark.The Green Meadows Bible Study group met on Tuesday morning with Mrs. Ruby McKnight for their regular meeting and Home Mission observance. Following the meeting the group enjoyed a luncheon with the hostess.“Pop” Schulte remains a patient at Winston-Salem Baptist • Hospital where he underwent emergency major surgery on Feb. 24. He is getting along fair presently, but must have further surgery in two months.Mrs. Odessa Branson remains a patient at Baptist Hospital where she expects to undergo surgery on a leg on Thursday. Mrs. Branson was the victim recently of a hit and run driver, running a stop Green Hill Baptist Church News Thre Reverend Gary M. Hauser of Charlotte, N.C. was the guest minister for the Sunday morning and evening services at the Green Hill Baptist Church, February 25. He is a native of High Point, N.C., and a ministerial student at the Gardner-Webb CoUege, BoUing Springs, N.C. He is married to the former Miss MeUnda Moore, and they have three daughters.He was licensed to the Gospel Ministry by Uie Trinity Baptist (%urch of Charlotte, N.C., 1975. He has served as the supply minister and Outreach minister in that church.His parents, Mr. and Mrs. Melvin Hauser and his brother Jeff Hauser from Wallburg, N.C. also attend the services. The pastor of Grfen Hill Baptist Church began a series of Bible Studies In the Gospel of Mark, Sunday evening March 4. These studies wUl cpntlnue .as foUows: Wed­nesday evening, March 7, from7:00to8:30 p.m., Sunday evening, March 18, from 7:00 to 8:30 p.m., and Wednesday evening, March 21, from 7:00 to 8:30 p.m.Pastor Jimmy Hinson wUl be leading Uie adults and youth in Utese studies. Mrs. Margaret Hinson will be leading the chUdren grades 1- 6, during the same times, and ttiey wUi be studying the Ufe of Jesus Christ.The public is invited to come and share in these sutdies. The church wUl begin a new ministry with the youth and children on Wednesday evening, March 7, at 6:00 p.m.This time wUi be used from 6:00 p.m. untU 7:00 p.m. for music and recreation, foUowed by the Prayer and Bible Study service for the entire famUy at 7:00 p.m. light. She received many bruises and abralslons and both legs were broken. She Is Uie mother of Mrs. John Wayne Seats of this com­munity and a member of Green Meadows Sunday School.Ear surgery that Mrs. Lawrence Riddle received recently has proved suc­cessful and she is hearing very well. In fact she says she never knew she made so much noise rattling pots and pans whUe cooking.On Feb. 17 relaOves and friends gaUiered at Uie home of Mr. and Mrs. Dean Clawson Gospel Sing At Fairfield Thomas Fowler, a solo gospel singer wUI be honored on his third anniversary of singing as a single of gospel music state-wide, Sunday, March 11, at Fairfield Baptist C3iurch. The church Is located on Hwy. 601 south of MocksviUe.Many groups wUl be on hand to sing and honor him'. The public is invited to attend. F u n e ra l JAMES P. SCOTTJames P. Scott, 67,820 N.W. l4Ui Street, Winston-Salem, died at his home Monday morning, unexpectedly. He was a native of Davie County.Survivors Include his wife, Catherine Booe Scott of Winston-Salem; three daughters, Trosla Cham­pagne of Clemmons, Mrs. LetUe Holt and Miss Roberta Scott of Winston-Salem; Uiree sons, James, Joe and Louis Scott, aU of Winston-Salem; and seven grandchUdren. Funeral services wUl be held Friday at 4 p.m. at Uie Morrison-Studevent Funeral Home Chapel. Burial wUl foUow in Uie St. John’s A.M.E. Zion church cemetery. The Rev. T.S. Holman wUI officiate ; assisted by the Rev. Ashley Champagne.The famUy wUl meet with friends for thirty minutes Thursday evening from 7:30 unUI 8 p.m. on Yadkin Valley Road to celebrate the blrUidays of Dean Clawson, Frank CampbeU, Dean Sharpe and Paul Barker. FoUowing a covered dish supper the group enjoyed square dancing, clogging to music provided by the “Blue Ridge Boys”. Special guests Included Mr. Hans Pfoke and Mr. Alex Hobermann of Luneburg, Germany, Maureen Reid and Louis Alexander of Lexington, N.C., Eugene and Evelyn Levine, Grazlano and Sandy Camastra, and Bessie White aU of Winston-Salem.InvltaUons are extended by Green Meadows Baptist Young Women to a white Bible presentaUon for Miss Rhonda GrlfflUi, bride-elect, next Sunday night March 11 at 7:30 p.m. at the church. Republican Women To Meet Tuesday *Davie County Republican women wiU meet Tuesday, March 13, at 7:30 p.m. at Uie CourUiouse.The Stanley order wiU be ready for this meeting, so aU Interested members are urged to attend. Democrat Women To Sponsor Special Meetings The DemocraUc Women of Davie County wUI sponsor a series of meetings on County Government.The first speaker wUl be on Law Enforcement and Sheriff George SmiUi wUl be Uie guest speaker. He wUl discuss Uie responsibUities of the Sheriff’s Department and different programs Uiey haye in the county. There wUl be a question and answer period at ttie end.The public is invited to attend the meeting which wiU be held at the Town HaU, March 13, 1979 at 7 p.m. "Peace is our final good."St. Augustine ABSOLUTE AUCTION Sat. March 10th. 10:00 a.m. Personal Property Of The L^te Oscar L & Effie B. Laird Approx. 5 IMIIei East of Mocksville, N.C. mavle- County) From Mocksvllla, Taka Hwy. 158 To Milling Road. Follow Milling Road To Sale. ITEMS FOR SALE INCLUDE Philco Floor RadioOld Chum10 Gal. Milk CanDictaphone For Edison-RoUsOld JaisManUe QockPie SafesWash Potsdiest of DrawersSmall TablesCross Chit SawsStone Crocks Giunow Teledial Floor Radio RCA18”B&WT.V.Philco Radio & PhonographOld Clothes HamperFlat Back Cupboardbon KettleIron PotOld DresserOld Dining Table;Sereral Old ChairsSome Old DishesIron BedsMisc. Hand Tools • Many Other Misc. Items Sale Conducted For Perry Laird TERMS: CASH or APPROVED CHECK ^ ^ у > SALE CONOUCTEp'^ J im S h e e k A u c tio n & R e a lty Co. Jim Sheek, Auctioneer Lie. & Bonded, NCA L 924 P.O. Box 903 Ph. 634.3611 Mocksville, N.C. 27028 «•/n file Not Responsible in Case Of Injury Or Loss Of Any Type WARD REM. ESMTE HAS A NEW OFFICE AT 29 COURT SQUARE L A N D REDLAND RU-3S acres, wooded, good locaUon, runs par with 1-40, exceUent land for development-yasoo.oo acre. Will sell in tracts.HICKORY HILL Section I & Il-Wooded lots on 92 acre lake & Golf Course .6 of an acre to almost 2 acres range. 19500.00 to IIS,500.00-other lot* ^4 to an acre aqd half on golf course and ones that are not aU wooded range-17500.00 to $11,000.00. All lots have county or community water systems ahd have been prepared. HICKORV TREE-H acre loU, wooded & clear. Range $4,000.00 to $5,000.00. IF YOU ARE PLANNING TO BUILD, BUY, OR SELL PROPERTY... PLEASE CONTACT U S ... ou WILL BE GLAD YOU DID.8%%'igSSrAVAILABLE ___ON BOX LOANS__________ Office: 919-998-8475 OFFICE HOURS; 9:00 to 5:00 Call at Night or Weekends: 919-998-4660 704-634-3464 H O M E S HICKORY niEE-Beauti/uI 3 bedroom brtck rancher. Z full batbs, kitchen with oven and dishwasher, single carport, fireplace in den and one in full sise basement, air condition electric forced air, paved driveway. $55,000.00.VALLEY OAKS-Wood contemporary rancher, sloped great room wltb exposed beams and heatUator in fireplace, 3 bedrooms, kitchen wltb oven and dish­washer, 2 full baUis with sky lites, fuU site basement wiUi double garage doors, concrete driveway, air condition and heat pump, located on a woodedlot-ZO minutes from Winston-Salem. $63,WM.00. HICKORY HILL-Sectlon 1-Always wapted a bigger bedroomT 'nis beautiful wood contemporaty has a 25’«13’ master bedroom, Z fuU baths great room wltb stone fireplace. Located on comer. Heat pump and flnisbed garage.HICKORY HILL-Section Z-Thls con­temporary bas 3 bedrooms, master bedroom separate №om Uie other two. Great room with stone fireplace, Z tuU batbs, beat pump. Located on large wo^ed lot.HICKORY HILL-Section Z-Rustic rancher bas 3 bedrooms with master bedroom separate, cathedral ceUlngs in great room. Formal dining room, redwood sun deck. COOLEEiMEE-l5 mUes from SaUsbury- two-story older home-» rooms-could be used as two apartmenU-Z baths. Z kit­chens, four bedrooms. Uvlngroom, den. Urge screened porch, natural gas beat. Urge lot. Priced lo seU $ZS.Q00.00. W HEN YOU HAVE THAT SPECIAL H O M E IN M IND, W EC A N H ELP Y O U FIN D IT. O n lU Q ;. Ж 2 1 BOXWOOD REAL ESTATE 333 Salisbury Street 634-5997 We're the Neighborhood Professionals.' NEEDED: Approximately 20-30 acres; pastureland.300 Acre cattle farm near Farmington. 3,000 Acre cattle farm from Davie County west to the Tennessee line. DAVIE ACADEMY RD.-76 beautiful acres, part open and part wooded. Reasonably priced. MILLING ROAD-4 BR home with Hi baths. Living room, dining room with fireplace, den, recreation room. Fireplace in basement also. Deck and porch. Call today. SPRING ST.-Assumable loan on this very nice 2 BR starter home. Features nice kitchen-dining com­bination, Uving room. Newly decorated. NEED A TAX SHELTER? How about a beautiful 18 hole golf course, club house, driving range, and all modern equipment situated on 178 acres of rolling terrain. Call Dan Correll today.17 ACRES 4 miles from Mocksville. Convenient to schools, shopping. This ACT ate can be yours today. Old hoDuNOER .Q.VKiution potential. Pricedto sell. _______________________ ^ MILLING ROAD-Owners ready to sell. Price reduced on this 3 BR, bath home. Features kitchen and brealtfast room, living room, entrance hail, den w-fireplace. A must to see. CRAF'TWOOD-3 BR home w-2^4 baths. Living room, dining-kitchen combination, den downstairs and fireplace. Large patio, small deck, basement.jCall today. ________ Round House on 3 acre estate. Resort area. Located in Roaring Gap, N.C. Year round living in this 17 room home. Excellent buy. English Tudor house 1 mile off Blue Ridge Park­way, Roaring Gap. Year round or vacation home. Mountain cottage partly furnished. Resort area in Roaring Gap. Reasonable price. HWY. 158-This 3BR, 2 Bath home offersliVtag room, dining-kitchen combination, large utility room. Fireplace w-heat-o-lator and double garage. Owners ready to sell. GLADSTONE RD.-Come see this 2 BR homewKh 1 bath, kitchen, living room, and oil heat. Call today! 601 NORTH-1966 Model. 12 x 6» mobile home. Double carport built onto the back. Air conditionwindow unit. Must be moved s o o n .____ JERICHO R0AD-3BR rancher. Large recreation room, 2 baths, utility building, iVi acre lot. Priced in low 40’s.SHEFFIELD PARK-The owners have loved this home but they are moving. 'Vn.<-v|ii know the care. It has had as soon -oor. Just 8 yearsold. 3 BRs, kitchen with built-ins, basement, and carpet. Paved drive. Just minutes from town. ________COOLEEMEE-Tiiis 3BR home ha« » baths, kitchen- CROSS STREET-Recently remodeled 3BR home. Living room, family room, and new roofing. Let us show you the rest.GARDEN VALLEY-This cue*«*n built home features REDUCED n, living room,basemenPR"?Ij,w, uji neating and central air conditioning. Possession immediately. $84,000 CRAFTWOOD-Save nearly $1000 in closing costs Dy assuming the loan on this home. Dining-kitchen combination, l'/^ baths, workshop, and paved drive. Just minutes from town.HICKORY HILL-All the modern conveniences. 4BRs, 3 baths,,rnMTPflrT “"'s* «•ecreation room, living i^arge patio deck overlooking 90 acre lake. Owner desires to sell. OFF 601 SOtitH-This 2 BR home features kitchen- breakfast room combination, den, 1 bath. Carpet and vinyl floors. 2 car garage w-gravel drive. Cali today. _ . GLADSTON^E R0AD-3BRS with freestanding fireplace in den, 2 full baths, carpeted and tiled floors. Electric furnace and air condition. Priced .to sell. ________________CANA ROAD-Lovely 3 BR, 2 bath home. Carpet and vinyl floors, living room, dining-kitchen combination, den. Do yourself a favor by making an appointment to see this home. DAVIE ACADEMY ROAD-Rancher with 4 BRs, 1% baths, living and dining room. Central air con­ ditioning and oil forced heat. Beautiiul country setting. GREENWOOD LAKES-New home now under construction. ThU rustic farmhouse features 3 BR, 2V4 baths, a great room with fireplace, and a 2 car garage all situated on 1.2 acres. Call now and finish the interior to fit your taste.HOME & 6.18 ACRES of land just off 601 South. This property features a 2 car garage, living room with fireplace, 2 BR, greenhouse, and a bam. Ideal for the small farmer or someone Just looking for elbow room. Call today for more details. L'RAFTWOOD-This 3BB bg*r"_'eatures baths, full basemeniiujjERCONTBRC'j.down payment if all qualifical.uus are met. PINE r !5GE R0AD-2Mi yr. old home situated on approximately 2'.acres. Features great room, dining room, kitchen, 3 BRs, forced air heat and air conditioning. Deck and screened in porch. Just beautiful. ^ la n d f o r sa le OFF SANFORD R0Ab-2.ll acres. Owner ready to sell. OAKLAND Heights-2 buUdin^otSj;______ VIRGINIA-.6.^ acres of commercial property. 1 mile out of Galax. ^ a l buy^•Approximately 1 acre located off Cana Road Priced {¿Tell.Approximately 45 acres off Hwy. 801 across from Needmore Road. Priced to sell. Lot located on Lake Norman. Approximately 1 acre. Priced to sell. ________ We buy. sell, tradfe, and build. DANNY CORRELL • MANAGING BROKER Louise Frosl Daigle Associate Broker Associate Broker Shelia OUver Phone 634-2846492-5512 Salesman Dick NaU Home 634-5462 Associate Broker Charles Evans office 284-2537 _______ Office Manager Sandra Shelton Each offIc* iiKitpendantly owned and operatad.CENTURY 2^* CasMe Hunting biochure a( paftictpaiifig officer ... 1978 LfcNTURv 21 REAl FSUTE CORPORATION • PRONTI if. u S A • HOUAl HOuStNG (Si« t CÌNSI D 'AkMr i’l HI .. V. DAVIh COUNTY KNTKRPR1S1-: RECORD, TIIURSDAY, MARCH 8, |ч?<) ;|, C L A S S I F I E D A D S PERSONALS PROPERTY RENTALS SERVICES SERVICES Cards of Thanks Homes Apartments Automotive Plumbing ANIMALS FURNITURE Pets and Grooming Commercial LOST: Dark grey cat in the hospital vicinity. Reward goffered. Call Animal ▼protection Society.634-5138 or 634-3468.3-8 ItnpH LOST: Blonde Cocker Spaniel, male...in Advance area near Strawberry HIU. Missing 1 ^week. Answers to Scotty. Contact Gary Bowden at 998- 5796 atter 6 p.m.3-8 ItnpB POODLE Grooming... AU Breeds. 6 years experience. Contact: Mary Johnson al 492- .5192. i|r34-4tnpJ EMPLOYMENT Help Wanted " EARN Extra income by wearing and selUng Sarah Coventry Jewelry. FREE Training. Transportation necessary. CaU 998-4925 or 998-4832.8-10 tfnH♦ STEP INTO THE exciting world of nuclear security for a challenging career. WHERE; Lake Norman area. If you have a clean police record, high school diploma, GED equivalent. Southern Security wants you. Starting pay )3.75 per hour ^w'ith periodic increase. 14.82 within one year. Apply in person to: 500 East Moorehead Street, Atlantic Building, Suite 316, Charlotte, N.C. (EOE)11-16 tfnSC ■^WANTED: A beauty operator Wat Mayfair Beauty Shop in MocksvUle. To apply: call- 634-2022 or 634-3143. 1-2S UnM ADDRESSERS - STUFFERS - *250 weekly possible working at home. Free MdetaUs, rush self addressed ' stamped envelope: National, Dept. 1722-C P. 0. Box 8520, Pembroke Pines, Fla. 33024. 2-15 4tp HOMEMAKERS CHOOSE YOUR HOURS...Earn $5-16 ^per hour. Have fun and meet ^ l^ p le teaching hobby crafts. Nd. experience necessary. Advancement opportunities. Call (704) 634-5282 between 9 a.m. and 6 p.m.3-1 2tpHHELP WANTED: Ex- ^perienced white goods ~ technician needed, 35 year old firm, company truck, benefits, salary plus com- miMion. Elmore’s T.V. & Appliance, 200 East Front Street, SUtesvUle. CaU: 873- 3959.3-1; 2tnpE «PART-TIME CUSTODIAN ^for local church. Ap­proximately six to eight hours weekly. Must be dependable. For appUcation caU: 998-3022 Monday through Thursday mornings.3« ItpR 0HELP WANTED: Person needed to work 2Vi days per week in egg processing plant. Must be dependable and quick. Call for an ap­pointment: 998-6851.34 ItnpK ^OPENING SUITABLE tor a ^reliable retired person doing janitorial service part-time. CaU: (704 ) 634-6991 Ext. 13; after S p.m. (919) 998-4204. E.O.E.3-8 ItnpW tlL Situitions Wanted NEW AND USED OFFICE furniture, fireproof files and sates. ROWAN OFFICE FURNITURE, 118 N. Main Street, Salisbury, phone 636- 8022. tfnR Home WILL keep children in my home on Davie Academy Road. AU ages accepted. CaU: 284-2742. 2-8 tfnB ^DEPENDABLE child care in Vmy home. Rediand Road nearCreekwood. Convenient to 801 and 158. *25.00 week includes 1 meal and snack. CaU 998-5730 anytime.3-1 2tnpR FOR SALE: AU types un­finished chairs, stools, of aU sizes-upholslered, swivels, deacon benches, ail kinds used furniture. CaU W. A. EUis al 634-5227.4-13 tfnE MISCELLANEOUS FOR SALE ... Custom frames,..any size...expert workmanship...over 35 samples on display...see at CAUDELL LUMBER COMPANY, 123B Bingham Slreet, MocksviUe, Phone 634- 2167.4-24 tfnC WILL BUY diamonds and gold. Don’s Music Center, 124 North Main Street, MocksviUe, N.C. Phone 634- 3822.11-23 tfnD APPLIANCE SERVICES Co. Inc, 998-2480, Parts and Service. New on Hwy. 64 East next to Fork Fire Dept. Store hours 4 p.m. - 6 p.m. Mon., Tues., Thurs., and Fri. 8:30 a.m.-12 a.m. on Saturday. 24 hour answering service.2-1 tfnAS REAVIS MUSIC CEN­TER...guitars, banjos, mandolins, base, amps, and all accessories for sale. In­strument repairs, piano tuning and repairs; also guitar and banjo lessons. Open from 12 noon until 9 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday. Call: 492-7302 or 492-7359.2-8 8tnpR- NOW you can make clothes Uiat really fit! Patterns made to your individual measurements. CaU: 998-3365 after 4 p.m. Farmington area. 2-22 4tnpH WANTED: Old Muzzle Loading Rifle with Patchbox. Any condition. Will pay $1()00.00 cash or more. CaU before you seU. 1-919-576-9451. Or write P.O. Box 528, Troy N.C. 27371.3-1 tfn СWANTED: SUver coins...aU denominations...1964 and earUer. $3.50 to $4.00 per doUar face. Must be in good condition. CaU Jack Sanford at day~634-2851, night-634- 2415.3-1 5tnpSTO WHOM IT MAY CON­CERN: Hubert H. CrantiU and wife, Lois CrantiU ot Route 1, Salisbury, N.C. are NOT divorced, there has been no change ot address made and no separation papers signed and NO settlement made what-so-ever.3-1 2tnpC IT’S SPRING Planting Time!!! Free copy 48 pg. PlanUng Guide Catalog in color-4)ffered by Virginia’s largest growers of fruit trees, nut trees, berry plants, grape vines, landscape plant material. Waynesboro Nurseries, Waynesboro, Va. 22980.3-8 4tnpWNFOR SALE: 300 Bales hay at 95 cents per bale. CaU: 634- 2478 after 4 p.m.3-8 itpSFOR SALE: Fescue No. 31 grass seed. $23.00 per hundred B. AvaUable in 50 lb. s. CaU 492-7558.3-8 ItnpW AIR WELL DRILLING CO. Route 9, Box 127 StatesviUe, N.C. 28677 Phone 872-7614 Advance, N.C. Phone 998-4141 FOR SALE..,Three bedroom frame house with 5.6 acres of land. Several storage buildings, $15,000, Ap­proximately two miles from MocksviUe. Call 634-5640, 11-19 IfnS Family of Uie late FOR SALE.,.House and 11.33 Alice H, Phelps acres on Counly Line Road Cooleemee near N.S. 901. Lizzie Gaither homeplace. $17,500.00. See WiUiam E, HaU, MocksviUe, PHELPS We wish lo express our sincere thanks and ap­preciation to all our relatives, friends and neighbors for the kindness shown us during our recent bereavement. FOR RENT: Crestview Apartments, U.S. 64 East, A nice 3-room apartment wilh patio and bath tor adults. Call: 634-5420.3-8 4tnpG Mobile Homes 3-7 ItpM DAVISThe family of the late Anne B. David would Uke to express their thanks and appreciation for flowers, food, cards and prayers which helped so much al Uiis time. It means a lot lo have friends and neightwrs who care enough to remember in such nice ways. Thanks to each of you.Mrs. Patsy Crenshaw 3-8 ItpC SPILLMAN We would like to thank everyone who has expressed their kindness during the iUness and death ot our loved one. We especially thank those who remembered us in their prayers; also those who sat with Deanie while he was sick, for food, flowers and the Countney firemen. May God bless you aU.The family of David Dean SpiUman 3-8 ItpS FRYEOn behalf of my family and myself, I would lUce lo take Uiis opportunity to thank the enUre staff of Davie County Hospital for their many acts of kindness shown to me during my stay. I shaU always remember the friendly faces and exceUent care. Mrs. Ruth Frye3-8 ItpF Birth Defects Fifteen miUion Americans have birth defects, reports The National Foundation- March of Dimes. About 1.2 miUion infants, children, and adults are hospitaUzed each year for treatment ot birth defects. Now available at Bonanza Mobile Homes...VA Finan­cing on all new homes up to $35,000. „low down payment. Contact BONANZA MOBILE HOMES, 722 Wilkesboro Slreet, Mocksville, N.C, Phone 634-5959.10-26 tfnB FOR SALE...2 Mobile homes, '69 and '76 models. New 3 ton central air system. Phone: 634-3148afler 6 p.m. or before 634-3596 2/l5/4tpS FOR SALE... 12 x 70, 2 bedroom mobUe home, fully furnished, 2 baths, central air, oil heal and blocks for setting up. CaU: 634-2239 after 5:00 p.m.2-22 IfnY S o c i a l S e c u r i t y Do you expect to receive a pension based on your job with a Federal, State, or local government agency that is not covered by social security? And have you also been counting on getting dependent or survivor benefits on the social security record of your husband or wife whose work is covered?If your answer to both questions is “yes,” you should be aware of a change in the social security law caUed the "public pension offset.” If can reduce or eliminate the amount of Uie benefU you hope to get on your spouse’s record. WhUe many people win’t be affected until December 1982, you should know about the new rule now so you can plan ahead for retirement.When the offset applies, the amount ot your dependent or survivor l)enefit is reduced- dollar for dollar-by the amount ot your pubUc pen­sion. If your monUily persion is $200 and your potential wife’s or husband’s benefit is $230, for example, you would get only $30 as a wUe or husband (230-$200).Keep in mind that the offset wUl not affect you if your Federal, State, or local government job is covered by social security on Uie last day you work. And you can receive retirement or disability checks on your social security record with no reducUon. In addition, any ottier payments you receive- such as workers com- pensaUon, black lung, VA, etc. are not subject to Uie offset.There is sUU anoUier major excepUon to the offset. It is designed to help some people who wUl receive a govern­ment pension before December 1982, or who are eUgible to receive one by then wheUier or not they actuaUy apply. Most of ttiese people Kessler's Furniture & Upholstery | (Formerly Joe’s Uphoittery) OPEN DAILY M on..Sat.-9:00-5:30 *Free Estimates *Wide Variety of Samples ‘ Presented in Homes ‘ Finandng Available Phone: 284-2512 Cooleemee Dial 636-2341 Salisbury, N.C. N.C, Phone; 634-5214.2-22 4tnpH FOR SALE.,.3 Bedroom House on large corner lot. Freshly painted inside and out. Good starter home. $22,000. Call: 634-3850 or 634- 3291.3-8 2tpHFOR SALE...Sanford Road...$55,000 Uke new, 3- bedroom split level in great location tor easy living. Large wooded lot, C4il-de-sac storm doors and windows, playroom, fireplace and garage. CaU: Mary Reid at (919) 722-2506 or 721-1000.3-8 ItnpLY Mobile Homes eiUier are already retired or are nearing retirement and have counted on getUng both benefits. It would be difficult for them to readjust ttieir retirement plans atthis late stage because of the offset.If you are a man, you also have to be eligible for a government pension by December 1982 to avoid Uie offset. In addition, your wife must have been providing at least one-half of your support at Uie time you apply for husband’s benefits on her social security record.It should be noted that a March 1977 Supreme Court decision ruled that men no longer have to prove dependency to get monthly benefits on a wife's social security record. This is stUl true for most men whose jobs are covered under social security but not so for men who have non-covered government jobs. Can you teU me what Uie eligibUity requlremente are for SSI payments?To be eligible for SSI. a person must be 65 or older, or blind, or disabled, and have Umited income and resources (assets). An individual may be eligible with income that counts below $189.40 a month and resources of $ 1,500 or less. Not all income is counted in determining a person’s eligibility, nor are all resources. A person also must be a U.S. resident and either a citizen or lawfully admitted Immigrant. For more in­formation. contact any social security office. OFFICE MACHINES Typewriters Adding Machines Service On AU Makes TRAILER SPACES FOR RENT...Water and garbage pickup furnished. Call 634- 2105,10-26 tfnW FOR RENT: 3 bedroom, bath and half Mobile home, by owner. At Dogwood Spring Park...1-40, 158, 801, Reasonable. Call: 284-2964 atter 6 p.m.3-8 itpM Rooms ROOMS FOR RENT...Apply al Don’s Jewelry and Music Center,.,124 North Main Street, Mocksville, N,C. Phone: 634-3822.1-H tfnD SALES SALES SALES HANNAH’S YARD SALE Everyday...al Uie TRADING POST, 2 miles west of MocksviUe, Hwy. 64. Good Used Cars and Trucks at GOOD prices, Open from 9 a.m, until 9 p.m. Cali 634-5735. 10-5 tfnH FOR SALE...March 10th, Saturday from 9 a.m. untU-at the last house on Fulton Street (Craftwood develop­ment)...Complete household furnishings, antiques, Uving room and den furniture, stained glass lamps, refrigerator with ice maker, washer, lawn mower, pen baU machine, smaU appliances, pote and pans in copper and brass, cobalt glass, large crystal bowl and cups, custom made drapes. Oriental waU hangings, large and smaU house plants, hanging baskets. Cactus, Oak table, 4 chairs, Color TV and rotary antenna and many, many more items! Don’t miss this special sale. CaU 634-3741 after 7 p.m.34 ItpdEYOU ARE INVITED TO LOOK at Uie cloUies, fur­niture, glassware, old items and twenty-five cent specials at the 3 FamUy Yard Sale, Friday, March 9, at 620 WUkesboro Street trom 9 a.m. UnUl 6 p.m.3-8 ItpYYARD & BAKE SALE...at Uie Rotary Hut on Salisbury Street...Saturday, March 24, from 9 a.m untU 4 p.m. Sponsored by Green HiU Baptist Church youth. Proceeds to send the youth to (^sweU Church C^mp. Any articles for the sale donated wUl be appreciated. Just caU: Reta Gaittierat 634-5513 (day) or 546-2291 (night) or Mrs. Frances O’Neal at 492-7282. ’There wiU be many good articles for sale.3-8 ItpG WANTED Livestock A. L Becit & Son Wholesale Meats Thomasville, N.C. WILL BUY 1 or 100 COWS.,jito, Bulls,Veals, Feeders, Calves. ...We Pay Cash For All Cattle When Picked Up. WE WILL Pick up • Kill • Process Vour Locker Beef A. L. Beck, Jr. Rt. 1, Thomasville, N.C. Call Collect Anytime WIniton-Salem (919) 788-9008 or 788-7524 Phone After 6:00 P.M. Early A.M. (919)476-6895 irssssssssssssssa BOB’S AUTO SER­VICE...Automatic tran­smission, radiator and general auto repairs. 10 a.m. 4- 8 p.m. Monday-Friday. 10 a.m. -f 2 p.m. Saturdays. CaU: 998-4005. Mocks Church Road, Advance, N.C.1-4 tfnBSOUTHERN Automotive CreaUons offers major, minor body repairs, clean-up service and FREE estimates. Located al corner ot Hwy. 64 and Cornatzer Road. Call: 998-8938,1-4 tfnS Carpet Cleaning Give your old CARPET a new lease on life with the do it yourself steam cleaner ... rinse and vac from DAVIE SUPPLY COMPANY. 634- 2859, tfnD PLUMBING 4 + CaU Mike Whitaker after 5 p,m, at 634- 2789, License numi)er 6988-P. New installation and repair work. 2-15 6tnW VEHICLES Septic Tank Electrii»! For fast and efficient service on all electrical needs, large or small, call Karl Osborne, owner of OSBORNE ELECTRIC COMPANY 634- 3398 520 East Maple Avenue, MocksvUle,5-11 ttnO Garbage Pick Up FOR WEEKLY garbage pick­up anywhere in Davie County...call BECK BROTHERS GARBAGE DISPOSAL SERVICE, 284- 2917 or 284-2823 Cooleemee, or Counly Manager’s Office, MocksviUe.6-12 tfnB SEPTIC TANK CLEANING SERVICE ... certified to pump sepUc tanks ... large truck for full time, efficient service also rent sanitary loUets ... call 284-4362, Robert Page, Cooleemee,4-24 tfnPSEPTIC TANK CLEANING If your Septic Tank hasn’t been pumped within the last 5 years, it probably needs CLEANING, Call 998-3770 for fast, efficient service, NEESE'S SEPTIC TANK SERVICE.10-26 tfnN Tax INCOME TAX SERVICE ... See Peggy Joyner tor your income tax service, tast, efficient and confidential. Flates reasonable. Have had 9 years of experience, Monday - Friday from 9 a,m. until 9 p.m.. Sat. from 9 lo 5 p.m. Phone 492-5559, Rt, 1, Mocksville, (Green Hiil- Prison Camp Rd.) Assisted by Sue Gobble. 2-15 tfnJ INCOME TAXES PREPARED... .Reasonable rates. Call: Gene Hendrix at 998-5845.3-1 SlnpH Automobiles FOR SALE: 1972 Pinto, Runabout 4-speed. Only $500,00 Cali: (704 ) 492-7716. 3-1 4tpT FOR SALE: 1971 Ford Thunderbird...In good con­dition, Loaded, full power and »air condition. Call: 634-2797. 3-8 ItnpC FOR SALE: 1973 Pontiac Grand Prix, green wiUi white vinyl top, a-c, ps, pb, AM-FM stereo, new Dayton radials. Call: Gary Bowden al 998-5796 after 6 p.m.3-8 ItopB Automobiles & Trucks FOR SALE: 1948 Ford pickup, runs. $250.00. Phone 998-3408.1968 Ford LTD, 5 new tires, brakes in good shape. $450.00.1960 Chevrolet Impala 2- door hardtop. With mag wheels, white letter tires. Three speed on the column. Newly rebuilt 6 cylinder motor. Perfect to restore. $700.00. Classic 1965 Ford Fairlane, 2door hardtop. Fully original, 298V-8 engine. Blue with original cloth interior, perfect liner. $900.00.1975 Plymouth Fury, AM- FM, power steering, power brakes, a-c, tinted windows. Bench bucket seats. Vinyl interior. $2,600. Call 998-3408. 3-8 4tnpG Boats Upholstery Home Repairs & Painting WILL DO all types of home improvement work, room additions, siding, storm windows and doors. CaU 284- 2045 after 5 p.m.12-28 tfnSPAINTING, home repairs, small or large jobs. For free estimates call James MiUer at 998-8340.12-28 tfnM OFFERING you the finest in custom upholstery...Large selecUon of Quality Fabric and vinyls. Free Estimates. Quick, efficient service. Call J. T. SMITH FURNITURE CO., INC. 492-7780. Located 10 miles west of MocksvUle on Sheffield Road. 30 years experience.1-18 ttnS FOR SALE: 1977 Silverline 16 ft. boat with 1977 long trailer and 1970 motor, complete canvas lop included Like New. CaU: 634-3966 after 6 p.m.3-8 ItnpB Campers Wall Covering NOTICE WANTED TO BUY LIVESTOCK Beef cattle, hogs, veals, or I feeder cattle, I have an order for all types of cattle. Will pay market price for ■■ )ck, ^ aymcheck or cash, which ever . . etpri your livestock, right on the farm. Payment In Old walls need a new face.. See complete selecUon of newest wall coverings at DAVIE SUPPLY COMPANY at 634-2859.3-25 tfnD you perfer. PROMPT PICK UP SERVICE I will buy one head or a whole herd. Give me a call!!! Fred 0. Ellis Livestock & Auctioneering Rt. 4, ¡Wocksville, N.C. 634-5227 or 998-8744 I Life-long resident of Davie AVON Representatives Never Looked So Good. You will loo, selling world iamous pro­ducts Flexible hours. Higti earnings Dorothy Whicker District Manager P.O. Box 585 Elkin, N.C. 28621 Call Collect 919-366-4040 FOR SALE „.Ten and half ft. Cab over camper Wolverine. Call 998-3092.2-15 4tpB FOR SALE...Camper for pickup, self-contained. $400.00. CaU; 634-5515.3-8 impT Motorcycles & Painting FOR SALE...1977 Yamaha 100 motorcycle. Bought new in 1978, low mileage, overaU excellent condition. CaU 634- 5415 after 3:30 p.m.2-22 IfnK CUSTOM PAIN­TING...Complete custom painting...Motorcycle tank and side covers from $75.00. Glass finish over professional air-brushing. Van scenes trom $100.00. McBride 634- 5193, 3-1 4tnpM Trucks P r i d e M a r k R o o f i n g C o . Tear Off ■■ Wood Shingles - Composition FREE ESTIMATES ASK ABOUT OUR GUARANTEE MIKE PERKINS Advance Phona 998-5040 DOUG COLBERT Mockivllla Phone 634-3981 FOR SALE; 1978 Ford pickup F-150, 351 engine, automatic transmission, 30,000 miles. In good condition. Call; 998-3585. 3-1 2tpC FOR SALE...1970 GMC 4- Wheel drive, long bed with camper and CB. Call: 634-3966 after 6 p.m. FINANCIAL STATEMENT FOR PERIOD ENDING: December 31,1978 Morrii-Studevant Mutual Burial Atiociataan, Inc., Mocksville, N.C. 27028 BALANCE DECEMBER 31,1977 RECEIPTS: Current assessments collected 2608.80 Number of new members 48 24.00 Interest on time deposits 390.29 Total Net Difference of edvance asst. Receipts Total Receipts DISBURSEMENTS: Salaries 428.00 Collection commissions 40.00 Miscellaneous expenses 428.18 Totil Death benefits paid; No. 100. 2 No. 200 5 Membership fees paid agents Total disbursements Balance To Be Accounted For: ASSETS: Bank deposit: Branch Bank & Trust Co. Securities: Mocksville S. & L. CD Securities Mocksville S. & L. P/B Total Assets LIABILITiES: Advance assessments Total liabilities SURPLUS .1 3024.09 + 23.40 .3047.49 ^ В В Ш 896.18 200.00 1000.00 2134.91 5380.12 JJJU 408.80 2120.18 7546.04 7646.04 408,80 7137.24 SI) I)AVII COUNTY KNTI-RPRISU RliCORD. THURSDAY. MARCH .4. I Davie District Court No court was held February IB, 1979 due to wealher.The following cases were disposed of in the regular February 26, 1979 session of District Court with Preston Cornelius, Presiding Judge and Frank Bell, Asst. District Attorney:Dennis Jackson Wilmoth, driving while license expired, »25 and cost; driving on wrong side of road, voluntary dismissal.Larry Douglas Head, operating motor vehicle while under the Influence, sentenced to six monlhs suspended for twelve months, $100 and cost, violate no laws of N.C., other conditions.Jerry Allen Sexton, improper equipment, cost.David John Price, Jr., reckless driving, $75 and cost.William Joseph Imus, speeding 80 mph in 55 mph zone, |25 and cost.George Randolph Dierkes, speeding 87 mph in 55 mph zone, bond forfeiture of $150.Marsha Ann Lay, reckless driving, $75 and cost.Ervin Carnell Dixon, speeding 70 шрЬ in 55 mph zone, dismissed with leave.Christine Atkins Gray, operating motor vehicle while under the influence, sentenced to six months suspended for twelve months, $100 and cost, surrender operators license, violate no laws of N.C., other conditions.John Johnson, reckless driving, $75 and cost.Jonathan E. Scott, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, dismissed with leave.William West, Jr., speeding 65 mph in 55 mph zone, dismissed with leave.Robert Zulbersztajn, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, dismissed with leave.Michael Steven Hall, exceeding safe speed, cost.George Taft Williams, safe movement violation, $10 and cost.John WesUey Hairston, operating motor vehicle while under the influence, voluntary dismissal; improper display of license, not guilty.Michael Dalton, assault, not guilty.Charles Edward Jimerson, non support, sentenced to six months suspended for five years, probation for five years, make support payments, special conditions.Everette Jenning Ligon, Jr., operating motor vehicle while under the influence, sentenced to six months suspended for twelve months, $100 and cost, surrender operators license, violate no laws of N.C.Norman Russell Smith, misd. larceny, sentenced to eighteen months suspended for two years, cost, surrender operators license for six months, make restitution, not violate any laws of N.C. for two years, other conditions; damage to coin operated machine, voluntary dismissal.James Curtis Caldwell, trespass, cost, not enter upon premises of prosecuting witness; bastardy, prayer for judgment continued on condition he sign voluntary support agreement.Paul D. Correll, odometer violation, $44 and cost.Deborah Carol Dick, exceeding safe speed, $10 and cost.Jerry Lee Dalton, two counts of worthless checks, sentenced to sixty days suspended for twelve months, $K and cost, make checks good, not violate any laws of N.C. for twelve months.Herbert Lee Hoots, two counts of setting steel traps, voluntary dismissal on each count.Kermit Clay Pendleton, too fast for conditions, prayer for judgment con­tinued on cost.Gary Ray Creason, possession of controlled substance, voluntary dismissal.Dennis Michael Davis, reckless driving after drinking, $100 and cost, other conditions.John Charles Mitchell, exceeding safe speed, prayer for judgment continued.James Bonds, resisting arrest, assault on officer, sentenced to sbc months suspended for twelve months,$200 and cost, not violate any laws of N.C. for twelve months; trespass, prosecuting witness does not desire to prosecute, dismissed on cost by prosecuting wit­ness.Geraldine York Ridenhour, com­ municating threats, dismissed. the following cases were tried in Magistrates Court or paid by waivering court trial:Maxin« Pearce McNeill, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, $10 and cost.Randy Lynn Harris, failure to stop for duly erected stop sign, cost.Jefferson E. Mahurin, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, $10 and cost.Joe Vance Leonard, exceeding safe speed, cost.John Michael Money, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, $10 and cost.George Thomas Moody, improper registration, cost.Leroy Miller, Jr., speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, $10 and cost.Steven Ray Reid, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, $10 and cost.Gyula Pandi, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, $10 and cost. Hugh Durand Stetler, speeding 66 mpn in 55 mph zone, $10 and cost.Jerry Jerome Summers, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, $10 and cost.Richard Jay Stafford, no operators license, $25 and cost.Mickey Lee Whitt, speeding 68 mph in 55 mph zone, $10 and cost.Willie James Torbit, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, $10 and cost.Karen Elaine Trivette, failure to drive on right half of highway that was suf­ficient width for more than one lane of traffic, cost.Limuel Toms, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, $10 and cost.Tamara Lynn Wall, speeding 67 mph in 55 mph zone, $10 and cost.Henry Evean Todd, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, $10 and cost.Vickie Ann Batter, expired inspection certificate, cost.Peggy Lee Baird, speeding 69 mph in 55 mph zone, $10 and cost.Roberl WaUer Bracken, speeding 55 mph in 45 mph zone, $5 and cost.Sheron Jones Page, speeding 65 mph in 55 mph zone, $5 and cost.Leo Goodman Watson, too fast for conditions, cost.Cynthia Tarlton Ends, speeding 69 mph in 55 mph zone, $10 and cost. Dewain Richard Schlotfeldt, speeding 67 mph in 55 mph zone, $10 and cost. Anthony Francis Bolton, exceedingsafe spe^, cost.Ronald Eugene Crawford, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone and failure to comply with license restriction, $25 and cost.Larry Benson Grove, excess of 45 mph in 45 mph zone, cost.Dwight McCleese Foreman, speeding68 mph in 55 mph zone, $10 and cost.Joseph Odell Fulp, Jr., speeding 70mph in 55 mph zone, $10 and cost.Carolyn McPherson Nance, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, $10 and cost.Jimmy Thomas Setzer, failure to stop for duly erected stop sign, cost.Roy Eugene Scarboro, exceeding safe speed, cost.Ernest Bradley Williams, failure to drive on right half of highway that was sufficient width for more than one lane of traffic, cost.Pamela Harless Tolbert, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, $10 and cost.Barry Dale Allen, exceeding safe speed, cost.Bobby Edsel Day, exceeding safe speed, cost.Mona Kepley Hutton, exceeding safe speed, cost.Michael Dennis Ligon, exceeding safe speed, cost.Dale Shoaf Stewart, failure to stop for duly erected stop sign, cost.Earl Hilton Bracey, speeding 69 mph in 55 mph zone, $10 and cost.William Emerson Campbell, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, $10 and cost.Samuel Kimble Hendrix, speeding 67 mph in 55 mph zone, $10 and cost.Brenda Sue Morrison, speeding 69 mph in 55 mph zone, $10 and cost.Gary Clinton Sedden, speeding 65 mph in 55 mph zone, $5 and cost.Leon Swinton, speeding 69 mph in 55 mph zone, $10 and cost.Polly James Bally, exceeding safe speed, cost.Brian Michael Crady, exceeding safe speed, cost.Anettia Miles Dailey, speeding 68 mph in 55 mph zone, $10 and cost.Patricia Ann Finney, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, $10 and cost.Phillip Roy Forrest, Jr., speeding 67 mph in 55 mph zone, $10 and cost.Edward Eugene Kerr, Jr., speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, $10 and cost. Operators Licenses Are Suspended Motor vehicle operators licenses revoked or suspended in Davie County for the period ending February 16th were as follows:Calvin W. Atkins Jr., 20, of Rt. 1 Ad­vance, suspended as of February 23,. 1979 unUl April 24, 1979.Joseph R. Beeson Jr., 37, of Rt. 2 Mocksville, revoked as of January 26, 1979 until January 26, 1980.Ricky W. Tutterow, 22, of Rt. 4 Mocksville, revoked as of May 30, 1979 until May 30, 1980. Stolen Car Is Recovered Here Robért Coe, chief deputy for the Davie County Sheriff's Dept, was on routine patrol early Tuesday morning when he discovered a car parked at Potts Texaco on Highway 801 which had been reported stolen in Massachusetts.The license check in Massachusetts revealed that the car bad been rented Feb. 24 by Paul Beausoleil of Salem, Massachusetts and later reported stolen by the company renting the car.Investigation Is continuing in the state of Massachusetts and no charges have been filed here in the case. re n t A NEW 1979 bv the day, week or month LTD II Ask About Our Leasing Cars. *Low Daily Rentali *Air Conditioning available •Rant nawMt Modal Fordi- /)h tizat and modali. Motnnajo^wHtardt^ Plisna TOLL FREE from Wintton-Mam 722-2386 RENT-A-CARFofCas.Trucksand ^ SavingsBucteSee... Reavis Ford, Inc. Highway 601 North N.C.t)«ilar MocksvUle, N.C. 27028 Licanta Phone 634-2161 2416 P r e p a r e F o r B r i d g e B e n e f i t ! ! ! Seated: Mrs. Precyous Sales, Mrs. Jackie Nicholson and standing left to right: Mrs. Beth Humphrey and Mrs. Susan Johnson are busily making preparations for a Bridge Benefit and Fashion Show for the Heart Fund which wiU be held Friday, March 16, at the National Guard Armory. Tickets are three dollard per person and each individual is expected to get their own foursome. For reservations, one ot the foUowing can be contacted: Mrs. Ora Bowen, 284-4225, 284-2526; Mrs. Hazel Kelly, 634-2647; Mrs. Gigi Marion, 634-5333 and Sears at 634-5988. (Photo by Robin Carter) L ib ra ry N ew s by David Fergusson Information Producer NEW BOOKS:Suffer the Children: The Story of Thalidomide by the Insight Team of the Sunday Times of London .-Here is the highly acclaimed story of one of tbe most horrendous mistakes of our time. Horrible but true is this tale of the relatively untested drug which the German inventors Chemie Grumenthal sold through the Distillers Company. This happened almost twenty years ago, and the 8,000 babies who were born deformed, often without arms or legs, have now grown up. This book is their story as well as the story of what can happen in a society where the in­dividual's rights are not properly protected. This report, held up for years in legal entanglements, is now available and should be widely read.The Joy of Signing by Lottie L. Riekehof-This new illustrated guide to mastering Sign Language and the Manual Alphabet should be welcomed by those who use sign. It is well illustrated, indexed, and very clear. It also has a bibliography.Talk Down by Brian Lecomber- Suspense! This novel about Ann Moorep nurse off for a weekend with her boy friend, has it! Happily flying along, Ann is plunged into a period of absolute fright. Her boy friend is in a coma and the only one who can save her is stunt flyer Keith Kerr, a maverick who decided to save her the only way he knows how - and the most dangerous way.Those tbe Sun Has Loved by Rose Jordan-The Claviers were a proud black dynasty whose story is told here starting in 1772 with Jacques, who led a raid which brought food and guns to George Washington. His decendents engaged in the struggles of American history. When Isabella breaks from the mold, the Claviers seemed destined to fade away, until the twentieth century...Successful Small Farms by Herbert T. Leavy-A very clear how-to book for the Rescue Auxiliary Holds Meeting Legislative Report By Senator Roberi Davis small farmer, or anyone who lives in the country. Leavy has written many books on construction and consumer goods, and his skills show here. Chapters cover greenhouses, wiring, plywood, adobe, housing for animals, swine shelters etc.Crockett's Indoor Garden by James U. Crockett-Now a book on houseplants and other indoor beauties by the man who brought you the Victory Garden. A month-by-month format introduces various plants and includes a question and answer section. Beautiful drawings and color illustrations make this a delightful gardening aid. The Encyclopedia of Hardware by Tom Philbin-Alphabetically arranged by general area, (general, electrical, plumbing) this will clarify all of those unknowns of the hardware trade. Now you can sound like a real pro when you go the Martin Brothers (but will that help:)Spoonbread and. Strawberry Wine by Norma Jean and Carole Darden-Two black sisters have collected stories about their family and its past from relatives across the country, including North Carolina. This book tells their story, expecially through the food the family loves. Actually this book is a delicious celebration.Steck-Vaughn Adult Reading by Sam V. Dauzat and others.