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St Francis of Assisi Catholic MissionSt. Francis of Assist Catholic Mission Compiled Information from the Collection of the Martin-Wall History Room of the Davie County Public Library Mocksville, North Carolina Table of Contents A History of St. Francis of Assisi Catholic Mission By Dennis McCarthy, April 7, 1963 4- 15 Newspaper Articles 17 - 64 v> '■cr> < o o 2 <r to ^ Davie County Public Library g Mocksville, North Carolina KJ cL ■2 O lA VA \A (A << «o 2 C3^ Lu o o XT A History of St. Francis of Assisi Catholic Mission by Dennis McCarthy April 7,1963 Pages 4-15 Davie County Public Library Mocksville, North Carolina , o V) Q yy t/) S: 0 A HISTORY OF SAINT FRANCIS OF ASSISI CATHOLIC HISSlOii MOCKSVILLE, N. C. fiCHl Dennis I-lcCarthy April 7, 1973 0 1 V) <b -< i "o DAVIE CO. PUBLIC UBRARY MOCKSVILLE^ NQ o 2 <c: „ l/> A HISTORY OF SAINT FRANCIS OF ASSXSI CATHOLIC MISSION MOCKSVILLE, N. C, The Catholic Mission of Mocksville was begun on Nov. 1:6, 11958. It was a mission of Holy Rosary Parish of Lexington, N. C., and has remained so except for a period when Rev. Thomas A. VJilliams was appointed pastor, when the Mission was attached to the parish of Salisbury, N. C.' The Rev. James Keenan was appointed pastor of the church, and he celebrated the first mass on Nov. 30, 1958, the First Sunday of Advent. The first mass, and most of the subsequent masses for the next two years^ was celebrated in the home of Lloyd and Catherine Van Benthuysen on Rt. 4(Salisbury St.). ^ Present for the first mass were: Mr. and Mrs. Van Benthuysen, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Smith and their sons Dennis and Chad(visitors from out of state), Paul Tpkary of Cooleemee, Mrs. Katherine Van Benthuysen and Mrs. Rose Mahoney, both of Baltimore Mary- i: land, and Mrs. Edwina Long of Mocksville. Not present, but one £ ^ of the first early members of the parish was Mrs. Lela(J.L.) Smith. ^ On March 1, 1959, the church had its largest attendance to S that date, with a total of 13 people, with 11 of those present •<j receiving Communion. Eight of those present were visitors to a 3^ the parish On March 4, 1961, the Catholic Layman's Association was founded. , with Mr. Lloyd Van Benthuysen being appointed President. Also at this meeting Mrs. Edw>ina Long was appointed Chairlady of the DAVIE CO. PUBLIC LIBRARY MOCKSVILLE, NC , , -2 , Teachers, Mrs. Mary Pope was appointed Chalrlady of Parent Education, fi nd Mrs. Catherine Van Benthuysen was appointed Chair lady of Fisheries.^ On April 5, 1959, Mass was begun being celebrated at the Armory on Railway Street, in Mocksville. UTien it became too cold to use the Armory, Mass was celebrated in the small "night-office" of Dr. William Long of Salisbury Street, with Father ICeenan using the Long's S' furnace room for confessions. On May 10, 1^59, St. Francis Mission gave First Holy Conmiunlon for the first time. The three communicants were Peggy Sanford and Eugene and Richard Pope.^ On July 22, 1959, Catechism was continued in trhe residence I of Mrs. Long for Negro children-most of these being from the Hall family. This event, plus the fact, the class was too crowded for a good religious education, forced one family of the parish to withdraw from the parish, and to join with a parish in Winston-Salem. This family has since returned to this parish and the third generation z ^ *7 has been baptized. On July 27, 1959, The Motor Chapel of the Diocese of Raleigh opened a two-week mission on the grounds of Davie CountyiHigh School, ac £ At 9 A# M., a Religious Vacation School was held and followed by ^ a I^ss at 10 A. M. It was written bv Father Keenan that "we had 3: . " u integration opposition which posed certain difficulties. Howeyer, a we continued to preach and live the teaching that all men were welcome in the Catholic Church." Because of this program, the Sparks family was added. The members of this family were Mrs. DAVIE CO. PUBLIC LIBRARY (p mocksville, no 1/^ Sparks, and also John and Susan Sparks. Around August 15, 11959, the Van Benthuysens moved to New York. I 1 ! ' This was considered a great loss.because they were the first I parishoners in Mocksville,^ and their home was the first chapel of Saint Francis.^ j On March l9, 1960, the.first child, a boy, was born into the i I parish in Davie County. His parents were Eugene and Roberta Ardis, I . /o i and was named Anthony Eugene Ardis. i j During Ikarch, i960, the house that was to become the mission I house on the Yadkinville Highway just beyond the City Limits was i 1 : j purchased. This is the house which is presently being used for I ' ' I services. It was given the name Saint Francis of Assisi Catholic I ! Mission. It was purchased partially through a grant of $4,000 by ! . uj. Mrs. Edwina Long. The total cost of the house was $8,500. I ! The Saint Francis Mission opened on Easter Sunday, April 17, Uu ' a ^ - 1060 with Father Keenan celebrating the first mass on this location, in Also on this date Anthony Ardis was Baptized by Father Keenan. if! 5 About the end oC July, i960, Ben and Martha Nayder moved onto to ^ a farm in the Fork Community on Riverview Road. About tvjo weeks ts o H later the first girl of the parish vas born. She was given the <c O f3 ^ name Catherine Rose and scheduled for Baptism on August 21", 1960. u> 5 On August 30, l96i:(the Feast of Saint Rose of Lima) the first ^ wedding to be celebrated in the Saint Francis Mission was performed. r/~\ John Ginther Jr. and Carolyn Deweese were the participants. Father i- . ,Keenan officiated at the nuptial mass. DAVIE co. PUBLIC LIBRARV j MOCKSVILLE, NO On Sept. 27, 1961, 4 Mary Miss loners ([Uiy Apostles) from I ' I n • Statesville came and began work with the mission. Two of them had been visiting homes and two had been teaching class. Because I of this, a fourth and seventh grade were added to the Keligious j Education Program, i ! On Nov. 29, 1^61, the Mission celebrated its third anniversary, i I I It was stated that "God has been good to us and we are grateful I for all his blessings," The average mass attendance at this date i I was 12, The mission comprised 6 active families. They were; Mrs, Edv;ina hong, Mr, and Mrs, John Ginther and children, Mr, and Mrs, i I Ben Nayder and daughter, Mrs. J. L, Smith, Mrs, Roberta Ardis, i ' I and Mrs. Helen Hyland and son Bill, The four Mary Missioners were j also here for the celebration. They were: Rose lUirie i^mone, I Carolyn Givens, Mary Apson, and Dorothy Oros. These young ladies ^ gave a party to tlie Negro childi'en in the afternoon. It was a 5.^ great success. About 17 children attended, ^ o In Nov. of 1961, Alex Hyland Sr, of Clemmons and Bob Ginther Gi v5 n in enlarged the chapel by removing a v\?all and making two rooms into one. This gave the chapel a large amount of room for a congre- ,$ DAVi£ CO. PUBLIC L!B,%RYSJ 3 $ nation the size of this miss ion,MOCKSVIiIle, nc k tJ On July 23, 1962, the Motor Chapel came to Cooleemee for a v> 5 two-week stay. Programs were conducted nightly. Father Charles f- Mukholland assisted by Father George Fleetwood was in charge. O 'The first week was very successful. Many people were present each evening. On Monday of the second week the owner of the property asked the Priests to leave, No reason was given at the time, % The Priests secured a lot in the Negro area and finished out the j'O week there. I * I . In Jan., 1963, Father Keenan was transferred to Christ The i ' , n ' ' n ' i King Church in Kings Mountain, N. C. The Rev. Robert Shea became I • II the new pastor. He was installed as pastor of Holy Rosary Church, j Lexington, N. C., and St. Francis Mission on Jan. 30, 1^63 ! During-the three years,Father Shea was pastor, very little I was done in the way of improvements to the Mission. The religious i ! education program was expanded, and the parish gained a few new I I i members. In 1966 Father Shea was transerred and Rev. Ronald I McLaughlin was installed as the pastor. Ilie policies of the church were continued, and a Ladies Guild was started. This Guild has been expanded and is now a driving force in the church. The i ! religious education program has been expanded and, under the !* I i guidance of Mrs. Helen Ginther has been continuing to improve the "2 ^ quality of religious instruction to the children of the parish.. IS o Oi In June, 1968, Father McLaughlin was transferred to Our Lady of aOthe Highv;ays Church in VJaynesville, N. C On June 12, 1968, the Rev. Thomas A. Williams was attached X to the Mission of St. Francis. During the year and one-half that £ n . V Father Williams was Pastor, the Mission was moved from the guidance s/y g of the Lexington Parish and placed under the juristiction of the Salisbury Parish. Father VJilliams was also named the chaplain of both Catawba College* and Livingstone College Catholics. He set up Newman Clubs at these colleges and the older children of the parish went over to Catawba College. This lasted until August 15, 0AV1E CO. PUBLIC LIBRARY ; ^ k^.ocksville, ng 6 1970 when, during the night, after celebrating the Feast of the Assumption Mass, Father Williams died in his sleep after a heart attack. For a period of about three months, the parish was without 1 I a pastor. Father McLaughlin traveled from l.'aynesville on Sunday, acting as a visiting priest, during this period. The Reverends Stahl and Friel were then transferred to the I 1 I Salisbury Parish on temporary duty. Both priests were Oblates of I • . , St. Francis de Sales. Eventually, Father McLaughlin was given, i I besides the Waynesville Parish, the Lexington Parish. St. Francis Mission was moved back under the jurisdiction of the Lexington Parish. After about a year. Father McLaughlin was sent back to the parish in VJaynesville, and Father Silvestri came to the Lexington Parish from v;ilmington, Delaware and was also named pastor of St. Francis Mission. Also during this time, the church received a grant of $17,000 from Mrs. Gertrude Dann of Norwich Conn. Plans are being made to build onto the present church to be used for storage space and also for classrooms for the religious education p ^ classes. Sf Since the humble beginnings in 1958, the church now has a :c membership of 36 families and a total membership of lli8 persons. S rv«V'' CO. PUBLIC UBRAR*'UWOKSViLLE, NO ft Hv<- raec^be-rs Saint F/ap^ql^, p^fthonc ^fission YADKiNVILLE ROAD MOCKSVILLE. NORTH CAROLINA OFFICE OF THE PARISH BOARD POST OFFICE BOX 642 MOCKSVIUUB, N. C. 27028 Allen> Maria (Eddio !)•} Route § ^ Mockaville, N. C. 27028 Broeoof Barry Route 4^ Box 110 Mockaville, N. C« 27028 Phonal 654-3114 Pariah Directory 495-W No Phono : Buncei John P. I Route # 4I Midway Campground ^ Statesville, N. 0. 28677 2 Ghildreasy Maria (Allen W.) No Phone ^^taute # 6, Box kaville, N. 0. 2'27028 Church, Jean (Roy) 654-^890 ^ 851 N. Main St. u.; Mocksville, N. C. 27028 C;' 1^} Cozart, Rosemary (David) 654-57^ 5 1027 N. Main St. ^ Mockaville, N* C. 27028 Cronin, Albert 654-5386 ^ Route ^ 5> Creatview Dr. M Mockaville, N. C. 27028 DePalms, Sheryl Ann (Charles) 654-5855 H904 DukeSt. ^ Mocksville, N. C. 27028 ) j <01 DePuew, George S. 766-4675 ^ 6858 Rollingwood Dr. ^ Clemmona, N. C. 27012 "t Draughn, Virginia No Phone ^ Route # 6, Box 551 ^M^kaville, N. 0. 27028 Drillette, Thomas 654-5885 650 Salisbury St. Mocksville, N. C. 27028 Ducharme, Kathleen (James) 495'-8715 Route # 5 Mocksville, N. C. 27028 Elustondo, A1 654-5181 615 Wandering Lane Mocksville, N. 0. 27028 Ginther, John 654-5255 629 Gwyn St. Mocksville, N. 0. 27028 Ginther, Robert 654-2986 Route # 6, Box 5^ Mocksville, N. C. 27028 Harris, Avery 284-.2484 Route ^ 4, Box ll4 Mocksville, N. 0. 27028 Hartman, Lynn (James) 998-4104 P. 0. Box 96 Advance, N. C. 27006 Horton, Carl n 492-5584 Route #6, Box ^10 Mocksville, N. C. 27028 Jenkins, Kathy (Keith) No Phone Route # 8, Box I58 Statesville, N. C. Long, Sdwina (Wm.) 654-2941 440 Salisbury St. Mocksville, N. C. 27028 r. -•< LIBRAR^ "\!r; Saint Francis Cathoiic i^lission y'adkinville road MOCKSVILLE. NORTH CAROLINA OFFICe OF THE PARISH BOARD POST OFFICE BOX 642 MOCKSVILLE. N. C. 27028 Marshall, Pat (Thomas} ! Route # 5, Box 295-A i Mocksvlllei N« C* 27028 1 : Martin, Dwayne I Route Box 61 1 Mocksville, N. C. 27028 I I Medlin, Martha (Roy) ! Route # 2, Box ^14 I Mocksville, N« C* 27028 i -2] Nayder, Ben S^ute # 2 ^l^^^.vanoe, N« 0. 27006 £| ^ j ^O'Brien, Robert ^ Route # 4^ Mocksville, N. C. 27028 ^ Pope, Gene : Route # 6 9 ttocksTllle, H. C. 27028 2.: £ Popoi Mary (E. R>) ^1 Route #6, Box 76 Mocksville, N. C. 27028 i1 0^ Reilly, James § Route # 1, Box 2^. ^ Mocksville, N. 0, 27028 U ^ Saunders, Mary £• ^ Route 4, Box ll4 3 0/0 A* Harris^ Itocksville, N« C* 27028 Seagle, Jimmy Ray i^Aute 2, Box 6 A cksville, N. 0. 27028 495-6555 495-A559 495-6762 998-6661 No Phone 495-4455 495-4250 492-7295 284-2^(84 654-5262 Simpson, Kathy (Jerry) 492-^197 Route ^ 7» Box 5^6 Mocksville, N* C* 27028 Stanley, Oianne (Kenneth) 654-55^6 Route # 7 Box 54 Mocksville, N. 0. 27028 Thomas, Jean (Qlyde) 546-7117 Route # 1, Box 185 Harmony, N« 0. 28654 Queen, Mary Pat (Wayne) 546-7444 Route # 11 Statesville, N* 0. 28677 ca - I'/L.%J ■«/;, V'—',u, FOOTNOTES ^Rev. James Keenan, Historical l^cord of the Catholic Mission of Mocksvilie. p« 1^10; Davie County Enterprise-Record^ Date and Page unknown. 2 Keenan, p. T; Enterprise^ page unknown; Talk with Mrs, Edwina Long, 3 Keenan, p» li, ^Keenan, p, 2; Enterprise, p, unknown, ^Enterprise, p, unknown; Talk with Mrs, Edwina Long# ^Keenan, p, 3, 7 Keenan, p,3; Talks with Mrs, John Ginther, Mrs, Albert Cronin and Mm, Krhvinn o ^Keenan, pp, 3,5,, ^Ibid#. p, 4, ^^Ibid,. p, 5, , ^^Keenan, p, 5; Talk with Mrs, Helen Ginther, 12Keenan, p, 8, i ^^Keenan, p,9; Enterprise, p. unknown, IS■^"'Keenen, p. It), Ibid,, pp, 10-111. Ibid., p, 11. iv.jJ^'iSVI.1,::. '0 l^Ibid, ^^Ibid.y p, 13; Enterprise, p, unknown. ^^Enterprise. p, unknown; Talks with Helen Ginther, Mrs, Albert Cronin, and Mrs, Edwina Long, ^^TaIk with Helen Ginther; Enterprise, p. unknown, ^^Talks with Helen Gintherand Mrs, Edwina Long. ^^Enterprise. p, unknown; Talks with Helen Ginther and Mrs. Edwina Long. \3 24 Talk with Mrs. Helen Ginther; Talk with Rev♦ Silvestri; Talk with Mrs. Albert Cronin; Talk with Mrs. Edwina Long. " ^^Talk with I-lr. and Mirs. John Ginther, Jr.; Talk with Father Silvestri, - : SOURCES USED 1/-^. Cronin, Mrs. Albert Davie County Enterprise-Record Historical Record of the Catholic Mission of Mocksville> Rev. James Keenan, pp. 1W13. Ginther, Mrs. Helen Ginther, Mr. and tics. John Jr, Long Mrs • Edwina Silvestri, Rev. Q'l'/?/.• Nc \5 Newspaper Articles Pages 17-64 S i tn Vi < ti' <J 2 G2 Sk- f to iC- t Davie County Public Library U> w Mocksville, North Carolina 'y It iilli«ifiiii L^?- /?43 . /■" / ' 0 ^ -5 ■-1 -eJ REV ROBERT F. SHEA, new Priest of MocksviUe's St. FjandtfMission and of Holy Rosary Catholic Church of Lexmgto .Father Shea replaces the Rev. J. F. Keenan former Priest who has been sent to Kings Mountain. ' Davie County Public Library Mocksville, NO Tifro 1963 -2 VI *jr» tr> <C Catholic Pastor . 