-This is a series designed to take adulU from toUl illiteracy to reading competence. There are two levels. Level 1 covers basic reading skills starting with shape recognition. Level 2 teaches numerous comprehension skills. The material is for adulU and appeals to their interesU as well as giving much information. We already have the Laubach materials which in addition to tills series make an excellent resource for those working with adult problem readers.A Life that Mattered by Betty Feezor- For five days a week Betty Feezor did her TV program on WBTV in Charlotte. In 1977 she discovered she had cancer and only a short time to live. During that time she put her story - and her feelings down on paper. This book is the result. As this session of the N.C. General Assembly progresses, it is important that the constituents in each district have an idea of their representative's priorities and actions.To that end, I hope to be reporting to you on a regular basis concerning the various Issues before the Legislature In Raleigh. One bill that has generated a great deal of interest in the capital and is certain to attract even more attention statewide. Is Senate Bill 134, which I co­sponsored with Senator Hesnon Barnes of Goldsboro, Is an act calling for a state constitutional amendment to allow legislators to serve four-year terms. Of course, legislators now serve two-year terms.I have introduced this amendment only after serious consideration and consultation with many of my con­stituents as well as fellow lawmakers. Already, 38 other senators have agreed to bote to offer the amendment to the voters.Thirty-seven states have already adopted the four-year terms.Naturally, there are valid arguments both for and against the four-year term. Still, I believe the reasons in favor of the longer terms far outweigh the arguments against.Either way, since the decision will ultimately be decided by the people in a statewide referendum, I think it is in the best Interest of the state that such an amendment be offered.The most obvious reason for the amendment, during a period of tax relief proposals and budget cutting, is the substantial savings of taxpayer money. Eliminating the two-year term would cut the cost of statewide elections by half. Statewide elections now cost the state $600,000 to $700,000 each time they held-and the price is rising.However, the most practical reason is the time and cost involved for the candidates running for election or reelection. Virtually all of the legislators hold down full-time jobs in addition to their work in the General Assembly. The burden of campaigning from 6 to 8 months every two years is enormous. Further, the legislators must spend another 6 yo 9 months in Raleigh during the Assembly Sessions and commlttec meetings.The results of such burdens in cost and time could, in the near future be ex­tremely detrimental to the workings of our state government. Certainly, fewer and fewer citizens of average Income will be able lo seek office In the Legislature. Many who already hold office and have valuable experience that our state sorely needs will be forced to give up their seats to return home and work al their regular Jobs.Holding public offlce could become loo expensive for people without great personal wealth.A not-so-obvious reason for the amendment is to at least lesson the almost continuous polillcing of some members. Often members are forced to spend all of their time looking out for themselves and reelection rather than working for their constituents and the best Interests of North Carolina.Finally, in fairness to the legislators, the two-year term allows little time for them to gain experience or knowledge of the system before they are forced to stand judgment at the polls. The lawmakers are only involved in one short session (approx. one month) and one long session (approx. six months) between elections. Consequently, the voters have little opportunity for feedback as lo their candidate's per­formance before election time.The bill, as written, has already been reported favorably out of the Senate (institutional Amendments Committee and could come before the full Senate al any lime. If it passes the Senate, then it will be forwarded lo the House for concurrence.As awways, I would appreciate your comments and feelings on this legislation and any olher subjects that interest you. My office telephone in Raleigh is area code 919 733-5653 or please write me at North Carolina General Assembly, Legislative Building, Room 2003, Raleigh, North Carolina 27611. Teachers’ Sorority To Give Scholarship The Beta Mu Chapter (Davie County) 4^ of the Alpha Della Kappa, International Teachers’ Sorority has announced plans lo award a scholarship for the 1979-1980 college year.In order to be eligible for the scholarship, the applicant must be (1) a senior girl at Davie High School who has been accepted by the college of her vHjp choice; (2) planning to go into the field of education; (3) a good citizen and (4) in need of financial assistance.Any girl wishing to apply for the scholarship or ask questions concerning It should contact a counselor at Davie High School Immediately. Applications are available at the Davie High School A guidance office. They must be com- ~ pleted and returned to the Guidance office by April 1, 1979. Fires Reported Henry Shore Henry Shore Joins Howard Realty Henry Shore is now associated with Howard Realty Company of Mocksville, as a part-time Real Estate salesman.Mr. Shore is also the Assistant Manager of Belk Dept, store of Mocksville.He is serving as a Deacon, Directoi*of the Adult Sunday School Department and teacher of the Senior Adult C3ass. He has been an active charter member of tbe Farmington Ruritan Club. He has served as Zone Governor, District Treasurer, Lt. Governor and District Governor of Piedmont District 31 of Ruritan National.He is married to the former Sarah R. Eaton. They have two daughters, Mrs. Tim Allen and Mrs. Sam Sheets, both of Mocksville. The Rescue Squad Auxiliary members met at the home of Mrs. Pal Veach, on Monday night March 5, 1979.The meeting was call^ to order by the president, Mrs. Susie Wilson.Mrs. Alva Howard had devotionals and a poem.The minutes of the last meeting was read by the secretary, Mrs. Ruby O’Neil, also treasurer report was made. Dues were collected.A box was prepared for the Jaycettes Better Infant Birth program. We wish them much success with this BIB program. During the business meeting, plans were made for the N.C. Association of Rescue Squads to have the area district meeting at the Davie Rescue Squad building on Sunday April is.A bake sale was discussed for Mother's Day Weekend. Anyone wan- Ung to donate to this, please let an auxiliary member know.At our next meeting we will fix a sunshine basket for Mrs. Bessie Keller.A suggestion was made to have an Auxiliary Woman of the Year Award.The officers for the new year 1979 & 1980 are as follows:President - Mrs. Judy Allen Vice-president - Mrs. Pat Veach Sec. & Treasurer - Mrs. Ruby O'Niel Asst. Sec. & Treasurer - Mrs. Nancy CookWays & Means - Mrs. Wylene Keller Asst. Ways & Means - Mrs. Lynn Ooss Membership Comm. - Mrs. Pat Veach Hospital - Mrs. Frances Heilard Chaplin - Mrs. Alva Howard Program Comm. - Mrs. Nancy Cook, Mrs. Margaret Myers Publicity - Mrs. Betty K. Freeman, Mrs. Nancy Harris, and Mrs. Jo Ann CouchThe annual Fall Fish Fry will be October 6th. Tbe meeting adjourned, thanlung each one for the good work that had been done, and hope to have a successful year ahead.Delicious refreshments were enjoyed by all. The following fires were reported to . the Davie County Fire Control Center A during recent days:-March 2-the Wm. R. Davie Fire Dept, responded to a house flre on the Bear Creek Church Rd. at 7:25 a.m.;-March 3-at 9:13 ; .m. the County Line Fire Dept, responded to a house fire on U.S. 64;-March 3- the Sheffield-Calahain Fire 'M. Dept, responded lo a small brush fire at ^ 9:08 p.m. on U.S. 64;-March 3-at 11:27 p.m. the Mocksville Fire Dept, responded to a brush fire on Milling Rd., and-March 5-at 8:00 p.m. the Mocksville Fire Dept, responded to a false alarm at the Heffner Food Store at the Willow 0 Oak Shopping Center. PotatoesDon't refrigerate potatoes. Below 40 degrees F. potatoes will develop a sweet taste, the result of an accumulation of sugars in the tubers. This increased sugar will cause the potato to darken^ when cooked. ^ TOBACCO GROWERS D e s i g n a t e y o u r t o b a c c o t o N O R T H W E S T F A R M E R S W A R E H O U S E March 5 Thru A p ril 6 A SC S INo. 8 9 2 Y A D K IN V IL L E , N. Q T o t h o s e w h o h a v e b e e n s e l l in g w i t h u s s o la r , w e t h a n k y o u . W e a p p r e c ia t e y o u r p a t r o n a g e . A n d t h o s e w h o n o t s o ld a t N o r t h w e s t s o f a r , w e i n v i t e y o u to d e s ig n a t e a n d t r y u s t h i s y e a r . N O R T H W E S T F A R M E R S T o b a c c o W a r e h o u s e a A. O W E N A N D K E N G R A Y , O W N E R S & O P E R A T O R S T E L E P H O N E 6 7 9 - 2 6 6 1 - Y A D K IN V lL L E . N. G / White billowing clouds and patclies of blue sky add a touch of majestic beauty to this old farm building off tiie Prison Camp Road. (Plioto by Jim Barringer) Seven Bills In General Assembly To Affect Davie •^Legislators in the North Carolina General Assembly were busy late last week getting their local bills introduced in time to meet last Friday’s deadline.House Speaker Carl J. Stewart Jr. and U. Gov. James C. Green agreed early in the legislative session that all local bills --.those affecting a single municipality or Wunty - should be filed by March 9.Any legislator needing to introduce a local bill now will have to get permission from the speaker or lieutenant governor and a suspension of the House or Senate rules.When it was over Friday, 66 local bills ^ d been introduced that would affect 16 'lliedmont and Northwest counties.There were 85 such local bills in­troduced for those same counties in the 1977 legislative session.Comparisons are not fair, though, because legislators were given about a month longer to file their bills in 1977. le early deadline for local bills this ar is part of an effort by Stewart and 3reen to meet the May 10 adjournment goal they have set.A summary of local bills that would affect Davie County that have been introduced during the present session of the General Assembly is as follows; ^- A bill that would give the Davie Mk)unty Board of Commissioners firoader power to lease, rent or sell property has been introduced.-Newly elected members of the Davie County Board of Education could take their seats on the fb^t Monday of December instead of waiting until April ^nder a bill that has been filed.H -Members of the Davie County Hospital Board of Trustees would be paid for attending meetings under another bill.-Rep. Ramey F. Kemp Sr., D-Davie, has introduced a bill to permit the Davie County Board of Commissioners to sell some land adjacent to the county lital for construction of a medical office building.-A separate piece of legislation would permit the Davie County Board of Education to sell and to the Jerusalem Volunteer Fire Department as the site for a fire station.-Another bill has been introduced that would let the school board sell land to the Smith Grove Community Development Center Inc. for use as a recreation center.-The county, under another local measure, would be permitted to garnish a person’s wages to collect unpaid ambulance bills. Bloodmobile Here March 21st The Red Cross Bloodmobile will be at Davie High School Wed­nesday, Marcli 21. Registration will take place from 9:30 a.m. until 2:30 p.m. in the gymnasium.A quota of 110 pints has been set for the visit and is open to public donation. A statewide effort, ali bloodmobile visits scheduled for the month will be held in various high schools. Its purpose is to promote participation and awareness among today's youth.Anyone seeking further in­formation or wishing to volunteer services is urged to contact Mrs. Nancy Murphy at 634-5393. School Calendar For 1979-80 The school calendar for the 1979-80 school year was adopted last week by the Davie County Board of Education.Teachers will report for work days on Monday and Tuesday, August 20 and 21st. Pupil orientation day will be Vehicles Collide On US 601 Two vehicles were involved in an accident March 5th, about 11 p.m. on U.S. 601, 2.5 miles south of Mocksvilie. Involved was a 1977 Fiat operated by David Russell Poplin, 24, of Magnolia Avenue, Mocksvilie and a 1967 Ford operated by Joey Wayne Dillard, 18, of Rt. 4 Mocksvilie.State Highway Patrolman J.L. Payne said his investigation showed that Poplin crossed a slight grade and saw the Dillard vehicle some distance ahead of him. The Dillard vehicle was being pushed by a pedestrian due to clutch failure. Poplin was unable to get his vehicle slowed in time to avoid collision.Damage to the Fiat was estimated at $300 and $200 to the Ford. There were no charges. P e t it io n C ir c u la t in g In D a v ie C o u n t y F o r B e e r - W in e V o t e By Doug Livengood For Uie first Ume in 27 years Davie Countians might soon be having the opportunity to vote on the question of legalizing the sale of beer and wine in the county.In 1952 the county’s residents over­whelmingly voted to abolish the pracOce then of legally selling beer and wine in Davie.^ u t last Friday the Davie County Board of Elections, at the request of Donald Milton Hardin, 50, of Rt. S, Mocksvilie (Cana Community), issued a petition calling for a countywide referendum on the question of again legalizing Uie sale of beer and wine in Davie, including Mocksvilie.In order for Hardin and his supporters to be successful in their petiUon cam­paign, they must gather the signatures of at least 20 percent, or 2,354 of Uie county’s 11,770 registered voters, on the petiUon to require the county board of elections to hold a referendum on Uie 1зеег and wine quesUon.The beer and wine proponents legally have unUl June 7 to gather the required signatures on the petition.Hardin, in requesUng the peUUon, asked that the voters of Uie county have Uie right to decide wheUier beer and wine can legally be sold both "on and off premises” in Davie,"Off premises" sales would involve selling the beer and wine for con­ sumption away from the place of pur­chase and "on premises’’ sales would involve selling the alcoholic beverages for consumpUon where Uiey are bought, Hardin, a full-time employee of Salem Carpet Mills in Winston-Salem and also Uie part-time operator of a "game room” at Uie intersecUon of Cana Rd, and U,S, 601 north of Mocksvilie, said in an interview Monday morning he favored beer and wine sales in Davie “because all of the surrounding coun­Ues. except Yadkin have beer and wine sales.”Said Hardin, “All of our money for the sale of beer and wine is going out of Davie County to these oUier counUes and all we’re getUng back is beer cans, botUes and other debris.”Hardin claimed to have check stubs in his possession totalling about $300 from Uie sale of beer cans for recycling at 17 cents per pound that he and his son had collected from along Davie roadways. “That’s proof alone that the beer’s (continued on page 2) (USPS 149-160) DAVIE CO UNTY I I P.O, Box 525, MocksviUe, N,C. 27028 " V V $10.00 Per Year in North Carolina $15.00 Per Year Outside North Carolina THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 1979 28 PAGES Single Copy 25 cents T o w n C o n s id e r s D is s o lu t io n O f R e c r e a t io n C o m m is s io n Wednesday, August 22nd. Thursday and Friday, August 23 and 24, wiU be teacher work days.The first full day of school wiU be Monday, August 27th.Monday, September 3rd, the schools will be closed for a holiday (Labor Day).Tuesday, October 2nd, wUl be a vacaUon day. (NCAE MeeUng).Friday and Monday, November 8 and 12, will be teacher work day and Veterans Day.Thanksgiving Holidays will be Thursday and Friday, November 22 and 23.Christmas-New Year holiday period will be from December 24th through January 1st,Friday and Monday, January 18 and 21, will be teacher workdays.Friday, AprU 4, will be a teacher workday.Easter holiday and spring vacation period will be AprU 7-11.Friday, AprU 25, wiU be a teacher workday.Tuesday, June 3, wUl be the last student day. By Doug LivengoodMocksvilie Mayor R.C. Smith has asked the town board of commissioners “to dissolve” the town’s recreation commission “as it now exists” and have the Iward of commissioners "take over the functions that normally the recreaUon board would do.”Smith made his request at the town board of commissioners meeting on - March 6.In asking for the dissoluUon ot Uie recreation commission, Smith recommended that the present recreaUon commission board members be used only in an "advisory board” capacity in planning for town-funded recreation in MocksvUle.The recreation commission was established by tbe town commissioners in Uie early-1950's to act as an overseer commission on town recreation matters.At Uie town board of commissioners meeting last week, SmiUi told Uie commissioners “We've had problems with the recreation board com- municaUng with this board in getting Uiings done that we need to proceed with.”Smith and the board members present at that meeting made it clear that one ot the problems of cummunicaUon bet­ween the town board and recreation board has l>een over the issue of hiring a new recreation director for the town to replace Russell (Russ) Spry of Cooleemee, who was fired from Uiat posiUon last November.The town board members expressed dissatisfacUon that the recreation board had not proceeded to make any recommendations regarding a replacement for Spry. Town commissioner Bob Hall told fellow-board members, “I definitely Uiink we should move immediately in regards to appointing a recreaUon director.” Hall said a recreation director should have been hired by the town “two months ago’’ because ot the fast approaching spring and summer recreaUon season.“We certainly should be able to bypass the commission on that one issue,” remarked Hall.Mayor Smith agreed with Hall that the recreation commission could be bypassed on selecting a town recreation director. Commented Smith, "ActuaUy, the (town) board appoints the recreaUon director anyway and the recreation commission only recommends.”HaU asked town attorney Hank Van Hoy if the town board could legaUy dissolve the recreaUon commission. Replied Van Hoy, "If the town board in fact created it (the recreaUon com­mission), the town board can certainly take it away...I would think that if you want to disestablish it that you can do whatever you want to.”Town commissioner Joe Murphy urged his fellow-board members to table Uie issue of dissolving the recreation commission at last week’s meeting until aU ot the town board members could attend a meeting to consider the issue. Commissioners Gene Seats and Pat Latta were not present at last week's ixiard meeting.Said Murphy, “Since this is important to the total town recreaUon I would lUce to table it at this meeUng and get to it at a called meeting when all of the town board members would be present to do whatever the board decides to do. I would certainly hate tor the three of us here to do someUiing wiUiout tiie total board being present...”The other board members present at Uie meeting agreed with Murphy’s suggestion on tabling the issue, but the commissioners did meet in execuUve session after the meeUng to consider applications and personnel matters relaUng to hiring a new recreaUon director for the town.On Thursday following the March 6 town board meeting, Mayor Smith, in an interview in his office, expanded on his reasons for asking for tbe dissolution of Uie recreation commission.“There’s just been too much lost motion between the recreation board and town board,” said Smith. He added, “The recreation board hasn’t met since last fall and when tiiey don’t meet this Uirows the town board behind in getting Uieir recommendations and we then can’t reach a prompt decision on Uiings.”Continued the mayor, “We have been trying to get some recommendations from Uie recreaUon board but couldn’t and our recreaUon program has suf­fered in recent monUis because we don’t yet have a recreaUon director. ’The time has come to hire a recreaUon director. We’d be late in getting our summer program underway the way it should be if we hired one today.”According to Smith, the recreation commission has not tried to opt the town board’s auUiority in Uie past in super­vising the recreaUon director. But Uie mayor did say “Uie town board needs to be in a posiUon where it can have complete control over the recreation (continued on page 2)^ j| (08pital for construcUon of a medical charges. student day. replacement for spry. w..«icvc. uua.u u«..u« uu. * (.contmuea on page T o w n M a y R e q u ir e A p a r t m e n t C o m p le x e s T o F u r n is h R e c r e a t io n A r e a s ^ By Doug Livengood.IP Requiring developers of newly con­structed apartment complexes within the town of MocksviUe to furnish recreational areas for tbe apartments’ inhabitants was discussed at last week’s town board meeting by town com­missioners.^ At an earUer board meeUng, com- l^missioner Bob HaU had expressed his belief that new apartment complexes should provide recreational areas for chUdren living in Uie apartments. Hall had asked the town’s zoning officer, Jesse A. Boyce Jr., to investigate the subject and report back to the board. ^ Boyce told the commissioners at last fljkeek’s board meeting the town needs an ordinance to require recreational facilities at apartment sites.Said Boyce, “When you have multi- famUy apartments and any of Uie mulU- famUy dwellings that are going to be constructed we would like some way to .^u ire that a certain amount of il^reation go along with it. We just don’t want to have five acres of land with 50 famUies Uving on it and no where for the chUdren to play.”HaU echoed Boyce’s comments by saying “it just seemed to me Uiat with our subdivision requirements...when we ^require so much area to be put aside for ii^eaU on in a subdivision then by aU meant we should do the same thing under multi-family dweUings.” Observed HaU, “In a subdivision you have yards you can play in. NormaUy in an a[Mrtment complex you don’t have yar^. You have buildings and you bave have asphalt and that's it.”^ Commissioner Hall continued by remarking “There should be, in my opinion, some area required to be sei uide (at apartment complexes) for a fit, •TM...where chUdren can play without going into neighbors’ yards.”He noted that his investigations had revealed that chUdren often play in neighbors’ yards when recreational areas are not provided at apartment sites. It seemed to be the consensus of Uie town board that Boyce pursue his in­vesUgation into Uie study of requiring recreational areas at apartment complexes and that the matter should be discussed among Boyce and town planning board members before final recommendations are made to the town commissioners concerning the matter.In oUier business at the March 6th town board meeUng:-The commissioners were advised by U>wn attorney Hank Van Hoy tiiat the town should not become involved in doing repair work on Honeysuckle Street because Uie sti-eei is considered to be private property."The commissioners granted a request of town police chief Alton Carter that he be aUowed to investigate the possibUity of renting, instead of buying, uniforms for the town’s policemen. Carter told the commissioners he wanted to investigate the matter to determine if Uie uniforms for his officers could be rented cheaper than buying Uiem. -The commissioners met with Davie County artisan George Hairston to discuss Uie possibUity of Hairston carving some signs for Uie town to be used in strategic places wiUiin Uie town for informative and aesthetic purposes.Hairston, who is employed by Uie county through the Comprehensive Employment and Training Act (CETA), told Uie commissioners he would need an appropriation of approximately $500 to purchase Uie wood and working tools needed to carve Uie signs if Uie town board decided to purchase them.Hairston said the signs would “visuaUy contribute to Uie quality of life” in the town.The commissioners decided to make a final decision regarding Uie possibUity ot Hairston carving the signs after a committee is selected to determine the most appropriate places to place the signs if Uiey are carved.-Town supervisor Andrew Lagle advised the commissioners that work is progressing on the construcUon of a new town fresh water storage reservoir. He also said progress is tieing made on the town’s involvement in tiie federally-, state- and town-funded 201 sewer project. r/? roi - A sure sign that spring is just around the corner are blossoms of the yeilow-bellw bush, Jonquils and croqus, some of the first flowers to bloom in this area. (Photo ^ ' by Jlro Barringer) -Zoning officer Boyce reported to the commissioners that he and state of­ficials would study several sites this week within Uie town to determine any changes which should be made in the town’s land-use planning map. “We’re trying to get the land-use plan in a litUe bit better shape,” said Boyce. Couple Charged With Murder Of Advance Man A man and woman were arrested in GreenviUe, S.C. on Monday, March 5, and charged in connection with Uie shooting deaUi of an Advance man last June.Jackie R. Wiemer, 42, of 239 Lodge St., Winston-Salem, and Darlene Francis Moore, 20, of 4237 High Point Road, Kernersville, were charged with murder. Murder warrants against the two were fUed by Forsyth County Sheriff’s Department officials on July 2 and July 18, 1978.Last June 30, Paul S. MUler, 26, of Rt. 1, Advance, an assistant manager at tbe Food World store in SUnleyvUle, was kUled in an apparent armed robbery attempt.Tbe FBI filed a fugitive warrant for Wiemer and Miss Moore last November 30.Wiemer and Miss Moore are being held in Uie Pickens, S.C, jaU wiUi bond set at $100,000each, A spokesman for ttie ForsyUi County Sheriff’s Department said the two plan to fight extradltioa. DAVlli COUNTY KNTKRPRISE RECORD, THURSDAY, MARCH IS. IP79 J o h n s o n T o S u p e r v is e 6 W e s t e r n O f f ic e s Frank Bahnson Named Manager Of Local CCB Frank Bahnson Frank H. Bahnson has been named Assistant Vice President and Manager of the Mocksville oftice ot the Central Carolina Bank, according to Rocky W. Johnson, CCB Vice President. Bahnson, who has been assigned to the bank’s Mocksville ottice since January, 1978, will assume total responsibility for the operation of the office on March 10. In maing the announcement, Johnson said, “Frank has been through an intense training program, and has experience in all areas of banking. We are pleased to have Frank in control in Mocksville."Johnson has been manager of CCB’s Mocksville office, in addition to supervising the operations of five other CCB western areas offices. After March 10, Johnson will devote full time to supervising the bank’s six western of­fices. The managers of the six offices, including Bahnson at Mocksville, will continue to report to Johnson. Johnson said, “I will StiU spend a good deal of time in our Mocksville oftice, but now I’ll be able to devote more time to our Petitions Circulate In Davie For Beer And Wine Vote (continued from page 1) coming in to Davie,” he declared.He also attributed the sparcity of recreational and eating facilities in the county to the fact Davie is "dry” on the alcohol question.“Davie County doesn’t have any recreational or social establishments where a person can sit down and sip a beer and enjoy his friends. We don’t even have a Pizza Hut because that kind of establishment gets a lot of its revenue from beer sales,” remarked Hardin.He continued, “I believe not only the young people, but also the older people would like to have places in the county where they can enjoy a beer along with their friends and watch the ballgame without having to drive 20-30 miles to do this.”Hardin said he also believed "if beer and wine is where a person can easily get it then he won’t make such a hog out of himself once he gets it.”He noted that he and his pro-beer and wine supporters "think the time is right for a vote” on the alcohol question in Davie County because they have “found the response to be good” in soliciting support for their cause.A vigorous campaign to get beer and wine into the county was promised by Hardin.“We will continuously poll the people to see how we’re doing and if we need to put a little special emphasis on any place or anybody we will. We’ll have people going from door-to-door talking to people and trying to get our points across and we’ll try to get much higher than the 20 percent signatures needed on the petition to call tor a vote,” he said.Concluded Hardin, "I’m just in­terested in getting beer and wine in Davie so that the people in the county can be afforded the opportunity to either sell or purchase it here and I really don’t know whether or not I myself will sell it at my place.”Hardin’s enthusiasm for the op­portunity to have legal sales of beer and wine in Davie certainly does not seem to be shared by most of the elected public officials in the county and Mocksville. Some of these officials have come down on the "dry” side of the beer and wine question and others have been reluctant to commit themselves on the issue."No sir, I don’t support beer and wine in Davie County and I will fight it from the first to the last on any grounds I can because I’m 100 percent opposed ot it,” declared the chairman of the Davie County Board of Commissioners, Glenn Howard, on learning of Hardin’s petition drive. Added Howard, “If beer and wine created a million dollars worth of revenue for Davie County I’d still be opposed to it because beer and wine create more problems than a million dollars worth of revenue could solve.”Joe Long, another county com­missioner, voiced opposition to beer and wine in the county. “I don’t drink myself and I don’t go along with it,” he said.County commissioners Bill Foster and Lawrence Reavis had “no comment” on Ihe beer and wine issue until they have more time to study the issue in more depth.Mocksville Mayor R.C. Smith said he did not have any opinion “one way or the other” on the alcohol question. “I just think that it’s an issue that should be voted on by the people if they so decide and we’ll have to abide by their decision,” commented Smith.Pat Latta, MocksviUe town com­missioner, said it was "too early to comment” on the matter of beer and wine Monday morning because she had not had time to consider the matter fuUy.One town commissioner who did not hesitate to express his opinion in the dry- wel controversy was Bob HaU."I’m not too concerned about whether the petiUon wiU be successful in caUing for a referendum or vote because I beUeve the majority of people in Davie County feel lUce I do and wUl not vote for it,” HaU remarked.He added, "I personaUy feel lUte the sale of beer and wine should have tighter controls on it and only be sold in ABC stores where it would be harder for young people under age to purchase it than it is now at places where they can readUy buy it in some places.” HaU did say he believed the people in Davie County should have the chance to vote on the beer and wine question “in the democratic process.” Said HaU. "I’m really surprised that the question of beer and wine sales hasn’t come up before now because so many of our neighboring counties already have this.”Another strong opponent of the sales of any alcohoUc beverages in Davie County is the Rev. Jimmy Hinson, pastor of the Green HUl Baptist Church in the county and also president of the Davie County Ministerial Association.Hinson said Monday he did not want to speak at this time for the ministerial association in making his comments opposing the effort to bring beer and wine to Davie. “We in ttie ministerial association wUl be discussing this in the near future and I wUl then make the appropriate statement regarding the association’s position on this matter,” he said.“But,” continued Hinson, “just speaking for myself I’m opposed to the sale of beer and wine in Oavie County because as a minister I see aU of the Uls, troubles, wrecks and broken homes which alcohol can cause.” Observed Hinson, “In the past 27 years a lot of people have moved into Davie County who drink beer and wine and if this thing is voted on now the drys might be outnumbered, whereas, they weren't when the county voted out beer and wine 27 years ago.”Declared Hinson, “We drys wUl have a real battle on our hands to defeat thisttiing.'Afteiter the General Assembly legalized the statewide sale of beer and wine in 1933 on the grounds the tax revenue was desperately needed to replenish a state treasury depleted by Uie Depression, beer and wine began to be sold in Oavie County and MocksviUe.But beginning in 1949 and extending tUl 1952 the Oavie County Ministerial Association petitioned a total of six times to the board of elections in Uie county to hold a vote on ttie beer and wine question. The first five times tbe peUtions were ruled invaUd because of technical errors in fUing them, but the sixtti Ume, in 1952, ttie peUUon was ruled vaUd and a vote on ttie quesUon was held.There were only nine retaU ouUets at that Ume in the county seUing beer.On ttie quesUon of seUing beer in Uie county, the Davie residents voted 2,578 to 1,037 to outlaw its sale. On the quesUon of seUing wine in Oavie, Uie county’s residents voted 2,622 against its sale and 974 for its sale.The town of MocksvUle voted against both proposiUons in the 1952 referendum and of ttie 11 precincts in ttie county, only Cooleemee voted in favor of retaining legal sales of beer and wine in ttie county.The nine estabUshmenU at which beer and wine were sold in the county in 1952 were given 60 days in which to dispose of Uieir stocks of alcohol after Uie vote.Oavie bas been legaUy dry since that 1952 vote. Stolen Items Recovered Several items stolen January 21,1979 from Ronald and Carolyn Foater, U.6. 158. have been recovered in Davidson County. Recovered and retumed to Uie owners was a space beater, two drUls, and ottier construction tools. 'B ig D it c h ’ O f f A v o n I s P r o b le m T o R e s id e n t s A n d T o w n B o a r d Rocky Johnson overaU operaUon in Davie, Davidson, Forsyth and Yadkin counUes.” Bahnson joined CCB in September, 1976 as a management associate, after earning a degree from the Air Force Academy and completing sbc years of acUve duty witti ttie Air Force. Since joining the bank, Bahnson has received trahiing in aU areas of the bank and was assigned to CCB's Credit AdministraUon Department in Durham for one year. Bahnson has continued his formal education as a student of the American InsUtute of Banking and currenUy ttie NorUi Carolina Bankers AssociaUon’s Mid-Management School at UNC in Chapel HiU. Married to ttie former Pamela Brewer of Durham, Bahnson and his wife have one daughter, and live at Route 3, Hickory HUl in MocksviUe. He is a member of the MocksvUle Jaycees and is currenUy vice president of Davie County United Way. He is ttie nephew of the late Charles F. Bahnson who was with Central Carolina Bank in Davie County for 35 years. By Doug Livengood There are many conflicting stories about the "big ditch" behind the homes on Avon Street in MocksvlUe.Some say Uie ditch was created by being a natural drainage flow of water many years ago. Others say It was created when the town of MocksvUle began channeling water down the ditch many years ago.Most of the residents along Avon Street have contended for years that the town has a responsibUity to either eliminate or alleviate the drainage and erosion problems caused by water flow in the ditch. Some of Uiese residents have even come before the town board on several occasions over the years to offer to share in the cost of doing something about Uie ditch if the town would also share in the expense. Town officials, on the other hand, have been reluctant to tackle the ditch problem because of the costs involved and because of the more Uiorny legal question of using public funds for private property pruposes.Many of the residents on Avon Street believe that although the ditch might be on private property, nevertheless, the town has a responsibUity to solve the problems caused by the ditch because Uie town over the years has increasingly channeled more and more water through the ditch, thereby, com­pounding the drainage and erosion problems there. One thing everyone seems to agree on at present is the ditch presents “big problems." both for Uie residents who Uve along it and for Mocksville town officials.But judging from comments made at last week's town board meeUng, current town officials seem determined that some sort of solution must be reached concerning the "big ditch.” At that board meeting, town com­missioner Joe Murphy said the ditch presented “a real bad situation” because “it is hazardous for the people of the area, for chUdren, it's detrimental to the town and it's cosUng property owners untold expense to try to keep their property in line.”Continued Murphy as he described his recoUecUons of touring Uie ditch area recenUy, "I saw trees that had been set out Uiat were not there or haven't been cut because of erosion and there's one street through there Uiat's now a ditch Uiat you could probably hide this office building in (referring to the town haU)...”Declared Murphy, "I personaUy feel Uie town has some responsibiUty in trying to correct this.”Commissioner Bob Hall echoed Murphy’s comments by saying “I think it’s a disgrace to the town that it exists.” He added, “Somewhere over the last 25 or 30 years Uiere’s been blunder after blunder” concerning Uie situation with Uie ditch. “It’s just a crying shame that the town has let it go this long,” bemoaned HaU. "It’s just a general mess and I Uiink it’s Ume we started giving it a great deal of consideraUon,” he said.It seemed to be Uie consensus of the commissioners that the ditch problem ' would cost the town quite a lot of money Staff Photo by Garry Foster Mrs. Bill McClamrock of Avon Street looks at the “big ditch” which runs behind her house and other residences on the street. to correct.Said HaU, “That situation is so bad now that there's not teUing how much money it will take to correct it, whereas, 25 or 30 years ago something could have been done about it and it would not have become a major problem.” Commissioner HaU said he hoped Uiat some sort of federal funding could be secured to aid the town in correcUng the problem caused by the ditch. But Mayor R.C. Smith informed HaU that no federal funding is available for correcting the ditch situaUon at this Ume. Murphy said he hoped state funding could beobtained to aid in solving the problem.HaU did report that he had contacted the local office of the SoU and Water Conservation Service to have officials from this agency study the erosion problems caused by the water flowing Uirough the ditch. These SoU and Water officials were to start their survey of the ditch this week, reported HaU.Board members seemed to agree that if Uie town has to foot the bill for correcting the ditch situaUon that Uie high costs involved in this solution would have to be spread over several years of town budgets.• Despite the possibUity of the town spending perhaps hundreds of thousands of doUars to remedy Uie problems caused by the ditch, board meml>ers seemed in agreement Uiat the cost must be met to solve a serious problem."In my opinion as a board member I’m subject to a suit. You know Uiere’s no question what I would do if I abutted on that ‘blasted ditch’ down there and if 1 had litUe children,” exclaimed com­missioner Murphy. “Who would you sue?” town attorney Hank Van Hoy asked Murphy. “I'd sue Uie town for dumping aU of that water on me that's what I'd do," responded Murphy.Van Hoy noted that the problem with Uie ditch has come up repeatedly before Uie town board over the years and legal questions exist about the town's liability. "That problem on Avon Street has been one that has been here for a long, long time...and you can't spend public money for a private problem,” noted Van Hoy. Van Hoy did say that "the town where' it diverts Uie flow (inlo Uie ditch) has responsibility,” but “where it increases the burden of the flow there is some question ~ a substanUal question about the town’s responsibUity.” ConUnued Van Hoy, “I guess where's Uiere's a wiU there's a way and maybe with enough legal research some resoIuUon can be found of an avenue to proceed, but it's a very difficult problem that can potentiaUy lead you into a morass.” The commissioners finished their discussion of Uie ditch problem by authorizing commissioner HaU to get informaUon from the SoU Conservation Service regarding costs of solving the problems caused by Uie ditch and then report these findings to Uie full board of town commissioners. Democrat Precinct Meetings Scheduled April 19 RusseU Walker, Chairman of Uie SUte Democratic Executive Committee, announced plans today for the annual precinct meeUngs and county con- venUons. The DemocraUc precinct meetings are scheduled for April 19,1979 at 8 p.m. at Uie polling place for each precinct, nie purpose of the meetings is to elect delegates to the county conventions and to fUl any vacancies Uiat may exist in Uie precinct committees. In the event a quorum is not present, a make-up meeUng wUl be held on April 26.The DemocraUc county conventions wUl be held on May 19,1979 at 12 noon at a site to be chosen by Uie DemocraUc county chairman. The purpose of the convenUons is to elect county officers for the next biennium and to select represenUtives from the county to the Recreation (continued from page 1) director.”At present the recreaUon commission has only four members because its former chairman, Richard Cook of MocksviUe. resigned from his mem­bership on the commission last fall. MocksviUe residents Jack Ward, Clyde Hendricks, Charies Barker and C.C. Chapman comprise the current recreaUon commission. Hendricks just became a commission member and has not yet had the opportunity to attend a caUed meeUng of the commission because it has nol met since his ap­pointment.All of the present commission members were not conUcted following Mayor Smith's announcement he wanted Uie commission abolished. But, of Uiose conUcted, none of the com­mission members expressed any desire to sUrt any controversy between the recreation commission and the town board and mayor.Barker admitted the recreation commission “seems lUce it can’t gel too organized” and has "had its problems” in Uie past. He commented that, in his opinion, ttie recreaUon commission and iU members have had "pretty good relations" witti the mayor and town board In ttie past.Ward said be did not "have much comment” about the issue of dissolving Uie recreaUon commission because he did not know for cerUin what was being proposed by the mayor. “It (dissolving the recreaUon com­mission) might be Uie best Uiing. I feel Uke whatever acUon Uiey (the town board) takes wiU be posiUve and I don't have any argument at all or any problem at aU wiUi Uiem," said Ward. state DemocraUc ExecuUve Committee.Other business which wiU be discussed at boUi the precinct meetings and county conventions includes the Delegate Seleclion and AffirmaUve AcUon Plans Do You Know? Cleaning a BlenderA blender Uiat isn't cleaned right after it's used soon becomes a blender that is hard to clean.Immediately after use, it’s a good idea to loosen food particles by partiaUy fUling the jar with warm sudsy water, placing it on Uie base and then "blen­ding” for a few seconds, say NCSU agricultural extension specialists.After unplugging the appliance, conUnue the cleaning process, foUowing guidelines for disassembling and washing described in the owner’s manual.If washing pieces by hand, rinse and dry all parts completely before reassembling. Be sure to also remove food parUcles from around the controls. This can easUy be done with a cotton swab dipped in suds.Household PestsCloUies moUis and carpel beeUes are destrucUve pests Uiat feed on hair, fur, wool, feathers and a wide variety of products made from Uiese materials found in the home.They will also attack blankets, clothing, draperies, carpets and upholstery.The best way to control these insects is through good housekeeping, say agricultural extension specialists at North Carolina SUte University.Don't let dust and lint accumulate and vacuum rugs or carpets, especiaUy ttie edges, as well as areas covered by furniture.Clean draperies often and keep cloUiing clean by washing or dry cleaning.Stained CupsThe brown stains often found in coffee cups can be eUminated if coffee or tea is rinsed from Uie cups right after Uieir use.It's when the cups sit for several hours before being washed that the sUins develop, say NCSU agricultural ex tension specialisu.To remove Uie sUins, use a litUe baking soda or mild cleaner on a damp clotti. Replacing MUk You can replace some of the mUk in your diet by using yogurt, ice cream or ice milk - but at an added cost. for the 1980 Democratic National ConvenUon, revisions in the Party Plan of Organization, voter reglstraUon and precinct training teams.Walker urged aU Democrats to attend ttiese meetings and to parUcipate in the workings of the party. Woman Charged With Selling Liquor To Minor Marie Knight, 43, of Rt. 1 MocksviUe has lieen chargeid with seUing liquor to a minor, age 14, student at the MocksviUe Middle School.Ms. Knight, a school bus driver, ap­peared in district court for trial Monday. The case was conUnued. Lean MeatWhen you're at the meat counter, consider the amount of cooked lean meat you'U get from what you plan to buy. Of the typical roast, half a pound is bone, excess fat and drippings. Ground beef or beef liver, on the other hand, is almost all edible and a beller buy, say NCSU agricultural extension specialists. Leo F. Williams, Davle County ex­tension chairman, was honored for his 30 years of service with the N.C. Agricultural Extension Service in Raleigh, Monday March 12. WUIIams received a tie tack and certificate from Dr. Carlton Blalock, N.C. Agriculturi^ Extension Service director. Th" presentations were made at an awards banquet during a conference of ex­tension workers at the Jane S. McKimmon Center. He has been chairman in Davie County since 1963. Ed Vogler ^ Davie Republicans Elect Ed Vogler As Chairman . Tne Davie County RepubUcan con^' venUon was held March 10, 1979, at ttie Davie County Courthouse. The meeUng was weU attended. The foUowing party officials were nominated and elected for 1979-1981. Chairman, E. Edward Vogler Jr, a Mocksville attorney; vice-chalrmaM Mrs. Betsy Cochrane, of Bermuda Runr secretory, WUliam M. "BUl” Seaford, Rt. 1 MocksviUe; treasurer, Gilbert T. Davis, Jr. of Advance; city-vice chairman, C. Frank Stroud.Member of SUte ExecuUve Com- ' mittee to be nominated at DisMct C^invenUon in Salisbury April 21, Mrs^ Maxine S. Boger, Rt. 3, MocksviUe. ^Special guest included Jim Godfrey of SouUiem Pines who is a candidate for ttie Eighth District Chairman’s post.Ed PoweU a Davie County naUve andchairman of the Forsyth County Republican party and a Wini attorney was the guest spRepublicanand a 'Inston-Saleni speaker. H a spoke on the need for more RepubUcan* to be elected to Uie Nortti CaroUna SUte House and Nortti Carolina SUte Senate. Delegates and alternate delegates to Uie Eighth District ConvenUon and Uie North Carolina Republican ConvenUon were elected. I F A C TS I & FteiTRES t The value of the dollar, economists say, and many consumers have discovered, is about half today what it was a decade ago. nAn improved balance of payments between the U.S. and other countries could help remedy this, and helping improve our balance of pay­ments is Pan Am, which In 1977 posted a $500 million credit to the U.S. DAVIE COUNTV UNTHRPRISE RECORD. THURSDAY. MARCH I.S. .i * iuäüw'ö-i-u-i. When the sun comes out, so do the sand-lot basketball players - another sign that spring is not far away. (Photo by Jim Barringer) March 1 1 - 1 7 Is 'Employ The Older Worker Week’ Mayor R.C. Smith of Mocksville has proclaimed "irch 11-17 as "Employ the aer Worker Week”. In issuing this proclamation Mayor Smith also issued the foUiwlng statement:“More than 78 million Americans are aged 40 and older, and nearly 40 millionmworking or seeking work, t of these middleaged and older workers are regularly employed, producing the goods and services our Nation needs. They have solid job skills and a wealth of ex­perience. Typically, they are ^gady, reliable workers who tRe pride in their work and are valued employees. Thus workers over 40, as a group, have no serious job problems- -so long as they remain em­ ployed.“The problem is that, despite high job qualifications, many who lose their jobs have great trouble finding new ones; and the search becomes more dif­ficult as they grow older. The costs of the longer spells of unemployment these workers experience are personal hardships, disproportionate public expeditures for unemployment insurance and other income maintenance programs, and lower productivity as our economy is deprived of highly ex­perienced workers.“The Federal Government and the State of North Carolina are working to overcome widespread reluctance to hire older jobseekers by making em- C O L O R T V S A L E ELECTRONIC VIDEO GUARD TUNING SYSTEMFeaturing One-Knob VHF and UHF Channel Selector S E R V IC E A FTER ■THE?AH?. The CHADWICK • K2S18MEarly American styled console. ' iple wood-grained finish applied to durable wood products on top and ends. Gallery, front and feet of simulated wood. Casters. • 100% 8olid-8Ute Titan* Chassis• Power Sentre Voltage Regulating System • Picture Control • VHF/UHF Deluxe Spotllte Panel Larry Vogler’s T.V. Sales And Service Advance, N.C. 988-8172 ployers aware of a well- documented finding: by every common measure of job performance, older workers are at least as effective as younger people. The objective is to have each worker judged on the basis of individual ability to do a specific job. As part of this effort, the President has designated the week of March 11 to 17 as National Employ the Older Worker Week.“As Mayor of the City of Mocksville, I actively endorse this opportunity to focus public attention on the problems of older workers.NOW, THEREFORE, I, R.C. Smith, do hereby proclaim March 11-17,1979 as Employ the Older Worker Week in Mocksville.“To focus attention on this problem. National Employ the Older Worker Week is being observed March 11 to 17. It is a good time for each of I us to examine our attitudes toward older workers. It is a time too for employers to consider carefully whether any lingering bias against older workers affects their employment practices. Hiring on the basis of ability, not age, is a matter of basic fairness. It is also good business," said j Mayor Smith. County Line VFD Auxiliary Meets The Ladies Auxiliary of County Line Fire Department met Tuesday night, February 28 with 14 members present.The meeting was called to order by president, Mrs. Olivia Foster. Devotions were given by Mrs. Margaret Ann Shew.Fire Chief Jack Koontz met with us and plans were made for the annual chicken pie and barbecue supper. Bake Sale At Davie Academy Davie Academy 4-H club is sponsoring a bake sale at Heffner’s Land of Food, North Main Street, Mocksville, Thursday, March 22, beginning at 2 p.m. and continuing until all items are sold.Proceeds will be used for the Florida, trip for Davie High School Band. f^ne A»MV UNIFORMWA$ STANPABPlZgl’ BY OBPfR OF THE COKTTINeMTikL ACMV IN 1 7 7 0 /THE UkllFOIlM 31.UE. ¿ep, WHITE BUFF ANP «¿AKier TKIVl inriCATeP UNIT AHP PE^lCNATlOM.' MMTMopeen ACMv uNiFiJien _ , Pe6i6NATiC>u IS -rue d n tHne*P6 BAB. OF IH t f c m i OPEN FRIDAY NIGHTTIL8:30 Vir j save 2 0 % : b n b l o u s e s & ‘S w e e t b r i a r ’ s k i r t s 3 d a y s o n l y THURSDAY, FRIDAY & SATURDAY BLOUSES IN SOLIDS AND FANCIES SHORT AND LONG SLEEVES Usually >6.00 to ’21.00 "4® ® " 16 ® ® SKIRTS IN TEXTURIZED POLYESTER ASSORTED STYLES Usually 42.00 to ’20.00 $ 1 6 ® ® O N E G R O U P BOY'S SUITS SLIGHT IMPERFECTS 100% POLYESTER IF FIRST QUALITY WOULD SELL FOR’35.00 M9.88 O N E G R O U P BOY'S AND MEN'S CASUAL SHOES •CANVAS «VINYL WHITE AND COLORS Usually’6.00 to ’15.00 $ / | 8 8 TO $ 1 | 8 8 BOY’S WEAR BILLY THE KID SPORT COATS, VESTS, JEANS, SHIRTS 5 0 r<'O O F F u su a lly 8.50! ‘A n d h u rs t’ half-sleeve b ro a d c lo th sh irts. Top drawer work­ manship you have come to expect from our own brand. Permanent press 65% polyester, 35% combed cotton. Short sleeves, chest pocket. New wanted shorter point collar, shaped to take your favorite collar pin. O N E G R O U P MEN’S SLACKS SOIIDS AND FANCIES $ 0 8 8 M and $ 1 0 8 8 DAVII (Ot NIV I.NTliRI’RI.Si; KICüRD, TIIURSDAY, MARCH IS. I‘)7‘» Davie Home For l\/lentaliy Retarded Fails To Pass State Inspection Beth Humphrey, co-chairman of the Heart Fund fashion show and bridge tournament (left) lool(s over outfits to be exhibited by modeis Anita Byrd and Jean Cleary. (Photo by Robin Carter) Fashion Show And Bridge Tournament To Aid Heart Fund follow the fashion show. People are responsible for forming their own foursome and a free trip for two to Myrtle Beach will be awarded for high score. Dessert and coffee will be served during the benefit.Beth Humphries, coK;hairman for the event said, “The evening offers varied entertainment and we hope for the support of the community in this wor­thwhile effort.”For reservations contact one of the following Mrs. Ora Bowen, 284-4225, 284- 2526; Mrs. Hazel KeUy, 634-2647; Mrs. Gigi Marion, 634-5333 and Sears at 634- 5988. “A Preview of Spring” is the theme of the Heart Fund Fashion Show and Bridge Benefit to be held Friday, March 16, at the National Guard Armory.Beginning at 7:30 p.m. the evening will commence with the fashion show featuring twenty outfits supplied by the Fashion Shop in Moclcsville. Designs will include everything from sportswear to stylish afternoon dresses in the latest fashion colors of lilacs and pastels.Clothing is coordinated to appeal to all tastes and designs featuring a size range of 5 to 20. Lingerie and swimsuits will also be featured. Music will be provided by Anita Long.The bridge benefit will immediately FmHA Sets Rural Housing Loan Interest Rate At 9 % The interest rate on rural housing loans made by the Farmers Home Administration (FmHA) of the U.S. Department of Agriculture increased from 8% to 9 percent after the agency’s close of business on Friday, February 9.Last year the agency made 3035 loans in North Carolina to families of Stepping Stone Has Reopened Stepping Stone, a group home for girls located in western Rowan County, has officially reopened, according to an announcement by Ronald Smith, Director of the home. The home, operated by Tri-County Mental Health Complex, was temporarily closed last July following a series of resignations by house parents.Three girls are presently in residence at the home ai d there are openings for others. The pr <?ram serves girls from ages 10-17 with mild to moderage emotional and behavioral problems. ReferraM may be made by parents or other agencies in Rowan, IredeU and Davie counties by contacting Smith at the home or at Tri-County Mental Health Complex. Cooleemee Pool Passes Now On Sale Season passes for the Cooleemee swimming pool are now on sale at the Recreation Center and wUI continue to be available through June 2. Prices this year are $50 per famUy and $35 for an individual pass. Gate prices wiU be $1.25 per person.Passes may be purchased on Monday and Friday 2 p.m. tiU 5 p.m. and Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday 9 a.m. till 12 noon. Top Stars Of Rodeo In Winston-Salem The entry list for the 9th annual Longhorn World Championship Rodeo in the Winston-Salem Co iseum March 23- 25 will read like the Who’s Who in the world of professional rodeo.All of the current world champions in each of the six major world cham­pionship contests is expected to compete here, barring injuries at another rodeo immediately preceding this one.More than 200 head of livestock wUI be transported here for the competition. Included in the herds wUl be some of professional rodeo's most noted animals, such as world champion bareback broncs, Panic and Show Boat; world champion saddle bronc. Gold Plated; and world clampion bucking bull. Trail Hand.WhUe the rodeo is primarily a sport it is designed by Longhorn to be a famUy show and has been pro> .aimed by en­ tertainment experts as a perfect blend of pageantry and excitement for total audience viewing.The three performance rodeo begins with a Bargain Night at 8 p.m. on Friday with aU seats $4.50. Saturday at 8 p.m. and Sunday at 2 p.m. tickets are f7, $6 and $5 with kids 12 and under half price on Sunday. Tickets can be purchased at the main box office and all normal tickets outlets. moderate income, and 3437 loans to low- income families. Moderate-income borrowers pay the full interest rate. Low-income famiUes may qualify for actual interest payments as low as 1 percent under “interest credit” provisions of the national housing act. FmHA officials said the V4-point in­crease to 9 percent full rate is necessary to keep the interest rate to borrowers in line with the government’s cost of money. The agency lends funds derived from sale of government securities to the public.FmHA North Carolina state director James T. Johnson said loan applications approved before the close of business at FmHA offices on Feburary 9 wiU receive the 8% percent interest rate remaining in effect untU that time.The rate change appUes to FmHA Section 502 insured loans for single- famUy housing, Section 515 loans for rental housing-including multi-family apartment projects-and Section 524 loans for homesite development. “In­ terest credit” benefits may be appUed to reduce actual payments for low-income single famUy housing, and for multip- family projects serving senior citizens and others of low i come.FmHA insured loans are made directly from the agency’s county of­fices serving rural areas including communities of up to 20,000 population (10,000 in Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area counties). The agency also guarantees housing loans made by other lenders to famUies with above­moderate income. Interest rates on guaranteed loans are negotiated bet­ ween borrower and lender. FmHa’s Limited Resource Loans Are Available FmHA’s Limited Resource Loans Available: Loans for low-income farm families to build their farming operations and raise family incomes are available through local county offices of the Farmers Home Administration (FmHA) of the U.S. Department of Agriculture.According to James T. Johnson, State Director, the program provides credit at reduced interest rates to low-income North CaroUna famUies whose farm operations and resources are so Umited Utey cannot afford the regular interest rates for FmHA loans.‘The program is intended as a helping hand to young, beginning farmers, and others who have not had an opportunity to buUd substantial farms and fake an adequate living,” Johnson said. “The limited resource laons are available to buy or improve land and buildings, or for farm production purposes.”Limited resource borrowers of farm real estate and operting loans may defer the beginning of repayment, if necessary, up to three year« after they get their loans.Johnson said the program will "enable FmHA to serve many farmers who previously could not qualify for any form of FmHA or other farm credit.” ‘They wUI benefit both from the availabUily of credit and technical assistance from the FmHA county staffs,” he said.Persons interested in FmHA's limited Resource Loan Program may contact one of the 76 local offices across the state. The location and phone number of the local office serving each counly is Usted in the telephone direc­tory under U.S. Government, Depart­ment of Agriculture. Davie County’s group home for mentally retarded adults wiU cost thousands of dollars more and open months later than originaUy planned, mental health officials said in MocksviUe on Monday night.The Davie County Group Home Inc., a nonprofit group which operates the home with state funds channeled through the Tri-County Mental Health Complex, had planned to accept the first of six residents in January.Instead, a state inspection at the home, at the corner of Main Street and US 64, Jan. 24 revealed the ceilings and some of the walls did not meet state fire safety standards. In addition, minor work was needed on a heat duct and a door, the group home directors learned.Directors estimate it wUI cost $15,000 to complete the improvements and that the first residents probably won’t be able to move in until late summer."We’ve got a contractor right now and he's checking into the cost of finishing the renovations,” Cindy Glasscock, chairman of the board of directors, said Monday night.The directors were “very surprised” to learn the ceilings and waUs did not meet the state building code, because a local official told them last fall that the structure would pass inspection, they said last night.“Some of us were not on the council then and we just don’t know who told us it would meet the code,” Glasscock said.Neither the original wooden ceilings nor the newer, acoustic panels that cover the wooden ceiling meet state fire standards, according to Conrad Taylor of Fiscal Services, the licensing arm of the N.C. Mental Health and Mental RetardaUon Services. And since the group home receives state money and will serve the public, it must meet the state building regulations.Ceilings and walls in group homes must have a one-hour fire resistant rating to meet the building code, Taylor said. Walls may be made of ’/^-inch plaster or 4ji-inch sheetrock.Because Fiscal Services doesn’t normaUy send inspectors to group home sites until the buildings are ready for licensing, neither the state nor the council discovered the problem with the ceilings and walls until after the other renovations were completed.“We just can’t afford to send in­spectors out to the sites during the renovation process...Taylor said. “We do hundreds of these a year.”Instead, discussions between the state and officials seeking state licensing for a buUding are usuaUy limited to letters or phone calls, Taylor said. Normally, after a group home site is selected, the directors send the state a description of the house, floor plans and snapshots of the structure. The state then sends the group home a Ust of changes it must make and buUding guidelines.Fiscal Services sent a copy of state guidelines to the home directors in April, 1978, when the house was first selected, Taylor said.The regulations explained the fire retardant standards, Taylor said. But Uiere was no real way for Fiscal Ser­vices inspectors to know ceilings in the Davie group home did not meet the standards, since no inside photos were taken and no on-site inspection held until January, he added.“I think in aU honesty, they probably Lt. Govemor Jimmy Green is shown above with Perry Collette of MocksvUle. CoUette was appointed by Lt. Govemor Green to serve as a Page in the North CaroUna Senate during tlie week of March 5-9. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Roy W. CoUette, Jr. The duties of Pages include working with members of the NorUi Carolina Senate and the staff of the Genreai Assembly. Pages are assigned to the various committee meetings and assist in the Senate Chamber during sessions. Pfefferkorn Files Another Suit To Block Perkins Opponents of the Peridns Nuclear Station that Duke Power Co. v ants to buUd in Davie County have l ied yet another suit seeking to clock the facUity.WUUam G. Pfefferkorn, the Winston- Salem attorney who represent? the High Rock Lake Association, main opponent of the plant, filed a motion liiesday, March 6, to reopen federa Nuclear Regulatory Commission he rings on Perkhjs.Pfefferkorn’s suit claims the now- discredited Rasmussen rep irt, which says nulcear power plants are safe, was sued in selecting the Davie County site for Perkins.“We looked through the (Perkins preliminary license) order and found some references to the Rasmussen study,” Pfefferkorn said.Duke Power Co. officials caUed the suit a staUing tactic and said the Rasmussen study was not used in the design or location or Perkins. The Rasmussen study was compUed in 1974 by a Massachusetts Institute of Technology research group and has been widely used by the nuclear power industry as a statistical bedrock for its safety arguments.But in January, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission downgraded Uie report's findings, claiming faulty mathemaUcs were used. The NRC has ordered its staff to review the extent to which the liasmussen report has been used in power plant licensing procedures. The Atomic Safety and Licensing Board, the licensing arm of Uie Nuclear Regulatory Commission, is also con­sidering wheUier to grant a full con­strucUon permit to Duke Power Co. for Rotary Has Program On Youth Exchange Dr. Tom Hinson of High Point, Youth Exchange Director for Rotary District 69, presented a program dealing with Uie youth exchange program of Rotary IntemaUonal to the local club, Tuesday.Dr. Hinson used a slide presentation entitled “Through An Open Door” to depict the program Uiat involves 6,000 students each year.“The secret of the future of tbe world lies in youth. We need more programs operqting Uke tliis and more clubs in­ volved in sending students to foreign countries”, he told the local Rotarlans.Christian Reiner, student from Austria now visiting in High Point, was present and spoke briefly.Rocky Johnson had charge of the program and introduced Dr. Hinson. President, Charles BuUock presided. Perkins.The licensing board heard arguments in MocksvUle last month over wheUier Duke Power Col studied alternate sites sufflcienUy before selecting the Davie (bounty locaUon for Perkins.A decision in that case is expected sometime after mid-March, but wUl almost definitely be appealed, attorneys for both sides have said.Duke Power Co. first applied for a construction permit for Perkins in 1974, and the NRC issued a partial permit last year. The licensing board opened the hearings in July, 1978, however, when Uie NRC staff raised Uie quesUon of alternate site selecUon.If approved, Duke Power plans to open Uie first unit of Uie Uiree- generator, $4.4 bUUon plant in 1989. AU Uiree units would be operaUng by 1993, according to the current Umetable. assumed it (the ceUing) was OK,” Taylor said. “1 don’t think they knew the ceiling was wood ... most homes do have sheetrock or plaster ceilings.” Inexperience on the part of the directors and contractors may have also contributed to the confusion, Taylor added. “The state buUding code has been very specific about what a one- hour fire rated wall is ... and to Uiat extent, yes, it requires an expert to understand the code ... However, nor­maUy, local building inspectors and fire marshals are qualified to interpret Uie code.”None of the home directors are builders or have had experience renovating buildings for state guidelines, the group said Monday night. And several members said they had problems understanding the state rules.“We were somewhat unaccustomed to the wording,” Glasscock said. “1 don't think what happened is ony one person's fault Uiough..."Larry Parrish, area director for Tri- County Mental Health, agreed that understanding the state quidelines can be difficult. “I think it eiUier takes someone who had done it before or you need a good building contractor who can read between the Unes,” he said in an interview Monday afternoon. “I think Uie main problem was Uiat they were not able to get a clear understanding of what needed to be done to the house before the lease was signed...Had they known aU this, it might have headed off some of Uiese problems.”"I don’t know what communications took place between Uie building com­mittee and the state ...I do know that at some point, they had a local buUding inspector come in ... and it was my understanding they were lold it would pass.”Parrish added that Tri-County of­ficials do offer advice to associate- agencies such as the Davie County Group Home Inc., but Uiat “we weren't taken up on our offer.”Both state officials and the home directors said they were opUmisUc that Uie renovaUons wiU be underway soon, and emphasized they were ready to cooperate with aU other agencies.“We're not trying to make anyone look bad,” Taylor said. “I think everyone means weU and they've aU worked real hard on this ... it’s just that we (Uie state) have to be the policeman here ... we have to protect Uie public.”“We’re real opUmisUc,” Glasscock said “...we’ve gotten a lot of support from Uie county and the community.” The major problem facing the group home now is lack of money, Glasscock and other members agreed Monday night.After the group decides how much money it needs to bring the house up to state standards, it wiU apply for ad- diUonal funds through Tri-County Mental HealUi, Glasscock said. “They’ll take it on to the region from there.”If addiUonal regional funds aren't avaUable this year, the group can ask for the money it needs in Uie 1979-80 budget, effecUve July 1.Some of the $15,000 needed for Uie renovaUons wiU be supplied by cuts in its own budget, the directors explained.Houseparents hh-ed to work with Uie retarded adults were let go, “and some other money has not yet been spent,” Glasscock said.Parrish estimated about $7,000 “could be freed up from Uie group home budget...any above that could come from other sources...maybe local and state.”There is also a chance that con­strucUon workers can be hired through the Davie County CETA (Com­ prehensive Employment and Training Act) program, reducing labor costs during the renovaUon.This year’s budget for the group home included $39,000 in state funds and $13,000 in projected fees from Uie residents, according to Terry Jones, former chairman of the group home board.The problem wiUi Uie state fire code isn’t the first setback Uie group home directors have been faced with over the past 18 months. Directors began looking for a group home in faU, 1977. The board finally agreed on Uie current locaUon in AprU, 1978, Uien was forced to take the matter to court to win a zoning dispute.Once licensed by the state, the group home wiU provide an informal, home- Uke setUng for mentaUy retarded adulU from Davie County. Dr. Alfred E. Johnson Dr. Johnson Is An Associate Of Dr. Kemp Dr. Alfred Eugene Johnson has joined Uie chiropracUc pracUce of Dr. Ramey F. Kemp. The appointment was ef­fecUve February 5, 1979. A naUve of SmiUifield N.C. U i Johnson earned his doctor of cliiropracti?' degree from Uie NaUonal CoUege of Chiropractics in Lombard, Illinois. He also served a nine monUi internship in Uie Mont Qare Clinic, one of Uie four clinics operated by Uie coUege.Johnson is licensed to pracUce in^ North (Carolina and lUinols. He als# holds a license in accupuncture and is a member of Uie American and N.C. ChiropracUce AssociaUons.As a student, Johnson was a member of Uie Sports Injuries Council, and Uie councils on nutrition, orUiopedlcs and roentgenology. He is a diplomate of Uie National Board of Chriopracti^ Examiners. T' Prior to attending the National C!oUege, Johnson received a bachelor of science degree from Illinois Benedictine CoUege. Dr. Ramey F. Kemp first set up pracUce in Davie County in the 1950’s . and operated out of an office located inf| Uie Old Southern Bank Building on Court Square. His present facility on Wilkesboro Street was built in Uie mid I960’s. Davie Dairymen^ Vote "No” In Referendum In the American Dairy AssociaUMii referendum held state wide las" Tuesday, March 6, Davie Dairymen voted almost 2-1 against. The referen­dum was held to determine if dairymen wished to conUnue assessing themselves 6 cents per hundredweight for the promoUon of milk and dairy products.There are approximately 55 grade Am dairies in Davie County, one of th ^ largest in Uie state. A total of 86 dairymen voted In Davie County. Of this total, 55 were against the self- assessment and 31 were for it. For Uie referendum to carry state wide, 66 percent of the dairymen must vote for the assessment. Should Uie total stated wide vote carry, Davie Dairymen will be" assessed even though the county voted no. However, the assessment is voluntary and a dairyman may have his assessment refunded if he so desires. Man Faces Multiple ^ Charges After Routine Stop A ForsyUi County man faces mulUple charges in Davie County after i)ehig stop^ for a rouUne traffic check on U.S. 158 near Bermuda Run.Gumie FrankUn Hege, 35, of Rt. 2^ aemmons was charged with possessionfP of a stolen gun, three counts of carrying concealed weapons, reckless driving, driving wiUi Ucense revoked, driving with falsified driver license InformaUon in an effort to obtain operator’s Ucenses.The SBI was caUed in to assist Uie sheriff’s department in the in­vesUgaUon. A hearing in district court^ has been set for Davie County. “ VinegarAdd a little vinegar to the water when an egg cracks during boiling. It wiU help seal the egg. STOP L O O K IN G F O R A U S E D P IA N O . . . ooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo ' G R ^ c p m m m l 000 00 000 0 0 ^ ^ 0 0 00 00 00 000 00 0 000 00 0 0 000000000 00000 Throughout The Month Of March i W m ^ im é ë w OPEN MON.SAT. 10:D0'6;00 p.m (Crots from WiUon-PlMBnts DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 1979 - 5 H ' t T h e % CELEBR^nOIir O f И » Ш й в г '$ H t w M o e k s i / i l l e Oa 601 НёгЛ ia Ни Mêw УЩш Oak СмЫг R t a S T i R ю н 4 5 0 ' 0 0 0 11 WINNERS OF 30,000 STAMPS (25 BOOKS) 1 WINNER OF 120,000 STAMPS (100 BOOKS) 120Z.PK6. THOMAS BROTHERS COUNTRY HAM) 120Z.PKG. THOMAS BROTHERS ^ BACON f r e e WHILE 500 “■ PACKAGES lAST! Beginning Thursday Morning.. T O B E O f í f B M / Ш Come /if ОЙой and Rogiftof fyf fhe FRBC Oi/h h bo Ohfou Awtf 1 - GE 1 0 0 % Solid State 1 0 Ineh Portable C o h r l V . KELLOGG’S RAISIN BRAN if S M iib * ■ H E FFN E R 'S L A N D O F F O O D C O U P O N I ! THIS COUPON GOOD FOR '^ O F F _ ON ANY PACKAGE NEECE'SLIVER PUDDING or NEECE’S PORK SAUSAGE I Good Only At The Heffner's Willow Oak Store This Coupon Expires March 20,1979 1 - BABY PLAY PEN 1 - G.E. CLOCK RADIO 1 - Louisville Baseball BAT & BALL 1 • JUGLER ALL PURPOSE THERMOS 1 - 2 V z Gallon Jar MT. OLIVE DILL PICKLES 1 - TOAST MASTER TOASTER 1 - Proctor Silex TOASTER OVEN 20 OZ. PKG. BANQUET FROZEN BREAD DOUGH 6 ROLL PACK KINGSFORD-QUALITY CHARCOAL 10 LB.BAG$109 HERY SUPER WEIGHT TRASH BAGS 15 COUNT $ |59 ★ SAVE 70* J-F-G PEANUT BUTTER$189 3 LB. JAR CARTON OF8 COKES 1 6 oz. BO TTLES COBUS COTTAGE CHEESE 12 OZ. CARTON^ B U .O N Í П o N t FEATUMD IN OUR Pai-PAKERY ^ FRIED CHICKEN Always Frasl^Crisp and Good HoTFi^itetoi'M G H N U re PLATE LUNCH I M w l'iiii^teblas and Roll witTAvVAyULLLrNiOFFlTi^ CHSyeS AND SANDWICH LOAVES FINE SALADS aio HOME MADE DESSERTS P LU S D E P O S IT ★ S A V E 5 4 TWIN PACK LAY’S POTATO CHIPS 5 9 « ★ SAVE 30* SEALTEST ICE CREAM Уг GALLON ★ SAVE 70* J-F-G MAYONNAISE 7 9 « i » QUART ★ SAVE 30* ^ M fS Q '®=^’yVebet ns/se HANOVER BRAND FROZEN CUT BROCOLLI SPEARS 16 OZ. PKG. m Ad М Л Пё Нёш Швкит Sbn OMlVte iki Mmt HMhw HANOVER BRAND FROZEN CUT OKRA 160Z.BAG | Ц | № 9 | | _ Im Ш SMpli REDWING APPLE OR GRAPE JELLY. 18 OZ. GLASS V 3 9 ^ ★ SAVE 30* СваЫг 6 DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD. THURSDAY, MARCH 15, I W S M IT H F IE L D M E A T FRANKS 1 2 O Z . P K G . J A M E S T O W N SLICED BOLOGNA$ 109 LB. J A M E S T O W N PURE P O R K SAUSAGE " T o fo l S h i p p i n g "V o / u e j N L iin l S( -'w\:ludble 1( otamps iliSl Oh! 1 P )ecidls adiri£ if.es I I HEFFNER'S PRICES DiscountPrice YOU SAVE Royal Pink Salmon 15V4 Oz. Can ’1.49 Lipton’s Lite Lunch 2 Pack Pkg.57*6* Heinz Polish Dill Pickles1 48 Oz. Jar 89*40* J-F-G Smooth Peanut Butter 3 Lb. Jar '2.19 40* 1 1 Country Kitchen I I Syrup ^ 99*1 0 * B I Nescafe Decafínated I t Coffee 2 Oz. Jar ’1.23 1 2 ‘ ll Nescafe Decafínated II Coffee 4 Oz. Jar ’2.19 30* II J-F-G II Tea Bags 100 Count,’1.59 10* 1 1 Baker’sII Chocolate Chips 12 Oz. Pkg.99*34V I |lo^ ¿alLin Regular II Pancake Mix 32 Oz. Size 73*16‘ llBes-Pak Extra Heavy I I Trash Bags 8 Count 99*36* I I Scrunge I I leaning Pads Pkg. of 2 59*10* CORN BEEF ROUND $ Í 9 9 CHATHAM CHUNK DOGFOOD $ 0 3 9 25 LB. BAG ★ SAVl40* FRISKIESDRY DOGFOOD $ ¿ 3 9 ★ SAVE’1.00 PURINA DOG CHOW [G FOOD 25 LB.BAG 9 9 25 LB. BAG PRINT DESIGN FACIAL TISSUE LIQUID LAUNDRY DETERGENT WISK __ _ _ _ _ $ 1 9 9 ' 64 OZ. SIZE I ★S A V E 60* ' LIQUID DISH DETERGENT DOVE LIQUID 6 9 * ★ SAVE 30* HEFTY FITS 30 GALLON CANS TRASH BAGS 10 COUNT 220Z.B0nLE 175 COUNT SAVE 46c LAUNDRY DETERGENT GAIN GIANT SIZE I $ 1 3 3 ★ SAVE 30*l i e f ^ KITCHEN S 15 COUNT ★ SAVE 40* F A N C Y ICEBERG LETTUCE F A N C Y MEJ = UOUR/^PAGHÏnS DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 1979 - 7, F O O D I WITH MEAT BALLSm HORMEL'S CANNED DINTY MOORE W BEEF STEW 7 % 0 Z .C A N ^ jr ★ SAVEll* DULANY’S CALIFORNIA BLEND - ORIENTAL - so^pladleVEGETABLES »KED 160Z.PKG. ★ SAVE 20* FLEISCHMAN'S PURE CORN OIL MARGARINE A i l GREER PURE APPLE SAUCI 1 LB. PKG. ★ SAVE 20* 303 CANS ★ SAVE 16' C LE M M O N S YADKIN VILLE LEXINGTON LEW ISVILLE LAND RIGHT TO reserve *ÜUANTmES ■ Л , M O CK SV ILLE OF FOOD NONE SOLD TO DEALERS essBii I • I I ' 4 9 Ô. 19i JEWEL SHORTENING ★ SAVE 24* DIET ORANGE DRINK TROPI CAL LO 64 oz. SIZE ★ SAVE 18* PET FROZEN DESSERT WHIP TOPPING BIG 130Z.PKG. ★ SAVE 30* $125 EXTRA jS&H Green Stam psli^ ' Wlih this Coupon and Purchas* of j One $9.95 or More Food Order I , NOTE: Umit of one Food Bonus Coupon with each o t ^ | — Good Only at Heffner’s rnki March 21,1979 i á 64 OZ. ^ T T L E S NABISCO FRESH CRISP SALTINES CRACKERS 1 LB. BOX ★ SAVE 14* HEINZ RICH FLAVOR TOMATO CATSUP 14 oz. BOnLE ★ SAVE 18* — Q E H B in H F — HEFFNER'S LAND OF FOOD COUPON FREEHaHZ14oi.KEKHUr G E T A B O n iE OF HEINZ 14 OZ. KETCHUP FREE L SAVE 12c mm TOMATO? iWETCHl T o t a l S h o p p i n g ” V a l u e 3 l-No Lim it Special Valuable Iraflinf C|\>i\UOS Stamp^ O “ '* 3 Oiscount Pncps BUY 2 PACKAGES OFI . e a n > u №»>■>>«ll I JUMBO SARAN WRAP* :rII Reii'i Price Marh at R<y«>ef WAGON TRAIL TO DEALER This coupon will U ledeemed lor (ace value (>t not eiceedmp suggested ret»! price) plus 6t handiing provided 1еггл| ol oKer riave Deen complied with Any other application corrstrtutes friud Invoices proving purchJM Ы sutlicient stock to cover coupons pretenied lor redemption must be sttown upon request Re­demption through outside agencies, brokers, etc Mill not be honored eicept where specrficiVy L authorized m wntmg by The Dow Chemical Com- «* I pany Vo«i proft'bited. t«<ed or restricted Cu$- S I tomer must pay any sales tu Man all coupons lo S I The Dow Chemical Company. P 0 BoiR-7007 «- El Paso Teias 79975 Wer good only in U S A “ Cash redemption value V20 ot H PANCAKE S Y R U P _ 4 9 « ^ P f e t 'R ii i^ust Shells in *m»< t» i»i»*1И itlt ип«1 hHKf 240Z.B0nLE ★ SAVE 30* ‘Tridimirt of Th« Dow CAimfcii Compiny OFFER EXPIRES MARCH 17,1979 шп от coupon пя cutroM» Ìf;LEAR PLASTIC WRAP SARANWRAP 100 FOOT ROLL ★ SAVE 4* peiTS'4__ „ PM-WU W милю«* G R B B N^ST A M P S M IL D Y E L L O W IB. ONIONS 3 1 B .P K O . 3 9 * H E F F N E R 'S P R I C E S DiscountPrice YOU SAVE 1 Green Giant Pieces-Stems Mushrooms ^4 7*6 * Sha«ta Canned Assorted Flavors Diet Drinks 12 oz. can 6 / ’ Г 16* Assorted Flavors Shasta Drinks 340». si»39*4* Assorted Flavors Hi-C Drinks 46 0.. Si»53'1 0 * Assorted Flavors Diet 30ng 10 Oz. Cans 3 /’ l 4 1‘ 1 Luzianne 1 Tea Bags loocoum *1.89 14* 1 Chicken of the Sea IChunk Light Tuna Fish 6 oz. can 75*18* 1 Gaines Bog Food 1 Gravy Train 25 Lb. Bag '4.99 ’ 1.3 0 1 Kozy Kitten Chicken 1 Cat Food 15 Oz. Cans 4 /79 *1 0 * 1 Armour's Corned Beel Hash i m o , .c 87*6 * cii$p«iiBeel i2 o».c»i *1.2 9 1 2 * 1 Acmour'f 1 Beef Stew 24 0z.size *1 .1 7 1 0 * K d a v ii: county nNTKRPRISl- RECORD. THURSDAY. MARCH 15, Chorus Begins Mar, 20 Maxine Watson Blackwell was born in Dillon, S.C. She received a BM degree from Brenau College in Gainesville, Ga. with a major In voice and minors in piano and school music. After a year of study in Philadelphia, she taught voice and theory at Brenau College and later public school music in Dillon for two years. For 30 years she has been teaching choral music in the Winston- Salem Forsyth County School System. She is past president ot the N.C. Music Educators Association; permanent chairman of the N.C. Summer Institute in Choral Art, Chapel Hill. A former teacher In the Governor’s School, she served for five years as director of the N.C. Youth Chorale on concert tours of Europe. For the past 32 years she has been director ot the Kernersville United Methodist Community Chorus. She is a certified conductor of music workshops and clinics, and adjucator of contest festivals. The Arts Council will again sponsor a community chorus and according to Jim Anderson and Dave Tedder, co-chairman of the Community ChorUs, there’s a real treat In store for those who enjoy singing. Beginning Tuesday, March 20th and ending Tuesday, May Sth, citizens of Davie will be able to relax and sing such familiar and sing such familiar favorites as Sound of Music, Beyond the Mountain (a Swiss folk song) and will even venture Into Latin with Ave Verum Corpus. The conductor for this 8 week treat will be Maxine Blackwell from Ker­nersville. Ms. Blackwell was the founder and is now permanent director of the N. C. Summer Institute In art at Chapel Hill. Her experience ranges from the Kernersville Community Chorus to professional pleasure of singing under the direction of Ms. Blackwell, say that Ms. Blackwell possesses the charm and talent that will assure a successful eight weeks. Want to be a part of this singing adventure? Just fill out the coupon below and bring it along with a tS.OO check made out to the Arts Council - bring It to the Presbyterian Church on South Main Street on Tuesday, March 20th. Although rehearsal beginsat 7:00 - try to be there between 6:30 and 6:45 for registration. Those who were a part of the last choral attempt that took place at the Methodist Church last year will be permitted to register Tuesday, March 20th free of charge - so long as you stop by the Arts Council and pick up your free pass. Also make sure music for this past workshop has been returned "Unless you turn in your music and pick up your pass, you will have to pay on March 20th,” said an Arts Council spokesman. Mike Hendrix, member of the Arts Council, will again, be accompanist. Fill In And Bring With You March 20th Name- Address- Phone Number----- Vocal Part-------- Paid by ----Check -Cash T o P l a y A t D a n c e S a t u r d a y N i g h t A dance will be held Saturday night, March 17, 8-12 p.m. at the Brock Gymnasium honoring the Davie High School Girls Basketball team, runners-up for the State title. All of the girls on the varsity team will be admitted free of charge. Music for the dance will be provided by "Smyle”, shown above. Proceeds from the dance ($3.50 a couple; |2 single) will go towards the band trip to Florida. ' Cooleemee Senior Citizens Meet A r t s C o u n c i l H a s N o t e C a r d C o n t e s t The Davie Arts Council Is sponsoring a note-card contest.The rules and regulations for the drawings are as follows:Anyone in Davie County is eligible. There Is no limit of entries, which should be mailed to; Davie County Arts Council, P.O. Box 744, Mocksville.The drawings should be done on a size 10 X 12 white drawing paper.Pen and black ink Is t>e8t; however a brush and ink or pencil or charcoal can be used.Subject matter: historical buildings, homes, other buildings, landscapes, particular trees and portraits that would give the feeling of Davie County.All entries should be signed and (on separate paper) they should be titled or an explanation of location, etc.Deadline date is May 19, 1979.Final selection date will be June 1,1979. Winners and rejects will be notified. Rejects can be picked up at the Arts Council office. Winners entries will become the property of the Arts Council.Twelve different drawings will be chosen and awarded $500.00. The Cooleemee Senior Citizens Club held their regular meeting on Monday, in the fellowship ahll of the First Baptist Church at 10 a.m. There were 48 members and guests attending.Mrs. Bessie Naile, vice president, presided in the absence of president Granville Spry.At the conclusion of the business, Mrs. iCate Foster led the group in an en­tertaining program. Mrs. Bessie Naile, Mrs. Ethel Gibson and Mrs. Luna Myers entertained with singing, imitating movie stars. Mrs. Theo Rice ac­companied them on the piano.The club discussed a Southern Railway excursion but additional in­formation will be available at the next meeting, which Is scheduled for Mon­day, March 25. This meeting will also honor ail those having birthdays this month.Refreshments were served at the conclusion of the program. T e e n - A g e M o v ie T o B e S h o w n A t L i g h t h o u s e "Changing Faces" a movie especially for teenagers will be shown at the Cooleemee Lighthouse Saturday, March 17, at 7:30 p.m.The fUm is a moving story about motorcycles and teenagers. is pleased to announce that is now associated with him in the practice of Chiropractic at 600 Wilkesboro Street, Mocksville, N.C. Office Hours 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. • Monday thru Saturday Telephone 634-2512 ST-BíTRias S P fie C € 4 x 4 Mr. and Mrs. Mark S. Alspaugh Route 1 Mocksville announce the bIrUi of a son, Eric Wesley Friday, March 9 at Forsyth Memorial Hospital, Winston Salem N.C.The baby weighed 7 lb. 12 oz.Maternal grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. M.H. Grose of Halander Drive Mock.svllle.Paternal grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. Robert W. Alspaugh of 210 North Hawthorne Rd. Winston Salem, N.C. ,Great grandparents are J. Ira Rhoades Sr., Mrs. Roy Grose, Mocksville and Mr. and Mrs. C.S. Chance of Winston-Salem. Mr. and Mrs. William Denise Grimes announce the birth of their second child, a son, William Leighton, on Sunday, March 11, at 11:59 a.m.The baby weighed 8 lbs. 6 ozs.Garndparents are Mr. and Mrs. Bryan Grimes Sr. of Washington, N.C., and Mr, and Mrs, James Leighton Ownley of Elizabeth City, N.C,The Grimes have one other child, Bobbye Dee Ann, age 3. Mr. and Mrs. David Alan James of Advance announce the birth of their first child, a son, Aubrey Alan, bom Tuesday, February 27 at Forsyth Memorial Hospital in Winston-Salem.The baby weighed 8 lbs. and4 ozs. and was 22 inches long.Maternal grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. Fred GenUe of Route 5, MocksviUe. Maternal great-grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. OdeU Adams of YadkinviUe.Paternal grandparents are Reverend and Mrs. E.M. James of Deadmon Road, Mocksville. Paternal great­grandfathers are Carl James of MocksviUe and Guy Hathcock of Nor­ wood. Alan Lakey celebrated his 1st bir­thday Saturday. March 10, with a supper at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Donald Lakey on Route 7, Jericho Road, Mocksville. Helping him celebrate were his aunts, uncles and cousins; and grandparents. Captain and Mrs. Robert Wallace and Mr. and Mrs. CecU Lakey. Alan received lots of nice gifts. M r s , P a t s y H i c k s P e r f o r m s F o r D a v i e M u s ic C l u b The Davie County Music Club met at Uie Davie County Public Library on Tuesday evening, March 10.Miss Louise Stroud, club president, opened the meeting and presided over Uie business session. Announcement was made of a public concert to be held at the Library on Monday, April 2, at 8:15 p.m. This concert, which is spon­sored by the Davie Arts CouncU, wUI feature Mrs. Lucille Epperson, Dr. Dale Higby, and Mrs. Martha Kontos.Rev. James Lochridge gave the background and development of the hymn “How Tedious and Tasteless the Hours.” The hymn was sung by the club members. The evening’s program featured Mrs. Patsy Hicks of MocksviUe at the Baldwin grand piano. Mrs. Hicks opened her program with the first movement of Beethoven’s “Sonata, Opus 2, Numt>er 3.” Her second selection was “Dedication” by Liszt-Schumann. She Uien performed Uiree movements from Ravel's “Sonatlne”. For her final selection Mrs. Hicks performed Chopin’s “B Flat Minor Scherzo”.At the conclusion of Uie program refreshments were enjoyed by club members.The next meeUng of the Davie County Music Club wUi be Monday, AprU 9,7:30 p.m., at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Pat Hicks on Duke Street. Orthodontist Opens Office Here Dr. James A. Vacca, 35, of StatesvUIe wUl open an orUiodonUc practice in the office of Dr. Kevin Armbrecht at 915 Ridgeview Drive. Beginning March 30, he wUl be available for services every oUier Friday between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. PaUents wUl be accepted by appointment only and should caU 634- 6291.Dr. Vacca, who has an estabUshed orthodonic practice in Statesville, received a B.S. degree from Florida 2 5 t h A n n i v e r s a r y Mr. and Mrs. J.D. Preinell celebrated their 2Sth wedding anniversary, Sunday, March 11, with a surprise reception given by thetr daughters. Miss SheUa Presnell and Mrs. Pam Harris, at the home o( Mrs. Mildred James. Ap­proximately one hundred guests called during the appointed hours. Refresh­ments consisted of a three-tlered wedding cake, cheese straws, mints, peanuts and fruit punch. Special guests Included Iheir son-in-law, Buster Harris, grandson, Andy and Mr. and Mrs.Paui Wagner. L i b r a r y News by David Fergusson Information Producer State University. He received his D.D.S. degree at Loyola University in New Orleans and a Masters in OrthodonUcs in 1975 from the University of North Carolina. Sizes of States Two Rhode Islands can almost fit into Uie 49th largest state, Delaware. On Uie other hand, Alaska, Uie largest state, would have to double its population to match Rhode Island’s, points out the National Geographic Society’s children's atlas. The Davie County Public Library is In Uie process of analyzing our services, facUiUes and especiaUy our community. For that purpose we have placed a map near the circulaUon desk on which our users can chart the location of their homes and can, by using color keyed pins, teU what user catagory they faU into. The catagories are children, teenagers, adult males, adult females, and retirees. We should be able to find out whether or not residents from out in the county are able to get in to the library and we wiU also know which on the user categories make the most tise of Uie library.Please take a look at the smaU display in our rear hall teUing about the Davie County ARC - AssociaUon for Retarded Citizens. The ARC is holding a meeting here March 20 and hopes to get the word out.Picturepages is working out very weU and they are going fast. If you haven’t been picking up your Picturepages each week to use with Captain Kangaroo, stop at the Ubrary soon. NEW CHILDREN’S BOOKS: My Grandson Lew by Charlotte Zolotow-This is a very good book about death, wherein Lew and his moUier remember his grandfather. Lew, of course, misses him and when he ieams how his mother feels, he is able to accept his loss better.The Dunkard by George Seiden- This is a whimsical story about a boy who brings his friend the dunkard to school on grown-up day - the day when each student brings a grown-up to school who does something interesting. The dunkard, of course, dunks.3x3. Three By Three by James Kruss- This is a picture book for aU chUdren who can count to tliree, and when they are done with 3x3 Uiey wiU always remember how many tlu-ee Is. The pictures are the most delightful aspect of Uiis book for preschoolers.At Mary Bloom's by AlUci- Another A r e a M e e t in g s T o D is c u s s P l a n t s Extension’s March Area Meetings wUl help answer quesUons atiout land­ scaping, plant and tree selecUon and placement, care of outdoor plants, selecUon and care of indoor plants, and flower arranging.Extension Agents, Douglas Lee, Nancy Hartman, and OsUne West wlU present Uils educaUonal program which is open to Uie public. The schedule of meeUngs is as foUows: Tuesday, March 20-County Office BuUding 6:30 p.m.; Thursday, March 22-WUliam R. Davie Fire Department 7:30 p.m.; Tuesday, March 27-County Office BuUding 10 a.m.. Bring a bag lunch for the March 27 meeting.ParUcipants are being asked to bring a "sick plant” so that discussion can clear up many problems and quesUons that concern indoor and outdoor plants. exceUent picture book with large print teUing about what wUl happen at Mary;^ Bloom’s if Uie young girl in Uie book tells her that her mouse had babies - and at Mary Bloom's a lot wUl happen! Rabbits by Herbert S. Zlm- Another fine Zim book, especially well Umed with Easter coming up. Zim tells about aU different kinds of Rabbits and where . they come from. He describes hutches, feeding pracUces, what rabbits do, and their living habits. Very nicely Ulustrated. "I can’t” Said the Ant by Polly C- ameron- SubUUed a second book of nonsense, Uiis weU Ulustrated nonsense peom wUl delight kids who hear it for Uie first, second, or Uiird Ume. Read such ^ great lines as “Don’t break her” said the ^ shaker, “Don’t choke her,” said the poker. “Shé’li crash" said the trash.”The Tale of Czar Saltan or the Prince and the Swan Princess by Alexander Pushkin-This short tale by one of the great Russian authors delights aU the more due to Uie beautiful pictures done^ by I. BUlbin. A beauUfuUy done fairy tale by a master. Fires Reported Fires reported in Davie County during the past week include: miMarch 6, about 4:12 p.m., the^ MocksviUe Fire Department answered a caU to a brush fire at the Tiuner residence on CampbeU Road.March 6, about 4:25 p.m., the Smith Grove Fire Department answered a caU to a structure fire at Uie WiUiams residence. ^March 6, about 4:27 p.m., Uie ^ MocksviUe Fire Department answered a caU to a structure fire, Carlin residence. Pine Street.March 6, about 9:27 p.m., the Cor- natzer-Duiin Fire Department answered a caU to a car fire, Doug Potts residence, WUliams Road.March 7, about 5:28 a.m., Uie Far-^ mlngton Fire Department answered a caU to a structure fire at Uie BUI Brock residence.March 8, about 4:30 p.m., tbe Cooleemee Fire Department answered a caU to a house fire on WaU Street in Cooleemee. A March 8, about 4:30 p.m., the" Jerusalem Fire Department answered a call to house fire on WaU Street in Cooleemee.March 11, about 9:03 p.m., the Smith Grove Fire Department answered a call backing up a request from the Clem­mons Fire Department to Bermuda Run. ^March 12, about 1:31 p.m., the Far­ mington Fire Department answered a caU to a brush fire at Hoots residence, off Farmington Road. Chuck Arm of Beef A chuck arm of beef can be identified by the round arm bone. It makes an exceUent pot roast and is also sold as jip steak in some stores. It should be braised or used as Swiss steak. ONE DAY ONLY F R I D A Y M A R C H 1 6 t h K IM E R IC K S O N LoHi 7Và In c h e s & 7>/2lb8.in21 Visits. W is h Y o u C o u l d F i r m & T o n e ? j j W i s h i n e W o n * t M D o l t — B u t , # PER ISta~Trim Figure S a /o nf^y^uMlTED Will!! IV VISITS TAKE ADVANTAGE OF V2 PRICE SALE COMPLETE^ N i MONTH Jo in U p In P airs! A lert F riends a n d F am ily . 