3 Is Transferred The Reverend James P. Keenat^'i paster of St. Francis CathpTlb .V7.'rsion in Mocksville for the paPt 'our yri?.is, has been transferred 3 •0 Chri:t the K'ns Church in riings Mountain, N. 0.. as of Jan. 4. He is succeeded' in Mocksville by -the Reverend Robert Shea, :ormgr pastor cf St. Joseph's Church in Mcm'oe. Father Keenon began the Cath- oic Miss'on in Mocksville in Dec ember of 1958, at the time con ducting Sunday services in the home of one of the members. Later the Sacrifice of the iwhss was conducted in the local Arni-* ory. In the Spring of 1960 the 'ittle white house which is the present site if the Mission was purchased. Tn his new assignment Father Keenan will direct newly ordained priests in the techniques used in North Carolina for the operation of small parishes. The missions of Chsrryville, Dallas. Spencer Mountain ani Ranlo -are attached to the Christ the King Parish In Kings Mountai, which is a ti-ain- ing center for these priests. o ■2 a u. fr- tr> o X 5^ e \ </> u> X o x rzJ V .<0 MoL^ugh^p^i y/as^'-a^^ .' , . |foV::^f;:;thp :Cat^^:|ia'i9hu j 1 Father JIcLaiighIm hails ^rom f ^ t < |yhn;c|W'a5sacfi\is^tt^:, ^ com- % , j ,pleting ;his seminary, traimng at St v i ^p|in'5/|n Bps^n, ^ ® I |d;/the :.priesthood : jn Fpoiuary i9fj^ ' ^ J .i4^I>urham/m the Ral- \ r Wfr -4 ^^gh:Diocei>e ' I 1 J ^(.Smce^ then' he ^^has/served; parish- iifw^«lMii ^ es'm jWake ^^orest. .Butner^ ^It I ;01ive, ''Wallace and Ealeich f (While statiorcd in Kilcigh, Fatn i ' i M<;£;aughiin'l.acted;'4a;l)Pa^^^ ' phaplain to Central prison,X^hmen's . ' pprreojipnaV Center, - ^«L * il ^ 13 'Hospital, and was a^tivp.in yavipus i^umenipai >|4''the^ .(^upi-. Sfe/kfei^M enterprise.record '.the'-' 'lyofth /Carplina /Calhoiipj^vand/i I .As?}stanlt;iDir|ectQr.:of \F4^ ijiteii I m/^e/;.i|talei|h/-gipce^ He. succeeds the Rpv. tRdbef't^Sheg" ip/)yaS; ^^ecentSy itransiptTed/^ .'th^''- pasjpr^te '.at: S|.j' .^J^ranpis;:i|ph)ij\cii/1^ • Bishop Michael Joe Begley,,' head of the Catholic Diocese, ofj, Charlotte^ has giveft approval of : the n b.uildiirg iplans for Sti' Francis Mission in Mocksville. ' The new church building will be constructed on the present i: site on the YadkinvilJe Roacj.J , Tentative plans are fork ground breaking to take place iafl March or April with occupancy: of the new building in August. • ^ iTennan.t., and , ,Tennant p£ i ' Salisbury are the architect§.|;! 'A^3' I 9 76"" 'ksvilh^ iV. Q -c/'c#' fe d 1 Gmund Is Broken Rev. Anthony F. Silvestri is shown above turning the first spadeful of dirt to break ground for the new building for St. Francis of Assisi Catholic Mission on the Yadkiriville Road. About' 150 people were present. Sunday, April A, at the groundbreaking ceremony. Father Silvestri was assisted by George DePiiew, shown at left, presidentof the Parish Board; Douglas Tennent.arjehitect; Mrs. W. M. Long: Albert (>onm, chairman of Uie building committee: and Mrs. E. R. Pope. Among the visitors were Mr. and Mrs. Robert Davis, in-laws of the late George M. Van Kirk, in whose memory the ia|e IWrs, iGertrude ponn beqiies^pd . quite a large sum tpjtar^ buJLdiiiff f«md;.l V '. - - ^ - ^ GltXNiTV n,Pfr.f Thumom, ft pal.io, ,qT5 (3 \Xi •~o A 8 Cl. w dL r U)cr v>_ cr C-' U) w ©2 CJ uj 1- > o K 2 >■si o <3 u (A w H 3 r I <^h a " aM. Francis Of Assisi Dedicates New Mission For Davie County by David Hoyle Only seven months after its ground breaking, The Mission Church of St. Francis of Assisi dedicated its new Parish Complex last Sunday, October 5. "We're not calling it a church," said the Rev. Anthony F. Silvestri, pastor of tlie parish. "It's a multipurpose hall for religious activities as well as social and educational purposes." The new building, which seats 2O0 persons, was necessitated when the parish outgrew it's formei* building which would seal only about 70 persons comfortably. "It's really just a beginning," said Father Silvestri. The old building has been sold and moved leaving a spree in front of the newly constructed building for a i church building to be added on in the future. That such expansion was necessary became obvious last Christmas when 163 worshipers overflowed the former mission. Father Silvestri stressed the functional asp-ccl of the present building. "We use it nol only for church services but also for education," he said. "That's what we had in mind from the beginning." Most of the building is taken up by the assembly hall in the middle. The en- tranceway on the front enters into the large hall flanked by an office and crying room equiped with a window and speaker . for mothers with small children to hear and observe the service without disturbing other worshipers. Behind the assembly hall is a spacious kitchen for social functions within the church. There is also an upper room for the youth and the members of the churches Catholic Youths Organization are going to do the final finish work. A brief history of St. Francis of Assisi Catholic Mission was printed in the program for Sunday's dedication service. It traces the churches growth from it's . birth, with some 15 parishioners who celebrated mass in individual homes to today's new mission with 73 families and 817 mcmbura. The church became a Mission of the Holy Rosary Parish in Lexington on Novembor 16, 1968. Fethur Janiss F. Koiuian was appulnlcd lls first pastur and celebrated the first Mass on November 30, 1956. By April of 1059, the congregation was using the facilities at the old National (Junrd Armory in Mockaville. In March of 1960, the present site was purchased and the Mission was placed under (he Patronage of St. Francis of A.ssisi. In January of 19G?, Father Robert !;e-.;ani? its pn-dcr. T:!o Uev. Ronald McLaugldin was in stalled as the third pastor of the Mission cimrch in lOPS and the chapel was renovated, etdarged end ttie Ladies' Guild was begun. Father Thomas A. Williams was ap pointed pastor in June of 1968 and the jurisdiction of the Mission was placed under the Salisbury parish. In May of 1970, Jhe Rev. Edward Friel, OSFS, was appointed pastor. Finally, the ' . . • ' - V •mgm nssv 9V o biiv MUItUIIIKk" ' (dark) as well as the church which will be added onlo^ the front later. pastor of the Mission Church. It was atthis time that a $17,000 bequest was for- •warded the parish from Mrs. Gertrude Dann of Norwich, Connecticut. Christmas of 1975 brought the number of families in the Mission to 44 and the ParishCouncil, along with its pastor, petitioned the Bishop for permission to build a multi purpose building for the celebration of theIJturgy and other religious and social functions. The ground breaking for this new building took place on Sunday, April 6. 1975.Twenty-six priests attended Sunday'sdedication ceremonies, including a number of former pastors of the mission.The Most Rev. Michael J. Begley, D.D.,Bishop of the Diocese of Charlotte waspresiding officer at the dedication, actingas principal concelebrant at the Lithergy of Thanksgiving. Father James Kenan, the church's first pastor, was In attendance and Father Silvestri, the present pastor, gave the Homily at. the service. Also present at the services were the Very Rev. Joseph Showfety, chancellor of the Diocese and the Very Rev. Joseph Kerins. The church is still considered a mission parish because the pastor still comes from Lexington to perform services. But the church serves the entire county v/ith some members coming from Yadkinville, Clemmons and Statesville,-s fact that prompted Father Silvestri to predict the mission would have a resident . priest within a year's time. "None of this could have been possible without the sacriftcal generosity of our parishioners and friends who have responded so well in their voluntary labor and their financial interest," said Father . Silvestri at the dedication ceremony. "This has proved an enormous impetus towards the meeting of our financial obligation," he said. 