4M0NH1 PLAN •STEAM JATHS. Sta- Trim Figure Salon NO APPOINTMENT NEEDED Phona 284-4247 COOLEEMEE SHOPPING CENTER HOURS: MONDAV-FRIDAY 10:00-8:00 Clowd Sit. E... Jerry Ellison, Rph. Pharmacist Manager Many Years Of Pharmacy Experience HALL W ia CONTINUE TO SERVE THE NEEDS OF DAVIE FAMILIES AS IT HAS SINCE 1938 -Family Pertcription Records -Free Insurance Claim Information -Charge Accountt...Free Delivery -24 Hour Perscription Service DISCOUNT PRICES! Ph. 6.34-2111 Davie’s Family Pharmaty I^or 41 Years. Midway Restaurant II <«OI/H»lT~it|lfyf n/l IF F Located in the Ellis Center 3 m lies south of Mocksville on hwy. 601' Fri. & Sat. I Seaford Platter & Drink * 4 ,5 0 Flounder Platter * 3.25 Wed. & Thurs. Ham-Steak w/BP o r French Fries - Slaw or Toss Salad * | , 9 9 Open: Monday-Saturday-6:00-9:00 p.m. Lib Grubb, Manager We Appreciate Your Business! Phone: 834-3626 Lib Grubb & Fred 0- Ellit Owners C a r t n e r - L a t h a m Mr. and Mrs. Jack Cartner of Route 1, Mocksville, announce the engagement of their daughter, Vickie Dianne, to Stephen (Steve) Latham, son of Mr. and Mrs. Harmon Latham of Route 2, MocksviUe.The bride-elect Is a 1974 graduate of Davle County High School and Is em­ployed by Foster-Rauch Drug Company in MocksviUe.Mr. Latham Is a 1970 graduate of Davie County High School. He Is employed wiUi the Ingersoll-Rand (Company in MocksviUe.An April wedding Is planned to be held at Society Baptist Church in Statesville. ^Miss Everidfre Honored At Dinner Mr. and Mrs. R.P. Martin were dlmier hosts at their home on North Main Street, Saturday evening, March 10, honoring Miss Candy Everidge and David Poplin, who wUl be married Saturday, March 24, at the First BapUst Church in Mocksville.Upon arrival toe bride-elect was presented with a corsage of daisies.The home was beautifully decorated with arrangements of daisies, spring flowers and greenery.Dinner was served buffet style. AssisUng toe hosts wito serving were Mr. and Mrs. R.P. Martin, 111.Twenty places were set for toe honorees, members of the Ad­ministrative staff of toe Board of EducaUon, bridal parents, Mr. and Mrs. Jim Everidge and Mr. and Mrs. Harold PopUn.The couple was presented wito a silver serving tray. Around About ON DEAN’S LISTA MocksvlUe resident has been named to toe Dean’s List for Winter quarter at Wilkes Community College. Tommy Leroy Dyson of Route 1, Box 229, Mocksville achieved toe academic honor by maintaining a grade-point average of 3.5 or higher while enroUed in 12 or more hours of college courses. WITH SWEET ADELINES Mrs. Myrtle Tomlinson of Mocksville wUl be one of toe 50 member chorus of toe Oolden Triad CHiapter of Sweet AdeUnes parUcipating tois weekend in an­ nual competition for Region 14 at toe Hyatt-Regency Hotel in Washington, D.C. The wmner wiU represent tols region in intemaUonal compeUtion. METHODIST CIRCLE NO. 4 Circle No. 4, of toe Metoodist Church, MocksvUle, N.C. wiU meet Monday, March 19,1979, at7:30p.m.atthe home of Mrs. John WaUter,KeUy St. Mrs. A.T. Grant, Program C3tairman, is having Allen Martin, Davie County Hospital Administrator as guest speaker. LOCAL WOMAN’S BROTHER DIES Marvin Oatoer Warren of CoUettsville, NO. died Thursday of last week at a local hospital toere. He was a brother of Mrs. Leslie (Christine) Daniel of Salisbury Street, MocksviUe. Funeral services were conducted Saturday at- Miller’s Funeral Home Chapel, wito burial at BeUevlew Cemetery. VACATIONS IN FLORIDA Miss Jennifer Frye and otter students of Western CaroUna CoUege, Cullowhee, N. C. are spending toelr spring break at Lakeland, Florida vlsUing friends and relaUves. They wiU also attend Disney World and other points of interest while toere. Upon return, Jennifer wiU spend a few days wito her parents, Mr. and Mrs. James H. Frye at toelr home on Rt. 1, Advance. She wUl also participate in Patricia Welch’s wedding at YadkinviUe next weekend. ON DEAN’S LIST Mrs. Gladys Scott of MocksviUe, a special student in elementary educaUon at Livingstone College, was named to toe dean’s list for toe first semester. BUY NOW AND M V I AN INGROUND POOL "■«*1 9 9 S ,00^ COMPLETI wHh NIMP « n m FINANCINC AVAIUIU DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD. THURSDAY. MARCH 15. 1^70 ') THE BARRY DEAN JONES' Frye-Jones Vows Are Spoken Miss Ramona Lou Frye became toe bride of Barry Dean Jones on Saturday, March 3, at toe home of toe bride’s aunt and uncle, Mr. and Mrs. Weldon Allen. The Reverend Elmer Day officiated at toe 6 p.m. double ring ceremony.The bride is toe daughter of Mrs. Emma Lambe of Route 3, MocksvUle. She attended Davie County High School.The groom is toe son of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Jones Jr. of MocksvUle. He also attended Pavie County High School and is presenUy employed wi№ GrinneaU of aeveland, Norto Carolina. C h il d r e s s - F r e e m a n Mr. and Mrs. Lee ChUdress, of 702 Tot Street, Mocksville, announce the engagement 6f toeU- daughter, Enoree LaRae to Bobby Vincent Freeman. Mr. Freeman is toe son of Mr. and Mrs. Donald Freeman of 700 Stewart Street, MocksviUe. Miss ChUdress is a senior at Davie High School and Is employed at Heff­ner’s Land of Food.Mr. Freeman is a graduate of Davie High and is employed at ThrifU-Mart.The wedding is planned for AprU 15 at Gospel Baptist Church. H u b b a r d - P h e l p s The bride was given in marriage by Norman Smito of MocksviUe. She wore a blue polyester floor lengto gown trim­med wito lace and wore a matching hat. She carried a nosegay of white; yellow and blue pompoms and babies’ breato.Miss Melissa Lambe was her sister’s only attendant. She was atUred In a yellow floor lengto dress and matching hat. She carried a long stemmed yellow mum.FYed Jones Jr. was his sons best man. Mickey Lambe, brotoer of toe bride was acolyte.Mrs. June Beal of Mocksville attended toe guest register.Mrs. Glenda Boger organist, Mrs. Yvonne Livengood and Miss Weldina Allen presented a program of wedding music.After a short wedding trip the couple wUl make toelr home in MocksvUle.FoUowlng toe wedding toe bride’s motoer entertained at a reception at toe Fork Civic Center.The bride’s table was covered wito a blue cloto and a white lace overlay. An arrangement of white, yeUow and blue Mmpoms and babies’ breato with ighted tapers centered toe table.The three Uered wedding cake was topped wito bridal figurines.Miss Taran Smito, Miss Annette Jones and Miss Allison Owens assisted in serving. M a r t h a B l a c k w e l d e r I n d u c t e d I n t o A l p h a C h i H o n o r S o c ie t y Martoa A. Blackwelder of MocksviUe, a student at Appalachian State University, was among 106 select students recenUy inducted into toe local chapter of Alpha Chi naUonal honor society.The society promotes achievement and recogniUon in scholarship and character as weU as high attributes In leadership, and students voted Into membership Include toe top ten percent of junior and seniors wito a grade-point average of 3.50 or better. Blackwelder, a junior matoemaUcs major, is toe daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Paul A. Blackwelder of MocksviUe. Mr. and Mrs. Charles G. Winkler of ill Oakdale Road, GreenviUe, North CaroUna announce toe engagement of toelr daughter, Debra Jean Hubbard to James Wiseman Phelps, son of Mr. and Mrs. Lee Phelps of Route 1, MocksvUle.Miss Hubbard is a former resident of Burlington, N.C., where she was em­ployed by Hugh G. Strickland Maintenance Company.Mr. Phelps is a graduate of Catawba College and served five years In toe Army. He and his brother operate a logging operation.The wedding is planned for Saturday, May 19, at the Concord United Methodist Church. B e r m u d a R u n D i n n e r H o n o r s M is s E v e r id g e Dr. and Mrs. Victor Andrews en­ tertained Miss Candy Everidge and David PopUn with a dinner at Bermuda Run Country Club, Friday evening,March 9. The couple wiU be married Saturday, March 24, at toe First BapUst (^urch in MocksvUle.Upon arrival. Miss Everidge was presented wito a daisy corsage to compliment her outfit.Places were set for toe honorees, Mr. and Mrs. Harold Poplin, Mr. and Mrs.Jim Everidge, Miss Anna Everidge,Miss Holly Andrews, Dr. and Mrs.Victor Andrews.The hosts presented toe couple wito a gUt of silver in toelr chosen pattern. Kevin Shane Gilbert, son of Ms. Wanda GUbert, celebrated his 7th bir­thday anniversary with a party Sunday evening March 11. He and his fourteen guests enjoyed a "Baseball” birthday cake, sandwlshes, pickles, chips, and Iced colas. Later, Kevin opened an assortment of birthday gUts and sur­prises. Maternal grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. Leon Bailey and paternal grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. George C. Gilbert. Sr. of Mooresville. M is s B a r b e r Is H o n o r e d A t D i n n e r Miss Anne Barber, a former resident of MocksviUe, and her fiance, Ron Cannon, were honored Friday evening, March 9, wito a dinner at toe Jefferson Standard Country Club in Greensboro, N.C. Hosts for toe occasion were Mr. and Mrs. John Frank Garwood and Ms. Susan Garwood.Upon arrival. Miss Barber was presented a corsage of yeUow rosebuds.Special guests included toe bride- elects parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Barber of WUkesboro, N.C.The hosts gift was a cake plate with cover. Ms. Katoy E. Galtoer, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Kelly L. Galtoer of Route 2. MocksvlUe. has successfuUy completed toe "PracUcal Nursing Program” at Forsyth Technical Institute bi Winston- Salem. She was named to toe Dean’s List for the entire year. Katoy has ac­cepted a prosltlon In toe Intensive Care Nursery at the N.C. Baptist Hospital Ui Winston-Salem. 17' Diomatw—226.87 M|. ft. OolvaniiMl itMl wall! ond it*pi epilenol. Sft Mir OtiMr muinil An ingreund ato) umplddy InitolM (w Ini than holf th* ^c* yn wwld normally pay! H»w li iMi poiilWt? BwouM s( n«w ivpcriw tpoM og« d«ii(n ond Mnitruclion do- v^pwl bv AUpOOD, on* •( Ih* •loK i «Idnl and loronl iwim- mino pM< doolori. Hoy* on •nlortolnmtnl nnlor In your own yord for only $1W». Doilanod hr tho ontiro himlly from ( )o ID. (vorybody will on|oy Iho hoallhful, rolaiini, lodal bonoflti thatB .u I B • M J 1 ■ »wl"»"!"» provldo«. And BmhIHhI Poal MoMi AIUMMD, tho pool profoHlonalil o HM bikMlM • ........ridi Mot • M Iw d okovo mrnmé poob oi ipoMo M Mrart • Mtakh My tawrod • Ml I m ol Mow rmid porii •• ipoM , il'i boclwd by AU WORK SUKRVItIO ANO OUAtANTHO Mail Coupon For Full Information No O bligation to You! C a ll T o d a y ! 8 5 5 . 0 5 9 5 Youi C it GocxJ Prutt (JfUily /oi /tjWi-'.f % Its fovHi Walfivl CM« NC 974pf N i U M é »im 17 H.Oth«r TvpM •! M l MAä TtMfl W« oi< «(»aSir homi ol iMi Hm. OFf-tK T' k Otu |name _ ADDRESS. CITY ___ TElt PHONE— STATE. Casualty Or The ft Losses May Reduce Tax Liability Wito toe deadline for filing Federal Income Tax returns fast approaching, now is toe time to consider all ways of reducbig Income tax liablUty.For toose who itemize their deducUons, one area where possible savings exist, ac­cording to the Insurance InformaUon InsUtute, is in toe reporUng of casualty or toeft losses not covered by in­surance.The Internal Revenue Service states that any sudden or unexpected loss arising from such oc­currences as fU'e, storm or tornado, vandalism or automobile collision may result in a casualty loss deducUon.The IRS permits a taxpayer to deduct personal casualty or tteft losses for boto real and personal property. In­dividuals who itemize toelr deducUons can deduct toe amount oftoe loss toat is in excess of $100, less any amount covered by Insurance. The amount of a personal casualty or toeft loss is toe difference between toe fair market value immediately before and immediately after a loss, .’hfi loss cannot be greater than Uie original cost plus toe cost of any im­provement toat might have been made.Here’s how to compute a loss involving a stereo con­sole. Suppose toe fair market value of toe console before damage was <950. After tte damage, the fair market value was $350. In tois example, toe casualty loss is $600, or $950 minus ^50.Next reduce toe figure by any insurance proceeds and toe $100 tax deductible. If toe insurance company covered $250 of toe loss, toe deducUon for Income tax purposes would be $250 ($600 minus $250 equals $ ^ , less toe $100 deducUble equals $250). This $100 limltaUon applies to each individual occurrence.In order to deduct a casualty or theft loss, you must be able lo show proof of loss. This proof must include a descripUon of toe casualty or theft; when it was discovered; toat toe loss was the direct result of the casualty or thefl; 0 o » > C o m e J n A s d ^ ^ ¿ g i m r F o r FREE Maerame Classes M o n . , M a r c h 1 9 & F r i . N i g h t M a r c h 2 3 ( M u s t C o m e B y S h o p T o R e g iste r) See Our Beautiful Selection Of Spring Fabrics On Display! McCall'i Patterns / 2 Fashion Fabrics Salii>l)ur\ Street M onda>-Saturdav 9:00-5:30 in\ll (Ol Л П ЬМ1 RPRISI: RUCORD, THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 1974 Davie High Speech winners are: (sitting I-r) Rick Carter, Randy Linlt, Dennis S o e e c h T r in n e r s Draughon, Avis Watlcins. standing (I-r); MUce Murphy, Tim Sell, Harold Smith." ' ' (Photo by Garry Foster) Speech Team Wins 3 rd Sweepstakes Award The Oavie High School speech team won its third sweepstakes award this season at the Twin City Invitational sponsored by Reynolds High School in Winston-Salem this weekend. The sweepstakes award is for the best overall school in the tournament.Davie students won top awards in debate, dramatic interpretation, and student congress. Nine schools, in­ cluding one from South Carolina, competed in the tourney.Davie had the top affirmative debate team, Dennis Draughon and Rick Carter, and the top negative debate team, Randy Link and Harold Smith. These two teams met in the finals with the affirmative winning on a 2-1 decision. Smith also received a sixth- place speaker award. Avis Watkins won the first-place award in dramatic interpretation with a presentation of a selection from James Baldwin’s The Amen Corner. Tim Sell received the best speaker award and Mike Murphy received the second speaker award for student congress.The strength of these top places gave Davie the overall award ahead of Thomasville, Freedom and Ledford high schools. Previously, Davie won sweepstakes awards at tournaments sponsored by ThomasvUle-Trlnity and by Freedom.“We were all very excited about the sweepstakes award,” said Larry Jones, director of forensics at the high school, “but we were particularly pleased with the individual students’ ac­complishments. “Avis won her first top award and Tim won the best speaker honor In his first congress. Randy did extremely well in his first experience as a negative debater. And, of course, Dennis, Rick, Harold, and Mike con­ tinued to excell.’’Other David students who competed included Kevin Cornatzer, Jeff Ferguson, Chuck Stone, and Jeff White in debate; Susan Lagle and Martin Brock in extemporaneous speaking; and Steve Heffner in congress.The Reynolds tournament was the last invitational tourney on the 1978-79 schedule for the Davie speakers. The district National Forensic League finals are this weekend at Thomasville and the state finals will be in Ohapel Hill on the first weekend in April. Two finals in student congress later in April will conclude the season for Davie. All four events qualify students for the national finals in Cincinnati in June. Department Of Transportation Receives Grant For Vans And Buses For Area Secretary of Transportation Tom Bradshaw announced today that the North Carolina Department of Tran­sportation has received a $520,368 Vehicle Hits Truck Two vehicles collided last Friday about 5:40 p.m. on the Davie Academy Road, 5.7 miles south of Mocksville.Involved was a 1970 Chevrolet operated by Hansford Linney Nichols, 55, of 19 Watt St., Cooleemee and a 1977 Chevrolet truck operated by Paul Weldon Correll, 60, of 37 Davie St., Cooleemee.State Highway Patrolman J.L. Payne said his investigation showed that Nichols failed to stop at the stop sign and ran into the front of the truck as it passed by.Damage to the Nichols vehicle was estimated at $400 and $1000 to the truck. Nichols was charged with driving under the influence and failing to stop for the stop sign. federal grant to purchase 48 vans and buses for 16 nonprofit organizations serving the handicapped and elderly.The Yadkin Valley Economic Development District will receive six vans. Eighty percent of the $650,460 total project costs was federally funded. The 16 local nonprofit organizations will provide the remaining 20 percent of the total funding.The grant, funded by the Urban Mass Transit Administration (UMTA) will be administered by the department’s public transportation division.Bradsliaw also announced that the North Carolina Board of Transportation has approved a request to reallocate 148,150 of unexpended state and federal planning funds for public transportation programs in 10 counties.The reallocated money will be used by each county to fund plans for coor­dinating transportation resources provided locally by human services agencies.Recommendations for reallocation of funds were based on requests for planning money receiv«.d since January 1 of this year. “One of our imme> ,ate concerns is insuring that our public transportation program measures up to growing demands in both urban and rural areas,” Bradshaw said."Developing an efficient transit system is an important part of this department’s effort to carry out the Governor’s balanced economic growth policy for this state while meeting the transportation needs of the elderly, handicapped, and other transportation- disadvantaged citizens,” he added.Counties approved for re-allocation of funds are; Madison-$2,400 federal,$300 state; Cherokee-$2,400 federal, $300 state; Hickory-Catowba-$7,600 federal, $950 state; Buncombe-$4,800 federal,$600 state; Haywood-$3,200 federal, $400 state; Rockingham-$4,000 federal, $500 state; Rutherford-$4,000 federal, $500 state; Region M Council of Govern­ ments (for Cumberland, Sampson and Harnett;-$14,400 federal, $1,800 state. F o r G i r l S c o u t s Merrill Deal, treasurer of the Sheffield-Calahain Ruritan Club presents a check to Mrs. Christine Church leader of Girl Scout troop 312. Mrs. Nell Dyson, assistant and Mrs. Barbara Hattaway leader of Brownie Troop 432 look on. The money will be used to build a storage cabinet for Scout equipment. Do You Know? The fall crop of potatoes was the largest in U.S. history. Potatoes may be one of the few foodstuffs that cost less this winter than they did last year, say sp^ialists with the North Carolina Agricultural Ex­tension Service. They are also a good buy nutntion- wise. Penny-for-penny, they have more energy,giving value than any other vegetable, says the United States Department of Agriculture. One medium potato supplies only 90 calories, but contributes about one-fifth of the vitamin C needed daily, plus worthwhile amounts of the B vitamins thiamine and niacin, as well as the minerals iron, phosphorus and potassium.Potatoes are also high in car­bohydrates. by P a t r i c i a B o d l e A v a i l a b l e T h r o u g h 101 WEST 3rd. AVENUE I.EXINGTON. N.C.T-F: 9 5 SAT. 10-5 CLOSED MONDAY C'u»toin flaming by Tfotinan't of Winilon-Salgm (704)249-4428 H«nrv Block "Well take all the time needed to do thejobrightr We ask the right questions. We dig for every honest deduction and credit. We take the time needed because we want to be sure you pay the smallest legitimate tax. That's another reason why H&R Block should do your taxes...whichever form you use, short or long. H »R B L O C K THE INCOIME TAX PEOPLE 201 DEPOT ST. MOCKSVILLE. N C. Phoiui 634 3203 Op«n 0:30 a.m.— ^ p.m. weekaays 8:30-5 Sat. NO APPOINTMENT NECESSARY Teacher's Award-Winning Design Features Barrels For Solar System In Living Room By Bob Cavin UNC-G News Bureau Some people might object lo having 32 big, 55-gallon barrels of water stacked up in their living room, but not John Alt.Alt, an instructor of interior design at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, has designed a whole house around the tiers of water drums, and he believes they will help reduce the cost of heating the structure by 50 to 90 percent.Decorated to be on aesthetically appealing living room partition, the barrels of water coupled with an 18 by 24-fool glass area on the south side of the house form a passive solar, energy system suitable for residential dwellings. The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) also believes in Alt's concept for a passive solar energy system and recently presented him with a $5,000 award for his design and a $7,000 construction award to help him get started building HUD sponsored a nationwide com­petition for passive solar energy system designs for residential houses and gave out 145 design awards and 80 con­struction awards for the best systems.Alt was one of seven North Carolinians who received design awards in the competition and he was Ihe only designer in the state to win a con­struction award.“The competition demonstrates a change in attitude by the government toward passive solar energy systems,” Alt commented. “At first, the govern­ment chose not lo support research on passive systems. Instead, it poured money into research on active solar energy systems.” Alt, who received the master ot ar- chitecutre degree from N.C. State University in 1976, has been interested In solar energy since 1972 when he helped Steve Baer, a pioneer in passive solar energy systems, construct the first home in the U.S. incorporating a passive system in New Mexico. Alt’s sinning design incorporates a passive solar energy system in a 2,500 square-foot, two story house. He plans to begin building the house in May."The passive solar energy system is the simplest, least expensive and A r t is t - O f - T h e - M o n t h Belle Boger has been named as featured artist for the month of March by the Davie County Arts Council. She was cited for her work in counted cross-stitch with a display of her crafts available for viewing at the Arts Council Office. She has been active In cross-stitch for four years and has also taught ceramics through Davidson Community College. The office is open Monday-Friday from 8:30 a.m.-12:00 and from 1:00-5:00. Diabetes Studied In Monkeys On Medical Research Farm When monkeys are bom at the Bowman Gray School of Medicine’s Research Farm, the employees there don’t get too excited. But when the off­spring are fathered by a monkey named Sam, that’s a different story.Sam, a Macaca fascicularis, is something of a celebrity at the farm because he is the first monkey of his species known to be diabetic and only the second diabetic monkey that researchers at the farm have seen.Sam receives a lot of special attention because he and his offspring may provide investigators with a diabetic monkey colony for research on genetic diabetes and possible links to atherosclerosis (hardening of the ar­teries) and studies on diabetic retinopathy (a disease which can cause blindness). Development of the colony depends on whether any of Sam’s nine newborn offspring prove to be diabetic like their daddy. Dr. Bill Bullock, associate professor of comparative medicine and the person ultimately responsible for Sam, is optimistic about the possibility.“We have not given the offspring any glucose tolerance tests yet.” said Dr. Bullock, “But other tests indicate a higher concentration of glycosylated hemoglobin than is present in age- matched control monkeys. This, I feel is an encouraging sign that eventually we will find some diabetic monkeys.”According to Bullock, when the three male and six female offspring are about six months old, they will be weaned and tested by measuring their insulin response to glucose load and glucose tolerance. He predicts that one-fourth of Sam’s offspring will have diabetes. In the event the colony is developed, Bullock said that research could begin to determine why diabetics develop atherosclerosis at an accelerated rate. The fact that deabetic humans are twice as likely to die of atherosclerosis as non­diabetics provides some interesting research possiblilties for researchers at the medical school.“We could also study diabetic retinopathy,” he said. “Diabetics are about 25 times more prone to blindness than non-diabetics. We could study what metabolic patterns develop which cause this eye problem.” Bullock said there is a national in­terest in diabetes today, especially since the disease among humans is increasing at the rate of six percent per year. Researchers at the farm plan to continue mating Sam with females in his personal harem. In an effort to locate diabetic female monkeys to breed with Sam and thereby increase the chances of diabetic offspring, researchers now are screening about 100 Macaca fascicularis females for defects in glucose metabolism.“We’ve got to get enough diabetic animals to keep a breeding colony going and to use in experiments,” Bullock said. perhaps the most effective way to reduce residential utility bills," Alt stated. “But few people understand how It works because active systems have received more attention by the govern- ^ ment.“To have a clear understanding of how the passive system works, it is best to know how the more commonly known active system works," he explained.Active solar energy systems use "collectors" mounted outside of the ^ house to trap the sun’s heat, according " to Alt. The heat is then transferred by pipes or duck-work to a storage unit usually in the basement of the liouse.“When the living spaces need heat, a heat exchanger takes the hot air from the storage unit and pumps it into the house," Alt said. “All this is done automatically just # like a regular heating system and the occupant would not know the house is being heated by the sun except that his fuel bills would be much less,” he added.However, il would take many years in fuel savings to pay for the active solar system, according to Alt, since they tend to be very expensive.“An active solar system costs from $8,000 on up for an average house,” he noted. “The expense of the active system is mostly for its mechanical devices and installation.“But a passive solar energy system uses almost no mechanical devices,” he u pointed out. “Instead, it uses simple, ^ creative ingenuity on the part of the designer.“Generally, the extra cost involved in a passive system house is having a competent person design it," Alt stated. “The design fee would l>e substantially less than the cost of installing an active solar system. “But it should be remembered that for the design fee the home owner is not only getting a built-in heating and cooling system, he is also getting a total home environmental designed specifically for his family needs."The passive solar energy house is . designed so the winter sun heats its living spaces directly, according to Alt, Instead of first heating a solar collector and then transferring the heat to the house as in an active system.“The glass that would normally cover the collector panels on an active system becomes the south window area on the passive house,” he said. “The house j itself becomes the collector panel.” ^ He pointed out that the size and location of the windows must be carefully designed to collect the amount of heat the house will need not only during the day, but also at night and the next day should it be cloudy. That’s where the barrels of water come in. ^“Obviously, the need to collect extra t heat while tlie sun is shining means the house would overheat during the day,”Alt explained. “Some of the extra heat is stored in the barrels of water, and the interior of the structure is designed with materials which absorb and store this extra heat.”In addition, there are two shafts on each end of the house, allowing the excess heat to escape through the roof in summer.“Fans located at the bottom of these shafts cut in when the temperature at the ceiling rises above a certain point,”Alt said. “Since heal rises and col ects in the'upper portion of the house, it can be pul ed down through the shafts and stored under the house for extra heat during winter.”This heat storage part of the interior sturcture is called “thermal mass” and it can be made of common building materials such as brick, stone, concrete or water.“The size and location of the thermal mass must be carefully designed to store just the right amount of heat,” he explained. “Generally, this is about three times the amount of heat needed during the day while the sun is out.”When the living spaces begin to cool at night or on a cloudy day, the heat stored in the thermal mass radiates outward and keeps the spaces at a warm tem­ perature.The only mechanical device generally required in a passive solar energy system is an insulating curtain which must be closed over the large south glass area at night or on a cloudy day. “This is the only ‘extra activity' required on the part of the homeowner,” Alt chuckled. Pino News Preaching service will be at10 a.m. and church school at 11 o’clock Sunday at Wesley Chanel Church. Tlie Wesley Chapel Church home-coming will be the first Sunday in June. The date was the first Sunday in July but many people are away on vacation. Steven Latham, who has been ill in the Baptist for some time seemed to be resting better over the week end. Mr. and Mrs. Roy Dixon were able to attend church Sunday. Mrs. Luther Dull spent a few days in Davie County Hospital for observation and tests last week. Mr. and Mrs. O’Brien Dixon and daughters Kathy and Tammy of Winston-Salem visited Mr. and Mrs. Roy Dixon Sunday afternoon. Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Latham, Mr. and Mrs. Robert L,atham and Mr. and Mrs. Johnny Latham of Monroe spent Sunday March 4 visiting relatives in Pino.Mrs. Fred Trivette spent the weekend in Winston- Salem with her mother, Mrs. Cates. 10th Reunion “ C la s s o f 1 9 6 9 ” Davie High School T o B e H e ld S a t. J u n e 2 3 , A t T a n g le w o o d P a rk - S h e lte r 1 (Covered Dish Supper) Activities From 4:30-11:00 p.m. (For Information Call Ralph Naylor At 634-3138) HELPING HOLD DOWN THE PRICE OF COTTON could be one effect of wiping out the boll weevil. S p rin g Is On It’s Way, E a s te r Around The Corner, Come in And See O u r B a rg in s . M e n 's M a v e r ic k Pre-Washed Jeans, Reg. ‘13.99 s f t t * » 9 * * L a d le s J e a n s From $ ^ ^ 9 9 To • 1 6 ” S p e c ia l S ale T a b le & R a c k . 1 0 % O F F On Other Clothes And J e w e lr y NOT On Sale Coma See You'll Be (ìlari You Old. F a r m i n g t o n F a s h i o n 801 It Farmington Cross RoadsM o n .-lliu i4 I Ü0-6 3Ü p.m. I ti.-l WJ-Ö OU p.m.Sat.-l 2 00-6 .10 p 111. DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD. THURSDAY. MARCII 15, I')?') n P r o je c t s H e lp D a v ie B a n d R a is e ^ 9 ,4 0 0 T o w a r d s F lo r id a T r ip By Kathy Tomlinson The Davie County High School Band has raised $9,400 toward their May IS trip to National Band Competition in Daytona, Florida,Approximately $17,000 is needed for the 102 member group to attend, with $12,000 set as the minimum amount to be raised through community projects sponsored by the group. This will assure that funds secured from individual contestants will be minimal.Band Day held last Saturday in the High School parking lot, helped to achieve the band's final fund raising goal. Beginning at 10 a,m. efforts in­cluded an all day flea market sponsored by the Davie Band Booster Club and live performance by the jazz band and jazz emsemble.An item with an estimated value of $50 was auctioned off per hour. Donated by local merchants, citizens and organizations, the items included a beef hind quarter. Heritage table, chain saw, hand-made afghan and many more items.Also, a radlo-a-thon sponsored by WDSL was held with students manning the telephones to accept donations and pledges. The evening culminated with a barbecued chicken dinner prepared by Larry McCullough. Approximately 800 chickens were cooked over hot coals to meet the quota of tickets sold by the group,Roger Staley, assistant band director said, "We are very positive at this point toward achieving our $12,000 goal,"The response to the supper was tremendous and we appreciate the support of the community. However, I regret that more people did not turn out for the auction," he said,"Our goal is now in sight and with a little more community support, I feel sure we can raise the needed money," said Staley. This is the first time that the DCHS band has had the opportunity to par­ticipate in the national music festival. The 102 member group will consist of 81 members of the marching band, 18 members of the dancing boots and 4 majorettes.With the cooperation of the Band Booster Club and the Davie Arts Council, students have sponsored several fund raising events. Rent-a-Kid programs and firewood sales were carried out along with a variety show in February.A mid-year band and chorus concert will be held Thursday, March 15 at 7:30 p.m. at the B.C. Brock auditorium. The latest fund raising effort, all proceeds from the evening will go toward the Florida trip. Photos by Robin Carter Larry McCullough and Gordon Ruby turn a portion of the 800 chickens they barbecued for the "Band Day” dinner. Gas From Seaweed Seen * As Home Heating Source The fastest growing seaweed in the world someday may help heat the nation’s living rooms.Scientists hope that a plot of giant kelp planted on an ar­tificial structure four miles off the coast of California near Newport Beach will be the forerunner of a huge supply of natural gas.Tests already have proven that anaerobic bacteria willreact with harvested kelp in I to produce methane, the airtight conditions I ethane, the principal component of natural gas, reports the National Geographic Society.New researchers want to fhid out If the prolific seaweed can be grown artificially far from shore in deep waters where there would be plenty of room to establish hugh kelp farms.. “With land in such short supply, the idea of using the space and water offshore to produce our energy needs has become very attractive,” explained Dr. David P. Chynoweth, manager of biological science research for the Institute of Gas Technology. “Theoretically, kelp could provide a major portion of our natural gas needs."A 102-foot- diameter ribbled structure resembling the top of an upturned umbrella anchored aobut SO feet below the ocean's surface forms the “soil" for the kelp farm near Newport Beach. The plants are moored by their holdfasts- -a rootlike system at the bottom of each plant-to stainless steel and nylon rope strung around the steel ribs.A 25-inch-diameter pipe plunges 1,500 feet Into the sea below, bringing up nutrients such as nitrates and phosphates to fertilize the kelp and maintain growth.Marine biologists from the California Institute of Technology will gather the crops and measure the amount and quality of the kelp during the farm’s ex­perimental 24-month run, supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy and the Gas Research Institute.They will have a good idea of the project’s success much earlier, perhaps in six months to a year. If the results are promising, the next step is a bigger farm, possibly as large as 10 acres. “After that, the sea’s the limit," observed Dr. Wheeler J. North, a Caltech environmental scientist.Hypotetically, other seaweeds could produce methane, too, but kelp was chosen because it’s prolific and its holdfasts can be easily anchored. Kelp, or Macrocystis, grows as much as two feet a day, reaching lengths of 200 feet.Nutrients from the water and energy from the sun, trapped by photosynthesis in Paper Drive At Davie Academy Davie Academy 4-H club will sponsor a paper drive, Thursday and Friday, March 22 and 23, at Cartner’s Texaco station at 901 Junction, where there will be dumpsters for your papers.Proceeds from this drive will be used to send Davie High School band to Florida. the plant’s thick canopy, support the amazing growth. Pillars of mature kelp can contain 50 or more densely packed fronds, all rising to a canopy at the surface. The dense shadowy underwater forests attract countless marine animals.California’s wild kelp beds not only harbor valuable sea life, but also are a source of the chemical algin. Extracted from kelp, algin is used to smooth and thicken more than 300 products, from ice cream to paints, sauces, and tooth­paste. In 1976, about 143,600 tons of wet kelp were har­vested from California waters for commercial purposes. Country Breakfast At Advance March 17 The East Davie Ruritan Club is sponsoring a country style breakfast on Saturday, March 17, 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. at the Advance Fire Department buUding. Circles To Hold Joint Meeting Circles 4 and S of the First United Methodist Church will hold a joint meeting, Monday, March 19, at 7:30 p.m. hi the Faithful Workers class.Guest speaker will be Allen Martin, Davie County Hospital Administrator.All members are urged to attend and bring with them a guest or prospective member. "The absent have a ringing in the ears when they are talked about." Pliny the Elder OIL CHANG-S P E C I A L - 5QTS. VALVOLINEAll-cllmate Motor Oil and a WIX OIL FILTERpopular sizes for most cars. SPARK YOUR LAWN- MOWER FREE FREE J-17LM Lawn Mower spark Plug with every set of Champion^ you buy for your car, truck, van... Good at participating carquest Auto Parts stores thru March 21,1979. MOCKSVILLE AUTOMOTIVE 727 SOUTH MAIN STREET MOCKSVILLE 634-2944 « ‘A’"it 6 ^'• The Davie band offered Just about everything at the Band Day festivities. Included was a free load of firewood for a donation to the Booster Club. Alcohol Information Report By:WILLIAM F. WE ANT, M.S. ' ALCOHOLISM EDUCATION CONSULTANT ALCOHOL INFORMATION REPORTFacts on alcohol and alcohollsm-This is in­ formation that may help to relieve stress which may interfere with your home life and your work. These facts will help you to be more knowledgeable about alcohol and alcoholism and mental health services.-Alcoholism is an illness caused by drinking alcohol, a depressant drug. Alcoholism may be fatal and may severely damage the alcoholic and others at home and on the job.-Early symptoms include: preoccupaUon with alcohol; attempts, however small, to control drinking; periods of amnesia (blackouts); sneaking drinks; and not “enjoying" yourself without a drink.-The alcoholic employee is :absent 2-4 times more frequently, has 2-4 times more accidents, and is paid 3 times as much for sick time than non-alcoholic employees.-Alcohol is a major factor üt North Carolina hi: 20 percent of all divorces, 15 percent of welfare cases, SO percent of hospital ad­missions, SO percent of fatal car accidents, 40 percent of cases brought to family court, 25 percent of suicides, and SO percent of homicides.-Studies indicate drbiUng during pregnancy can cause damage to fetal development.-Youngsters from 12-17 have increased their drhiking 48 percent shice 1973.-The incidence of alcoholism hi women has risen dramatically from 5:1 to 3:1 man-woman ratio sbice 1970.-Women are prescribed tranquilizers twice as often as men. Alcohol mixed with other drugs multiplies the strength of both, leadhig to dual addiction.-The woman alcoholic is left by 9 out of 10 husbands as compared to the male alcoholic where 9 out of 10 wives stay with him. Families of alcoholics often have serious emotional problems.-The estimated number of alcoholics in the U.S. is at least 10 million. Alcohol is the nation's number one drug problem.Questions and answers about mental health services:Wouldn't it be better just to tough it out? TMngs could blow over if I Just hang on.That't like having a toothache and not going to the dentist. The price you pay is exactly the sime-you keep on hurting, and tbe problem may get worse histead of better.If I do seek help, what's the treatment all about?A specially trabied staff member wiil talk with you about the things that are worrying you.How can just talking make problems disappear?When you're talking to someone who has helped many others with problems similar to yours, that person is able to see the patterns In your life that have led to your unhappiness. In therapy, the job Is to help you recognize those patterns, and you may try to change them.Actually, I think my wife could be helped if I could talk her into coming in.This is something you can discuss with someone at the Mental Health Center. Marital, or family, therapy Is available when a problem exists that involves more than one family member.Does the Mental Health Center treat children?Yes. Children usually respond very well to short­term help. It they are not suffering from a disorder. The family often is asked to participate when a child is being seen and would be consulted tf long-term treatment Is needed.I have a friend who says he could use some professional help, but he is worried about keeping it confidential.He needn't worry. Medical, records are never released without the patient's written permission.Do emergency cases wind up as long-term patients in mental hospitals?Not usually. Mental hospitals are mainly tor the severely ill. Mental health professionals believe that the troubled person who readjusts best is the person who con­tinues to live In the com­munity and not In a hospital ward. That's why the Mental Health Center stresses the Importance of having dif­ferent services available.If you or someone you care about has a problem, contact Tri-County Mental Health Center.(This is the sixty-eighth hi a series of articles about “alcohol" provided by BUI Weant, Alcoholism Education Consultant with the Tri- County Mental Health Ck>mplex. These articles are designed to create un­derstanding about sensible drinking, alcohol abuse, and alcoholism in our society. If you have a question con­cerning alcohol that your would like answered In a future column, phone 634- 219S.) NaUonal SaluteOn February 14, a national salute to hospitalized veterans brought sports and entertainment stars and top government officials in contact with patients in Veterans Administration medical centers. The lilac, a native of the Orient, was not Introduced into Europe until the 16th century. OF Discount Merchandise Located in the Ellis Center on Hwy. 601, 3 niiles south of MocksviUe IVe Appreciate Your Business! Dorthy C. Howard, Manager Fred O. Ellis, Owner STORE HOURS: Mon. ■ Thuri. -11:00 • 8:00 p.m. Fri.-10:00 a.m.-9:00 p.m. Sat.-9:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m. Foster-Rauch Drug Co. WILKESBORO STREET MOCKSVULE, N.C, PHONE 634-2141 Outdoor Patio Lounges Vinyl Garden Hose- (60 Ft.) T.V. Games Reg. ‘39.95 Oil of Olay (4 oz. Bottle) Jean Nate’ (19 oz. Bottle) j Moisturizer & Body Lotion Reg. 7.00 Value $ y 9 9 9 ^ 9 9 1 9 9 5 $2 * 8 8 oz. Final Net Hair Spray Clairol Condition Shampoo (16 oz. Size) Tylenol Extra Strength 60's 165’S Bufferin Reg. *4.39 $ ] | 5 7 $ | 3 9 $ | 8 8 $ 2 ^ 7 Ski Jackets Reg.'69.95 L im ite d S e le ctio n 1st C o m e 1st Serve! Children’s Ski Jackets Cigarette Lighter C loseout 2 9 9 5 $ 9 9 8 2 9 « State, Duke, Wake & Carolina Sun Visors We Have Easter Baskets, Candy, Cards & Stu ffed Animals See Our Selection! Spring Cleaning Time Is Here R e n t O u r S t e a m e x C a r p e t C le o n e r . m r 12 DAVII-: rOUNTY liNTl-.RPRISl: KliCORD, TMliRSDAY. MARCH IS, l<)74 __ M u r a l S it e Martha Kontos. president of the Davie Arts Council (right) and Biii Jordan, artist in residence (center) discuss possible mural site with owners Norman Smith and Margaret Potts. (Photo by Robin Carter) Sheriff’s Dept. Is Kept Busy The Davie County Sheriff’s Department arrested James Boyd Smith, 32, of Rt. 4, Mocksville at his residence on March 7th and charged him with possession of marijuana. The department investigated a case ol vandalism on March 7th to a Drott 150 Loader .Skid Shovel of the Department of Transportation. The vehicle, located off the Deadmon Road, had grease smeared on the front window, the wipe motor was damaged, and windows were broken. Damage was estimated at $150. On March Sth the department in­vestigated a breaking and entry and larceny of a vehicle parked at the Davie High School. Barry Oliver of Rt. 7 Mocksville reported someone broke into his car between 8:0S a.m. and 3:20 p.m. last Thursday and took an FM stereo and tape player, with new speakers, valued at M55. An RCA am-fm radio, two Bell & Howell cassett tape recorders, and a black heavy leather carrying case were recovered last Friday by the sheriff’s department behind the Cooleemee Elementary School. L e t t e r T o T h e E d i t o r Painting Of Wall Mural Being Considered The wall of Smith’s Shoe Store facing Depot Street is being considered by the Arts Council ds a possible mural site. Bill Jordan, artist-in-residence, will design and paint the mural. He is presently in the process of creating sketches for approval by the Arts Council.A committee will be formed of people with backgrounds in local architecture and history to secure the approval of the proper sketch.The wall itself is part of the old San­ford Building on Court Square now owned by Norman Smith and Margaret Potts. It measures 38-feet in height and 102 feet in length. If approved as the definite site. Jordan hopes to paint the entire wall. The size of the mural depends on how much money is available for painting materials and scaffolding.“A wall mural is very good for the community,” said Jordan. No only does it beautify the building, but also arouses a generally dormant aesthetic spirit within the public.”"Since the artist will be working directly on the wall, local citizens will be seeing a work of art created right before their eyes,” he said. “This activity brings the artist to the people and ex­poses them to a creative process.” Jordan has painted murals in Spencer, Davidson County, Thomasville, and a host of others. April has been set as the projected date for beginning the mural and its completion is set at October 21. If approved and completed, the mural will be one of the largest projects of its kind in the entire state.Martha Kontos, president of the Arts Council said, “Any suggestions or comments will be welcomed and con­sidered. This is a very important project for the council and we want it to te a Report From Raleigh by Rep. Ramey F. Kemp Again this week, more of our time was taken up by the Subcommittee on Ap­propriations for Human Resources and Corrections. We are getting close, in this committee, to making our recom­mendations to the full Appropriations Committee. The results of the long hours spent in this subcommittee are begin­ ning to show.Another committee I serve on, the Committee on Local Government I, also had an active week. We must have set some sort of record in our meeting of March 7 when we heard and acted on a total of eleven Bills. These Bills then reached the House floor and all were passed by the House on Thursday. Amont these eleven Bills were three that I intorduced at the request of the Davie County Board of Commissioners and the Davie County Board of Education. I am sure these Bills will also pass the Senate and be enacted into Law. One BiU will convey a portion of the Cooleemee School property to the Jerusalem Volunteer Fire Department for con­ struction of a building thereon. One would convey a portion of the hospital property to Dr. Ben Richards for con­struction of a building for medical professionals. The third Bill would allow the former Farmington School property to be used for purposes other than recreational and would include educational and service purposes.Today, March 9, is the deadline for introducing local Bills so our calendar on local Bills will be less crowded.On Tuesday, March 13, at 3 p.m., the Senate and House Committees on Education will discuss an Act to rewrite the elementary and secondary education Laws of the State. I feel sure some of our educators will want to be there. If so, I hope they will come by my office to give me their views.It was nice to have Perry Collette as a Senate Page this week. Perry was ap­pointed by Senator Jack CSiilders, and he represented Davie County well.If you have anything at all that you wish to discuss with me concerning legislation, please do not hesitate to call. Legislative Report By Senator Robert Davia The Governor's “crime control package” is now entering the first stages of serious debate in the state Senate ane most reactions from the lawmakers have been extremely positive.Certainly my position is that the Governor has offered North Carolinians the basic elements for an extensive campaign against the ever growing problems of criminal activity. Problems 'not just for the victim and the criminal but for all of our citizens.Foremost in the legllsatlon being considered are a number of laws dealing with the tragedies of family violence. The need for substantial legislation in this area is especiaUy apparent when one is aware of some rather startling statistics recently quoted by Governor Hunt. According to his figures, one of four murders in North Carolina during 1076 occurred between members of the same famUy. Almost one In four law officers assaulted that year were assaulted whUe answering a domestic caU. Obviously, domestic violence when it reaches tills scale deserves special attention.Particularly sad Is the plight of chUdren living in homes where violence is a common occurrence.One proposal is that we give law of­ ficers clear authority to protect the victims of famUy violence crimes as weU as themselves. I fuUy support this measure.Other legislation under consideration calls for adoption of proposals by the JuvenUe Code Revision Committee to protect abused and neglected chUdren.Hopefully, several additional recommendations by the JuvenUe Code ^vision Committee wiU be adopted. Among those recommendations If the concept that parents be held more ac­countable for the actions ot Uielr chUdren, Including their school at­tendance, and that we should aUow flngerprlnUng and photographing of serious juvenile offenders. Further, we should encourage stiffer sentences for the most serious offenders. The Com- mittee also suggests a more effective juvenile recordkeeping system.Of course, as we adopt more stringent attitudes toward our serious juvenile offenders, we must stUl be mindful that some are just misdirected young people and not hardened criminals. For­tunately the recommendations wlU not Interfere wlUi a young person’s sincere desb-e to pay for his wrongdoing and lead a productive life.PresumpUve sentencing is yet anoUier ---' [islatlon which 1 believe to beparticularly important to the citizens of our state, 'hiis law would set presumed sentences for certain categories of crimes. The judge would still be given some lattitude for increasing or decreasing sentences after considering such reasons as age, background, and prior record. He would, however, be required to enter valid reasons for varying a sentence as part of Uie written judgment.Such legislation as presumptive sentencing could go a long way in helping to improve the Image and restore Uie confidence In our judicial system. At U»e same ttane, it would serve noUce to potenUal law violators U»t Uiere can to no "easy out.”> In fact, I hope we can buUd our entire “crime conUrol” package wiUi Uie №d result of no "easy outs” for law breakers. lasUng work of art Uiat local citizens will be proud of in yesrs to come.” Hopefully the scene will depict tradiUons of Davie and blend Into surrounding architecture”, she said. Community participaUon as to con­sidering proper site and design is very important in its success.”Anyone interested in voicing suggestions of constructive criticism is urged to contact the Davie Arts CouncU at 634-3112. Dear Editor: The Mocksville Jaycees would like to express thanks to Uie following mer­chants for Uieir help in making their disU-ict meeUng such a success: Firestone Store, Discount House, HaU Drugs, P.B.’s Hobby Shop, Sport Shop, Rintz’s 5 and 10, Foster-Rauch Drugs, Martin Bros., Belks, Mocksville Builders Supply, C’s BBQ, Millers Restaurant, Wilkins Drugs, Davie Auto Parts. Buck Hall MocksviUe Jaycees. Driver License Applicants Being Checked On New Vision Tester Applicants for North Carolina driver’s licenses now are being tested on new equipment which checks eyesight more accurately and requires knowledge of internaUonal traffic symbols.Driver’s license examiners across the state began using the new electronic vision and sign testing instruments in late December. NorUi Carolina Is Uie first state to use this new type of elec­tronic equipment. A comparison test with the former, manually-controlled machines recently was concluded.Some 15,000 applicants tor license renewals were screened at 40 locations on both machines. Data from these tests are being compUed now by Uie Division of Motor Vehicles ot the North Carolina Department ot Transportation.Noting that the changeover to the new equipment was now complete, state Secretary ot Transportation Tom Bradshaw pointed out that the purchase of the machine was "another step In our department’s efforts to carry out Governor Hunt’s policy ot making state government more efficient and ef­fective.”"The former equipment served Uie state well. Most of the mechanical units were used for more than 30 years. We also expect to receive long-lasting economical service from the new vision testers, whUe providing a higher level of service,” said Bradshaw.The new machines were designed to specifications developed by the division’s driver services section, ac­cording to Elbert L. Peters Jr., Com­missioner of Motor Vehicles. He said Uie new units will provide a better examination of applicants, "insuring that drivers can see properly and possess sufficient knowledge of traffic symbols to operate motor vehicles safely on North Carolina’s highways and streets.” Zeb Hocutt, the agency’s Director of Driver Services, said Uie new in­struments examine applicants for levels of sight in each eye, depUi perception, color and peripheral vision, and sight in day and night UluminaUon.In checking vision, Uie new models use numbers instead of letters. “The combinations of numbers are varied by the examiners, eliminating memorization of the charts. Previously, we did not have the capability to examine for ‘night glare’. The new machine does. We also get a better check on depth perception, color blind­ness and peripheral vision.”Applicants also are tested tor un­derstanding of 12 traffic signs using International symbols. WhUe the signs have been described in the driver’s Ucense handbook for six years, the former units did not possess Uils feature. A handicapped parking sign is Included in the examination but is not in the current manual. Hocutt said the agency is preparing a new edition ot the hand­book which includes the sign.The division purchased 170 new in­struments for its 187 driver license examining stations across Uie state. The total cost was approximately $100,000. Pointing out that some of Uie examiners travel between several stations, Hocutt said the new units are more compact Uian the former machines and have a durable case."We believe we’U get 30 years of service from these new Instruments also,” he said. Bradley Kyle Lagle celebrated hi* 3rd birthday on March 4 with a party at bli home. Gueitf enjoyed hamburgen and hotdogi and a cake decorated with Seiame Street characters. Brad li tlie grandion of Mr. and Mn. Calvin Barney of Route 3, Mockivllle and Mrs. Blanche Ugle ot Route 7. Mockivllle. Hli parents are Mr. and Mrs. Rickie Lagle o( Route 7. Шмшмп Combs celebraled bis 4tb birthday. Baiurdayj^February *4. wi^•t Us •I Route T.MocksvUle. HU parenU are Mr. and Mrs. Tommy Combs. His Uttle sUter. Heather. a«d several Irleads aad relatives kelped bUn celebrate. His birthday cake was baked by Us metlier aad «as decerated with cowboys aad iDdians. Sbaaaoa’s graadpareals arc Mr. and kirs. Harold Byrd al RmiI* I. Advance and Mr. aad Mrs. Nelson Combs of Asbeboro. DAVIE ACADEMYThe Davie Academy 4-H Club had their regular monUily meeting on Monday, March 5. President, Joe Tulbert called the meeting to order and led Uie pledges. Laura Parris had the devotions. Tracy Snow caUed Uie roU and read the minutes. There were 24 members, 4 leaders, and 7 visitors present. David Winfrey gave Uie treasurers report.Business was discussed. There wUl be a bake sale at Heffners’ on March 22 and also a paper driv^ on March 23. Nancy Hartman and Doug Lee had the program dem onstration. Liz HUlebrand gave a demon- stration on “Horse of a Dif­ferent Color”. We had a fUm on Sunshine Feed.Refreshments were served by Mrs. Betty CarUier and Mrs. June Parris and Uie meeting was adjourned. Todd Cartner Reporter '■tie /J««’ i«v X^1- C-N I'i Some people believe that apes can talk but don't for fear of being put to work. Staff Photo by Robin Carter “ O / i L ig h t n ir iß f O h ! ^ * A man called “Lightning” illustrates In the above picture how not to remove a person from a wreck. Sunday morning about 11 :S0 a.m., the 1972 Mercury was proceeding south on US 601, ran off the roadway on the right side and Into a ditch near the Intersection of the Cherry Hill Road. Hie passenger, Argene Hubbard, 27, of Salisbury, shown above, was later taken by ambulance to the Davte County Hospital. Thus far, “Lightning”, has not been located. The vehicle, owned by Sarge’s Inc. 3117 Jefferson Hwy., Jefferson, La., was damaged an estimated 1750. W E E K L Y N E W S ... fromNorth itive J(3mes E Lcambeth lina Legislature, 30“> District Nath Caiolina legujattve-Building. Raleigh. NC 2XU (919-733-SM3I The Appropriations on General Government and Transportation Committee on which we are proud to serve-is hard at work three hours a day examining Uie budge of State Depart­ments for 1979-1980, which has been presented to us by Uie Budget Advisory Committee. Under study by us are the Gienerai Assembly, Judicial Depart­ment, Governor’s Office, Lieutenant Governor’s Office, Special Boards and Commissions, Debt. Service and Reserves, and Departments of Ad­ministration, Agriculture, State Auditor, Commerce, Oime Control and Public Safety, Cultural Resources, Insurance, Justice, Labor, Natural Resources and Community Develop­ment, Revenue, Secretary of State, State Treasurer, and TransportaUon.llie Wildlife Resources BUl (HB 302, SB 226) which we are co-sponsorlng with Senator Conrad R. Duncan, D- Rockingham- is presently being discussed in both House and Senate Wildlife Committees. If you are un­familiar wiUi Uie bUl, NorUi Carolina’s WUdlife Conservation Laws have not been revised in nearly 45 years. But numerous amendments changing existing law have cropped up over the years. This is the main reason for the proposal at hand to reqwite the State’s Game Laws-to clear up any confusion Uiat may now exist and to redefine the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Ckimmisslon’s role as the State Agency responsible for regulating kiUlng game in the state. A major controversy ot the present proposal is the status of the fox which developed when the revised bill emerged during the 1977 General Assembly. The House Study Committee recommends that the fox be classified as a game animal, with trapping being permitted where the animal is not scarce.Unfortunately, the deadline for local bUls for the 1979-1980 session of Uie General Assembly was March 9, but for your future Information, your representatives can introduce a local bUl or add an amendment to a local bUl, whichever you as a constituent request. You might keep this in mind for the next session. McIntyre Is Available For A Volunteer Agency Mark McIntyre, son of Mr. and Mrs. (jeorge McIntyre, Route 6, MocksviUe, has announced his availabUity as a professional staff member with a volunteer agency.McIntyre expects to graduate from High Point (^Ue'ge on May 6 with a bachelor’s degree in human relations.His coUege career has prepared him to assume a leadership posiUon with Uie Boy (Hubs of America.At High Point CoUege, McIntyre is a member of the American Humanics Student Association, Uie High Point CoUege track team, and the High Point CoUege ChrisUan FeUowship group.McIntyre served tor Christ Program Team Leader for juvenUes during 1976, 1977, and 1978; YMCA program assistant 1977; and has had four years of acUve scouting. He is an Eagle Scout and was named to the AU Conference Tract Team in 1974. 135 Million Cars There are 135 mlUlon cars on the roads of Uie United States, at least one for every two people In Uie country. Cut youc. monthly payments by up to 50% or more! Just let Southern Discount help you pay your current debts with a consolidation loan of >2.000, ‘4,000, ’5,000,7,000, or more. All you have to be is a home owner with average good credit and your situation could improve much like the example below. H ere's how paym ents o f *308 w ere cut to *128 i f a m il y BUDGET PROBLEM • MONIIll V ■ ACCOUNI (IW .fi H,\>VilNT4 ' IIIAN Я .Ш О ____ î al k j 1.0\n 1,400 75 HOMI RI PAIR LOAN 750 45 1 ГНЛКГ.Ь CARDS 550 40 .... .^■sto res 250 • 01)0 BILLS 450 ÜÜ ' total 54.<11(1 VÍIPH CONSOLIDATIONLOAN SOLUTION AMOUNT Ol LOAN S5.041 ■ AMOLM SlLULD TO PAY BILLS 4.500, FXTR -, ( \SH FOR YOU S511 NEW MONTHLY PAYMENT si:s iv I54ATotal |>a> incnl of 7680. S veaik*6u 1 uua^ SD SOUTHER¥DTSCOONT----------------- P.O. Box689/42-ACourt Square 634-3SS6 Mocksville/North Carolina/27028 CHRIS LIHLE. PRESIDENT Fire Safety Worltshops To Be Held DAVIE COUN’H' ENTERPRISE RECORD, THURSDAY, MARCH IS, 1979 - 13 Thia ll Yvonne Renee Jonea ot Lilburn, Georgia. She celebrated her Sth birthday February 1, 1979 with her Kindergarten trienda. CharUe Brown decorations were used. They enjoyed punch with red, white, and chocolate cupcakes decorated with animal picka. Everyone had a balloon with their name on It and a heart ahaped aucker to take home with them. That night at home she celebrated again with her parents. Friday her grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. James Kelly “Dock" Smith, Sr. of Rt. 2 Mocksville came tor the weekend and picked her up at Kindergarten. That night 8 close trienda brought gltta when they came for cake and Ice cream. The cake, made for her by Nancy Lee, had a corral with horse figurea Inalde. She also received cards, money, and gifts trom other rlatlves In North Carolina. Yvonne Is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John David Jones formerly of the Farmington area. Her paternal grandmother la Mrs. Dinah Jonea of Rt. S. Mockavllle. Police Report The monthly report for February for the Mocksville Police Department, aa reported to the Mockavllle Town Baord on March 6 by Police Chief Alton Carter, was aa follows: -Arreata made - 96 -Complaints investigated - 91; -Courtesies rendered - 197: and -Waminga issued - 31. In some places people be> lieved that whoever cuts the last sheaf of wheat at harvest time will marry within the year —to someone old. Holy Cross Lutheran Youth To Stage A Love Fast Davie 4-H, In cooperation with the Davie County Fire Departments, and the Davie County Schools Is planning a four week county-wide Youth Fire Safety Program beginning the first week in April. This program is aimed at reaching the fifth and sixth grade students, 4-H’ers, and Boy Scouts In Davie County. However, any Interested young people are invited to attend.Firemen in the community fire stations have volunteered to teach the sessions. The four consecutive sessions will be taught during a iMi hours period each week at the fire departments. The topics for the four sessions will include; (1) The chemistry of fire, (2) Fire Hazards, (3) Fire Extinguishers, and (4) Home Fire Escape Plans.The first session will acquaint the student with the three essential elements which make up the fire trlangle-fuel, heat, and air. A fire safety demonstration kit will be used to em­phasize the nature of fire. Identification of common fire hazards will be the topic of the second session. Students will look for hazards in their homes and com­munities. The third session will ge devoted to giving the student a working knowledge of fire extinguishers. Home fire escape plans can be very important in case of fire. The fourth session will stimulate Interest and assist In developing home escape plans. Each session will be highlighted by a film to captivate the youUi In an effort to teach tire safety. Officials are confident that the fire sUtlon setting will encourage good participation by the students. In ad­dition, the youth can become familiar with the operation of the community fire station. Enrollment for the sessions will take place in the schools with the aid of Highway Patrol Names Local Recruiting Officer In an effort to expand recruiting ef­forts of the SUte Highway Patrol, State Patrol Commander John T. Jenkins has named eight troopers, one In each troop in the state, to serve as Recruiting of­ficers.Trooper C.H. Johnson will serve as Recruiting Officer tor Troop D-3. Working out ot his base station In Winston-Salem, he will spend two days a week, roughly 40 percent of his thne, finding qualified applicants, especiaUy minorities and females, interested in joining the Patrol.According to Jenkins, the officers will solicit speaking engagements from civic, military, coUege and university and other community leaders in an effort to attract qualUied applicants. They wUl also make personal contact with persons who would likely qualify and tty to interest them in appljing.Recruiting Officers will begin their new duties on Mareh 12. __________ the fifth and sixth grade teachers and principals. Students will receive enroUment information during the week ot March 19. Sessions will begin the week ot April 2 and foUow through the next three weeks. Certificates wiU be awarded to those attending three or more sessions in the Youth Fire Safety Program.A successful Youth Fire Safety Program was completed In Davie in 1973 and 1977. Due to the success of these programs, the Oavie Firemen are repeating the same program. The program offers students a chance to learn something worthwhile and to help others as they are learning themselves. The promotion of fire safety is a most satisfying experience for everyone involved. For additional Information and enrollment, contact Douglas Lee, Assistant Extension 4-H Agent at 634-5134^FoUowing Is a schedule for the Fire Safety Workshops.Starting April 3, continuing April 10,17, 24 at Smith Grove Fire Station.Starting April 4, Continuing AprU 11, 18, 25 at MocksviUe Fire Station.Starting April 5, continuing April 12, 19, 26 at Center Fire Station. How To Reduce , Best of Show winners in the county 4-H Bake-On were (1 to r) Allison Sell, Tonya(r O O u lB S 1 Turner, Charlynne Ellis, Christy Hamrick and Teresa Shew. (Photo by RobinCarter) Static Electricity 4 -H Baking Contest Winners Announced During the winter, static electricity makes clothes cling and hair stand straight out every time it is brushed.What can you do to eliminate it?According to specialists with the North Carolina Agricultural Extension Service, the static cling in clothes can be reduced by using a fabric softener In the last rinse cycle or in the dryer. Removing clothes from the dryer when they are stlU slighUy damp or line drying clothes also seems to help.There are commercial products which can be sprayed on cloUiing to prevent static cling, but to relieve Uie problem temporarily, spray hair spray between your dress, skirt or hose and a nylon slip.Using a creme rinse ^hen shampooing wUl have the same effect as a fabric softener has on clothes.Applying hair spray to the brush before brushing your hair may also cul down on the amount of static electricity eenerated. Licenses Are Suspended Motor vehicle operator's license revoked and sustendedln Davte County for the period ending February 23rd included: Edward L. Kiblinger, SI, of Cooleemee, suspended as of January 29, 1979 until January 29, 1980. The 1979 4-H Baking Contest was held Saturday, March 10, in the County Office BuUding and was attended by 80 youth and adiUts. There were 48 entries from 33 different 4-H members representing 9 community 4-H Clubs.“Best of Show Awards” selected from category winners were presented to Tonya Turner, cakes: AUison Sell, pies; Davie Pork Producers To Meet March 22 The Davie County Pork Producers wiU hold their next regular meeting on Thursday, March 22, at 7:30 p.m. in the auditorium of the County Office BuUding. The meeting wUl begin with a sponsored meal, courtesy of McNess Feed Company of Statesville. Anyone interested in pork production is invited to attend as weU as aU pork producers.The program for the meeting wUl be concerning the nutrition of baby pigs. After the program, the producers wiU discuss future activities of the Davie County Prok Producers Association,All producers planning to attend are asked to contact Ronnie W. Thompson, Associate Agricultural Extension Agent, at 634-5134, and make reservations by ' Monday, March 19, so that meal plans can be completed. Christy Hamrick, cookies; Allison Sell, yeast breads; Teresa Shew, muffins; and Charlynne EUis, biscuits. Awards were sponsored by Davie United Way and Martha White Kitchens.During the contest, two breads demonstrations were presented to the audience of youth and adults. Mrs. Louise Allen, adult leader from Davie Academy, showed correct measuring techniques, a very important part of baking. One of Sheffield-Calahaln’s 4-H leaders, Mrs. Pat ReiUy, demonstrated a very popular food, Moravian Sugar Cake. She even had samples for the .ludicnce to taste.Judges for this year’s event were Mrs. Gin Duncan, Mrs. Peggy Cornatzer, Mrs. Agnes Wooten, Mrs. Jane Bullard, Mrs. Terri Dunn, Mrs. OUle Ward, Mrs. Shirley CotUe, Mrs. Doris MiUer, and Mrs. Elaine Beauchamp.Category winners receiving blue ribbons and certificates were: Pre-Teen - Pies, KeUy Kinder; Muffins, Bradley Pruit; Cake, Tonya Turner; and Cookies, Christy Hamrick. Early Teen - Biscuits, Charlynne Ellis; Yeast Breads, AUlson SeU; Pies, AlUson Sell; Muffins, Teresa Shew; Cake, Marsha Reavis. Senior Teen - Pies, Malanda Wright; Cale, Kathy Teilly; and Cookies, Cheryle Woodward.Other blue ribbon winners were Teresa Shew, Tracy Snow, Rebekkah AngeU, Teresa Ratiedge, Angela Cope, Tricia ReiUy, Joe Tulbert, Cheryle Woodward, Malinda Wright and Terry Reavis.Red ribbons went to Kaye Boles, Sandy Alberty, Chariynne EUis, Leanne Williams, Charlotte Junker, Jan CoUette, Daphne Cartner, Tonya Tur­ner, April RusseU, Pam Reavis, Venus Reavis, Bradley Pruitt, Ashley Max­well, Wendy Reavis, Mark Hamrick, David WiUiams, WUl Junker, Kathy ReUly, Sidney White and Terry Reavis. Towed Vehicle Hits Car A vehicle being towed went to the left of center and struck another vehicle in an accident March 6th on the Hanes Road, 5.4 mUes east of MocksvUle.Involved in the accident occurring about 4:04 p.m., was a 1966 Ford truck operated by Jimmy Roger Barney, 46, of Rt. 3 MocksvUle and a 1970 Ford being operated by Eleanor Neely Faulkner, 33, of Advance.State Highway Patrolman W.D. Grooms said his InvestigaUon showed. Uiat Barney was towing another vehicle with the truck. In a sharp curve, the vehicle being towed went to the left ot center and struck the FauUcner vehicle.Damage to the Faulkner vehicle was estimated at $300. Barney was charged with driving to the left of center. The youth group of Holy Cross Lutheran Church of MocksvUle wUl Uve up to its name, Agape, this month when tbe members stage a Love Fast. Moved by the tragedy of Salem Lutheran Church of SaUsbury which burned down recently, the group decided to do tmmething for Salem. The decision was to hold a twenty- four hour fast. Members of the group wiU meet at Holy Cross and beghi the fast at 6 p.m. on Friday, ARC To Hold Meeting Tuesday The Davie County Association for Retarded CiUzens Membership “Kick- Off” meeting wUl be held Tuesday, March 20, at 7:30 p.m. at Uie Davie County PubUc Library.The pubUc is invited to attend.A special service recognition awards wiU be presented and a fUm ot the March 30 and continue until 6 p.m. on Saturday, March 31. The participants are looking for sponsors who are willing to support them in this project. The support is in the form of contributions either of an hourly rate or project donation. Proceeds will be given to Salem Lutheran Church. Center Methodist To Hold Revival Center United Methodist Church will have revival services March 26-27.The Rev. Robert L. "Bob" Oakley, Pastor of Trinity United Methodist Church, Lexington wUl be Oie guest speaker. Rev. Oakley was pastor of Center United MeUiodist Church 1954-1958.The services wiU be each evening at 7:30 p.m. In old China, it was believed______ powdered jade would 1978 Special Olympics wUl be strengthen the Jieart, lungi shown. * and voice. Fuluro canes provide needed walking assistance and are available in a wide range of styles and finishes, both for ladies and men. Regular and adlustable canes in either select hardwoods or tubular aluminum are available, all with replaceable non-skid rubber tips for maximum safety.Futuro Patlent-Aids quad canes are also available In two sizes. A Complete Selection of CANES Medicare Note; It you qualify, Medi­care may pay for a large part of the purchase or rental price ot FUTURO Palient-Aids convalescent products. Headquarter$ tor the complete line of Patlent-Aldt conifBlescent products. W i l k i n ’s HOSPITAL PHARMACY 713 HOSPITAL ST. PHONE 634-3300 WILKINS DRUG CO. 20 COURT SQ. PHONE 634'2121 F R S T F E D E R A L R E T R E M E N T P L A N W I T H „ B E N E F I T S Y O U C A N U S E N O W . First Federal offers a retirement plan that allows persons not covered by a qualified pension plan to save in a tax-sheltered account that yields a high return. The money you deposit is tax-deferred and deductible from your annual income, so you pay less in Income tax. These tax benefits can mean big savings each year, if you would like to leam more about I.R.A., sec the folks at First Federal... where putting First Things First Is a way of business. HRST FEDERAL SAVINGS Main Office: 230 N. Chenv Street Branch Offices: 490 IHanes Mall • 130 S. Stratford Road 3443 Robin Hood Road (Robin Hood Center) 2815 Reynolda Road • 3001 Waughtown Street Mocksville Office: 215 Gaither Streel «iMim 14 DAVIK COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 1979 You and Your Pet There is no mistaking Ute misery and depression of a pet suffering from distemper. II Is one of tiie most dreaded ot all canine diseases. Puppies are more susceptible to distemper tiian older dogs, but the disease can occur at any age.Symptoms of canine distemper are similar to those of an upper respiratory ailment. You may notice a runny nose, flat and dry cough and loss of appetite at first. This will be followed by a high temperature, vomiting, a white crusty material around the eyes and nose, thirst and diarrhea. In the last stages of the disease, there may be muscular twitching, con­vulsions or paralysis.Canine distemper Is a highly contagious disease caused by a virus that is carried through the air. It is more common in the colder months, although a pet may contract the disease in any weather. Canine distemper can be picked up by direct contact with another dog with distemper or from the feet, hands or clothing of the person caring for such an animal. In fact, everything used by the distemper- infected dog may spread the disease; its cough, sneeze and urine contain virus particles that travel on air currents and can infect dogs.To prevent distemper, it is Important to have your pup vaccinated soon after it arrives from pet shop or kennel and to follow with booster shots at intervals set up by your veterinarian.Occasionally, the protection offered by vaccination is rejected by puppies already carrying immunity obtained from nursing their mother. Puppies receive what are imown as maternal antibodies from tiieir mother’s first milk, called colostrum. These special proteins temporarily protect the pups from specific diseases which the mother is immune to. If the mother has distemper immunity, for example, she will pass on distemper antibodies and short-term protection to her litter.There is no easy way to tell if the puppy is ready to accept a distemper vaccination. Thus many puppies were left unprotected while their matemal antibodies disap­peared l>etween 6 and 12 weeks of age.Researchers discovered that measles virus will puppies from distemper during this in­termediate period. Puppies can be Immunized by a combination distemper- measles vaccine whether or not maternal antibodies are present. Your veterinarian can give you details about it.The death rate for un­protected pets is high, and many pets that do survive distemper attacks are disabled. Sometimes distemper leaves the animal deaf or without the sense of smell. Permanent damage to the nervous system may cause chorea (twitching) for the rest of the pet’s life.If there is a case of distemper in your neigh­borhood, keep away from the house and everyone in it. Even a short visit from a member of the family with the diseased pet could transfer the virus to your pet. If your dog should suffer an attack of distemper, good nursing care will be vital to bring him through. He should be kept quiet and isolated in clean, warm, dry and well- ventiiated quarters. Simple foods such as beef broth and soft-boiled eggs may have little Interest in food, so you may need to coax him to eat several times a day. Follow your veterinarian’s advice about medicines and treat­ment to help your pet recover as quickly as possible. Following recovery, blankets and materials that are not too valuable to discard should be burned. Otherwise, clean and spray disinfect everything the pet hag come in contact with . . . including the backyard and fence posts.Canine distemper is a dreaded disease that can be prevented. Booster shots at prescribed intervals will keep your pet’s immunity at a highlevei so it can resist in­fection. Distemper is much easier to prevent than to treat. havehumanprotectcanine 'rii>! record for tht“ highe»! prin> ever paid for a glass object al an auction was set at SoUieby’s in London on ■ July 13,"197bV Thy ifla»» piece, an Archaemcnid Per­sian bowl, measuring si* and three-quarter inches in diam eter, was sold for $llf>,940 “Old wine and an old friend are good proviiioni."George Herbert SAVE UP T O ... COOlECfflEC BE A... welcome FOOD S T A M P SHOPPERS COOLEEMEE, N.C. OPEN FRIDAY NITES TIL 8:30 P.M. WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT SUPER MARKET SERVE ICE COLD COKES 6 33.8 Oz.3 BTLS. WITH ONE FIttEO SUPER SAVER CARD OFFER GOOD THRU MARCH 17, 1979 YOUR CHOICE SUGAR 8 9 5-LB. BAG MVI3» WITH ONE FltlED SUPER SAVER CARD OFFER GOOD THRU MARCH 17,1979 BLUE BONNET OLEO 1-LB. CTN.3 9 SAVE SC WITH ONE FILLED SUPER SAVER CARD OFFER GOOD THRU MARCH \7. 1979 TATER BOY FRENCH FRIES 5-LB. BAG 9 9 С $AVE60< WITH ONE FILIED SUPER SAVER CARD OFFER GOOD THRU MARCH ? 7. } 979 BANQUET FRIED CHICKEN 892-LB. BOX ■ M V E S IJ S WITH ONE FILLED SUPER SAVER CARD OFFER GOOD THRU MARCH J7. )979 WALDORF BATHROOM TISSUE 6 9 PKG. OF 4'S ^ ^ «W37« WITH ONE FltlED SUPER SAVER CARD OFFER GOOD THRU MARCH 17, 1979 CHATHAMREG.DOC FOOD 25-LB. BAG WITH ONE filled SUPER SAVER CARD OFFER GOOD THRU MARCH 17, 1979 QUARTER PORK MAXWELL HOUSE INSTANT COFFEE 6-OZ. JAR $ 2 ^ 9 SAVE4C WITH ONE FILLED SUPER SAVER CARD OFFER GOOD THRU MARCH 17. 1979 ASST. DIAL SOAP 1 BATH BARS 0 0 SAVE35< WITH ONE FILLED SUPER SAVER CARD OFFER GOOD THRU MARCH 17. 1979 TETLEY TEA BAGS 10 PKG. OF lOO'S П 59 SASAVE 40« WITH ONE FILLED SUPER SAVER CARD OFFER GOOD THRU MARCH 17. 1979 ^m SUPER saver EXPiANATIONMi^ Hat»'« your opportunllv for loM m ita M v in ^ • Vou'll r*c«W « 1 S w ^ r lo r ooch 11 pwrchato ol our iioro. • I i Supor Sottort n il о Svpor Savor Card (a«allablo Irao at ourchochovn). • W olch lo t out odvorllM rf Sopor Sovot tpoclel». you to»tngi w ill bo 01 m iKh o i oH o «r ro fu lo t ptko. FRESH LEAN (SROUND BACON WHITE'S BOLOGNA HUNT'S TOMATO KETCHUP HEINZ KOSHER GENUINE POLISH DILLS YOUR CHOICE CHINA FOAM DIVIDED 9-INCH PLATTER Or PLATES MB. PKG. 32-OZ. BTL. 464)Z. JAR PKG.OF10'S 9 9 9 9 4 9 Ç ROAST ARMOUR'S POTTED MEAT SALTINE CRACKERS ZESTA YELLOW-WHITE POPCORN 5 -34)Z. CANS 1-LB. BOX 2-LB. BAG STEAK ^ - „ ARMOUR'S VIENNA *2 ” SAUSAGE . _ _ - FRENCH'S INSTANT *1 “ I POTATOES JAMBOREE STRAWBERRY PRESERVES JAMBOREE GRAPE JELLY 6 9 * 4 9 ' 5-OZ. CAN 6</i-0Z. PKG. 2-LB. JAR 2-LB. JAR MIGHTY HIGH STRAWBERRY SHORT- » •J 3 » 5 9 ' 9 9 « 5 9 ' M iA D ” CAKE BANQUET TV DINNERS M.D.I. BISCUITS 25-OZ. CAKE ASST. 11 OZ. CANS EASTERN WHITE POTATOES FIRM, CRISP 10-LB. BAG 0 0 ^ hi yellow ONIONS Ш . BAG LETTUCE BLUE BONNET -14». CTN. IDEAL HOT'DOG, HAMBURGER, & BROWN 'N SERVE HEAD SERVE ICE COLD CHICKEN BEEFLIVER COKES M.D.I. DOG FOOD WALDORF BATHROOM TISSUE KOTEX SANITARY NAPKINS REGULAR ORSUPER 3 9 * f k 33,84)1 V BTLS. В + DEP. 6 st 8 9 ' 4 4 8 9 ' m 8 8 * « Once co-workers al the Davie Counly Post Officc Daisy Holfhouser, Virginia Waters, (standing), Stonestreet and Arthur Daniel gather to discuss old times. B o o n e S t o n e s t r e e t . B e g i n n i n g T h e S e c o n d 1 0 0 Y e a r s L ik e a m o rn in g d re a m , life becom es m o re a n d m o re b rig h t th e lo n g e r we live, a n d the re aso n o f everything ap p e ars m o re clear. W h a t has p u z z le d us becom es less m ysterious, a n d the croo ked ‘ p a th s lo o k s tra ig h te r as we a p p r o a c h the e n d . Marshall Boone Stonestreet makes a toast saluting his 100 years of life. —Richter. Marshall Boone Stonestreet who celebrated his 100th birthday Sunday, March 11 Is the epitomy of this verse.With confidence and conviction he aches life to Its fullest, looking c on experience as a guiding light to tomorrow.Having served as president of the MocksvUle Savings and Loan board of directors since 1946, he retired from service December 31, 1977. Stonestreet had been on the l>oan] since 1927. i||) fSiends from Mocksvilie, and Davie, ^otm ^ turned out in force Sunday at the Forest Oaks Country Club in Green­sboro to honor Stonestreet upon reach^ a century of life. The celebration was given by his children Mrs. BUI Brooks of Greensboro and Dr. Frank Stonestreet of Albemarle, l l Stonestreet, who looks and acts much lounger than his 100 years was heard commenting to people expressing bir­thday wishes, “Today I wUl celebrate my lOOth birthday, and tomorrow I wiU begin on my second hundred years of life."Stonestreet was a maU carrier in Savie County in the early 1920’s. a job he Tept before retiring in December 1945. During his years with the postal service, he worked with many Davie Countians including Arthur Daniel, Daisy Holthouser, and Virginia Waters.All were in attendance Sunday and reminsced about old times with Stonestreet.Arthur Daniel who is 96 recalled, “In the early days we traveled in a horse and buggy to deliver the mail. Stonestreet and myself would wrap a blanket around a hot brick and place it in the buggy to warm our feet.”“We started to work early,” he said," and many a day we returned by the light of lantern hanging on the side of the buggy.Daisy Holthouser said, “Boone Stonestreet was the most pleasant person I have ever had the honor to work with.”“There were only four carriers at that time to service the entire county.No matter what pressures of business were upon him,” said Miss Holthouser, Boone remained t>leasant and very easy to get along with."Withthe wisdom that his years convey, Stonestreet expressed his beliefs for a successful and happy life.“Just do the best you can aU the way through life," he said with a smUe. Sometimes it is easy and sometimes it’s not, but Just keep busy. “That’s one of the most important things for a happy life, he said. Be satisfied with wliat you have and don’t worry about what you don’t have."The desire for longevity is within each of us, but the abUity to live 100 years is a secret even to Stonestreet. “I can’t specificaUy say what I have done to reach this mark in life, he said. “The only advice I can give is to do exactly what the doctors tell you." “They alwaySj.managed to cure me,' “he said with a la ^ . ' Stonestreet had appendicitis in 1910 and gaU bladder surgery in 1932. Since Uiat time he has been astoundingly healthy. Over the past ten years he has had several pacemakers but admits that they slow him down very little.“I don’t drink, smoke or use tobacco in any form,” he said, “But I can’t say if this has attributed to my long life or appearance.“I have always kept busy and have always had a job." This to me is the most important contribution to my long life," he said.Stonestreet assumed his position on the MocksvUle Savings and Loan board of directors in 1927 and did not retire from this position until the age of 98.Laws of the association state man­datory retirement age, but Stonestreet said as a look of contentment crossed his face, “I worked 20 to 25 years longer than I was supposed to.”Stonestreet lived in MocksviUe untU five years ago at which time he moved into the home of his daughter and son-in- law Mary Elizabeth and BiU Brooks of Greensboro. His wife, the late Viola Ratt Stonestreet, died in 1972. They were married in 1911 and had she lived two more weeks, would have been 90.After the move to Greensboro, Stonestreet frequently returned to MocksviUe to enjoy the company of "hometown Iwys."Stonestreet has firm beliefs on keeping busy, and travels with his daughter whenever possible. He ac­companies her to the shopping centers and takes advantage of the opportunity to taUt with people he meets.At home he listens to the radio and keeps up-to-date with the world news. Stonestreet is also an avid sports fan.With more than 200 people in at­tendance Sunday, the event was much more tlian celebration marking 100 years of life. It was a time in which people gathered to honor a man the) respect and love.MarshaU Boone Stonestreet is a monument to Davie County...a man whose roots are deep within the area. His achievements and contributions to Uiis town wUl never be forgotten or unappreciated. D A V IE C O U N T Y F e a t u r e 1 - B M a r c h 1 5 , 1 9 7 9 Story by Kathy Tomlinson Photos by Robin Carter Mrs. Helen Martin (bending), George and Brook Martin and Lester Martin (left to right) were on hand to extend best wishes. Standuig with his children Dr. Frank Stonestreet ah^’GBlJrooks, Sfohestfeet looks much younger than his 100 years. Ed Jarvis (right) loan ofncer with Vorluville Savings and IxMn, and his wife Vickie entend tlieir cougralulations to Stonestreet. 