'T pray to God that we will continue to grow as a good people, as a holy people, as a dedicated people." t, « ^ ' m- i CATHOLiCi MlSSlOhj" ^UIW8I.M1 Piiiiiioiintii firiTn J?OTfttPT former building for the mission church, which has^ ■ been sold, was moved from the site so that the new ; JjIisSlOn building could be construc(p«l . . V/ J yr 1. mrnXSTmrn K> .''-v:^ %rrf^ DAVIE rOUNTV ENTERPRISE RECORD, SPECIAL BICENTENNIAL ISSUE. JULY 1076 - SECTION IV - PAGE 5 The Mission Church Of St Francis Of Assisi Davie's First Catholic Church The Mission Church of Si. Francis of Assist became a Mission of the Holy Rosary Parish in Lexington on November 16, I9sa. Father James F. Kennan was appointed its first pastor and celebrated the flrat Mass on November 30, 1966, By April of 1959. the congregation was uiillig liie4adlit.iS8 at the old National Guard Armory in SfoSRSVlUc: In March of i960, the present site was purchased and the Mission was placed under the patron age of St. Fancls of Assisi. In January of 1963, Father Robert Shea became its pastor. The Rev. Ronald McLaughlin was in- sloHed as the third pastor of the Mission Church in 1966 and the chapel was renovated, enlarged and the Ladles' Guild was begun. Father Thomas Williams was appointed pastor In June of 1998 and the Jurisdiction ' of the Lexington Parish with Father Ronald McLaughlin as Us pastor. At this lime, the parish hod increased to 17 regular families. By early 1972. the Rev, Anthony Francis Sllvactrii OSESr-bccamo the KOOCfH- pastor of the Mission Church. It was at this time thai a Sl7,000 bequest was forwarded the pariah from Mrs. Gmrude Dann of Norwich, Connecticut. 6 II ■vtSi 1" "j .4.ir^5 g - Former The former bulldin nr- * been sold, was mcnliSSlOll building could be The former buildin Christmas of 1975 brought the number offamilies in the Mission to 44 and the Parish(^uneil. along with its pastor, petitionedthe Bishop for permission to buiid a mulll* purpose building for the celebration of theLiturgy and other religious and social functions. AjjiS Francis ofSunday. October 5.1975, The new bullSing seats 200 persons.. g for the mission church, which has been sold, was moved from the site so that the new building could be constructed. o % V- DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, SPECIAL BICENTENNIAL ISSUE. JULY J076 - SECTION IV - PAGE 5 .. t • . . - i- •' . • - ' (¨ * * ¨ ; .-v . , A . f.-.'VX ^vU A c,t •■V V H^V • iitV- • ♦ •- <L( SSt. Francis Of Assisi InstallsFirst Resident Pastorn . .... .iddicis is useful since everywhere youddicts is useful since everywhere ywFather Noel McSweeny was insuUrt "as tSenJst resident pastor of St. Franos tof Assisi Church f (day. Nov. IS marked liie 1Sweeney's installation ^gin ^ning of St. Francis as a full fledged ^'^The^installation «rcmooy was co^(hicted by Monsignor Richard ^ea aiWinston-Salem repjesenling Bis^PMichael Begley. Although he hasmoving into Mocksville fof ^month. McSweeney was o«>ciallypresented the keys to the church on^•^£e a small town like Modcsvill^said McSweeney. "St. Francis >s a g^community, and I want «keeping the people closeFather McSweeney was^n in NwYork City fh 1918- He attended St John sCoSge then worked for a telephoneSnybMore joining the Fr^^nFriars of the. Atonement Grajmo^Garrison, JJ.Y.'He graduated fromCatholic University M Ame^ inWashington; D.C. with a degreeSliopbyand theology. "J.ninnng inDsvchology. After attending Notre' Dame University for onen Sweeney was ordained as a pnet mlby Cardinal Spellman at St Patrick sPathedral in New York.Father McSweeney's.first assignmentwas in Kingston, N'.C« in 1948. N^t he'gave missions and retrMts.' prisons and then with drug "GreenwichVillagem New York. He has•t also worked In the Rocl^ Mountains of,Canada with Indian• Fifteen years ago,' returned to North' CaroliM to l^dnarlshes in Lumberton and High Point.LuWrton. I had a chance to. go to Jamaica or back toVillage but 1 wanted a small town. Ithink the experience with the dragaio there are kids falling into drags.Sneaking of his experience as aCath^fc feather in the South. Fat^McSweeney said, "In 1984. it was a bigdifference. Most people had never seen aCatholic priest before, but it really madeno difference when they got to know you^•ThTworld is getting smaUer. Mostdenominations are realizing how clwethey are more than how they are dlf-^^Mocksville's new priest wanU to leadthe 75 famiUes of Davie County andsurrounding area in an ecumeniMlspirit with otherwant to carry onasa commumty of faittand fit into the whole community <aDavie CountyMocksvill#.Father Noel McSweenyV^'iCOUNTV .NTERPR.se RECORD. THO-RSDAV. NOVEMBER 20. .980n ?"blic LibraryiVioc;\svilie, N. G- ). (VnLf.c. SI ofSister Bemadette; Making A Difference)By Kathy D. CbafflnOavie Coumy Enteiprise-Record. In the. three years that SisterBemadette McNamara has beenpastoral associate at St. FrancisCatholic Mission in MocksviUe,the church's enrollment hasgrown from SO to 80 families.It was also under her leadershipthat the church reached out to thecommunity, sponsoring Fridaynight Bingo games, an annudShamrock Run bringing in runners from all over the state andan annual Blessing of the Animalsceremony."All of these activities, they'rea very important pan of parishlife." said McNamara, calledSister Bemadette by her congregation and friend. "All ofthem have helped bring the people of this parish and this community together."I believe that's what churchlife is all about, people comingtogether for worship and for having a good time in fellowship."Sister Bemadette's involvement didn't stop at St. Francis.She has work^ with cancer patients through Hospice of DavieCounty and Davie High studentson the Project Prom Committee.She has also given programs onher native Ireland forschoolchildren on St. Patrick'sDay.It is the people in the churchand community that Sister Ber-nadene said she will miss mostwhile preparing to leave last weekto work on a mission on the islandof Rota in the South Pacific.° "It was a very difBcult decisionfor me to make because I am veryhappy here in MocksviUe," shesaid. "I love the people at St.Francis. I love the count}', but Ifeel we have to listen to what theLord is calling us to do."I'm willing to take the riskand to meet the chaUenge."Sister Bemadette plans to spendsix weeks studying at FordhamUniversity in the Bronx andanother month visiting family inIreland before going to Rota, asmall island north of Guam."The island has about 1,400Catholics and there's just onepriest there, so I'm hoping to beable to help him with his pastor-ing," she said. "Also, they asked me if 1 would teach themEnglish. (Residents of Rota speakChammoron, a derivative ofSpanish.) I'm sure I wUl be doing all kinds of things."Working on Rota is the iulfiU-ment of a childhood dream forSister Bemadette."Over the years. I've had adesire to go there and never hadthe opportunity," she said. "Wehave sisters who are working onthe island of Guam and lastAugust, th^ opened a mission inRota and I was invited to come."Then, Sister Bemadene saidshe didn't feel ready to leave St.Francis, but she made a conunit-ment to go in the fall of 1990.It's the challenge of workingwith another culture that hasSister Bemadette excited aboutthe move."I just feel that I havesomething to share with the people there," she said. "After myexperiences here in MocksvUleworking in parish ministry andalso my past years of experiencein schools and administration,maybe this is the time."We