2B DAVIi; COUNTY KNTERPRISE RECORD, THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 1*574 Staf^hot^ySreyTostcT A ll- S t a t e T o u r n a m e n t S t a r s ^ D a v ie s ta r s D e a n n a T h o m a s a n d J i l l A m o s w e r e n a m e d to th e a l l ­ t o u r n a m e n t te a m a t t h e N o r t h C a r o lin a H ig h S c h o o l A t h le t ic A s s o c ia tio n g i r l ’s 3-A b a s k e t b a ll t o u r n a m e n t in H ic k o r y la s t w e e k . T h o m a s s c o re d S4 p o in ts a n d g ra b b e d 38 r e b o u n d s In t h e t o u r n a m e n t , w h ile A m o s t a llie d 44 p o in ts a n d m a d e s e v e r a l k e y s te a ls f o r t h e W a r E a g le s . A ls o n a m e d to th e te a m w e r e G r a h a m ’s D o n n a T r o llln g e r a n d R o b in H a d le y , S o u t h w e s t E d g e c o m b ’s A lp h e lla J e n k in s a n d W e s t e r n H a r n e t t ’s L is a M a tt h e w s . N e w C e n t e r S o f t b a l l F i e l d T h e n e w C e n t e r c o m m u n it y s o f tb a ll f le ld Is n e a r in g c o m p le tio n a n d w i l l b e r e a d y f o r t h is s e a s o n . R e p r e s e n t a t iv e s f r o m e a c h te a m In th e le a g u e ( m e n ’s a n d w o m e n 's ) a r e a s k e d to a t te n d a m e e t in g T u e s d a y , M a r c h 2 0 th , 7 :3 0 p .m ., a t t h e C e n te r C o m m u n it y B u ild in g . R u le s , e n t r y fe e s , e tc . w i l l b e a d o p te d . O n ly a f e w o p e n in g s r e m a in in t h e le a g u e s . A n y o n e In t e r e s t e d In e n t e r in g a te a m s h o u ld a t t e n d t h is m e e t in g o r c a ll 492-7777 o r 492-5113. Davie Nine Defeats East Davidson, 5 - 1 In a game against East Davidson at the East Davidson field Tuesday af­ternoon the Davie boys pulled out a 5-1 win.Going into the top of the 7th inning the Davle squad trailed 1-0, but Todd Jones got a base hit to start the winning five- run rally and Bobby Smith doubled home the winning run with the bases loaded.Bart Reece pitched a 4-hltter for the War Eagles to notch the win.David Barnhardt had two hits for Davie in the game and Kenny EUer played a really good defensive game at shortstop for the War Eagles. East Rowan opened Its high school baseball season in style, blasting out 14 hits on its way to whipping Davle County, 8-1, last Friday at Granite Quarry’s Station Field.The Mustangs came back from a one- run deficit to score five runs in the second inning and later add another in the tliird and two in the fifth.Righthander Kim Arey pitched the win. Going the distance, Arey allowed six hits, an earned run and four walics, while registering 13 strikeouts.Arey, a senior, struck out 10 of the last 12 batters he faced.“Kim started slow but settled down, found his control and got his breaking pitch going,” said Mustang head coach Phil Harbinson. “After that, he was superb.”Kelly Gordy rapped out three hits and drove in four runs from the leadoff slot to pace East Rowan, Arey, Todd McKenzie, Terry Kepley and designated hitter Rusty Hiatt connected for two hits Gordy and Hiatt had a double each for the Mustangs’ only extra-base hits of the game.East committed only one error in the game. That came on a throwing error ‘ from a plckoff attempt. D A V II COUNTY lA S T ROWAN ESmMI-p .. r UM 2 0 11 erdy.ibHlcmb.ll 1 0 0 0 Blton.li Brnht.lb 4 0 2 0 Slvnt,» RMCt,ef-p 3 0 0 0 KArtK.p Burton,lb 1 0 0 0 McKni.rf 1 0 0 0 Hlfnr.lbJoncirCBSmlth,c Craftdh Sh«rrill,»ft OSmHh., • ■b r hM 4 13 44 1 0 0 0 0 0 03 0 3 14 0 3 0 3 0 10 10 0 0 0 0 0 0 lh.0h\rf GrubtflfH«ll»rd.3bCt»d)r.3b OivMiCwiiifr ■••t IlMran 3 0 0 0 - 0 0 0 01 0 0 0 Brwr.cf4 0 0 0 Kftltr.ph t 0 1 0 Hlatt.dh 10 1 0 Stmll.3b Ilio Pilt.3b 3 0 0 0 BrowfVCShlvt,pl> 17 I « I Ttfaii O il IIO 0 - 1•SI OM I 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 10 0 0 3 3 3 0 0 0 0 0 10 0 0 3 1 1 1 10 10 3 3 3 0 34 014 I E -• Whitaktf. CatMdjr, Burton. Shtr* rill Z K. Arty. LOB - Davla County 7. Eatt Rowan V 3B - E. Smith. Gordy. Hiatt. SF - K. Aray. SB, - Sttvani, McKtntl«. Pr.t,,u.^„ /5 iE. Smith 3\4 S 3 3 0 1Rate« m I 0 0 0 0K. A rn (W .I4 ) 7 4 I 1 4 13 HBP - Kaplay (by E. Smith). PB • Jont»3. U - Hampton. Kaplay. T - 1:31. Drag Racing Season Opens At Farmington By Ralph SmithThe drag racing season opened Saturday night at Farmington Dragway but rain forced action lo be postponed until Sunday afternoon after about an hour of practice. Nevertheless 102 drivers retumed along with a near capacity crowd of drag racing fans. It was the first time In several years that the track has reverted to a Saturday night schedule. Many of the drivers competing came as far away as Virginia and S.C.Capturing the super-stock victory was Mike Westmoreland of KernersviUe, driving the Westmoreland and Mabe Camaro. He picked up $250.00 with a victory over the Camaro of Arnold Hinson of Lenior. Westmoreland’s winning elapsed time on the Vk mUe dragstrip was 7:38 seconds. Low quaUfyier for super-stock action had been the Chevy 11 of Robert Bowman of Walnut Cove with a low elapsed time of 6:90 seconds. Bowman wound up a semi-finalists along with one of last seasons frequent winners Linwood Daughertry of Salem, Va.Bob Tilley of Rural HaU drove his Vega U> a victory in the Pro-Street division with an elapsed time of 7:48 seconds winning out over the Camaro of Mike Hawks of Mt. Airy to pick up a $200.00 purse.In the Modified-Street division Wayne Myers of Clemmons put down a winning elapsed time of 8:75 seconds in a Nova to win out over the Camaro of Jerry Hicks of Winston Salem.The Super-Street division ended up un a battle between the Plymouths of Ronald Thomas of Mt. Airy and MUte I Groce of MocksveUe with Thomas getting the victory.Super-Stockers Steve StuiU of Wahiut Cove and Kenny Melton of HiUsvUle, Va., who had been in victory circle numerous times last season finished as semi-finaUsta.Track managers Norman DrouiUard and Jerry Joyce described Far­mington's first Saturday night race in several years as a success. “Even though the rain bit us early Saturday night, almost everyone retumed on Sunday,” said DrouUlard. “We even had some drivers here for tbeir first Ume and we feel this Saturday night schedule wUI be successful.”Two IHRA National Title Series races are set for later this season at Far­mington. Tbe track also is running "Motocross” Motorcycle competition events twice a monUi witb tbe next event scheduled for next Sunday.' Drivers UUs season at Farmington wUl be able to compete in a points fund and higher purses are also being paid out this season. Farmington Softball Anyone wishing to enter a men's or women's team in ttie Farmington Soft­baU League should conUct Derek Harpe, »98-3044. Hie enU7 fee wUl be $70.00 and each team furnish ttie baUs. DiamondA diamond is actuaUy a very pure carbon, formed miUions of years ago under intese heat and pressure of the earth’s Uquid magma, says National Cieographic. t Mayo r Sm ith Commends Davie Girls ^Basketball Team I would like to congratulate and cnmmcnd you for your outstanding per­formance In the final«. And while you didn't quite make II to the top we are proud of your untiring effort* and for the goals you did reach. It Is Indeed a tribute to Davle High and the community for the recognition you received while climbing in the playoffs.Once again, I am proud of you. Keep up the good work! Stacerely R.C. SMITH Mayor of MocksvUle '‘‘^BigRed The following poem was written and composed by her uncle, Alvin T. Can­nady, of Mocksville. “TRIBUTE TO DEANNA” Cause I'm supposed to be a poet. Just wait while I make this rhyme, When it comes to winning at any sport. I'll pick "Big Red” everytime. We call "Big Red” Uie Roadrunner- Do you know Uie reason why?Wel, check that girl on Uie back track You’d think "Big Red” could fly! Now when it comes to all these sports, Just listen to this story- If my girl, "Red” keeps on keeping on;|ft She's bound for fame and glory. Baseball Roster NAME Bart Reece Scott Pratt Ed Smith Joe Holcomb Bobby Smith Todd Jones Dean Smith Alan Pardon David Barnhardt Keitti Craft Kenny HeUard Todd Cassidy Todd SherriU Barry WhiUock Brent Burton Steve Grubb Larry Whitaker Kevin Foster Jaimie James GRADE 12101010121211101212119109 12 1210 10 9 POSITION Pitcher - OF Pitcher - OF Pitcher - OF Pitcher - OF Catcher Catcher Catcher Catcher First Base First Base Second Base Second Base Shortstop Shortstop Third Base Outfield Outfield - Inf. Outfield Outfield - Inf. M e m b e r s o f th e 1979 D a v ie H ig h b a s e b a ll te a m a r e : ( f r o n t r o w l- r ) ; E d K e l ly ( m a n a g e r ) , S c o tt P r a t t , T o d d J o n e s , D e a n S m it h , B o b b y S m it h , T o d d C a s s id y , K e n n y H e lla r d , T o d d S h e r lli, B a r r y W h itlo c k , E d S m it h , B a r t R e e c e , B i l l y M a r s ( m a n a g e r ) . S ta n d b ig ( l- r ) ; C o a c h D a v id H u n t, S te v e G r u b b , D a v id B a r n h a r d t , J a m ie J a m e s , J o e H o lc o m b , B r e n t B u r t o n , L a r r y W h it t a k e r , K e it h C r a f t, K e v in F o s t e r , C o a c h K e n B o g e r. ( P h o to b y G a r r y F o s t e r ) ^ Davie High Boys Tennis Team Wins 3 Straight Victories ^ MANAGERS Ed KeUey BiUy Marrs The Davie High boys' tennis team is off to a fast start this spring with 3 early season victories in its first three meets of the season.On March 7 the Davie netters shut out Trinity, 9-0, in North Piedmont Con­ference matches played at the Davie home courts. The foUowing day the team from Davie traveled to South Rowan and triumphed Uiere, 8-1, in a non- conference meet. Tuesday. March 12, saw the Davie squad going to Thomasville to take a 7-2 conference victory.. Scores of the individual matches in the first three season meets were as follows: The large boisterous crowd of rooters from Davie,get behind the girls as they rally to overcome a lead by Graham. (Photo by Garry Foster) Davie High Girls Begin Softball The Davie High gb-li’ softball team, defendhig North Piedmont Conference champions, wiU open defense ot that tiUe hi its first game of the season Friday. March 16, when It travels to Trinity for a 4:00 p.m. conference contest.On Tuesday. March 20, the Davle giris wlU host Asheboro bi a con­ference game at 4:00 p.m. at Rich Park in MocksvUle.In next week's Enterprise a finalized roster and story -con- cerabig the Davie gb-i softbaUers wiU appear. Billy Packer To Participate in Basketball Show Here March 30th DAVIE VS. TRINITY Singles Matches -Everidge (D) defeated R. HUl (T), 6- 1, 6-3;-Rauch (D) defeated Slucker (T), 6-2,6-0; i -MiUer (D) defeated S. HiU (T), 7-6,6- X 0; ^ -Kimberly (D) defeated Reece (T), 6- 3, 6-2;-SmiUi (D) defeated Eller (T), 6-0, 6- 1;-Fleming (D) defeated Swlggett (T), 6-1, 6-1.Doubles Matches -Everidge-MUler (D) defeated R. HiU-S. HUl (T), 6-0, 6^);-Rauch-Kimberly (D) defeated Jucker-Seiggett (T), 6-1, 6-2;-SmiUi-Fieming (D) defeated Royals- Pickett (T), 6-1, 6-0.DAVIE VS SOUTH ROWANSingles Matches M.-Everidge (D) defeated Rogers (SR), ^ 6-3, 6-3;-Rauch (D) defeated Champion (SR), frO, 6-1;-MUler (D) defeated Deal (SR), 6-4,6- 0;-Kimberly (D) defeated Myers (SR), , 6-2, 6-2; H-SmiUi (D) defeated Strickland (SR), ^ 6-2, 6-2;-Fleming (D) defeated Jones (SR), 6-0, 6-3.Doubles Matches -Rogers-Deal (SR) defeated Everidge-MUler (D), 8-6; ^ ,-Rauch-Kimberly (D) defeatea|||, Champion-Strickland (SR), 8-4; ^-SmiUi-Fleming (D) defeated Myers- Jones (SR), 8-5.DAVIE VS THOMASVILLE Singles Matches -Hollard (T) defeated Everidge (d), 6^, 3-6, 3-6; V-Rauch (D) defeatedSmiUi (T), 6-2,6-m -Alexander (T) defeated MiUer (D),6-4, fr6, 3-6;-Kimberiy (D) defeated Latham (T),6-2, 6-3;-SmiUi (D) defeated MitcheU (T), 6-2, 6-3;-Fleming (D) defeated Rodden (T), 6-^ 1, 6-3. WDoubles Matches -Everidge-Mlller (D) defeated Hollard-Smith (T), 6-1, 6-3;-Rauch-Kimberly (D) defeated LaUiam-Aiexander (T);-Fleming-SmiUi (D) defeated Rod- den-Patery (T). BiUy Packer, naUonal TV basketbaU personality and Davie County resident, will participate at Davie High School in an evening of basketball sponsored by the Davie High AthleUc Boosters' Club The Greatest TIPS ON JOGGIIMGIt's fun...It’s free...It's jogging!Here are tips to help you run in comfort and safety:• Get your physician's approval before you run.• Then, dress comfurtably. Buy sturdy running shoes, absorbent socks, and clothes treated with aerosol softener to minimize rubbing.• Keep cool and confidetit with convenient aerosol de odorant, and protect feet with spray powder.• Wear lightweight cloth­ing in layers so you can peel cnme off when you get warm. J IMuhammad Ali, then known as Cassius Clay, is shown here scoring a smash­ing uppercut to the jaw of Floyd Patterson in Las Vegas on November 22,1965.Ppopie with films of other old fight:,, particularly the one between lightweight fighters Armstrong and Jenkins in 1939 or the heavy­weight fight between Louis and Burman in 1938. may be able to sell them for a good price to former hand­ball champion Jim Jacobs. 9 East -10th St., New York. N.Y.10016. on March 30.The evening's events wiU begin at 7 p.m. in the high school's gymnasium and, in addition to Packer, others in­volved in the event will include both men and women who starred in sports events over the years at the school.Both twys and giris basketball games will be played Uiat night.The evening's actlviUes are being held to raise funds for the Boosters' Club and a percentage of the profits will be donated to assist the Davie High Band in its trip to Florida to participate In a naUonal compeUtion this spring.The Boosters’ Club will also donate a plaque, to be hung in Uie gym foyer, iisUng the names of ail Davie High basketbaU players, past and present, who have scored al least 1,000 points in their basketbaU career.Ail Davie residents are urged to at­tend this evening of entertainment and contribute to this undertaking. Swimmbig MotionsSwimming motions-of fish nr people- createlow-frequency vibrations picked up by sharks acute hearing. If Uie sound is rhythmic and regular, a shark may ignore it, National Geographic says. But if it is irregular, indicating Uirastiing or struggling, Uw shark may sense easy prey and attack. TalksMost golf balls look alike. But they're not. Here's in­formation you should have before choosing between two- and three-piece golf balls. Three-piece Two-piece f A CROSS SECTION OF TWO GOLF BALL typei, with the arrows indicating areas of greateit weight. Advantages of the two- piece ball (solid core and cut- proof cover) are making it more popular among both amateurs and pros. Its aver­age weight distribution is near the outside of the ball. The resulting rotation helps you hit longpr drives Distance is also affected by the aero­dynamics of different types of halls and by roundness.On the other hand, the three-piece ball is made with a metal or liquid core. A ribbon of rubber twice the length of a football field is wound around the core and, finally, there's a cover. Unlike the two-piece ball, Ihe three- piece has most of its weight centered at the core. OAVIH rOUNTY ENTl-Rl’RISl; RI-CORD. TMURSDAY. MARCH 15, l‘)7‘) Pavie Girls Are Runners-Up For State Class 3 -A Title By Mike Barnhardt Only three points separated the Davie High girls’ basketball team from winning it all last week - the State Class 3-A Championship,But despite losing the state championship game, 43-41, to the Graham High girls’ team in a game at Hickory High last Saturday night, the female War |k Eagles finished by achieving the finest season performance in ths history of ^ girls’ basketball at Davie High,The Davie girls compiled a season record of 26 wins against only 4 losses. This was the highest total or wins ever for a Davie High girls’ basketball tean ,The laurels for the Davie girls this season included winning the North Pied­mont Conference regular-season championship with a 14-2 mark, winning the North Piedmont Conference Tournament, claiming the District-5 post-season championship and finishing second in the State Class 3-A Tournament at Ijb Hickory, ^ On an individual basis, Bill Peeler, the Davie girls’ coach, and senior forward Deanna Thomas and junior guard Jill Amos received numerous special honors during the past season.Peeler was named coach-of-the-year in the North Piedmont Conference, Thomas and Amos were named aIl4:onference performers this season and Thomas added to her list of awards by being selected as the girls basketball player-of-the-year in the conference.In addition, both Amos and Thomas were also named to the all-tournament Vteams in th Catawba College Christmas Tournament and the State Class 3-A Tournament,And both Thomas and Amos reached the 1,000 point career scoring plateau during the past season, with Amos being the first Davie junior ever to reach this mark. i G ra h a m E dges D avie 4 3 -4 1 Graham edged the War Eagles 43-41 for the state title on a layup by Donna TroUinger with three seconds left in the game. TroUinger, who was chosen as the tournaments most valuable player, scored 21 points and pulled down 15 fifcounds,Davie went into the third quarter holding a 25-23 lead, but scored only two points compared to Graham’s 10 in the quarter. *№0 Red Devils full-court pressure defense forced several Davie turnovers and gave them a 33-27 ad­vantage going into the final quarter, ^ ^ e game was stopped for about 20 Hnnutes early in the fourth quarter because of a malfunction in one of the two scoreboard clocks located in the gym. Another delay occurred in the first quarter when referees Leon Ijames and Gary Henson noticed that the two clocks weren’t keeping the same time. When w y asked the official timekeeper which ^>ck was correct, he pointed to the one that was losing 10 seconds almost every minute. The game was played on that clock until early in the final stanza when it went haywire and skipped SO more seconds. The game was finished on a wrestling clock.^,‘‘The clock might have helped us," ^Rd a disappointed Davie coach Bill Peeler. “It gave us time to regroup and rest.”Graham had their biggest lead, eight am free throw, teammate JiU ) connected on a lO-ft. jump shot to make the score 37-33.Gwen Farrington then hit a free throw for Graham, but missed the second. Gina HoweU rebounded for Davie and passed the baU to Thomas who hit another jumper.ypwo Graham turnovers helped the M r Eagles get four shots off during the next minute, but none were successful. Freshman Sarah Gardner finaUy scored for Davie after grabbing a rebound in the lane. That shot made the score 39-37.With 3:05 left in the game, the Red Devils were caUed for an offensive foul, anna Thomas responded with a ket for Davie to tie the score at 39. bin Hadley of Graham hit a driving layup with 2; 05 left to put the Red DevUs up by two. Although Graham coach Don AmoB emphasized to his team not to let Thomas or JiU Amos get the ball, I injured Mary Gardner,star forward on the floor,is looked after by a concerned Deanna '№oma8 \ Thomas hit a 15 ft. jump shot while surrounded by Graham players. That shot tied the score at 41 with 40 seconds left,Graham held the baU for the last shot and called a time out with seven seconds to go. The baU was thrown in to TroUinger and she drove past Davie defenders for the winning basket.“In the last seven seconds, we knew what they were going to do. We knew they weren’t going to shoot from outside, that she (TroUinger) would drive,” Peeler said.“We wanted TroUinger to take the last shot, but we didn’t think she would get a shot that easy,” winning coach Amos said. “The long delay hurt us. We had momentum going our way, with an eight point lead. They put the pressure on us, got the crowd behind them, and caught back up,” Amos added.“They’ve got a fine team, the best we’ve played aU year,” Peeler said about Graham. “They were quick, they could jump and they could shoot.”“I really don’t think we played the game we're capable to playing, but I don’t want to take anything away from Graham,” Peeler added.The third quarter was the turning point of the game when Davie hit only one of 14 field goal attempts, whUe aU five of Graham’s players each hit a bucket.Davie took an early lead when JiU Amos stole the baU and connected on a Uiree point play to give the War Eagles a 3-0 lead with less than a minute elapsed in the game. Two more buckets by Amos, along with four points from Mary Gardner and two foul shots by Gina HoweU gave Davie a 13-8 lead after the first quarter.Davie buUt theh- biggest lead in the first three minutes of the second quarter. When they outscored Graham eight to three. Deanna Thomas led that stretch with four points whUe Rhonda BuUabough added two. Graham caUed a time out with 5:20 left in the half after Amos made a steal and bucket that made the score 21-11.Graham went on a hot streak the next Oiree minutes, and with 1:10 left in the half, took a 23-22 lead. HoweU connected on a free throw and Thomas added two more to give Davie a 25-23 halftime lead, Deanna Thomas finished with 16 points to lead Davie, whUe JUl Amos scored 13.Davie’s Gina HoweU led all reboun­ders with 17, Thomas puUed down nine rebounds.Davie hit on 15 of 49 field goal at­tempts (34,6 percent), while Graham hit 16 of 42, for 38.1 percent. The War Eagles hit 11 of 18 free throws. Graham hit 11 of 21. First Two Games Davie County was never behind in the first two games of the NCHSAA girls 3-A tournament as they downed West Carteret 56-43 and Southwest Edgecombe 63-46 before losing the finale to Graham.Daanna Thomas and Jill Amos combined for 40 pointe in Davie’s opening round victory over West Car­teret, scoring 21 and 19 respectively.The two started their scoring early with Amos hitting for six points and Thomas four as the War Eag es buUt an 11-3 lead before a West time out with 2:43 left in the first quarter. Two points by Gina HoweU and a bucket by Amos with four seconds left gave Davie a 16-7 lead after one quarter.Thomas and HoweU controlled the boards for Davie, as the War Eagles r * ___________________— Gina HoweU goes over tlie top of a Graham player to score two points for Davie. Photosrat)hs by Garry Foster t The Davie County starting line-up,among them seniors Deanna Thomas,Gina HoweiI,and Rhonda Bullabough,rush out to mid­ court to slap hands as they prepare to face Graham for tiie .‘J-A State Title. grabbed 45 rebounds during the game compared to 25 for West Carteret,A large and appreciative group of Davie fans were brought to their feet by an exciting third quarter performance from Thomas, She made two strong drives and baskets and fought for several rebounds. A rebound and bucket by Rhonda BuUabough with two seconds left in the quarter gave Davie a 41-27 lead.The fourth quarter was aU Davie with buckets by Thomas, Amos and Mary Gardner giving the War Eagles a 47-29 advantage with 6:58 remaining. West Carteret mustered a brief raUy late in the fourth quarter but fell way short, Davie won 56-43, Davie used a balanced scoring attack and held six Southwest Edgecomb players to a total of 12 points in a 63-46 triumph over that team in the second round of the NCHSAA girl’s 3-A playoffs last week,■Three Davie players scored in double figures, with Deanna Thomas leading Uie way with 17. Rhonda BuUabough and JUl Amos each scored 12 for the War Eagles.Also scoring for Davie were Gina Howell with nine, Mary Gardner with seven and Sarah Gardner with six.Most of Southwest’s scoring punch came from the sister duo of Alphelia and Bridgett Jenkins, Alphelia. who passea the 1,000 career point mark this year as a sophomore, went to the hoop for a game-high 21. Sister Bridgett came off Uie bench to score 13 in the last three quarters,Davie again outrebounded their op­ ponents, this Ume by a 37-27 margin,Mary Gardner got the War Eagles off to an early start with seven first quarter points. She was aided by Gina Howell, who hit three foul shots, and Rhonda BuUabough, who pumped in a 17 ft. jump shot that gave Davie a 12-6 first quarter lead, Gardner. HoweU and Thomas led Davie to an 18-5 rebound advantage in Uiat quarter.“We said we could outrebound them,” Davie coach Bill Peeler said, “because Uiey rebounded flat-footed in their first game. Positioning was the key.”Davie’s rebounding edge was more impressive when you looked at the fact Uiat Southwest had two players who were at least six feet taU.The second and third quarters were closely fought as Davie scored just two more points than Southwest did in each.BuUabough hit on two long jumpers and Thomas fought for three buckets to pace Davie’s second quarter effort. JiU Amos added four points and HoweU three to give Davie a 29-21 lead going into halftime.JUl Amos came out burning Uie nets in Davie High Varsity Cheerleaders Bonita Nichols(l) and Betsy Daniel (r) embrace one another after last Saturday nights loss. For the sen­ ior cheerleaders as well as the senior ballplayers this was the last game. the third quarter and pumped in eight points during the first three minutes, building a 10 point lead for Davie, which they kept untU the final quarter,Ajfter a bucket by Sarah Gardner with 6:35 left in the game, Deanna Thomas took over and scored four straight baskets, giving Davie a 56-40 lead with l:56remaining,Thomas added three foul shots to five her 11 points for the quarter, and Davie a 63-46 victory and birUi to Uie final game against Graham, Davie hot only 17 of 34 attempts from Uie foul line, causing Peeler to say “If we had made the free throws, it would have been a lot easier,Davie made 23 of 56 field goals for 41,1 percent. Southwest was 18 of 52 from the floor for 34,6 percent and added 10 of 12 from the foul line.Thomas led Davie’s rebounders with 13 and was foUowed by Howell, who pulled down 11 boards. E x te n s io n S o u g h t O n D eer H u n tin g S eason In D avie Ron Knight, wUdlife officer in Davie County for Uie N.C. WUdlife Resources Commission, has requested commission officials to extend the deer hunUng season in Uie county next deer hunting season from its one-week limit this season to a 2-week limit next season, Knight said last week he made the rfaces of Deanna Thomas and Gina Howell express the anguish of the Davie Girls following their heartbreaking 2-point loss in the championship game at Hickory last Staurday night. Basketball Games Here March 30 The Davie AthleUc Boosters Club will sponsor two basketball games March 30th at 7:00 p.m. between alumni players and high school athletes. Both girls and boys games are scheduled.Billy Packer ЛАС and National TV personality (also a Davie County resident) will act as an­nouncer for the games.The Dancing Boots and High School Band will entertain. Special half time activities, door prize. Admission win be 11.00.A portion of tbe proceeds will be donated to the band to assist in their planned trip to Florida. request to have the local deer hunting season extended next season because “the figures of deer reported kiUed in Uie county this season justify a 2-week season.”He explained that during the recent 1- week deer hunUng season in the county hunters reported to commission officials Uiey had kiiled a total of 47 deer. This 47 total represented an increase of more than 42 percent more kills this season Uian during the past two seasons when 33 deer were reported to commission of­ficials as having been killed each year in Uie county. Hunters have been required to report aU deer kills in NorUi Carolina since the 1976-77 hunUng season. InformaUon from this reporUng system is very useful to biologists in determining hunting seasons and oUier management practices.Commented Knight, “It is important to hunters that Uiey report the number of deer they kill locaUy because this reporting can lead state officials to increase the deer hunUng season in the county when Uie numbers indicate that deer herds in the county are ex­ panding,” COMORATUIATIONS Davie High Girls' Basicetbaii Team ON AN OUTSTANDING SEASON YOU'RE NUMBER ONE WITH US!! DAVIE COUNTY The 1978-7» Davie High Gtrb Vanity BttketlMU Team. Pictured l-r, from row: Rbonda Bullabougti. Oeaou TboiMf, Clna HoweU. Back «»w. l-r:Beck (manager). JulU Cornatxer. JIU Amoi. Maiy Gardner. Sroooi.Sarab CarOner. Kim Fo«ter, Oen* Secbrctt, Sharon Young. (Photo by Garry rosier) • 4Ь IMVIi; ( OUNTY 1;NTI:R1’RISI; RUCORD, THURSDAY. MARCH 15. 1979 Connell Residence In Cooleemee Destroyed Bv Fire I Extension Homemakers Meet __________f r. .____^____II ^_____ * The Center Extenilon no more transDortatlon and hot chocolntp forThp residence of R. James Connell of Wall Street, North Cooleemee wasU, destroyed by fire Thursday afternoon. \ The Jerusalem and Cooleemee Volunteer Departments answered the call at 4;30 p.m.A spokesman for the Jerusalem Department said the fire apparantly started in Ihe vicinity of the chimney at the back of the house, however, the exact cause has not yet been deter­mined.The Connell house, formerly the Williams home place, also had a fire last winter, however it started in the livingroom area and was not as severe.The family was able to save part of the livingroom furnishings but all clothing and possessions throughout the remainder of the house were lost. The family is presently living in the old Church of God Parsonage. They are presently looking for another home (o rent, and the Rev. Don Whitchard, paslor of the Church of God asks anyone knowing of a suitable house to please contact him.The family is grateful lo so many people who have brought Ihem clothing nad other articles since the fire and to Ihe United Way for the $100 in groceries delivered to them. Rev. Whichard said at this time, they have a sufficient amount of clothing for the family of five. “Their biggest need is now information on a house they can rent.” He also said they could use diningroom furniture and refrigerator. The house and fur­nishings were not insured. (Photo by Gairy Foster) Cooleemee News Mrs. Grace Pierce returned home Saturday after spending the past month in Fayetteville with her daughter and son-in- law, Mr. and Mrs. Clyde Roberts and sons. Mr. and Mrs. Roberts drove Mrs. Pierce home and were overnight guests. They were also accompanied by Loran Pierce, who spent the night with his parent«, Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Pierce.Mrs. Alice Hoyle spent last week in FayetteviUe with her daughter, Ruth. Her husband. Bob Hoyle and daughter, Margaret joined them Friday and they returned home Saturday. Bob Hampton returned home from Davie Hospital last week after being a patient for the past two weeks. He is improving.Ray Overcash is expected to return home this week from Rowan Memorial Hospital. He is improving. Mr. and Mrs. Glenn Mc­Daniel spent Monday in Rock Hill, S.C. where they visited Mr. and Mrs.Howard Mc­Daniel. They went expecially to see Mr. McDaniel who is critically ill in York General Hospital Intensive Care Unit.Mark Batchelor of Rocky Mount, Carla Bastic of Newark, Delaware and Marty Kurfees spent their spring break from CampbeU CoUege visiting Mark’s parents in Rocky Mount and Marty’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. Jack Kurfees of Cooleemee.Anyone interested in en­tering a team in the Cooleemee Man’s and Women’s Softball League should contact Ron Bivins (284-2756) or BiUy Correll (284-2762) as soon as possible.There wiU be an open meeting about the Summer Recreation Program for Cooleemee on Thursday, March 22, at the Recreation Center at 7 p.m. AU persons interested in any summer activities, including the swimming pool, should at­tend. Democrats To Hold Precinct Meeting Clarksville Democrats wiU hold a precinct meeting April 19th at 7:30 p.m. at the Wm. R. Davie Fire Dent. à n d j 3 k - 5 f t e c f î By ROQERS WHITENER Member of the N.C. & NATIONAL AUCTIONEERS ASSOCIATION I Al SHEEK AUCTION «REALTY CO. PHONE 634-3611 P.O. Box 903 Mocksville, NC 27028 NCAL 924 NCRL 40328 Bonded Res.-704-872-0502 Route 12 Statesville, NC 28677 "A land of promise, a land of romance, and a land about which perhaps, more things are known that are not true than any part of our country.” -John C. CampbeU, The Southern Mountaineer and Hii Homeland (1921).Most longtime Appalachian residents claim that Camp­beU’s terse description may be one of the more accurate historical statements about the region and its people. They have been the victims of many other attempts.Depending on the speaker, and his or her knowledge of ignorance-to say nothing-of prejudice-the Southern Appalachian region has been labeled everything from “A barbaric wUderness peopled by uncouth, shiftless poor whites” to “a romantic haven whose inhabitante are the pure-hearted descendants of European nobiUty.”Outsiders have, for the most part, tended to go along with the first impression since it has been backed by a con­siderable amount of scholarly weight. But, to echo Campbell, much of the comment has apparently stemmed from ignorance rather than knowledge.Even the eminent historian Arnold Toynbee was guilty of sizing up the region and its people without bothering to check them out firsthand, according to a recent article in the Appalachian Journal.The writer, James S. Brown of the University of Kentucky Socialogy Department, claims that he caUed Toyn­bee’s hand in a letter written to him in 1948 stemming from Toynbee’s characterization of Appalachian in his multi­volume A Study of History. The Toynbee passage in­dicated that “the modern Appalachian has not only not A L L T Y P E S O F I N S U R A N C E There c:^ brger SQl(3fies we insure But rK>ne m ore im p o rb n L II t.'Vt'fy CtiMl of yuuf l.'Hkt.'-nonm p¿iv got»s tow.ifd toocl. £indclothing lof the l<'nniiy wlh '10 surplus M en(j cA ttiu v.'OOk, v;hat counj i)c‘ rnofo itnportan! ihcin pioU'cl'fiq ynuf I'l- r.'inV''* Mos' i.,t ouf n.MMU.ind litt.- Ti- suiaric*.» lo s.iui’K^s youf^ L.iH us tof tno ppf^ona' >JlU*fl(iOn you ijn.l I ifuj nc lal f ul u f t' disserve R0pt9S9nting ■r Tho Traveitfib Insurance Company and lie AMihatea Cornpanies Hartford, Conn 06115 PERSONAL Homeowners Fire Personal Arti­ cles Coverage Life Accident/ Disability Hospital Plans Group Plans Mobile Home Homeowners Bonds Auto Estate Planning Special Events COMMERCIAL Business Life Fire Special Package Discounts General Liability improved on the Ulsterman ^ the Scotch-Irish forebears of today’s mountain inhabitants); he has faUed to hold his ground and has gone downhUl in a most discon­certing fashion.” “In fact, the Appalachian ‘mountain people’ today are no better than barbarians. They have relapsed into illiteracy and witchcraft. They suffer from proverty, and squalor, and ill health...The Appalachians present the melancholy spectacle of a people who have acquired civUization and then lost it...” ChaUenged by sociologist Brown's demand for an ex­planation of his remarks, Toynbee admitted that he had buUt “a composite picture” of the mountain people from “a number of visits” to a friend Uving in East Central Ken­tucky, two visits to Berea CoUege in Kentucky, and one or two additional forays into the mountains. Toynee wrote that he realized this was a “slight acquaintance” on which to base his views of Appalachian people. “In fact, now that I come to think of it, I do not believe that any of my knowledge of the mountain people comes from books.” Brown reporte that Toyn­bee’s letter “stunned me so much that I unfortunately did nothing further with it for nearly 30 years”-that is untU the Appalachian Journal article. Appalachian’s Dr. Gratis WiUiams, whose The Southern Mountaineer in Fact and Fiction is considered one of the more faithful represen­tatives of mountain people and their background, feels that Appalachia is today finaUy opening its doors to genuine scholarship rather than recorded hersay.In the future, he says, “Appalachia will figure strongly in academic research. Doctoral disser­tations will increase in number and in quaUty, for many of the scholars them­selves wUl have Uved in the region and known it fir­sthand.”John C. CampbeU would be pleased to know. Readers are invited to send folk materials to FoUc-Ways and FoUc-Speech, Box 376, Appalalchian State Univer- , sity, Boone, N.C. 28608. Davie Top Daiiy Herds Are Listed The top S herds for thelary ; foUo Commercial Auto Life BRANTLEY- EDWARDS IN S U R A N C E A G E N C Y , vouaiktarawrj 503 Avon Street Mocksville, NC ^ A C E N T t D A R R E L L E D W A R D S Use Our Easy Monthly Premium Financing Plans ‘'«ЛМЬ A' PHONE 634-2105 County were as foUows;Barnes and Barnes, SS cows, 46.9 mUk, test 4.0 and 1.85 average butterfat.Sparks and MUler, 56 cows, 49.5 average mUk, 3.7 test and 1.84 butterfat.C.W. PhiUips and Son, 76 cows, 76 cows, 47.2 miU(, 3.7 test and 1.73 butterfat.FredBaiinam, Jr., 67 cows, 48.7 miUi, 3.5 test and 1.69 butterfat.James W. Boger and Son, 69 cows, 44.3 miU(, 3.8 test and 1.69 butterfat. MONEY SAVING TIP: Slock up on freezer containers that can go right from the freezer to the microwave oven for double duty service. Buy frozen vegetable« in the handy plastic bags. That way you can use just the right amount you want to cook and keep the test in the freezer to use another time. Kappa Women Have Meeting Kappa Extension Homemakers Club met Tuesday, March 6, at the home the home of Mrs. Louise Cartner. Mrs. Cartner gave a devotional reading for the month of March. Mrs. Peggy Winfrey led the singing of America.Mrs. Judy Hartness and Mrs. Jenny Turner gave a very informative program on Perennial Flowers. Mrs. Hartness gave, in detaU steps for planning a Perennial Flower garden that wUl add beauty from spring untU fall. Mrs. Turner told of the im­portance of colors in the garden. Mrs. Hartness an­swered questions from the group concerning their flower garden problems.Mrs. Joetta Snow, president, presided over the business session. Fourteen members and two guests, Mrs. Beatrice Hendrix and Mrs. Mavis Peoples, an­swered roU caU with their favorite flower. FoUowing the minutes and treasurer’s report Leaders reports were given.Mrs. Louise Beck, Ed- cuation Leader, gave the Education goals for the year. Mrs. Peggy Winfrey, Health Leader, discussed the WIC program through the county Health Dept, and the donation of organs.Mrs. Mae WaUcer, Foods Leader, discussed car­bohydrates and fats in the diet and gave some cooking hints.Mrs. Margaret Ann Shew, Safety Leader, gave some safe gardening tips.The Jaycettes BIB program was discussed. At the April meeting everyone is to being a baby gift for this program.March 20 at 6:30 is the Area II meeting at the County Office BuUding. The meeting was adjourned with the club coUect.During the Social Hour Mrs. Cartner served Pound Cake, Brandied Fruit Cake, Per­simmon Pudding, Peanut Butter Snacks and Punch. A pack-a-day smoker smokes 7,300 cigarettes in a year. The Center Extension Homemakers Club met Tuesday, February 16,1979 at the home of Mrs. Ruth Tut­terow.President Sue Gobble called the meeting to order and conducted the regular business. Ruby O'Neal led the sixteen members present in a hymn “Fairest Lord Jesus”.The Club was reminded of the Southern Living Show in Charlotte and the trip to Pennsylvania. The Club received a Thank You Card from the Trainable Class at the Elementary School for their Valentine Party.For the program Louise Tutterow gave some hints on “Curbing the Costs of Everyday Living”. For in­stance she said to make out a shopping list and plan for the fixed obligations and the basic needs for everyday living, set aside a realistic amount for savings for the emergency fund (2 to 6 months' takehome pay) and future puft:hases, cut down on the purchase of those goods and services which are desired but not necessary, learn to do many of the desired services yourself, shop harder to get the best buy for your need. One can save from 10-25 percent by: using store brands instead of nationally advertised brands, com­paring prices and qualities, using seasonal sales for purchases, buying promotional sales items, paying cash instead of using credit, buying used goods when they wiU serve the purpose, and avoid pur­ chasing excessive amounts, quaUties or features in goods. Practice a “mini-purchase system” - buy only what is really meaningful and worth the money invested.To reduce total investment in goods: buy only the item that wiU meet your need, keep an on-going inventory of goods on hand and substitute goods or recycle goods in­stead of buying, do not abuse goods, keep repaired, and use them for maximum length of time, plan ahead for big-ticket items and plan to purchase when there is a special price advantage such as a seasonal sale.To conserve energy costs: decide just how much you want to cut down on energy bills, dress warmly and maintain heat at a minimum level for comfort, change tastes, cooking and Uving habits to reduce fuel for cooking and hot water heating, reduce tran­sportation costs: eliminate unnecessary trips, drive for safety and fuel economy, own no more transportation vehicles than absolutely needed, learn simple main­tenance repairs and pool transportation, plan home activities and adjust habits to reduce the need for tights and water, especiaUy hot water.Recycle items for further use by family members or others. For example: create novelty gifts from items on hand (surplus foods, fabric bits, or plants); recycle garments to up-date fashions or use creative patches or trims for worn garments (might start a fad), and use holey garments to make accessories such as scarves, belts, handbags, or establish an “Exchange Post” or “Pass-AIong-System" among friends and neighbors (ex­change surplus foods, clothing, equipment and household gadgets, tools, educational or recreational materials, etc.To save money on medicine bills, ask the doctor to specify by company or brand name the most economical price of the medicine that he knows to be reliable, and it condition requires long-term use of drugs, ask him to consider prescribing a larger supply at a time (you save dispensing fees and may reduce the cost per dosage.) Minimize the use of patent medicines.Keep charges for use of credit to a minimum. Avoid borrowing for everyday needs. When borrowing, shop around for lowest finance charge.To summarize, Mrs. Tut­terow stated that consumers have two choices for curbing costs: (1) reduce buying, and (2) practice getting the greatest value for the money that is spent. To reduce your buying: Get necessities first, reduce miscellaneous pur­chases and shop for savings on the big ticket or expensive items.Mrs. Ruth Tutterow served a wonderful variety of cookies, fineer sandwiches. Announcing MCC... foi^irrijpand hot chocolotr for refreshments. Jackie HarriJ won the door prize.Immediately foUowing thp refreshments each member displayed some handmade crafts such as macramè, sugar molding, crocheting, drawn work pUlow case^ cross stitch, hook rugs, botttol crafts and various sewing crafts.At the April meeting Ms. Patricia Chaffin will visit with the club to taUc about CPRand each member is to bring a small baby gift to he donate^ to "BIB” (Better'Inrant Birth# which is sponsored by thè MocksvUle Jaycetts. I 4-H News I SHADY GROVE Thp Shady Grove 4-H Club met Tuesday night, March 6, at 7 p.m. at the Sah- dy Grove School Cafeteria. The meeting was caUed to order by Angela Copji president. The minutes walw read by Tracy Smith, secretary. Business consisted of rema iding everyone of the Baking Contest Saturday, March 10; the fire safety program; the sewinu workshops; and about goii^ to camp. Also, the club decided to give $10 to Uie Davie High Band. Then, we started our program which consisted of a Talent Show, put on by the members. The winner was Linda Fualkner« She did a dance by the musilp “Livin'-Up”. The Talent Show was enjoyed by all the members and their famUies. Refreshments were served by Tracy Smith and Angela Cope and the meeting was then adjourned. ^ Rocky Cope Reporter MCC Mortgage Co. Jerry Mackie 873-3221 (Out ol town-e«M col led) 302 Buffalo St.