wonder why things happen when they do and maybe thisis the time for me to be there."Sister Bemadette, who is 56,was a fourth grader in Irelandwhen she decided she wanted tobe a nun."At that time, I didn't knowthere was anybody else butCatholics," she said. "We usedto have mission sisters and apriest come to our school andshow us movies of their work. Ijust knew that's what I wanted todo."When she got to high school.Sister Bemadette was consideringentering the Community of theMedical Missionaries. "Theywork in Africa and (Thina, I guessall over the world," she said,"and I was very much drawntoward the work that they did."It was her aunt, a Sister ofMercy in Belmont, who got herinterested in North Carolina."She told me that North Carolinawas mission territory, too,"Sister Bemadette said, "and eventhough I can't say that she reallyinfluenced my decision, I came toNorth Carolina to Belmont."It was in Belmont that SisterBemadette enrolled at SacredHeart College. From there, shewent on to Marywood College inScranton, Pa., where she eamedher undergraduate degree, andStetson University in De Land,Fla., where she eamed a master'sin school administration.After that. Sister Bemadetteserved as teacher and principal inCatholic schools in NorthCarolina, New York, Florida andCalifornia. It was in Florida thatSister Bemadette was approached about the MocksviUe position.Because St. Francis doesn'thave a priest-in-residence, thepastoral associate is the one whoworks closest with the congregation, helping members deal withdaily difficulties, sickness, &mUyproblems and death.. "Each day brought a newchallenge," Sister Bemadettesaid. "I devoted a lot of time tovisiting the sick and people whoare in their homes and for onereason or another, are unable tocome to church and be with thecommunity.""ActuaUy, living in a family ofnine children where you had toshare and give and take and lotsof times fight for what was yours,.I think prepared me for living acommunity life later," she said."The community I came tolater was one big family, too, andcoihing into a religious tife, it wasalso a family of faring and caring and assuming responsibilityand also being accountable."When she recalls her time here.Sister Bemadette said the onememory that wiU stand out is thisyear's Shamrock Run."It poured from the heavens,"she said, "and people came fromall over the state to participate inthe race. I couldn't believe p^pie would come out in that kindof weather. We had 110 runners,and we were all soaked."How would she like to beremembered?"I would like people toremember me as having made adifference in their lives," SisterBemadette said. "And I don'tknow how to say this, but I wouldlike to be remembered for mysense of humor and joyfulnessbecause I believe that's a very important pan of life."OAVIE CO. PUBUC UBRARYMOCKSVtLL^ C.HoiacHESSt. of ^ssisi hissitfi^Sister Bernadette McNamara on her move to Rota: "I'm willing to take the risk and to meet the challenge.Sister Bernadette was at St. Francis for three years.— Photos by James BarrlngerQAVIE CO. PUBUC UBRARYMOCKSVtLUiL NA -DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, THURSDAY. June 21. 1990 •air. ^ The membership at St. Francis grew under Sister Bernadette's leadership. Sister Bernadelle talks with Wendy Gien and Rosemarle Rowland about parish activities. X K > , "Py Ant c i ^i^Qss««^» 1^9'^Geary Named Catholic Mission AdministratorJ n chupluin of ihc medical jikI licntal testing. Ai ibe same lime. (^ . _ . . U» mnuM across own 10 . . .. . . . .. ... .". , . .L_ c.historychaplain of the medical and dentaltesting. At the same time. GEffective July pBishopDonoghuc ap-pointed FatherEdward A.Gcap'. S.J. ad-ministrator ofCatholicMission of SaioiofMocksville.Geary was at Gearythe Jesuit House of Prayer ii» HotSprings, wtere he wa» a spiriiuaidirector and retreat master.Geary was bom in 1930 inBakiiUHe. Md. He aiieixled theparish school of Saint Bernard taughtby ihe Sisters of Mercy and then theJosuii High School of U>yola. In1949. Geary entered the Jesuitnoviilate of Saint Isaac Jogues atWemersville. Pa.College and seminary studies inscholastic philosophy were completed at theJcsuii Seraiiatry in Plait-sburg. N.Y. In 1953-34. he completed a graduate-year of study inphilosophy at Fordham University inShrub Oak. N.Y.A shon-lived career in high schoolle-jching began and ended in 1954-55at Gonzaga High School inWashington. D;C.. where Gearytaught Latin. English, and ancient. He moved across lown toGeorgetown University ai the end ofthai sch»>ol year lo become assistantdcun of men for the next two years.From 1957-1961. Geary studiedtheology at Woodstock College inMaryland near his native Baltimore.In I960 he was ordained to thepriesthood by Cardire^l Shehanfollowed by a fourth year of theologystudies- during which Geary alsoacted as chaplain to the StateHospital at Springfield. In the springof 1961 he was signed to the VillaS. Ignazio in Fircnze. Italy.After an opportunity to visit atlength in Rome and a leisurely triphome ihrot^h western Europe.Geary returned to GeorgetownUniversity as dean of men.In the early 60s Geary became active a» a counselor on campus, aswell as handling the traditionaldisciplinary chores of the dean ofmen. At various times, he was alsotapped to assume responsibility as.schools. He also served a year asuniversity chaplain.The university sent Geary back toschool to obtain a degree inpsychology since his work hadbecome increasingly psychothcra-peutic. In 1971. he completed hisdoctoral work in theclinical/counseling psychologydepartment at Catholic Universityand began a clinical internship at theUniversity of Tennessee MedicalComplex in Memphis.In [973. Geary began an association with Loyla College inBaltinwre. His work there includedteaching, directorship of the counseling center, and work as a professorof pastoral counseling in thegraduate school.In 1979. Geary became a staffmember of the Consultation Centerfor Clergy and Religion in the Archdiocese of Baltimore where he didpsychotherapy and psychodiagnostkearyworked pan-time for the State ofMaryland court-system doingpsychologicui assessments ofjuvenile ddiiKjucnts ItMhc SouthernMaryland counties and' the PrinceGeorges suburbs. After lOyears inthis kind of work. Geary moved to(he less stressful work of spiritualdirection ii» Hot Spring-• DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, March 6,1997 n Sister Of l\Aercy Takes A New Role With Mocksviiie Parish immm 1-1 ,iV- *r VWu-'ia Sister Anita Sheerin is the parochial administrator for St. Franl of Assisi Church in Mocksviiie. - Photos by Robin Fergusson 0 vO o •O \ o V o ^avie County Public Library WocksWfle, NC DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, March 6,1997 - a o ir» tr> vr> lA < O VA 0 1 a. a Lu iTt o r >- 4: at £ o rs £ Davie County PuWicUbraiv MocksW/te, MC , B; Morgan Harper Davie County Enterprise Record ' AnitaSheerin left home forthe first titne when she was 19. • n Home was Pennsylvania. Forty seven years later, home is Mocksville. n' Sister Anita, 66, has been working . in Mocksville since July 12,1996when .she was appointed pafwhial adminis- . trator of the St. Francis of Assisi parish on Yadkinville Road. n The Sister was commuting from Salisbury until volunteers from the parish repaired thehouscshebas moved in to approximately one month ago. , Sister Anita is a Sister of Mercy, a religious community founded in the Catholic church that iSbuses on the . principles of education and health. n Anitahasbeenraisedintherealmof Catholic education, beginning with her Catholic school days in Philadelphia. But she thought about the things young ' girls think about. "In my teens, I thought about boys. ' I dated, I had my crushes and all the rest," she said. "In the back of my mind I knew that this is where the Lxird is calling me." Sister Anita's chance to leave I%ila- ; delphia, which she said was "too big," ; tame through a distant cousin in North n Carolina. The cousin stopped in Phila- n delphia on a trip from Massachusetts ; back to Shelby. -!; "She asked me what I wanted to do 2 and I told her I felt like I wanted to be ~ a missionary," Anitasaid. "So sheaskcd ; me, 'Why not come to North Carolina?* ; t; "This state, I think, still has the Jpwest Catholic population in the United States," said Anita. She came to Belmont in 1950. : * As the youngest of eight children, she was homesick. "Thelongerlstayed, the longer I felt this was for me," she ' said. . • After her undergraduate studies at belmont Abbey, Anita made her final . vpws in 1956 to become a Sister of : fdercy. Anita also obtained an admin istrative degree from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. After making those vows. Sister Anita's life began revolving in and around schools. She taught elementary . ^ucation for a number of years and, bcginningwith her appointment in 1965 as the principal of St Michael's School in Ashcville, has been principal of . schools in North Carolina, Long Island and Florida. .. "Working with kids has been a ; l^nderfulexperienceforme,"shesaid. ; i "I felt fulfilled in my ministry. It rein- :. forced my thought that this is where I [belong." But last year. Sister Anita got a ° different kind of calling, this time by' ' telephone. The church called me and asked if I wanted to be a parochial administra- .; lor," she said. ° "Isaid,ldon'tknowifIcandothat Tin not a priest' and he said, 'You've 1 [been a principal. You can run schools. ; You can run a parish." "The one question I didn't ask is 'What do I do?" she said. Coming to a strange town and not knowing anyone was a challenge for Sister Anita, but the parish reached out to her. With 82 families and 225 pa rishioners, the parish is small com pared to some she has worked with, but so far she says it has been fun. Before coming to Mocksville, Anita had never lived or worked alone. "It was my first time not living with two or three sisters in a convent," she said. She felt overwhelmed. "Initially I thought. 'Where is my secretary'". "I have people skills, not skills in finances." she said. "That takes a lot of my time." Sister Anita is enjoying the time she is able to spend in the community. She visits several community nursing homes, and performs Autumn Care's Wednesday morning prayer services. She has also gotten involved with Davie County Hospital's as one oftheir chaplains. Sister Anitaattendcdameet- ing along with other area ministers to discuss the hospital's need for a chap lain. At first she asked herself what she was doing there, but "by tite second meeting, they were people just like myself," she said. Once a month Sister Anita visits with patients, an experience she calls "very enriching." Patients there are "faith- filled. "It's amazing that as soon as you say you're a chaplain, they just talk about their faith," said Anita. "Re ligion is not an issue." "The spirit of the ministers has im pressed me," said Anita. "I have found a lot of openness here." Sister Anita has also found a room mate. Sister Teresa Susana Dandison, who works closely with DavieCounty's Spanish speaking community. Dandison is also sponsored by the Sis ters of Mercy. "We pray together and support each other in our ministry," said Sister Anita. "We're just people who are try ing to do good," she said. "We all have a vocation. We're here to reach out to others and be happy." People make Sister Anita happy. "In religious life you're not limited in religion. You're free to be there for everybody," said Anita. "And I think people give me energy." "I don't have a lot of gifts," she said. Anita can't play the guitar, she can't sing, and she doesn't consider herself artistic. "What has helped me is to be the enabler of other people's giiiis." "We all have gifts but nobody has all the gifts," Anita said. "If we share them, we can have all the gifts." Sister Anita said she will stay in Mocksville through the end ofthe year, then her staying will depend on if she's been good for the parish and if she has the energy to continue. "I'll go on a year-to-year basis," she said. "My main goal while Fm here is to give everything Fve got every day." "This parish has tremendous en ergy and what makes me happy is that they share their gifts. "I need their gifis to keep building," she said. 33- DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, March 6,1997 - M":' -fr-Wi ^.lr #'fl& Sister Anita Sheerin: "What has helped me is to be the enabier of other people's gifts." 4 « Davie County Public Library Mocksville, NC DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, March 19,1998 Record Number Participate In Annual Shamrock Run A record 182 runners took to the streets of Mocksville during the 11th annual Shamrock Run sponsored by Saint Francis Catholic Church on Sat urday morning. The runners participated in lOK (6.2 mile) and 5 K (3.1 mile) runs, as n ^ ft V * ■Q 'i o Cj X rZ -c > 25 well as a 5K walk, Scott Walschiager of Winston-Sa- lem crossed the finish line fi rst in the lOK run in 33 minutes, 46 seconds. A runner for 19-years and former runner for Indiana State University. Walschiager called the Saint Francis run "enjoyable." "The wind was a little brisk, and it's definitely a hilly course like the entry form said," ac».ordingto Walschiager."I enjoyedihe course. It was achallenge." Second place went to Davie High Schoolsenior.GarrickHillof Advance. The first female fi nisher in the lOK run was Susan Moore of Woodleaf, with a time of 49:27. Top finishers in the 5K run were Steve McCachrenofAsheboroin 16:36 and JulieSmiihofClemmons in 19:10. The 5K walk winner was Roxanne Goughnour of Mocksville in 41:09. There were 29 participants in the events from Mocksville. 15 from Ad vance, a record number from Davie County. Runners and walkers represented 38 towns in North Carolina. They also came from Georgia, New York and West Virginia. The youngest participant was 4, the oldest 77. Six were over 70 years of age. Scott Walschleger crosses fin ish line first in 10K race. FTvc-.V,.. Julie Smith of Ciemmons was the first female 5K finisher. anixOCHtS - ri>AKici.5 Of ni5Sl<^Wr I N' 'UiAnd they're off: runners start in the annual St. Francis Shamrock 10K and 5K runs in Mocksville on Saturday morning.