(Comer Industrial BIMI.ISTATESVILLE, N.C. C R O P - H A I L I N S U R A N C E Ю A ll T y p e s O f C r o p s TOBACCO ORIENTED PROGRAMS T O B A C C O W A R E H O U S E S AND CONTENTS T O B A C C O B A R N S Easy Monthly Premium Financing Program B R A N T L E Y -E D W A R D S INSURANCE AGENCY 503 Avon Street Mocksville, NC AGENT: DARRELL EDWARDS Use Our Easy Monthly Premium Financing Plans TOBACCO GROWERS D e s ig n a te y o u r to b a c c o to NORTHW EST FARM ERS W AREHOUSE M a r c h 5 T h r u A p r i l 6 A SC S No. 8 9 2 Y A D K IN V IL L E , N. Q T o t h o s e w h o h a v e b e e n s e l l i n g w ith u s s o f a r , w e t h a n k y o u . W e a p p r e c i a t e y o u r p a t r o n a g e . A n d t h o s e w h o n o t s o ld a t N o r th w e s t s o f a r , w e i n v i t e y o u to d e s i g n a t e a n d tr y u s t h i s y e a r . NORTHW EST FARM ERS Tobacco Warehonse a A. O W E N A N D K E N G R A Y , O W N E R S & O P E R A T O R S T E L E P H O N E 6 7 9 ^ 6 6 1 - .Y A D K 1 N V IL L E , N ^ C __________________ I DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, THURSDAY, MARCH IS. 1979 - 51) Local Airman In Training Mission Over English Channel Ftring anti-tank rockets circled) at targets on England’s Sallsburv Plains. The Battle of Britain is an easy thing for an Advance soldier to visualize. He can reaUy understand what it was like to fly an armed aircraft from a German airfield across the English channel, and then machine gun and rocket the English countryside. It’s easy for him to hnagine, since he just finished doing it as part of an innovative training exercise.The reason that Sergeant George M. Smith and his German based unit “crossed the pond” to use the British training areas on Salisbury Plains was space. German training areas are so small that safety considerations con­siderably detract from training.Captain Wayne Killian, one of the unit’s platoon leaders, compared the German training ranges with SaUsbury. “About 90 percent of the cobra pilots hear the following scenario when they are about to fire on a regular range; “Start'here, fire when I say fire, cease fire when I say cease fire, turn off here, come around and cross the line again. I will tell ;rpu when to fire and what weapons to fire.” On top of this you usuaUy can only fire one aircraft at a time.”KiUian continued, “In England it was a lot different. We were able to fire and maneuver in sections and as a platoon. At times I had five cobras firing at the same Ume wiUi suppressive fire and wire guided missUes. AddiUonaUy, the scout aircraft were there to acquire the targets for us like they are supposed to. It was great; we trained to do just what we would do in combat.” One of Uie highlighu of Uie entire U-ip was a firepower display put on for the British MUltary and the local press. The scout aircraft arrived first, acquired the targets, then the cobras arrived on StaUon to supress and fire wire guided missUes at Uie targets. The assembled audience was duly impressed as all missUes wiUi inert warheads hit Uieir Urgets. The 2.75 inch rockets were also on target as were Uie hnpressive mini-gun fire. “Good God, Uiey don’t miss,” one English tank commander was overheard to say. “It makes you want to get out of Uie bloody tank corps.” Newly promoted company com­mander, Major Gary EUls, was proud of his unit’s effort in England. AU eighteen pUots that went on the trip qualUied on aU Uie gunnery tables. "The 72 enlisted personnel that supported the pilots were key to the overaU success we enjoyed,” said EUis and added, “Without our people’s teamwork, we wouldn’t have been able to hit very many targets." Smith, the son of Mr. and Mrs. Stanley H. Smith of Route 1, Advance, played an important role in supporting this exercise. His job as an aircraft ar­mament mechanic was criUcal to the reUabiUty and effecUveness of the gunships. He is a 1976 graduate of Davie County High School. C a r o l i n a R e v i e w PUBLIC LOTTEHY...Governor Jim Hunt’s “crime control package" is now entering Uie first stages of serious debate in the General Araembly and most reacUons from the legislaotrs have been extremely positive.In his weekly conference last Thur­sday, the governor caUed for public support of his presumptive sentencing biU. The bUl, if passed, would set presumed sentences for certain categories of crimes. AlUiough a Judge would be given some lattitude In in- creasiog or decreasing sentences after considering such reasons as age, background, and prior record, he would stUl be required to offer valid reasons for changing a presumptive sentence.Gdvernor Hunt caUed the present means of sentencing convicted criminals a “public lottery" and has said in Uie past that presumptive sen­tencing was peeded in order to restore confidence in our judicial system.AlUiough SimUar bUls over the years have been defeated at Uie hands of Uie Assembly’s substantial number of* lawyers, Governor Hunt’s proposal seems to be headed for relatively smooth sailing.MERIT SELECTION...Unfortunately for the governor, his proposed legislation for the merit selection of judges might not receive the same feiendly reception as presumptive sentencing.Former secretary of Crime Control and Public Safety, PhU Carlton, had caUed for merit selecUon of judges rather than election in his Crime ContiMil CCB To Buy United Citizens Bank In Winston-Salem -i'ii The board of directors of the Central Carolina Bank, at a meeting held today at the bank’s headquarters in Durham, has approved an offer by CCB to acquire Uie United Citizens Bank of Winston- Salem, NorUi Carolina for »6,220,000 cash, it was announced today by WUliam L. Burns, Jr., CCB’s President. The executive committee of CCB had authorized president Bums to make the offer subject to approval by Uie fuU board, which was granted at today’s meeting, thereby finalizing CCB’s proposal. The offer, which represents a payment of $20 per share for the UCB stock, must be approved by UCB shareholders at a meeting which wUl probably be held within the next three months, Burns said.The board of United Citizens Bank, at a meeUng held February 28, has agreed in principle to accept CCB’s offer. Should the UCB shareholders vote to accept CCB’s offer, boUi federal and state bank supervisory authorities would have to approve. Such action might require 60 to 90 days after shareholder sanction.The United Citizens Bank was char­tered in 1973 and currenUy operates six offices in Forsyth County. It has total asseto of $39.22 miUion and total deposiU of $34.02 mUlion as of December 31,1978. ’The book value of Uie UCB stock was $13.37 per share as of Uie end of 1978.United CiUzens Bank Chairman C. R<«er Harris released a statement in conjunction wiUi Bums In which he stated, "the acquisition is a natural; UCB has done a good job of buUding a soUd foundation for a local bank which would be attractive to a larger, more prestigious institution; one seeking offices in this area. CCB is just such a bank.”In Bums’ statement he said his bank was enthusiastic about the prospect of acquirUig UCB. “Five years ago,” Bums stated, “we entered the Raleigh market by establishing six new qffices on the perimeter of the city. AU of Uiese offices are now profitable. We have long wanted to enter Winston- Salem in a fashion simUar to our Raleigh approach. UCB’s six offices wUl aUow us to enter Winston-Salem in a comparable way, five years head ot schedule.” Bums emphasized that the Winston-Salem operaUon would com­plement CCB’s nearby offices in Mocksvilie, Yadkinville, Clemmons, and Denton. “This acquisition would produce a number of efficiencies for us. The Winston-Salem offices would automaticaUy benefit from the ad­vertising being done for our nearby offices and our new Greensboro office. Our couriers already pass through Winston-Salem daUy. The acquisition would fUl in a large gap in our existing market area,” Bums said.CCB is 76 years old and is currenUy the seventh largest commercial bank in Nortti Carolina. It operates 55 offices in29 communiUes, located in 15 contiguous counties in Uie NorUi central region of ttie state. Snowstorms Are Not Uncommon In March Krista MlUer, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. C.J. MlUer of the Farmington community, MocksviHe, made the dean’s list at Lenoir-Rhyne College tor the winter semester with a GPA of 3.8. She is majoring In early childhood education and Is a member of the var­sity cheerleading squad, corresponding secretary for Kappa Delta Sorority and a TKE Sugarcub. Two Charged With Breaking Into Building Two teenagers were arrested last week and charged witti breaking and entry and larceny.Michael Elvis Anderson, 17, of Rt. 2 MocksvUle and Johnny Riffle, 19, of Rt. 5 Mocksvilie were arrested by the sheriff’s department and charged with breaking into a buUding at the Bear Creek Baptist Church and taking a lawn mower, rake, 4 chairs and an auto whed.Bond was set at $500 for a March 19th court appearance. Just because you’ve put down your convertible top doesn’t necessarily mean you can put up your snow tires and windshield scraper.Snowstorms aren’t uncommon in North Carolina in March, says Peter Robinson, meterologist and associate professor of geography at the University of Nortti CaroUna at Chapel НШ.“If you look at data from recent past, you’U see that storms around this Ume have been relatively severe,” Robinson says.So, just in case, keep that know equipment handy and save these driving tips from ВШ Hunter of UNC-CH High­way Safety Research Center.“The best advice, of course, is not to drive at aU,” Hunter says. “This is especiaUy true on ice. Nothing works very well on ice.”Hunter says thinkhig and preparing ahead wiU save a lot of trouble on Uie road. “The vehicle should be in good shape, the engine properly tuned and the exhaust system working weU," he says. “The latter is important if you get stranded by the side of the road.”Other things Hunter says should be checked in advance are brakes, tires and tire pressure, heater and defroster, cooUng system, battery, and windshield wipers and wiper fluid.Put a few special items in the car in case of snowy weather, Hunter says. Ice scrapers, a smaU brush or broom, a shovel, a rag, a flashlight, extra wind­shield solvent, a bag of sand and chains are useful thhigs to have in the car, he says. Hunter also has some specific driving tips: -“Do it genUy. You are trying to keep traction. Start slowly and when slowing down, pump Uie brakes genUy. You need much more stopping distance.-“Another thing is to aUow the car to warm up weU. If the car starts to staU, you may hit the accelerator and cause the car to skid. r-“Be especiaUy watchful for ice, such as in shady areas and on bridges. If you see ice ahead, brake weU in advance. -“VisibUity is extremely important. Clean Uie windows thoroughly; don’t make just a peephole.-“In case of skids, steer in the direction the rear of the car is headed. You must be ready to steer the car. -“Radial tires work okay in loose snow, but Uiey are not equivalent to snow tires. Don’t mix radials with regular car tires. If you have radials, get radial snow tires. If belted, get belted snow Ures.-“If you become stranded or decide to seek shelter, try to leave the car in a place where it wUl be easy to get back on the road later and where other traffic is nqt impeded.-“When driving uphUl, ideaUy aUow some foUowing (^stance between cars. Look ahead, and maintain speed as you approach a hUl.-‘If you become sti'anded, flrst try shoveUng. Then sand or salt might give you enough melting to develop some traction. Burlap or an old rag may also work.” by Jerry МоЫсу Agenda which he presented to Governor Hunt before he moved over to his new- job as Appeals Court judge.ApparenUy, the govemor is using Uig Crime Control Agenda as the basis for most of his crime prevention and punishment proposals.But even Uie most ardent Hunt sup­porters are quieUy cool to the idea of eliminating judgeship elections.GREEN A REPUBLICAN?....Some of Uie most active speculation in Raleigh for several months took place last week over Uie possibUity ot Lt. Gov, Jimmy Green changing his party membership from Democrat to Republican.Reportedly, Green has been wooed iti recent weeks by several ranking Republicans from across the state. He was seen talking in Uie ahlls of Uio Legislature last week with former govemor, Republican Jim Holshouser. Green also said that the subject of changing parties had come up in in­cidental conversaUons with Senator Jesse Helms and his weU-respected campaign manager, Tom EUis.The public speculation was probably initiated by a “what if” column written by weU-known syndicated writer, BiU NobUtt of Raleigh. NobUtt listed some very good reasons why Green might wish to change-wincluding Senator Jesse Helms and the N.C. Congressional Club (a conservative campaign organization headed by Helsm). .By week’s end, however, the Ueutenant governor had issued a statement that he had been a Democrat for four or five generations and did not have time “to engage furUier in premature poUUcal speculation." In­terestingly, the statement did not rule out a future change if curcumstances should warrant. The statement did rule out the possibUity of a mn for Robert Morgan’s Senate seat in Washhigton-a race that many had thought more feasible than a ran on Hunt in the 1980 gubernatorial campaign.“It is my intention to run for govemor or for re-election as Ueutenant govemor in 1980," Uie statement said. Rib RoastA rib roast is unexcelled for ten- demess and flavor. It is easy to prepare, carve and serve. It may be sold bone-in or lioneless. If the bone Is in, it is caUed a standing rib roast. WHEN A HEARING AID CAN HELP Ask to see the Solo Beltone's exciting, inconspicuous ali-within-the-ear aid Adaptable Kangaroos Can Do More Than Just Hop BELTONE HEARING AID SERVICE Foster-Raudi Drug MocksvUle, N.C.634-2141 136 Oak wood Dr. Winston-Salem, N.C. 27103 919-723-S2S3 By Barbara S. MoffetThey may not be able to leap taU buildings in a single bound, but kangaroos get around pretty weU, The gray kangaroo-one of the largest of the lot-can clear a six-foot fence with plenty of room to spare.The only large mammal that hops, the kangaroo has some other tricks up its pouch;-Kangaroos cruise at 12 to 15 miles an hour and can accelerate to more than twice that speed, Geoffrey B. Sharman writes in the February National Geographic.-A red kangaroo, anoUier of Uie larger “roos,” excels long-jump. I can bound 20 linear feet on flat ground.-Although Uiey are born the size of a large lima bean, kangaroos can grower taUer Uian the average man. Full- grown males-called boomers- -may stand seven feet taU when fully erect and weigh close to 200 pounds.-A cornered kangaroo can wreak havoc on its enemies, such as the huge dogs trained to hunt it. Back to a tree and standing on the tip of its taU, a roo wUl strUte blows wiUi the daggerlike claws of its hind feet. If water is nearby, the boomer may wade in chest deep, grab a dog with its fprepaws, and hold it un­derwater until it drowns.--Possessing a multichambered stomach, kangaroos can ingest large quantities of plant fiber high in ceUulose, a major com­ponent of cardboard. This abUity to eat what ottier animals can’t helps roos survive. One of Uie most amazing features of the kangaroo is Uie way it begins Ufe. Within moments of arrival, defen­seless and blind, the infant no more than an inch long finds its way up its mother’s furry frong and into her pouch with its life-giving teats. If the infant loses its way, it dies.Firmly anchored to a steady milk supply, a baby red roo, for instance, wUl grow two thousandfold in Uie six monUis before it ventures outside again.The pouch’s teats simultaneously provide different mUd formulas: a low-fat liquid for Uie newborn sUU inside and a high-fat mixture for Uie young Uiat have left the pouch but return for feeding.The fe'.iale has another abUity: She can store a dormant embryo that wiU resume development and be deUvered if a newborn dies or is prematurely removed from Uie pouch. EvidenUy, Uie cessation of teat stimulation triggers tills response.Indigenous only to Australia and adjacent islands, the 56 kangaroo species range in size from the one-pound musky rat kangaroo to Uie nearly 200-pound red. There is a species for almost every terrain; one can even survive by drinking seawater.Who their antecedents were and how Uiey got to AustraUa are StiU debatable. It is generally agreed that all Australian marsupials, in­cluding kangaroos, descend from small, perhaps pouchless, carnivores or insectivores capable of bearing larger litters of young.Several of Australia’s smaU kangaroos are now .rare or extinct, probably as a result of Uie clearing away of brush Uiey need for food and shelter.And until recenUy, people could kill roos without restriction. Now every s'tate in AustraUa has adopted a system that permits only controUed destmction ^Saire up to‘‘3 6 0 ^^ ^ on Dodge Prospector PiGkupUption Packages. Pharmacists Bill Foster & Boh Rauch --------S ay- 700 Wilhesbura St., Mocksuille, NC, TV/. 634-21 Thermometers? Read this Do you have a good fever thermometer in your medi­cine cabinet? Next to aspi­rin. cough drops, and band- aids, a thermometer is probably one of the most needed health aids you can own. They are highly valu­able diagnostic items.Modern thermometers still register degrees via the old mercury column, but others are available which register above, normal, or below normal temperatures in just a matter of seconds by touching to the fore­head.I'll be happy to help you choose a proper thermome­ter and also demonstrate how to read it. Please visit us at Your Pharmacy. m 634-2141 Your Pharmacists, W0 Appreciate Your Èueineee i IRRIGATION NEW EQUIPMENT DEM ONSTRATION Friday, March 16 9:00 a.m.— 4:30 p.m. Saturday, March 17 9:00 a.m.— 2:30 p.m. We Will Be Demonstrating The Newest Traveling Sprinkler Irrigation System On The Market. Ag-Rain's Water Winch WW-1400 It Dnigned For Smill Acrrage (6-25 Acres Per Week) On Small FieldiWith Row Lengthi 300 to 1,000 Feet. Five Sizes To Select From—Up To 120 Acres Per Week. ALSO WE WILL BE SHOWING THE: ORIGINALIRRIFRANCE HARD HOSE, DRUM TYPE TRAVELING SPRINKLER (Assembled In Charlotte). THIS IS THE MACHINE THAT COMPETITORS HAVE COPIED IN RECENT YEARS. WE ARE NOW DISTRIBUTORS FOR VALLEY, THE W ORLD’S LARGEST AND OLDEST MANUFACTURER O F C E N T E R P IV O T S . DwioMtiition^nCeJir^^ GRA-^M AC DISTRIBUTING CO. Rout* 2 Mocktvills Hwy. SO I DODGE IS INTO TRUCKIN ' UKE AMERICAS INTO JEANS. _ . »1 ^ AdventurerPackage No. 1 package • \Nheei covers • AM radio • Bright rear bumper* Special "Prospector" decal. Retail Savings S10000.* Package No. s a X ““"’ • Air conditioning • Protection Package • Tinted glass—all windows. Retail Savings *300oo.* _ , KI n includes PackagePackage No. 2 no ^ pms: • Automatic transmission • Tilt steering column • Power steering • Convenience Package. Retail Savings >200°°.* Package No. 4 S t r “““' • Electric door locks • Automatic speed control, V8 required (extra cost) • AM/FM/MX stereo radio. Retail Savings »3600».* F U R C H E S M O T O R C O . 1 ^ M ocksvlll».N.C Ph.634-5948 6B - DAVIE COUNTV ENTERPRISE RECORD. THURSDAY. MARCH 15, 197') H o w P o O t h e r S u p e r m a r k o ; WE INVITE YOU TO COME BY AND SHOP WITH US TRIS W EEK TO G r n c p r v S n v in p < : t I Savings That You Can See! ^ • I W H E N Y O U S H O P W IT H U S A F T E R S H O P P IN G A T O T H E T H R IF T l M A R T W H E N Y O U S H O P W IT H U S A F T E R S H O P P I N G A T O T H E R A R E A S T O R E S , Y O U W IL L N O T IC E S O M E T H IN G D IF F E R E N T A B O U T Y O U R C A S H R E G IS T E R R E C E IP T . T H E T O T A L IS L O W E R T H A N U S U A L . T H E T O T A L S A V IN G S T H A T Y O U S E E A R E A N E V E R Y D A Y T H IN G A T T H R IF T l M A R T A N D T H E T O T A L S A V IN G S A R E N O T A R E S U L T O F A C O U P L E I O F L O W -P R IC E D “ S P E C I A L ” IT E M S , B U T B E C A U S E O F E V E R Y D A Y L O W E R P R I C E S T H R O U G H O U T T H E S T O R E . S O Y O U C A N R E S T A S S U R E D T H A T N O M A T T E R W H A T S IZ E Y O U R F O O D O R P E R , Y O U W IL L A L W A Y S S A V E M O R E A T All We Cut Is The Price! YOU SAVE. 16 OZ. PURITAN , VEGETABLE-20‘ OFF C O O K IN G O IL VAN,STRAW,Fl№GE RIPPLE ICE C R E A M \I 19%0Z. SALUTO SAUSAGE, PEP 10%0 z. HILTON ORSASSY&SPICV 5 0 7 9 OYSTER STEW........... ................................... ^ 2 PK. PET RITZ 40 CT. TOSS &.SOFT 49 DEEP DISH FABRIC SOFTENER... H PIE SHELLS................ 64 oz. BO PEEP 32 oz. LIQUID AMMONIA....................67^ DRANG....................... 4 CT. BRILLO O O C ^2 oz. COMET LONG GRAIN SOAP PADS.................ZZ' RICE............................ SpCT.BESPAK " ttlC 20OZ.WtNDEX GARBAGE BAGS..........79'^ WINDOW CLEANER.. I YOU SAVE w m ■ |Y O U S № KING - PALMOLIVE * D IS H LIQ U ID 1 7 MAXWELL HOUSE 1 LB. BAG COFFEE . . . MAXIM 4 oz. INSTANT COFFEE QT. OLD VIRGINIAAPPLE JUICE.. .. FOLGERS 1 LB. ALL GRINDSBAG COFFEE ... FOLGERS 13 0Z. CAN FLAKED COFFEE. IYOU SAVE T R Y O U R L A R G E S E L E C T IO N O F G A R D E N F R E S H P R O D U C E ! O R A N G E JU IC E > ARCADIA 1/2 GALLON $ 1 0 9 J 20 OZ. HUNTS K E T C H U P 2 H =0 R I ^ ^ G A R D E N F R E s I ^ ^ SALAD LETTUCE ESCAROLE, ENDIVE, ROMAINE, OR LEAF LETTUCES hÌ « for L A R G E B U N C H c3- ® J■«o;SThrífíi’^Maré l o w e s r FOOD R H IC B S A H Y W H M H M QUANTITY RIGHTS RESERVED ....N O N E SOLD TO D EALERS FOOO STAMPS HUY MORf AT THRIFTIMART I ASST.COLORS PRO SCRUB BRUSH 88 3 CT. GOOD NEWS RAZORS 6 9 15UZ. REG.&XBODY SELF-ADJUSTING SILKIENCE CONDITIONER * 1 8 9 36 CT. COLD MEDICINE ALKA-SELTZER PLUS * 1 9 9 * DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 1V79 - 7B C o m p a r e t e T h r i f t i M a r t ? IE FOR YOURSELF HOW WE COMPARE WITH OTHER STORES!!! '^ X S a v in g s A re Im p o rta n t, B u t... r : , * ^ H A T A B O U T T H E O T H E R T H IN G S T H A T M E A N A L O T T O O U R C U S T O M E R S . T H IN G S L IK E Q U A L IT Y , C U S T O M E R S E R V IC E , T O T A L S A T IS F A C T IO N ? W E K N O W T H A T T H E S E T H IN G S A R E V E R Y IM P O R T A N T T O C U S T O M E R S B E C A U S E T H E Y A R E A L S O V E R Y IM P O R T A N T T O U S ! W E A L W A Y S M A IN T A IN T H E H IG H E S T S T A N D A R D S O F Q U A L IT Y . U R C U S T O M E R S D E M A N D A N D D E S E R V E T O P Q U A L IT Y P R O D U C T S F O R T H E IR F A M IL IE S , A N D T H A T IS W H A T T H E Y G E T ...E V E R Y D A Y ! W E A L S O T A K E G R E A T P R ID E IN O U R S T O R E S A N D T H E P E O P L E W H O W O R K IN T H E M , T H E . S P E C IA L P E O P L E W H O T A K E C A R E O F O U R C U S T O M E R S E V E R Y W A Y T H E Y C A N . T H E S E T H IN G S A D D U P T O C U S T O M E R iS A T IS F A C T IO N .I T M E A N S ! A L O T T O Y O U ;Y O U [ M E A N A L O T T O U S ......... YM SM iJ 1 LB. CHAMPION WHOLE HOG PORK S A U S A G E 3 S 20-22 LB.A V G ., U.S.CH OICE WHOLE B E E F U.S. CHOICE lllilill 6 9 5«! 3A G \K IN G rOES OSCAR MAYER 12 OZ. PORK OR BEEF CRACKER BARREL SHARP S 9 NATURAL n n i CHEDDAR CHEESE . SWISS CHEESE ... 9 9 ' 12 OZ. KRAFT 8 OZ. WISPRIDE INDIVIDUAL WRAP SHARP « 4 1 24OZ. GORTON FRpZEN $ 1 7 9i&'FAsr «^ 59 $099 ROUND ROAST...............lb ISTRIPS.... 1 FISH PORTIONS .. . C» u.s. choice cubed S0 0 9 ■ ¡S S y i* ROUND STEAK..........lb^Z"^ OSCAIf MAYER 1 10 OZ. STICK 6 OZ. KRAFT ....................*1 U.S.CHOICE TOPROUND ROAST. OSCAR MAYER 12 OZ. MEAT. BEEF, OR THICK BOLOGNA. . . . MARKET MANAGER S P E C IA L 5 LB. BONELESS CHUCK STEAK 5 LB. BONELESS BEEF STEW 10 LBS. ONLY 1 LB. PKG. CAROLINA PRIZE 1 4 um nr rooo Muen ANymwm I PRICES GOOD THRU m 7 l7 9 ... HB D/WIE COUNTY ENlERPRISn RECORD, THURSDAY, MARCH 15, l‘»79 Obituaries Weekend Revival At Liberty Methodist MAUVIN 0. WARREN Mr. Marvin 0. Warren, 51, of Collettsville, died Thursday in Lenoir.The funeral was conducted al 2 p.m. Saturday at Miller’s Funeral Home Chapel with burial In the Bellevlew Cemetery.Surviving are his widow, Mrs. Gwyn Ledbetter Wnrren; one son, Bobby Warren ot Lenoir; one daughter. Miss Lynn Warren of Boone; one brother, James Warren of Hickory; and a sister, Mrs. Leslie (Christine) Daniel of Mocksville. Mocks The United Methodist Women held their March meeting Monday eve, Mrs. Kay Carter the president presided. Mrs. Emma Allen served refreshments.Mrs. Helen Meyers and- Donald Myers were Sunday dinner guest of Mrs. Jean Dzeskwieg of Winston.Paul W. Jones retumed to his house Saturday from Davie County Hospital where he had been a patient for the past six weeks.Miss Cindy Brewer spent Sunday with Miss Cindy riif'lps. Cindy was ill for the past several days with sore throat.Mr. and Mrs. Paul G. Jones spent Saturday eve with Miss Ethel Jones.Mrs. Polly Myers entered Medical Park Hospital Tuesday where she un­derwent major surgery on Wednesday.Mrs. Pedie Carter and children Tammy and Brian liave been ill the past week with a virus.Mrs. Clarence Campbell spent one day the past week with Miss Mattie Jones. Community Watch Meets In JerusalemJerusalem Community Watch will meet Friday, March 16,1979 at 7:30 p.m. at the Jerusalem Fire Depart­ ment. ^ Guest speaker will be Sheriff George Smith. MRS. EFFIE S. SMITHMrs. Effie Smith Smith, Route 1, Advance, N. C. died Tuesday morning, March 13, at Davie County Hospital after an illness of six months. She had been in declining health for three years.She was born In Davie County to the late Carson B. Smith and Ida Sparks Smith, August 21, 1887. She was educated in the Davie County schools, Brevard College and the Woman’s College in Greensboro, which is now luiown as the University of North Carolina.She taught school In the Davie County schools for twenty-five years and was a member ot Bethlehem United Methodist Church.She was married to the late C. Duke Smith.Survivors are two daughters, Mrs. Louise Adams and Mrs. Frances Temple, both ot Winston- Salem; one sister, Mrs. Rosa Sain of Mocksville; and.a number of nieces and nephews.Funeral services will be held Thursday at 4 p.m. at Bethlehem United Methodist Church with the Rev. Donald Funderburk officiating. Internment will be in the church cemetery.The family wUl receive visitors Wednesday evening from 7 p.m. until 8 p.m. at Vogler’s Main Street Chapel in Winston-Salem. Center Barbrcue A revival will be held at Liberty United Methodist CHiurch this Friday, Saturday, and Sunday (March 16-18).The guest preacher for these services will be the Rev. A.B. Weaver. A native of West Jefferson, North Carolina, Mr. Weaver is now the pastor of Wesley Heights and St. Timothy United Methodist Churches In Lexington. He Is married to the former Joan Krider of Todd, N.C. and they have two children.There will be congregational singing and special music each evening. Leading the singing will be the Rev. James Lochridge, Jr. Mr. Lochridge, President of Lighthouse Evangelistic Ministries and Minister of Music at First Baptist Church In MocksvUle, Is married to ' the former Belinda Harris of Durham, N.C. and they have two children. He can be heard on Radio Station WDSL each Sunday at 2:15 p.m.. The public is invited to attend the services each evening beginning at 7:30 p.m. The prayer room will open at 7:00 p.m. A nursery will be provided for the children. Green Meadows News Rc%. James Lochridgc ...To Lend Singing Rev. A. B. Weaver ...Guest Preacher Farmington News Cornatzer News Is Saturday The annual spring barbecue at the Center Community Building will be Saturday March 17.Barbecue sandwiches and trays will be on sale all day and a barbecue supper will be served beginning at 4:30 p.m. The barbecue plate will in­clude chopped or sliced barbecue, slaw, french fries, hushpupples, dessert, coffee or tea.All proceeds from this barbecue will go to the Center Volunteer Fire Department. Mrs. Bobby Winters returned home from Medical Park Hospital last Wednesday after undergoing surgery. We wish her a speedy recovery.Mr. and Mrs. Jack Jones and Mr. and Mrs. (Jettys Bingham and children at­ tended the wedding of Mrs. Jones’ nephew, In Statesville Saturday afternoon.Mr. and Mrs. Taylor KoonU visited Mr. and Mrs. (Haude Williams Sunday afternoon.Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Potts visited Eva Potts Sunday afternoon.Dottle and Sharon Potto visited Mr. and Mrs. Bruce Hinkle Sunday afternoon.Mr. and Mrs. Enloe Young of Hickory were Saturday night supper guesto of Mr. and Mrs. Jack Jones. Mrs. Lucy Harding who is now a patient in the Davie C^ounty Hospital has shown some improvement at this time.Mr. and Mrs. J.T. Greene Jr. and Miss Margaret Brock visited Mrs. Gene Lewis of Warrensville, N.C. last S- unday March llth. Mrs. Lewis is the mother of Mrs. Greene.Mr. and Mrs. Londley Peoples from the WUliam R. Davie community were the guesto of Mr. and Mrs. W.S. Spillman last Sunday af­ternoon.Mr. and Mrs. Charles Lashley, Debbie, Cecil and Mary Lashley visited Mrs. Lashtey's parento Mr. and Mrs. Grady Doub of Lewisville last Sunday night.Mrs. Helena Boger and gradnson, Scott Cranfill ot Mocksville and Mr. and Mrs. Tommy Jarvis ot the Jonestown Rd. Winston- Salem were the gueste of Mr. and Mrs. Clyde Jarvis last Sunday March 11.Mr. and Mrs. C.F. Holden of Winston-Salem were the guesto of Mr. and Mrs. Grady Smith last Saturday afternoon March 10. The Holdens had just returned trom a 3 weeks visit to Los Angeles, Calif, where they were the guesto of their granddaughter and family. While there they attended the Johnny Carson show, the Lawrence Welk show and several other in­teresting places. •Mr. and Mrs. Grady Smith also had dinner with Mr. and Mrs. W.R. Latham in Winston Salem last Sunday the llth.Mrs. Nancy McBride of Lewisville celebrated her 84th birthday anniversary on Monday March the Sth at the home ot her daughter, Mrs. Karlene Cope and family of Farmington. Other guests were Tommy McBride and daughter Rita and grand­daughter MicheUe of Winston- Salem. Also Mrs. Frances Harris ot EUtin, Mrs. Betty Baity and daughter Jane and grandson RusseU of Hun­ tersville were guesto.Two other friends, Jackie Lagle and Sheila Brown were also present for- the birthday celebration. Mrs. We aU hope Mrs. McBride wUl have many more happy birthdays.Mrs. Thurman Martin of WaUcertown was the guest of Mrs. Carrie S. Tucker last Sunday afternoon. Mrs. Martin also visited J.W. Tucker and famUy. Supper Saturday At Smith Grove There wiU be a barbecued chicken supper at the Smith Grove Fire Department on March 24th, from 4 p.m. until sold out. Green Meadows Church was pleased on Sunday to welcome thirty-one members of the Girl Scouto and their leaders to the morning worship service. They were members of troops 582, 602, 691 and 616.The March to Revival Coampaign now underway at Green Meadows reached ito goal of 135 In Sunday School on Sunday. Now they are reaching for 156 next Sunday. So if you are a member and haven’t for various reasons attended recently now Is the time to get an early Spring start. If you are not a member of other churches you have a special Invitation to Green Meadows.Plan now to attend Spring Revival Services at Green Meadows April 1-6. The visiting Evangelist is Rev. John D. Wilkinson, Pastor of ' Four Oaks Baptist Church of Four Oaks N.C.“Pop” Schulte has been transferred from Baptist Hospital to the Winston-Salem Convalescent Center on First St. in Winston-Salem to recuperate.The Joe Langstons visited his broUier Bill in StatesvUle on Saturday afternoon. BiU wiU enter Rowan Memorial Hospital on Sunday where he expecto to undergo surgery on Monday.Mrs. Donald Bingham and Mrs. Pansy Smith visited Mrs. Ernest Cope last Wed­nesday and they enjoyed playing the piano and organ and singing. All Mrs. Bingham’s friends are pleased to hear she is now able to be out some.Mr. and Mrs. Gray Mat­thews attended dedication services for their grand­daughter, Vanessa Matthews last Sunday at pleasant Gardens Methodist Church, Greensboro. Vanessa's parents are the Mitchell Matthews.Wendy, Tina and Michelle Smith of Winston-Salem spent a long weekend with their grandparento, Mr. and Mrs. J.K. Smith Sr. Their cousin Stephanie Smith of Far­mington joined them on Saturday. Several members of the family joined for lunch and a family gathering on Sunday.Mrs. Sallie Riddle hasn’t been feeUng very well tor several days.Mrs. Hubert Lashmit and daughter Opa of Hanes visited her sister Mrs. MUton James and family on Sunday af­ternoon.Mr. and Mrs, Kenneth Smith visited their son Danny at Campbell College on Sunday evening and attended the performance of the “Son Light" singers at the Bethel Baptist Church, of Spring Lake. Danny is a member of Ihe group.The Baptist Young Women ^ of Green Meadows Church conducted a white Bible service at the church on Sunday evening for Miss Rhonda Griffith and fiance Dennis Wishon, foUowing the regular evening worship. ’The group then gathered in the.A followship center where'^ everyone enjoyed refresh- mento of Lime Punch, cake squares, and salted nuto. The couple were showered wlUi a lovely assortment of useful gitto for their home. Ladies Booster Club Meets Sheffield-Calahain rural ladles booster club held ito March meeting Tuesday of last week, with 13 members and one visitor, Karen Ratledge of GuUford CoUege, N. C.The president, Phyllis AUen caUed the meeting to order with the members repeating the club creed.Naomi Wooten gave- the treasurer’s report.Plans were completed for the FamUy night spaghetti supper which is scheduled for Saturday, March 31. 0During business, it was ■ decided that Uie members would bake and sell chicken pie for the Easter holidays. Anyone interested in the pies can contact any club member or caU: 492-5344. ^ "Turophile" il a relatively new word for "a connoisseur or fancier of cheese. JERICHO CHURCH OF CHRIST Route 7, Jericho Church Road Phone: 492-5291 Minister-Charles Isenberg SERVICES: Sunday: Bible Study and classes for all ages at 10:00 Morning VVorship at 11:00 a.m.Evening Worship at 6:00 p.m.Wednesday Night: Mid-week Bible Study at 7:30 SERMON TOPICS FOR SUNDAY, A.M. Faith is The Victory P.M. The Devil's Long Dark Thread Of Enmity THOUGHT FOR THIS WEEK Who said, “It is better to marry than to burn?" ANSWER TO LAST WEEKS: S^ral, no one knows for sura See I Sam. 25-42-43; II Sam. 11:26-27 FARMINGTON METHODIST CHURCH Worship; 1st Sunday 10 a.m. 3rd Sunday 11 a.m. - Sunday School 1st Sun. 11 a.m. 3.2,4, ^ndays 10 a.m. ___WESLEY CHAPEL METHODIST ' CHURCH Wofdiip: 1st Sun. 11 a.m..3rd Suni 10 a.m. - Sunday School 3rd Sun, 11 a.m., 1,2,4, Sundays 10 a.m. NO CREEK PRIMITIVE BAPTIST CHURCH THE COOLEEMEE EPISCOPAL CHURCH Of The Good Shepherd The Rev. WiUis M. Rosenthal, Priest In Charge, Morning with Sermon 9:30 a.m., Sunday School 10:50 ajn. HUNTSVILLE METHODIST CHURCH WORSHIP: 2nd Sun. 10 a.m., 4th Sun. 11 a.m. CAUDELL * LUMBER CO.* 1238 Bingham Street IVIodteville, NC PHONE 634-2167 EATON FUNERAL HOME 328 N. Main Street MocluviUe, NC PHONE 634-2148 ADVANCE BAPTIST CHURCH CEDAR CREEK BAPTIST CHURCH FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH Rev. GeoTK Auman . Sunday School 10 a.m.-Worihlp Service 11 a.m. MOCKS UNITED METHODIST CHURCH .YADKIN VALLEY BAPTIST CHURCH CHINQUAPIN GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH EDGEWOOD BAPTIST CHURCH SMITH GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH CORNATZER BAPTIST CHURCH FORK BAPTIST CHURCH 6 miles East on Hwy 64, Rev. Yates K. Wakinson, Pastor, Sunday School 9:45 ^.m. Worship Service 11:00 a.m.-Evening' Worship 7:20 p.m. CORNATZER UNITED METHODIST CHURCH MARTIN HARDVtARt; tGENERAL I MERCHANDISE ' Feeds, Dry Goods Groceries, Fertilizer PHONE 634-2128 DAVIE TRAim)Rt iMPUMENTCO. Ford Fannlii9-Sal«s 'nd Service-New Holland JSqulR SaliibuiY Roid A Complete PHONE 634-SB6B RfOfir COBLE LIME t FERTILIZER SERVICE Cooleemee, NC - Hwy 158 BuN'nen Phone 2844364 Home Phone 284-2782 UNION CHAPEL UNITED METHODIST CHURCH ELBAVILLE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH OAK GROVE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH ^CENTER UNITED METHODIST CHURCH SALEM UNITED METHODIST CHURCH , UBERTY UNITED METHODIST CHURCH ADVANCE UNITED METHODIST CHURCI BETHLEHEM UNITED METHODIST CHURCH HARDISON UNITED METHODIST CHURCH TRINITY BABTIST CHURCH. Route 4, Mocksville, Pastor: Gene Blackburn, Sun­day Schooi-lOiOO a.m., Worship Service- 11:00 a.m., Evening Service-7:00 p.m..Wednesday Service-7 p.m. ___AJrf.E. ZION METHODIST CHURCH DULIN UNITED METHODIST CHURCH COOLEEMEE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH-ReV. John F. Edwards DUTCHMAN CREEK BAPTIST CHURCH' NORTH MAIN STREET CHURCH OF CHRIST Doiuld Freeman. Minister. Sunday School 10 a.m.-Worship Service 11 a.m.-Evening Worship Service 7 p.m.-Wed. Service 7:30 FARMINGTON BAPTIST CHURCH LIBERTY WESLEYAN CHURCH Tioy C. Vaughn. Pastor MOCKSVILLE WESLEYAN CHURCH . Hospital St., MocksvUle. NC Rev. Lindsay Wimers , Sunday School 9:4i a.m.Vlorning Worship 11 a.m.-Evening Worship 7 a.m. BEAR CREEK BAPTIST CHURCH REDLAND PENTECOSTAL HOLINESS CHURCH Rev. Paul C. Ledbetter,Sunday Scho­ol 10 a.m.-Worship II a.m.-Lifeliners 6 p.m.-EvangeUstic Service 7 p.m. - Wed. Bible Study 7 p.m. PICTURES OF SILVER The small daughter o( a minister watched him as he wrote his sermon. "Does God tell you what to say, Daddy?” she asked. "Of course He does," the father replied. "Then why do you scratch out so much of what you write?" John Newton said, "If you think you see the ark of the Lord falling, you may be sure it is a dizziness in your own head." God does tell men what to write. He tells them what to compose. He tells them what to paint and what to s^y. And should you ever doubt His divine power, remember, the lack of power which you sense IS not in Hitn.It IS in you* ATTEND CHURCH THIS WEEK MACEDONIA MORAVIAN CHURCH Rev. John Kapp, pastor-Sunday School 10 a.m.-Worship Service 11 a.m.-Youth Fellowship 6:30 p.m.-Evening Worship 7:30 p.m. Wilkins Hospital Pharmacy Located beside Davie Family Clinic Bill CoUette, R. Ph. FuU Prescription Service At Discount Prices 713 Hospital Street Phone: 634-3300 Ì 2,1,3 Sundays GREEN MEADOwS BAPTIST CHURCh Rev. David E. Rol)crts, Sunday School 10 a.m.-Worship Service 11 a.m.-B.T.U 6:30 p.m.-Evening Worship 7:30 p.m. Evenmg Worship 7:30 p.m.-Prayer Meet­ing Wed. 7:30 p.m. CHURCH OF GOD. Cooleemee, NC CLEMENT GROVE CHURCH OF GOD 1. W. Ijames, Pastor. Sabluth School 10 a.m.-Worship Service 1 p.m.-Prayer Meeting Wed. 8 p.m. SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST ON MILUNC ROADBairy Mahorney Pastor, Sabbath School 10 a.m.-Morning Worahip 11 a.m. Betty’s Florist For \smeis. iccasions CaU 634-3136 If No Answer 284-2629 927 YadkinvUle Rd. MocksviUe, N.C. ©Comniumlv Adwitltiing COMMUNITY BAPTIST CHURCH Gladttone Road.Sunday School 10 a.m.-Worship Service 11 a.m. HOPE BAPTIST TABERNACLE Norman S. Frye, Pastor, Sunday School 9:45 a.m.-Worship Service 10:45 a.m.-Evangelistic Service 7:30 p.m.-Wed. Service 7:30 p.m. fiOLY CROSS LUTHERAN CHURCH JERICHO CHURCH OF CHRIST Jericho Road, omce: 492-5291 Home: 492-5257. Charles C. Isenlierg 7257 ST. FRANaS CATHOLIS MISSION Sundays at 10 a.m. - Sunday otjUgation fulfilled also at anticipatory mass on Saturdays at 8 p.m.634-2667 or 2«-2463 BLAISE BAPTIST CHURCH Rev Jimmy Martin Pastor, Sunday Service y:SO a.m.-Worsh№ Servloe 11 a.m.-Sunday Evening 7 p.m.-Wed. Evening 7:30 p.m. CHESTNUT GROVE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH BAILEY'S CHAPEL UNITED METHODIST CHURCH FULTON UNITED METHODIST CHURCH BETHEL UNITED METHODIST CHURCH SMITH GROVE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH ZION UNITED METHODIST CHURCH ' NEW UNION UNITED METHODISTCHURCH EATONS BAPTIST CHURCH Sunday School 10 a.m.-Moming Worship 11 a.m.-Training Union 7 p.m. DAVIE BAPTIST TABERNACLE Rev. T. A. Shoaf. Pastor, On Fork Bixby Rd, Sunday School 9:45 p.m.-Morning Worship II a.m.-Erening Worship 7:30 p.m.-Blble Study Wed. 7:30 p.m.-Evening Worship 7 p.m JERUSALEM BAPTIST CHURCH Sunday School 10 a.m.-Worship Service 11 a.m.-Evening Worship Service 7 p.m. FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH Cooleemee SHILOH BAPTIST CHURCH TURRENTINE BAPTIST CHURCH CHURCH OF THE LIVING GOD BUby CHURCH OF GOD OF PROPHECY Rev. CharUe Talbert, MocksvUle, Rt. 4 (Epheaus) 284-4381 CONCORD UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 601 Shell Joe Thompson, Owner 7 Days a Week 140 at Hwy. 601 N. MocksviUe, N.C. Wione: 634-3211 C. A. SEAFORD . LUMBER COMPANfjJJericho Road ModcsviUe, NC PHONE 634-5148 J- J.P. GREEN MILLING CO. II«;. Diusy Flour We Custom Blend 524 Depot Street Phone 634-2126 FARM & GARDEN SERVICE. INC. 961 YadkinviUe Road PHONE 634-2017 or 634-5964 CLARKESVILLE PENTECOSTAL HOUNESS CHURCH Suo^y School 9:4S-Worship 11 a.m.|Mo(J»vl^.R^^^^MOCICSVILLE PENTECOSTAL Sunday School 10 a.m.-Wonhip ServkeIla.m.THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH Fork. N.C. The Church of the Ascension Church School 10:00 a.m. Worsliip & Sermon 11:00 a.m. Prayer Meeting 7:15 p.m. on Wednesdays: Canon C. Nichols, Pastor. HOLINESS CHURCH James C. Hodnett, Minister Sunday School 10 A.M. Worship Service 11A.M. Evangelistic Service 7:00 p.m. FamUy Night Wed. 7:30 p.m. FOSTER-RAUCH DRUG CO. Ixiwes Shopping Center MocksviUe, NC PHONE 634-2141 DAVIE SUPPLY CO. MocksviUe, NC PHONE 634-2859 MARTIN EQUIPMENT & SERVICE 508 Depot St. MocksviUe, NC PHONE 634-2082 ENTERPRISE-RECORD 124 South Main Mocksville N.C. J.R. Campbell & Son Specializing in Commercial Building«’ Milling Rd. MocksviUe, N.C. Pilone: 634-5341* JEFFCO CO., INC. ROUTE 1 - Advance "Our staff and employees encourage you to attend the church of your choice.' SHEFFIELD LUMBER (PALLET COMPANY Route 6 ■ Вож 153 ModuviUe, NC PHONE 492 5565 R evival S erv ices C o n tin u e « A t Fork B a p tis t DAVIK rOUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, THURSDAY. MARCII 15, I'Ved Wilson...iMiiiislcr of Mftgic A Revival services are still jnlinuing at the Fork Baptist Church. Minister ot Music, Fred Wilson is in charge ot the musical part of the service; and the tollowing has been planned tor this week: Wednesday, a program of ^lusic will be presented by the youth choir, with Jackie Bailey leading the choir and Janice Carter, accompanist, Thursday, the Chi dren’s choir will perform with Aneta Merrell, Jane Jones, Ann .Younte and Louise Sutton, n iwic Evangelist assisting. Friday, special music will be presented by Betty Booher, Karen Wilson, Aneta MerreU, Jean Carter and Kenneth Carter.Song evangelist Jimmy Snelen of Dallas, Texas, will be the featured artist each evening, and will lead the music. He is in his 24th year of evangelism and has been in over 850 revival campaigns. He is an outstanding musician. Dr, Homer Martinez, evangelist from Dallas, Texas, will be guest speaker each evening.The public is cordially in­vited to attend this special series of meetings. Before Enroiling, Study Up On All Private Vocational Schools Private vocational schools A may be a good means of ob- W taining practical training in a specialized field or vocation. This education is designed to prepare students for entry level jobs in business and industry. The skills learned at a vocational school may enable the unemployed to Msecure a job or the employed to advance to a higher level job. Although most vocational schools are reputable, the Better Business Bureau advises that ^ some schools may not be able /to fulfill a career-aspirer’s iipcxpectations.For example, some radio : and television ads have en-' ticed the unsuspecting to enroll in courses which , supposedly lead to jobs upon ' graduation. In one case a young man went to a ^vocational school for lypunch operator classes; the tuition was $2,900 for a 9 month course. Admissions officials assured him it could be paid for by federal student aids funds. Six months later the young man discovered he id incurred an additional $1,200 not covered by student aid. He also became dissatisified with the choice ot classes he was allowed to take so he dropped out. None of his money was refunded. Other students from the same school eporled similar financial Ifticulties. One woman claims she was duped into borrowing $1,300 from the school at 18 percent interest. Another woman said she signed a contract to borrow♦$300 from the school and the next time she saw the form, the figure had been erased and replaced by $2,000.Thinking about enrolling in a private vocational school?It may be a good idea to ask a tew questions first. For example, is the school ac­credited? Accreditation is ipgiven by various private ‘agencies recognized by the U.S. Office of Education and indicates that a school meets certain qualifications or standards.Does the vocational school Ja v e an open-admissions Wolicy? To avoid the trap of • paying for a course and fin­ding out it is too difficult, ■check out the services available for students who may need extra help. Is there a free placement service for graduates? Find out if this merely means they send graduates’ names to a list of companies. Ask for actual placement information. Remember that no school can guarantee a job at graduation.It's always a good idea to visit the school. Talk with the faculty and find out their qualifications. Is there a high rate of instructor turnover? Talk to current students; their feedback could be beneficial. Ask for copies of the school’s course catalogs and any other descriptive information about the content of the lessons, audio-visual aids, instructional equipment, etc. Study this material carefully to see if the class offerings will adequately suit specific career objectives.Don’t forget to ask for the names and addresses of recent graduates. A reputable school will be happy to give this information. Contact recent graduates to find out it the school really helped them in obtaining a job. Also talk with the graduates' employers. Are they satisfied with the graduates’ work per­formance? Would they hire more graduates from the particular vocational school? How much money could a hired graduate expect to earn?And finally, never sign an agreement until it’s thoroughly read and un­derstood. Make sure the total cost in the contract includes books, labs, equipment fees, graduation fees, etc. There should be no blanks in the contract and all promises should be in writing. The school’s refunded and can­cellation policy should be clear. Find out if any tuition money will be refunded in case you become dissatisfied with the courses.The Better Business Bureau advises interested students to evaluate the credibility and suitability of a private vocational school before signing an enrollment con­tract, Doing some homework on the credentials of a vocational school before in­vesting could mean a more satisfying education later. A T o u ch O f Jap an C onies To C o o le e m e eA touch of Japan came to Cooleemee Elementary School Friday as six young Japanese studenU visited the school and presented a most entertaining and educational program. The students are part ot the Japanese Christian En­counter who arrived in Salisbury on March 7th for a three weeks visit, sponsored by the Rowan Cooperative Christian Ministry.Mrs. A.C, McNeill, a Salisbury resident and a native of Japan, ac­companied the group to Cooleemee and she too brought some of her mementoes from Japan.The students gave a varied presen­tation, beginning with introducing themselves followed by the singing of a Japanese song, Shingo Suzuki made a brief talk about the Japanese coun­tryside and Mari Kanno, dressed in a white kimono, danced “The Stream”, a traditional Japanese dance.Shing Tchi Nozaki explained the Japanese alphabet to the group and wrote some of the student’s names in Japanese, Due to popular demand, he visited the suite at the conclusion of the program and wrote more of the students’ names. The program concluded with a demonstration of origami, Japanese paper folding. The visiting students passed out paper to members ot the audience and demonstrated the step-by- step process of paper folding.Now in it’s fifth year, the Japanese Christian Encounter program has at­tracted ever increasing interest among young Japanese people who are in- Three Japanese students demonstrate the process of paper foldins to students in Cooleemee School. terested in a program which provides something more than a standard American tour. The 36 young people who came to Salisbury last week will spend their three weeks in this area learning the English language, sightseeing, and getting a taste of American life ana Christianity through staying with Rowan county families during this time.The students visiting Cooleemee were; Mari Kanno, Hitomi Fujito, Miho Nakano, Sachi Hosoya, Shing-tchi Nozaki, and Shingo Suzuki. C h ain L e tte rs N e v e r D ie It seems that chain letters, like old soldiers, never die. From San Francisco lo Boston, from Chicago to Miami, the lure of easy money has unsuspecting victims plunking down as much as $100 each hoping to reap illusory profits from chain letter opportunities. The Better Business Bureau urges those who receive these let­ters to use caution.The latest vogue in chain letters is called the “circle" letter. This particular scheme asks the recipient to pay $50 for the letter and send $50 to the first person on a list of 12. The buyer removes the top name, adds his or her own at the bottom, sells two copies, and presto; $ioo comes back. Then, according to the pitch, participants need only sit back and wait for the money to roll in as letters including their names spread to a geometrically increasing portion of the population. So long as no one breaks the chain, everybody ^ns.,.or do they? Those receiving this type of chain letter should keep in mind that the definition ot a chain letter money-making scheme is “the exploitation of many by a few.’’ The chain almost always gets broken. Over 60-Million Gallons Of Hazardous Waste Produced Annually In North Carolina A two year long statistical survey ot industry in North Carolina shows that over 60 million gallons of hazardous or difficult to handle waste is being produced annually in the state.The report was released by the Solid Waste and Vector Control Branch of the Division of Health Services, N,C. Department ot Human Resources,Dr, Hugh Tilson, director of Health Services, pointed out that the survey gives the state a more accurate picture ot a situation of which it has been aware for some time and which it shares with the rest of the nation,“In North Carolina we want to be on top of this situation before there is any immediate health hazard and to develop approaches that will keep this material from posing any threat to future generations. An appropriate solution has not yet been found for this problem nationwide, but we feel that by being aware of the problem early and developing approaches to it, we can avoid the problems that have faced states that industrialized before we did,” Tilson said.North Carolina ranks 16th in annual production ot hazardous and hard to handle wastes.According to the survey report, based on 1976 data, “much of the hazardous and hard to handle wastes were being disposed ot within the state in environmentally unacceptable ways. Some were being poured down sanitary sewers, some were going on plant property and some were going to sanitary landfills.” Accoi^ing to Jerry Perkins, head of the Solid Waste and Vector Control Branch, the amount going to landfills is is small and in­cidental.The report is based on a survey of 23 percent of in­dustrial facilities in the state and includes a statistical projection based on the numbers and sizes ot industry located in each county.Recommended in the report is that hazardous waste management facilities be located within the state to provide “acceptable alter­natives for recovery, treat­ment or disposal of hazardous wastes;” that "adequate legislation and regulations be provided for statewide management of hazardous March 18-23 Bethel United Methodist Church 7:30 p.m. N ightly Rev. Jack Luther (Pastor) Will Be Bringing The Message Each Evening. THE BETHEL CH0IR WILL-SIN6 EACH-NI6HT Layman Will Be In Charge With Special Singing Each Night. Sundny-Oavid Etiex-Cornatzer Choir Monday-Vouth-Youth Choir of Bethel TuBsday-Sidney Garner-Evalyn Stewart & Marie Wednesday-Randall Cave-The Friendly Four Thunday-James Etsex-Bethel Choir Friday-Abe Howard-Oebbie Phippt & Sarah Srittoe Prayer Rooms Open At 7 p.m. Each Evening. Nursery Will Be Provided Everyone Invited! and hard to handle waste"; that governments ‘ at all levels continue to cooperate with industry in seeking mutually acceptable means ot waste management” ; and that “similar studies be made in order to obtain a more complete picture of the statewide waste problem.” A bill is expected to be in­troduced into the legislature in the next few days which will amend the Hazardous Waste Control Act and allow the state to permit a hazar­dous waste disposal facility. Currently state law demands compliance w)th EPA regulations which won't be adopted until 1980.The information in the survey was obtained from the industries themselves. “There was very good cooperation from industries in this survey,” the report says. According to Perkins, in­dustry has long been aware ot the problem and has been working closely with the Division of Health Services to find acceptable solutions.The report contains in­formation broken down by both county ahd type of in­dustry. The largest generation ot hazardous and hard to handle waste in the „ state is chemical and allied }{ products industries with production ot over 35 million gallons annually. Second is machinery manufacturers and distributors other than electrical with over 12 million gallons. The textile industry ranks third with over eight million gallons.Included under the chemical and allied products p classification are tliose in­dustries which manufacture' organic chemicals, synthetic rubber, medicináis and botanicals, phar-nacutical preparations, soap and other detergents, fertilizers, agricultural chemicals, ex­plosives, printing ink, etc.The types of waste generated included fertilizer liquids, adhesive sludge, automotive chemicals, inorganic salt solutions, alcohol and resin solids, paint sludge, aresenic compounds, dyestuff residues, paint thinners and solvents, detergents, petroleum distillates and sludges, graphite, mercury waste, acids, chorinated hydrocarbon solvents, in­secticide manufacturing sludges and fiber resins and residues:Included under the machinery except electrical classification are steam engines and turbines, internal combustion engines, farm machinery and equipment, construction machinery, mining machinery, elevators and moving stairways and other specialized industrial machines.This type of industry produced ammonium nitrate solutions, calcium fluoride sludge and water soluable sludge.The textile industry produces sanitary and dyehouse waste treatment sludge, varsol type solventa and lubricating and hydraulic oils.According to the statistical projection, the foUowing counties generate over 1,000,000 gallons of hazardous waste annually: Mecklenburg 10 million gallons, Alamance,1 miUion gallons, Brunswick2.1 million gallons, Buncombe1.2 million gallons, Columbus1.3 million gallons, Cum­berland 1.9 million, Forsyth 1.6 million, Gaston 4.4 million, Guilford 7.4 miUion, Johnston 1 mUlion, L<enoir 1.1 million, Rowan 2.1 mUlion, Wake 2 3 million, WUson 1.4 miUion.Local health directors were briefed on the report at their annual meeting laBt week. By Garold Carter I have been told by a number of people that they have been reading Scouting News, and Uiat they enjoy it. That makes me feel good, ot course, but something is happening Uiat makes me feel even better. There has been an increase in the number of adults who want to work in scouUng, We have heard from some adults who want to try their hand as leaders, and some who would like to “do someUiing but not a leader,”Anyone who works with scouting is a leader whether scout master, committeeman, or counselor. It takes a big team to bring a boy from Bobcat to Eagle, We have a good team, but we need stiU more members of Uiat team. Right now one of the serious shortages is in nierrit badge counselors. Scouting has merit badges for about every skiU, and every merit badge requires a counselor. You could tiU that role. Why not share your skUl, whether professional or hobby? The field includes over a hundred skiUs ranging from American Business to Zoology and everything in between. In­terested? Good! Contact Rev, Carter (634-5322-634-5419), Jimmy Robersson (c-o Davie Jewelers), or any scout­master.My job as Davie District Chairman includes many fringe benefits. One of these is an invitation to such events as Blue and Gold Banquets, an annual event of Cub ScouUng. Pack 574 furnished me with a program of their tianquet which I pass on to you. The banquet was very weU planned and provided an evening tiUed wiUi fun and excitement.Pack 574 held its Blue and Gold Banquet, February 27th at 7 p.m. in the Davie County High School cafeteria. Invited guests present included Mr, Gary Prillaman, president of Uie MocksvUle Jaycees; Mr, and Mrs, Stephen Kennedy, Pack Committee Chairman; Rev. and Mrs. Carter, District Scouting Chairman; Mr. and Mrs. Stephen Murdoch, District Cubbing Chairman and Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Naylor, Scout Master of Troop 575.The Banquet was a covered dish affair with an abundance of food for aU. The meeting was caUed to order and Den 6 under the direction of Den Leader Kitsey Slye put on Uie Opening using an Indian skit on the Blue and Gold Theme.Pinewood Derby awards were given as foUows; Best Design - Weblos, Uraa Steele; Pack, Jeff BaUey; Den Winners, Scott Wands, Bruce BuUcock, Chris James, Greg MiUer, Davin Brown.Derby Race - Weblos 1st.- Brad Steele; 2nd-Jim Slye; 3rd-David Johnson; Pack ist.- Grant Hensen; 2nd-Brian Smith; 3rd-Greg Miller; Honorable Mention - Scott Wands, Jeff Bailey, Richie Percival,Shane Young and Robbie Hudspeth were inducted into Uie Webclo Den by Al Streit, Wclicio Leader. After the Award ceremonies, the pack was entertained by the Indian Dancing of the Order of the Arrow under the direction of Jim Roberson ot Troop 525. The Cubs really enjoyed the Snake Dance which they were invited to join.Den 2 held the closing, again using the Blue and Gold Theme, but this time with candles under the direction ot Den Leader BeUi Humphrey, VAID Cards For Uie first time in its history, the Veterans Ad­ministraUon is issuing per­sonal idenUficaUon cards to more- than two miUion ser- vice-disabied veterans to emphasize their top priority in obtaining treatment at VA medical centers and out­patient clinics. Chain letters tend to spread rapidly and then die down rather quickly. Only a small number of people, usually the organizers, gain Uie expense of a much larger number. It’s fairly easy for the chain letter promoters lo benefit from these schemes because the names and addresses used are often phony. Wilh the "circle" chain letter scheme, it may be easy to sell tiie letter at first, but after a while people begin lo have trouble selling their copies. Remember that if the letter cannot be sold to others, the buyer's name never gets into circulation thereby curtailing the chances to receive any money. Also, keep in mind Uiat it is possible for Uie others to redo Uie letter and change the order of the names to improve their position.Chain letter schemes that involve the maUing of money or any other item ot value violate federal law. Watch out for the chain letter that claims to be perfectly legal, but then says that money has to be maUed at some point. If money, a bond or other valuable item is to be mailed, Uie enUre scheme is iUegal. Also iUegal are chain letter opportunities which 1) urge or obtain a pledge from par­Ucipants to donate a portion of their receipts to charity, or 2) provide so-called reports or other items ot alleged value in return tor a participaUon tee.Whether the letter received refers to a "circle” or not, be sure to turn over any chain letters to your postmaster or a postal inspector. Those en­couraged to parUcipate in any mail scheme Uiat seems to be fraudulent should save ail the evidence including envelopes. Get in touch with Uie Postal Service as soon as possible.A chain letter opportunity may sound like a fast, easy way to make a lot of money. However, Uie Better Business Bureau advises prospecUve participants to consider aU Uie facts. Not only are chain letters against the law, but they offer false hopes of monetary reward.An energy-saving Up trom Uie Better Business Bureau: Be sure to fix leaky faucets in your home, especiaUy hot water faucets. One drop a second can waste up to 700 gaUons of water a year! Child's RightsMore than 100 nations are observing 1979 as The In­ternational Year of the ChUd, according to The NaUonal FoundaUon-March of Dimes, The voluntary health organizaUon joins 200 other American groups in saluUng Uiis tribute to every child’s rights. s ik: You're Invited To Hear • • • DR.HOMER MARTINEZ Yates Wilkinson Minister Fork Baptist Church Rev. Homer Martinez, Evangelist ^ CHAM PION ATHLETE (BOXIN G) ★ BI-LINGUAL M ISSION ARY TO LATIN AMERICA ir DYNAM IC AND GIFTED SPEAKER ir HAS CONDUCTED OVER 1000 CRUSADES F o rk B a p tis t C h u rc h M a r c h 1 1 -1 6 ,1 9 7 9 7; 1 5 -M in i C o n c e rt 7 :3 0 -W o rs h ip S e rv ic e Ya'll Cornel • Jimmy Snelen, Music Evangelist Fred WUson, Minister of Music ( D A M I COUNTV I M l: Rl’KISI-: RLCORD, THURSDAY. MARCH 15, Davie District Court F arm M a rk e t S u m m a ry The following eases were disposed of in the regular Miirch ,'j, 1979 session oi Dislricl Court with Lester P. Martin, Jr., Presiding Judge ond Frank Bell, Asst. District Attorney:Willie Leo Walker, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, dismissed wilh leave,Lee Franklin Wilson, Jr., (Hissess pyrotechnics, cost. •Jerry Wayne Wilson, possess marijuana, cost; possess pyrotechnics, voluntary dismissal,Lee Franklin Wilson, Jr,. operating motor vehicle while under the influence, $100 and cosí; left of center, cost,Julia Beauchamp Brown, failure to see safe movement, cost.Beverly Charlene Camp­ bell, reckless driving, voluntary dismissal,Randy Eugene Godbey, speeding SO mph in 35 mph zone, $20 and cost.Leslie Ann Neese, ex­ ceeding safe speed, $15 and cost,James Michael Sullivan, no operators license, voluntary dismissal,Clyde William Whitley, Jr,, operating motor vehiclc while under the influence, $100 and cost and other conditions.Cole Freeman, com­municate threats, prosecuting witness does not desire to prosecute, dismissed on cost, Lynn Koenecke Billings, improper equipment, cost.Dale Carter, damage to personal property, sentenced to thirty days suspended for one year, cost, make restitution, not go about preini,ses of prosecuting witness.Newton Coke Marion, improper equipment, cost, Dora Mae Self, speeding 47 mph in 35 mph zone, cost.Fred Preston Badgett, improper equipment, cost.Risdon Fields Flowers, reckless driving after drinking, $250 and cost.Sharon Ann Frank, im- ; proper passing, voluntary dismissal.Vernell Eugene Kirby, exceeding safe speed, cost.George Torrence Yocum, exceeding sate speed, $15 and cost.Larry Douglas Wyatt, operating motor vehicle while under the influence, sen­tenced to pay $100 and cost, surrender operators license,■ other conditions.Jamie Brown, two coimts of • misd. larceny, prayer for : judgment continued on conditions; two years probation, $100 and cost, surrender operators license for six months, special con- . ditions.Kevin Huff, misd. larceny, prayer for judgment con­tinued, 2 years probation, $100 and cost, surrender operators . license for six months, special conditions.Mark Spaugh, misd. lar­ ceny, prayer for judgment continued, two years probation, $100 and cost, surrender operators license for six months, special con­ditions.The following cases were disposed of in Magistrates Court or paid by waivering court trial;Walter William Link, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, $10 and cost.Rodney Steven Williams, speeding 67 mph in 55 mph zone, $10 and cost.Leroy Mitchell Riiey, Jr., speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, $10 and cost.Lester Rowan Baker, speeding 68 mph in 55 mph zone, $10 and cost.Dolly Lavita WiUiams, failure to comply with license restrictions and speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, $25 and cost,Gerald Dwain Parks, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, $10 and cost, Mary Freeman Whitaker, exceeding safe speed, cost.Joseph Levon Hoover, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, $10 and cost.Henry M, Hartzog, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, $io and cost.Reynolds James Ivins, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, $10 and cost,Saul R. Medina, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, $io and cost.Ronald Lee Medlin, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, $10 and cost,David W. Staley, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, $10 and cost.Marie Hardy, allow dog to run at large, cost,Gary Bonny Hairston, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, $10 and cost.Marilyn Louise McClendon, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, $10 and cost.Vanessa Redmon, allow dogs to run at large, cost.Buddy Lynn Visser, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, $10 and cost,Alfred Clarke Wilson, speeding 58 mph in 45 mph zone, $in and cost.Edwin Jerry Wetmore, speeding 66 mph in 55 mph zone, $10 and cost.Carolyn Stephen Brakebill, speeding 65 mph in 55 mph zone, $5 and cost,Donald Martin Hendricks, speeding 67 mph in 55 mph zone, $10 and cost.Ronald Alexander Hanes, speeding 67 mph in 55 mph zone, $10 and cost,George aifton Ridenhour, speeding 68 mph in 55 mph zone, $10 and cost.John M. Tacker, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, $10 and cost,Janet Carter Bates, safe movement violation, cost.Ronald Eugene Crawford, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone and failure to comply with license restrictions, $25 and cost.William H. Carlisle, speeding 69 mph in 55 mph zone, $10 and cost.Mary Oakley Cain, speeding 66 mph in 55 mph zone. $10 and cost,Clayton Moore Chamberlin, speeding 69 mph in 55 mph zone, $10 and cost.Roby Lewis Grant, Jr., display registration registered to another vehicle, cost.Sylvia Joan Harper, speeding 65 mph in 55 mph zone, $5 and cost.Daniel Eugene Harris, speeding 60 mph in 45 mph zone, $10 and cost.Steve Allen Hubbard, speeding 67 mph in 55 mph zone, $10 and cost,Troy Franklin Sipes, failure to stop for duly erected stop sign, cost,John Thomas Beaver, exceeding safe speed, cost, James Warren Kennedy, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, $10 and cost,Bernard Andrew Angel, speeding 69 mph In 55 mph zone, $10 and cost,Deborah Thompson Arey, exceeding safe speed, cost, Clyde Cicero Byerly, safe movement violation, cost.Randy Wayne Gaddy, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, $10 and cost.Betty Walter Furches, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, $10 and cost.Donald Earl Goforth, speeding 68 mph in 55 mph zone, $10 and cost.Dennis James Kelly, speeding 65 mph in 55 mph zone, $5 and cost.Carolyn Lee McDaniel, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, $10 and cost.Abdallah C. Melki, speeding 68 mph in 55 mph zone, $10 and cost.Robert Frederick Miller, Jr., speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, $10 and cost.Charles William Lamon, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, $10 and cost.Robert Sanford McCarter, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, $10 and cost.Donald Lyda, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, $10 and cost.Donald Lyda, speeding 70 mph in SS mph zone, $10 and cost.MiUie Childers Mecimore,. spee^ng 70 mph in 55 mph zone, $10 and cost.Kenneth Wayne Minyard, speeding 70 mph in S5 mph zone, $10 and cost.James Joseph Lisk, speeding 66 mph in 55 mph zone, $10 and cost.Charles Frank Potts, failure to drive on right half of highway that was sufficient width for more than one lane of traffic, cost.Thomas Foster Rudd, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, $10 and cost.George Donald Royals, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, $10 and cost.Charles Bruce Ruff, speeding 68 mph in 55 mph zone, $10 and cost.Julian Edward Stewart, speeding 65 mph in 55 mph zone, $5 and cost.James Anthony Snow, exceeding safe speed, cost.Floyd Colonel Smith, speeding 66 mph in 55 mph zone, $10 and cost.Stanley Dale Turner, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone and failure to stop for stop sign, $10 and cost.Texola Miller Tucker, speeding 65 mph in 55 mph zone, $5 and cost.Donald Carolyn Williams, too fast for conditions, cost. Roslyn J. Teffeteller, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, $10 and cost.Marsha Howard YingUng, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, $10 and cost.Nicholas Peter Booras, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, $10 and cost.Zeno Hadley Dixon, ex­ceeding safe speed, cost.James Edward EUis, Jr., by entering intersection while stop light was emitting red, cost.Mary Jones Hatley, ex­ceeding safe speed, cost.Grady Ue McNeUI, Jr., safe movement violation, cost.Thomas J. Patrick, speeding 52 mph in 35 mph zone, $25 and cost.Lawrence Ernest Niemeyer, without having headli^ts in operation, cost.Charles Robert Sims, safe movement violation, cost.Rory Reford Benton, ex­ceeding safe speed, cost.Susan Lynn Booth, ex­ ceeding safe speed, cost.Hubert Lee Bassett, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, $10 and cost.Joseph Virgil Clontt, speeding 68 mph in 55 mph zone, $10 and cost.Therman Harley Cor- pening, speeding 75 mph in SS mph zone, $25 and cost. Frances Ledbett Edrey, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, $10 and cost.Leonard Mayer, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, $10 and cost.Stephen Caldwell Owens, exceeding safe speed, cost.Charles Irvin Norris, speeding 69 mph in 55 mph zone, $10 and cost.Marty Lane Norton, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, $10 and cost,Bruce Eugene Spry, ex­ceeding safe speed, cost,James H. Sams, speeding 66 mph in 55 mph zone, $10 and cost.Joel Lome Speer, following too close, cost.James Randal Vestal, exceeding safe speed, cost.Earnest Weldon Allen, expired Inspection certificate, cost,Charles Fredrick Bethel, exceeding safe speed, cost.Linda Carol Coley, speeding 69 mphin 55 mph zone, $io and cost.Kevin Bruce Eüis, no in­spection certificate and without display registration plate, cost.Charles Elmer Rice, ex­ ceeding safe speed, cost.Wendall Fletcher Sain, safe movement violation, cost.Future Lee Williams, Jr., speeding 65 mph in 55 mph zone and Improper registration, cost.Bobby Greene Winters, exceeding safe speed, cost. Donald Gaston Allen, failure to reduce speed, cost. Henry Paul Davidson, speeding 69 mph in 55 mph zone, $10 and cost.David WaUer Duncan, Jr., exceeding safe speed, cost.Earl Caton, Jr., exceeding safe speed, cost.Roclcy Dale Davis, im­proper passing and exceeding safe speed, $10 and cost,James Wallace Lane, Jr., without being licensed with motorcycle endorsement and no insurance, cost; without displaying registration plate and no safety helmet, cost.Melvin Eugene Myers, speeding 69 mph in 55 mph zone, $ 10 and cost.Freddie Tyrone Miller, failure to stop for duly erected stop sign, cost.James Hugh Pierce, speeding 69 mph in 55 mph zone, $ 10 and cost.Carolyn Potts Potts, im­ proper tlreá, cost.James Douglas Stanley, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, $10 and cost.Melissa Jean Sturdivant, exceeding safe speed, cost.Jean Davis Wilson, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, $10 and cost.William Charles Bothweii, failure to yield, cost.Bernard R. Browm, speeding 79 mph in 55 mph zone, $35 and cost.Mostafa A. Elramlly, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, $10 and cost.Garland Calvin Gorham, consume malt beverage while driving motor vehicle, cost.Betty J. Freeman, wor­thless check, make check good and pay cost.Debra Ann Kiser, consume malt beverage while riding in motor vehicle, cost.Coleen Mickles Howell, speeding 66 mph in 55 mph zone, $10 and cost.Esam Mohamed Morsy, speeding 70 mph in S5 mph zone, $10 and cost.Jerry L. MUler, speeding 79 mph in 55 mph zone, $35 and cost.Diane Ladd Redmond, worthless check, make check good and pay cost.Mark Andrew Purvis, speeding 7Ó mph in 55 mph zone, $10 and cost.Ann P. White, worthless check, make check good and pay cost.Joseph Martin Walters, _ safe speed, cost. g ^ s S e s | У Л BACKI'I.ll’ is perloriiiod by a luimpback wlialc in .Alaska'.s CMacicr Bay. Tliu ineaii- iiiK »I sdcli displays —wlicther for I'oinniii- By Al Gidrtings . 1978 Na'inn.il Goog'aphii: Soi.ioly iiiiatioii or just liiuli spirits —intriuiii’s sci­entists. who also would like lo know wli\ the- humpback is Ibc onl\ wlialc llial sinus. Some Wiiale Compose Songs; Scientists Want To Know Why Pullman cars get their name from their designer, Georae Pullman.___________ By William J. O’Neill Birds sing, but wh.iles compose.Birds stay with the same song year after year, but the humpback whales compose as they go along, each year in­corporating new elements into their old songs , reports Dr. Roger Payne of the New Advancel News Mr. and Mrs. Bradley Cornatzer of Michigan arrived at the home of his sister Mrs. Recie Shwte on Saturday for a few ^ys visit. While here Mr. and Mrs_ Cornatzer will visit his brothers andarea They were visitors ai the Methodist Church Sunday^ Mr. and Mrs. G.W. Potts have returned from a two weeks vacation m They traveled as Naples on the West coast of Florida and spent a week m Fort Lauderdale.M r^ Lucille Cornatzer expresses appreciation to all thwe who contributed to Ше Heart Fund, also the workers and co-workers, Mrs. i»r- natzer was chairperson of the Advance area which Bixby, Cornatzer, R^and and Smith Grove; “«1 communities of Mocks, Elbaville,and Fulton. A totel of $901.49 was collected. в! „лMr. and Mrs. James Black of Lexington were Sun^y aftemoon visitors of their cousins Mr. and Mrs. BUl Zimmerman. °visited Mrs. Hazel Shutt.Ito. Genny Walt Cornatzer is a paUent at Davie HfP|»l in the intensive care unit aftw suffering a hwrt attack. Jim Jones was hospitollzed last week at Davie wittipneumonia. Mrs. Lib carter « ronfined to her home wltn pneumonia. Get well wishesare extended to these. Mrs. Georgia FMter. Mrs^ Vogie Marsh and Mrs. Gladys were Sunday afternoon visitors of Mrs. Claw ^ity- Other visitors of Mrs. Baity wwe Mrs. Alice Hauser and Mrs, Sue Smith of Lewlsvüle.Mr and Mrs. Lawrence Baity of Courtney, Mrs. ЗаШе Grow of Pfafftown, Clyde Cornatzer and Paul Cornatzer “ шЬу, Charlie CornaUerand son Charles WesleyofWs community were Sunday afternoon visitors of Mrs. Recie Sheets and her howe guests Bradley and Mae *^Mlss*^ren Alvord is quite illThome. A speedy recovej7 is wished for her and we ho^ BhP will soon be able to resume her studies at Pfeiffer ^Ш вГ Cora Hartman of PeUcare Nursing Home sj^nt Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. BiU Hutchens and other relatives in the community. WMtarn M o Mon.-Tues.-Wed.- Fri.-Sot. 9:00-5:30 p.m. Thurs.-9:00-1:00 p.m« Ph. 634-237) L ic e n se B u re a u Mon.-Tues.-Wed.-Fri. 9:00-5:00 p.m . Thurs.-9:00-1:00 p.m. Ph. 634-3303 713 Wilkesboro Stfeet York Zoological Society, who has been observing whales for more Ihan a decade.To Ihe uninitiated, the notes emitted by a singing whale may sound more like noise Ihan music; drawn-out bass rumblings and squeaky trebles interspersed wilh ascending and descending scales.By charting the whales’ vocalizations on spec­trograms, however, Payne has determined that they follow definite, yet changing patterns."Each song, for example, is composed of about six lhemes--passages with several identical or slowly changing phrases in them,” he explained, “Each phrase contains from two to five sounds.”He said Ihe songs, which can Iasi from several minutes to half an hour, “are propably the longest, loudest, and slowest songs in nature."Payne, whose work is supported by grants from the Soybean Production Meeting is March 21 The Davie County Agricultural Extension Service will sponsor a Soybean Production Meeting on Wednesday, March 21, at 7;30 p.m. The meeting will be held in the auditorium of the County Office Building. Door prizes to be given away in­clude; (1) Five gallons of Treflan herbicide, (2) One bushel of Ransom seed beans, (3) One bushel of Davis seed beans, and (4) One Bushel of Forrest seed beans. Refresh­ ments wlll also be avaUable.The program wUl cover such topics as varieties, foliar boron for soybeans, foliar fertilizer for soybeans, selecting herbicides for soybeans, etc. The program wlU be presented by Ronnie Thompson, Davie County Associate Agricultural Ex­ tension Agent and Fate Thompson, Extension Weed Specialist from North Carolina State University.The results of various soybean tests conducted In Davie County last summer wlll be announced and discussed. All persons in­ terested in soybean production are invited to attend the meeting according to Ronnie W. Thompson, Associate Agricultural Ex­tension Agent. GREAT GE1AWAY SA U E! WAUCOVERINGS Lowest prices ever 3 0 % O F F Thru M arch 2 4 CAUDELL LUMBERCO. 1238 Bingham Street Mocktville, N. C.Phone 634-2167 National Geographic Society, New York Zoological Society, and Ihe World Wildlife Fund, recorded as Beethoven from the Beatles.”He has even found contrasts between groups of hump- backs-those that pass Ber­muda each spring on their way north trom southern calving grounds, and the Pacific whales that congregate at the same period oft Hawaii,Payne said (hat although all the whales in each group sing the same song, the hump­ backs in the Pacific have a different song from those in Ihe Atlantic.“In any one song the Ihemes always follow the same order, though one or more themes may be absent,” he said. “The remaining ones are always given in predictable sequence,”He considers the 40-ton animals to be “irrepressible composers,” since the songs keep changing. Apparently as one whale improvises a change in Ihe song, others pick it up.Payne said new phrases sometimes are created by joining the beginning and end ot consecutive phrases and omitting the middle, and he likened this to (he way people shortei. “do not” to “don’t.”He said the underwater vocalist always seem to be a male, to be alone, and to remain still in the water, although the whale may move Us flippers slowly as though in time with the song.Other whales have at least limited underwater vocabularies, but only humpbacks has structured songs, Payne said. He hasn’t yet found what role the songs play. The average U.S. worker works 37 hours, 6 minutes per week. (Farm Market Summary week of March 5-9, 1979 Federal-State Market News Service North Carolina Department of Agriculture Division of Marketing).A total of 12,914 feeder pigs were sold on 12 state grad^ sales during week of March 5, according to the Market News Service of the NorUi Carolina Department ot Agriculture, Prices were mostly $1.50 to $6 higher per hundred weight, U.S, 1-2 pigs weighing 40-50 pounds averaged $119.11 per hundred pounds with No. 3s $112.28; 50-60 pound I-2s averaged $108.02, No. 3s $96.18; 60-70 pound l-2s $95.31, No, 3s $81.88;70-80 pound l-2s $83.62 per hundred pounds with No, 3s $76,62,At weekly livestock auc­tions held within the state the week of March 5, prices for slaughter cows were 25 cents to $3 lower and feeder calves $4 (0 $10 higher. Utility and commercial slaughter cows brought $50.25 to $58 per hundred pounds. Good and choice veal calves $88 to $111; Good and choice slaughter steers above 800 pounds $61 to $67; Good and choice slaughter heifers above 700 pounds $61,50 to $67; Good feeder steers 300-600 pounds $80 to $113,50 and Good feeder heifers 300-500 pounds $72 to' $92; feeder cows $48,50 to $61,50 per hundred pounds. Baby calves brought M2.50 to $130 per head. Market hogs brought mostly $50.50 to $52.75 and sows 300-600 pounds $41.75 to $47.40 per hundred weight.Sweet potato prices were higher this week. Supplies and demand are both moderate. Fifty pound cartons of cured U.S, No, Is on March 8 were Tax Forms 'Hotline’ quoted al $6.25 to $6.7.'i, few $6.00 and $7.00.Corn prices were steady and soybeans 9 lo 21 cents per bushel higher through Thursday, March B, com­ pared to the same period of the previous week. No. 2 yellow shelled corn ranged mostly $2.50 per bushel in Ihe Eastern part of the stale and $2,35 (0 $2,65 in the Piedmont, No. I yellow soybeans ranged mostly $7.41 to $7.63 in the Easl and $7.20 to $7.50 in Ihe Piedmont; No. 2 red winter wheal $3.12 lo $4.12; No. 2 red oats $1,12 to $1.13; and milo $3. to $4,15 per hundred. New crop prices c|uoted for harvest delivery corn $2.39 lo $2.46, soybeans $6.76 lo $6,93, Wheal $3.06 to $3.17, oats $1.13 to $1.15.Egg prices were 4 to 6 cents per dozen higher this week with the greatest increase on larger sized eggs compared to Uiose of Ihe previou.s week. Supplies are in derate. Demand was very good. The North Carolina weighted average price quoted oH March 8 for small lot sales of cartoned grade A eggs delivered to stores was 76.15 cents per dozen for large. Medium 73.07 and Smalls 50,05.The broUer-tryer market is higher tor next week’s trading. Supplies are moderate and demand is good. The North Carolina dock weighted average price is 48,23 cents per pound for less than truckloads picked up at processing plants during Uie week ot March 12, This week 7.2 mUllon birds were processed in North Carolina with an average live bird weight of 4,03 pounds per bird on March 7.Heavy type hens were steady Uils past week with a firm undertone for next week.Available To Tar Heelssu^iiL were moderate and These days there are few Uiings which are free, but the Internal Revenue Service offers free assistance to taxpayers in the preparaUon ot Federal Income tax returns.The newest free service offered by the IRS is the toll- free telephone line for ad­ditional forms and publicaUons. You just dial your area access code, then 800-241-3860 which Is a direct line to the Forms DistrlbuUon Center. The material will be mailed to you postpaid.In addition to forms and schedules, the IRS has more than 90 different pubUcations which go into detaU on just about every phase of Income tax preparation for the in­ dividual. These booklets deal with such subjects as child care credit, various deduc­tions, earned income credit, taxable income, how to choose between the 1040A and 1040, and energy credit, to name just a few.Don’t wait untU the last minute to order your ad­ditional forms or publications.Look at your tax forms now and see what you need to complete your return your­self. demand good. Heavy type hen prices 26 cents per pound at Uie tarm with buyers loading.Market hogs at dally cash buying stations about the state week of March 5 ranged mostly $50.00-$52.50. Scout Leaders Are Wanted New Scout leaders are needed for Woodlee, Creek­wood, Davie Gardens and Bermuda Run developments. There are lots of boys in these areas interested In becoming scouts.Leaders are needed before dens can be started. Anyone Interested In working with scouts are asked to caU; 998-4152 or ......... Jordan Reunion Set For March 25th The Jordan reunion wiU be held at Uie William R. Davie Fire Department, Sunday, March 25. Dinner wUl be served at 1 o’clock.All relatives and friends are invited to attend. JOIH THE MOVE TO Т Т - Г Г Т Ж Т " AND GET YOUR MONEY'S WORTH! MICHELIN X 175-13......51*® BR78-13 ..... 55" 185-14.... ... 57®“ DR78-14....61*® J95-14......62®“ ER78-14......63” 205-14......65®“ FB78-14......67®“ 3215-14......69®“ GR78-14.....71®“ ^|;165-15 ...... 52®“ HR78-14....74®“ 195-15......64®“ GR70-15.....71®“ 205-15 ...... 70®“ HR78-15....75““ 225-15 ...... 76®“ JR78-15..... 77®“ 230-15 ...... 84®“ MICHELIN XX 155-12 ...... 38®“ 165-14......45®“ 145-13......35®“ 175-14 ....... 47®“ 155-13......39®“ 185-14 ....... 52®“ 165-13......42®“ 165-15 ....... 48®“ 155-14 ....... 43®“ 185-15RW...,61®“ 'BIB' THE MICHELIN MAN - COME TO WHERE THE TIRE SALES ARE - C L E M M O N S TIRE and AUTOMOTIVE Lewisville-Clemmons Rood. Clemmons, N.C. HOURS:DAILY7:30-6:00p.m., SAT.7:30-1:00p.m. Phones: (919) 766-5450 or 766-9789 NEW TIRES-BRAKE WORK-FRONT END ALIGNMENT- AIR CONDITIONING-HIGH SPEED BALANCING-TIRE TRUING ■ !S f L mbuNCLUDf • fedTtKx • MOUNTINC • BAUNCINC I DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, THURSDAY, MARCH 15, I»7<' pt' Suzanne Says If you are a new bride, the first few meals in your home will seem like just tiie time lo surprise Uie best man in the world with a new dish or two, perhaps something a bit fancy. Take a tip from ex­perienced cooks and stick to things you know are popular, adding new dishes gradually.GocS meals are worth the effort, as a witness, a happily married farm woman who says, If my men come in from the field out of sorts over something that went wrong, a good appetizing meal makes them able to talk over their troubles and often laugh it off.Its never a mistake to be a good cook in addition to being Uie sweetest and loveliest bride of the year.These meals, typical of serverai different states meet unfailing approval when well cooked and nicely served.Happy meaUime to you, whether you live in the city or the country.Sweet Cream Short Cake 2 cups sifted flour 3 tsp. baking powder 1 tsp. salt1 cup sweet creamsoft butterI qt. strawberries cut and sweetenedSift flour with baking powder and salt, stir in cream. Add a very little more flour if needed, just stiff enough to handle. Roll out lighUy on floured board, divide into 2 parts. Pat one part to fit a pie pan. Spread generously with soft butter, pat out the other dough and lay on top. Score into diamond sha^s wiUi back of knife. Bake in a very hot oven 450 degrees 15- 20 minutes. When done seperate layers fill and cover top with berries. Serve warm, with a pitcher of cream.Hot Potato Salad 10 medium size potatoes 2 medium onions, chopped salt and pepper ■j tsp. celery seed 1 egg■i lb. bacon 2 tbsp. hot bacon fat cup hot vinegar'/4 cup hot water 2 hard-boiled eggs, chopped Boil the potatoes in their skins until tender. Mix potatoes and onions, salt and pepper and celery seed.Fry bacon until crisp, remove from fat. Reserve two tablespoons of the bacon fat. Beat egg well, add the warm fat , hot vinegar, and hot water, mix well pour over Uie potatoes and onions . Add chopped hard boiled eggs and toss lightly.Blue Cheese Salad 1 lettuce pound beets V4 ib. blue cheese 1 cup chopped celery French dressing Wash and drain the lettuce, tear into bite-size pieces. Mix beets, blue cheese, and ceiei7 . Chill. Just before serving, pour french dressing (or dressing of your choice) over the salad and serve immediately.Japanese Egg Salad '/ii cup rice ■<<! onion, finely chopped 1 cup French dressing 1 ib. cooked shrimp 6 hard-boiled eggs lettuce leaves4 sweet gherkins 2 tbsp. tomato sauce 1 tbsp. capers, chopped 1 tbsp. chives, chopped Cook and drain the rice, add onion, Ki cup of dressing, shrimp and three eggs, diced. Mix carefully. Chill. Put lettuce leaves on a platter and place egg mixture on top, sprinkle gherkins around the edge of the salad. Grate Uie remaining egg white and yolks, seperately. Sprinkle over salad. Mix the remaining of dressing with tomato sauce, capers and chives and pour over salad.Saucy Pork Chops ■s cup ketchup '/i tsp. salt 'i tsp. chili powder 1 cup water >s tsp. dry mustard 1 tsp. brown sugar 4 loin pork chops 1 lemon 1 yellow onion Mix first 6 ingredients together. Put chops in flat jased baking dish in one /er, pour sauce over chops. Slice lemon and onion and greasei layer, I Larew-Wood-Johnson, Intx И (au OR SEE Don Wood-Hugh Larew Office 634-5933 ' Highway 601 South Established Mobile Home Park, 13 mobile homes, 11 acres with pond, nice 2 bedroom home, outbuildings. Excellent op­portunity. Hickory HUl Nice lot on Pinevalley Rd. Priced at $6,950. CooleemeeTwo story commercial building. 98 x 48. Only $20j000^00._ JackBooeRd.(off Hwy 601 North) - Small acreage tracts available. Southwood Acres We are selling agents for the lots in Southwood Acres, behind Davie County Higji SchooI>- Several lots available to fit almost any style house. Let us show you today. Highway 601 North and FostaU Dr.7 lots for sale, 6.8 miles north of Interstate 40. CaU today for details. arrange one slice of each chop. When ready to cook place in 325 degree oven, covered, for 2 hours. Remove cover and baste well with the sauce. Continue cooking, uncovered for ‘/4 hour more. Spoon sauce over chops again l)efore serving.Suzanne SUZANNE It is good to think about warmer places even though we may not go there. It’s been quite a while since I was at Daytona Beach Resort area. It is the place where the whole family can afford to vacation. There are many ac­commodations 26,000 rooms and you can drive 23 mUes on free public beach. The world’s most famous beach.If you won’t relax and stay in one' place, the Daytona Beach Resort Area has something for everyone. Wake up to Uie sun rising over ttie AUanUc or experience the sun setting over the Halifax River. Enjoy the exciting night life, good food, culture activities or just an easy day of sunbathing. Go Deepsea fishing, fresh-water fishing, and speed racing. Recipes from the area;Key Lime Pie4 eggs1 can condensed mUk one-third cup Ume juice Beat egg yolks and the white of one until thick. Add condensed milk and beat again. Add lime juice and beat until Uiick. Beat Uie Uiree remaining egg whites unUl dry and fold into above mixture. Pour into a baked pie SheU and bake in a slow oven (325 degrees) until set. About 15 minutes. Top with meringue and place in hot oven, 400 degrees for 3 minutes to brown meringue slighUy.Pickled Shrimp 1 cup salad oU1 cup vinegarjuice of three lemons2 tbsp. sugar5 bay leaves1 tsp. crushed peppercorns 1 tsp. dill seed >Vi tsp. tarragon leaves 1 tsp. celery salt MOCKSVILLE, N.C. 2702 LONGHORN MARCH 2 3 - 2 5 IWINSTON SALEM GOUSEUHI SAVEn^MAR.25SUN.2Din. COURTESyOF: t„?;rpr*«Si«,d Rll.AOUU YotrADUlT No.itDULT CHILD No.CHILD AMOUNT t^lCE PRICE TICKETS PRICE TICKETS HtciSro n 350.± CHILD TICKETS А1ЯЕ*0У Vl РЯ1СЕ NO FURTHER DISCOUNT Check or money order (payable to Memoriol Coliieum) •Send Self-Addressed Stamped Envelope To : LONGHORN RODEO Tickets, WINSTON SUEMMEMORIAICOUSIUM, P0B«i6i.Winit(w-SilMn.NC ¡no: NAME____ ADDRESS. CITY-----STATI--ZIP-.PHONE. O R D ER N O W !!! Capacity Lim ited Otter good wmie capacity lasts ONLY! • • • 1 up. dry mustard cayenne pepper 3 pounds cleaved and cooked shrimp 6 medium size onions, sliced Combine all ingredients (except shrimp and onions) and simmer for 10 minutes. Add shrimp and simmer for 3 more minutes. Choose a large casserole with a Ud. Make a layer of sliced onions, Uien a layer of shrimp untU aU are used. Pour the hot marinade over and be very sure that aU shrimp and onions are covered. When cold, cover and place in refrigerator to “age”. ChiU at least 48 hours before serving. Slivers of permpernickel are just right with Uiis. 18-20 servings.Fried Oysters 1 qt. select oysters 1 egg2 tbsp. water buttered bread crumbs sairand pepperPick over oysters for bits of sheU. Pour 1 cup water over Uiem and drain. Dry wiUi paper towel. Beat egg and add water. Dip oysters in egg mixture. Then in seasoned crumbs. Repeat. Fry in deep fat at 375 degrees to 385 degrees for tiiree to four minutes.London Broil 1 flank steak Rub garlic over meat. Sprinkle with salad oU. BroU over charcoal grUl or in oven IMi inches from heat. BroU 5 minutes on each side. Spread with melted butter and season. Be sure to cut against grain in thin slices. Serve with sauce below. Serves 4.Steak Sauce Saute hi cup mushrooms in 2 tablespoons butter. Add 2 teaspoons corn starch, then 1 cup beef bouillon or stock and thicken slightly. Add 2 tablespoons red wine