- Photos by Michelle RogeDavie County Public Librai]fMocksville, NC DAVIE CO^TY ENTEKFRISE RECOKU, THUKSDAV, Sept. 22, 1988- Th^ first project is to buy a. new copier for the Mocksviile parish. "We also hope fo enhance our education program." If successful enough, bingp funds will be used for coramwuiy- wide projects, she said. McNamara thinks it's good fun — especially for the area's elderly. "I don't see it as gambling. It's an opportunity for people to get together. A lot of older people, have nowhere else to go." The bingo has created a positive response from Mocksviile residents. McNamara said. It gives people something to do, and brings life to the downtown area at night., -The bingo equipment was pur chased by a friend of die parish. The games are conducted ' by church members, who work in teams. Each member has to work one night each month. if The gapies are from 7-10 p.m. Ai^d it isn't just straight bingo. There are several types of games played on the bingo cards, w,fuct) are marked by ink dabbers., "If it's too easy, people gel Alike jB^rnhardt . Davi© County Entefpriae-Flecord It W9S a cpoj, foggy and rainy Friday night, Not muc , good for anything but slaying af hotne, maybe even goir to bed early. I ' But the Rotary Hut in Mocksviile was packed with pei pie, ink dabbers in hand, listening iptently to numbers b ; ing called over a loudspeaker. It was the first night of bingo sponsored, by the St. Fra cis Catholic Mission in Mocksviile, and more than 75 an residents came for a chance at the several hundred doUa in prize money. They came from across Davie County, fro Kernersville, Winston-Salem and Salisbury. State regulations on bingo, considered by some as gumt ing, are strict. " , "You have to be very specific about recording each gan — the money taken in apd tlie money dispursed," said Sisti Bernadette McNamara, The fdqds ipust go to a non-prol group, such as the Mocksviile, chprph, and the money hi : to.be kept in a separa^ ' r . bored," McNamara said, "so you have to vajy it to piake it mop pff, a challenge." > She looked over the first night crowd with a smile. "Tm glad everyone is having a good time, having hm and epJcy- ing it, Sometimes people get too serious, like Nvhen they play cards.*' • ' • DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, Jan. 20,2000 Father Andrew Draper By Mike Earnhardt Davie County Enterprise Record In 1960, a group of Catholics began meeting in side a house, not too far from the current Yadkin- ville Road site of St. Francis of Assissi Catholic Church. Now, the church boasts nearly 100 families who diligently work to gain the money for a new church building. And they are being assisted in worship by a priest Father Andrew Draper, a third-order regulai Franciscan who hopes to help the church grow, anc reach its dream of a new sanctuary. "From that little house and the faith in those fami lies, it has grown to this," said Draper, a 53-year- old cheerful man who in is own words, is a Yankee who kept moving South. "People around here.are great. People keep com ing here asking if I need anything. They're so happ\ New Priest At St. Francis VA (a vh to have me here. They don't want me to leave." Draper has traveled many places, and studied at Villanova and the University of Toronto. He has served large churches with thousands of families, and at a nursing home. He likes the people of St. Francis in Mocksville, and thinks the new church will help draw more pa rishioners here, maybe some who go to larger, more elaborate churches in other towns. Draper wanted to be a veterinarian as a child, and first got the idea of going into ministry when he at tended a prep school operated by Franciscans. The Franciscans, he said, study the life of St. Francis, a 13th Century saint who gave up his wealth for God. There's the story of a murderous wolf, whom St. Francis tamed by befriending it by taking a thorn from it's paw. "By seeing God in all creation, he brought others Please See Priest - Page 03 w> o «) S- 3 o 3"? DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, Jan. 20,2000 ;yi( nn ! . .' •' r^..v n 1^.- f i.- i 1: m jiLAKw';.™ ES^imacBSaie! Vr V ;C ;,l taaaftgag' Father Andrew Draper hopes to start a new sanctuary for St. Francis. Priest Now Serving St Francis Continued From Page D1 around lo see ihe same thing." Draper said. "He had an effect on people be cause of his closeness to God." After 13 years as a brother. Draper missed baptisms, weddings and con fessions. He is close to his parents, who live in High Point, and in addi tion to church work, can enjoy his hobbies of reading, traveling and lis tening to music. Glad not to be in the city, he al ready has bapti.sms and weddings lined up for coming months. He's started daily mass, adjusting the time almost weekly to accommodate more people. "There's more people coming back, and I think having a priest here is a draw," Draper said. "I want to build a new church. I would love to get that started this year ... and use this as the all-purpose building. We could offer a lot of things to help the community." Although the building is impor tant. it doesn't make St. Francis of Assissi. "It's not this building that is the church, it's the people." Draper said. o -c DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, Jan. 20,2000 Father Andrew Draper: "There's more people coming back, and I think having a priest here is a draw." County Fubijc Ubrary Mocksville, Nc DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, March 9,2000 St Francis Catholic Church Becomes By Alesha M. Price The Catholic News & Herald It can be called the little parish that could. The church began as a vision and a dream for three families in the Mocksviile are^ in 19SS, and 45 years later, St. Francis of Assisi Church is a visible and thriving presence in the area. From celebrating Mass in the homes of the original three families to the present building, Mary and Eugene Pope have been there from the begin ning. The family had been attending Mass in Winston-Salem when they decided they wanted their own parish. "We were very close-knit then, and we still are," said Mrs. Pope. "I am surprised about the growth. When people started coming from up north the congregation just started getting bigger." When there were 11 families, the liturgy began to be celebrated in the local National Guard Armory, moved to a small house that was purchased, and then, the present structure was built where the house once stood. "We keep things very personal, and we are i nterested i n what one another is doing. We try to involve everyone in the parish activities," continued Mrs. Pope. The parish has seen many adminis trators and priests come and go over the years, including Mercy Sister Bemadette McNamara, Mercy Sister M. Anita Sheerin and Mercy Sister Mary Carmelita Hagan. "I enjoyed working in that commu nity because there isagreatspiritamong the people," said Sister Bemadette, now the administrator at St Joseph of the Hills Church in Eden. "They had to bond together to keep the church go ing." November 1999 brought cooler weather and the arrival of a pastor. Third Order Regular of St Francis Father Andrew Draper, who had been the chaplain of Maryfield Nursing Home in High Point where his parents are in residence, was sent to the parish. "When I arrived, there were about 98 families, now there are about 120 families," said Father Draper. Along with the installation of the first pastor, Father Draper attributes the growth to additional Masses, a Saturday vigil anddailyMasses,andthesteadygtowth in the Mocksviile and surrounding areas. "What amazes me is how the pa rishioners can rearrange the building from a church to a hall to something else by simply moving the folding chairs," joked Father Draper. As more families poured into the parish, there came a time when some of the male parishioners agreed that in order to better serve the needs of the community, St. Francis needed a Knights of Columbus council of its own. The fact that Father Draper is a fourth-degree knight himself may have a little something to do with the newest council in the diocese. Through theeflbttsofGrand Knight Roger Hunckler, Past Grand Knight Jim Gildein, District Deputy Knight Matt Reilly and State Deputy Knight Bob Singer, the St. Francis of Assisi Knights of Columbus Council # 12610 has the distinct honor of a Jan. 1,2000, inception date. They are the first new \n VA W' O A IL Davis County Public Library Mocksviile, NO s- cJ HO DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, March 9,2000 Thriving Presence In Area O. o trj to <■ council of the millennium in the United States. "AfterMasses.Father Draper would encourage the men to sign up, and we were able to get the 30 men we needed for the council," explained Cildein. "Anytime you start something new,that is alre^y great, but being-able to tie it in with the millennium was really special and important." Some of the projects that the coun cil has been involved in include repair ing and replacing the front steps of the church, replacing the front doors ofthe church and doing electrical work in the kitchen and back areas of the building. Their meetings ate held on the prop erty of a fellow knight who owns a nearby hall. Gildein is not only involved with the Knights of Columbus but has also been the Shamrock Run director for the last two years. The Shamrock Run has become an event that the parishio ners and the community have looked forward to for the past 12 years. In 1988, while Sister Bemadette was the administrator, she, Vince Mannino, and his daughter, Anna-Jo Mannino, came up with the idea for a fund-raiser for the building fund. "I felt it would be a great commu nity builder and that people in the parish could work and do things to gether," said Sister Bemadette. "Of course, the idea was that it would gen erate funds, but that wasn't the original purpose. It was a way for the other area churches and surrounding community to become involved with the congre gation." So, named after a symbol of her Irish heritage, the Shamrock Run was bom. For the first year, there were 33 participants in the SK walk and run and the lOK mn. Last year, the number jumped to 182 runners and walkers. This year, on March 11, with coopera tion from the local Chiunber of Com merce, the route will now pass through downtown Mocksville. When Sister Carmelita asked Gildein to take over as race director, he had no idea how much he would have to do. He and the committee are in charge of advertising, and this year, there is a website running on the Lntemet. They worked with the locsdl chamber to create a new course that* would challenge the participants. > -I "This is the largest fund-raiser for- the church, and there is a Ipt of parish and community involvement. Th^ has been so much positive growth, and there is a positive spirit and friendship among the parishioners," said Gildein. Vince Mannino has volunteered his cooking talents in past years and man aged to get many items donated and has generated support from local bush-; nesses through his wod: as the pan'shi fund-raising committee chairpersohr • "This even brings a community aP mosphere to the town," said Mannino."The youth are the reason why we need a new church because they are impor- tant; they are the ones who will be here ^ after we are gone." : Contact race director Jim Gildein; for regisuation forms, (336)998-92(12; or St. Francis Church, (336)751-2973.;;Registeron-lineat www.racegate.cohi".' Saturday's races will travel down Main Street in Mocksville. Don't be surprised if you hear bagpipes, Mannino said. -J 0 X V- k. 1 v-> X o c?' Dswis County Public libraryMocHsville, NO Ml DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, March 16,2000 Records Fall As Shamrock 0 CJ VI V/^ \a Q v/» o Z It was a day for records. A total of 240 runners and walk ers took to the streets of Mocksvilie for the 13th annual Shamrock Run & Walk sponsored by St. Francis of Assissi Catholic Church. That's up from the previous record of 183 last year, and way up from the 33 who panicipated in the first event. St. Francis members, all of whom almost always volunteer for the event, had a record number of par ticipants, with 28 running or walk ing, and seven of those going home as winners. And two records were broken, the male lOK (6.2 miles) at 33 minutes, 44 seconds, and the overall 5K walk at 34:19. There were some new runners, and some familiar faces. Margaret Hagerty always makes the trip from Concord, and Richard Hamilton, 78, Arnold Hecht, 79, and Herb Keller. 80, have been running it for years. This year, Hecht brought seven family members and a friend, all of whom entered a race. Linda Hartle of Mocksvilie, who is more accustomed to working out on the walking machine at the Davie Family YMCA, entered her first race. She placed third overall with a time of 39:32. Wade Leonard of Mocksvilie, who ran in the Myrtle Beach Mara thon last month, his seventh, partici pated. And the number of young people - those on their own two feet and those being pushed in special "stroll ers" by a parent - continues to in crease. The new course took all of the runners and walkers through down town Mocksvilie. First place in the 5K walk went to George Antonelli of Mebane. Second place went to Larry Seymour of Asheville, a N.C. Senior games champion in the race walk. He had a time of 34:19. Linda Hartle finished at 39:32. SK Run Overall winnes in the SK run wee Mark Looney at 17:22 and Bonnie smith at 20:00. Age group winners follow: 10 and under: female - Stephanie Jarvis. 30:02; Rose Robertson, 30:43; Megan Grey, 31:45: male - Tim Kochy, 25:52; Micah Smith. 27:14; Steven Jarvis. 33:22. 11-15: female - Lindsay Coomes, 21:27: Janel Darcy. 22:27: Brooke Har ris. 29:02; male - Cody Moore, 20:15; Tommy Wilson, 21:45; Michael Paoni, 23:52. 16-19: male - Ryan Strader. 17:55; Cody Angell, 22:23; Andy Almeter, 23:55. 20-24: female - J.F. Williams. 25:00; Sarah Johnson, 27:50; male - Jason Childers, 17:38; James Honaker, 21:13; Jeff Cruz. 21:56. 25-29: female - Merridith Stutts. 24:37; Amy Hatley. 26:42; Judy Sweatman, 30:21; male - Robert Miller. 17:44; Chris Amburn. 21:49: Scott Callison. 22:01. 30-34: female - Joan Howard, 20:48; Leigha Joens, 27:54; Amy Devereaux. 31:44: male • Jeff Exiine. 19:58: Mark Vollinger. 22:56; John Bullins. 38:49. 35-39: female - Jackie Whitley. 23:41: Beth Cassidy. 32:30; Donna Ful- lerton. 36:45; male -Tony Rouse. 21:29; Jay Kontcr. 22:00; Stephen Coats. 22:59. 40-44: female - Terry Coomes. 25:28; Meleah Goulds. 26:26: Linda Harris. 41:09; male - Johnny Watkins, 22:09; Eddie .Moore. 22:48; Mike McCall. 23:00. 45-49: female - Emily Robertson. 36:44; male - Rodney Lee, 20:02: Greg Kiziah. 20:12: Eugene Thiebaud. 20:22. 50-59: female - Dona Johnson. 30:08; male - Jim DeHart. 21:17; Mackie Johnson. 21:33: Eric Gibbs. 23:10. 60-64: female - Dorothy Sides. 34:24. 65-69: male - Luther Thompson. 23:43: Fred Sides. 32:41. Over 70: male - Arnold Hecht. 34:40: Herb Keller. 38:51. lOK Run The overall winners in the lOK run were Kevin Hill with a time of 33:44, and Teresa Tagnani with a time of 45:52. Age group winners follow. 11-15: male - Jesus Cabrera. 38:25; Michael Sturgil. 56:19. 20-24: female - Scottie Pate. 51:16; male - Jason Childers, 39:09; Jonathan Wilson. 40:05: Bradley Ferree. 43:28. ! ^Oavis County Public Libraiy NO DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, March 16. 2000 Run Gets New Course Homing pigeons are released at the beginning of the Shamrock Run Saturday. 25-29: female • Caroline Paul. 48:23; Adiysha Khurshced. 56:13; male - Cetiiio Cruz Casiillo. 36:58: Patrick Ferree. 39:25: .Vligue! Angel Cutien-ez. 40:28. 30-34: lemale • Christie Hullinger. 47; Rhonda Lee, 48:45: Kip clybum. 50:38; male - Rich Vanderford. 40:34; Trey Aycock. 42:33: Dennis Pope, 43:57. 35-39: female • .Susan Bjerkc. 51:44: Lisa Henniean. 54:00: Bercie Chapman. 54:24: male - Mark Looney, 36:03: ChrisiopherSpanoJr.. 37:40: David Lee 38:14. 40-44: lemale - Trudy Gile. 47:44; Pam Saine. 49:21: Linda Causey. 1:00:15: male - Richard Ferguson. 35:37; Dan Bradley. 42:48: Tom Hourihan 42:59. 45-49: female - Anne Champlain. 48:26: Jeanne .McKittri. 53:19: Beth Wilson. 57:14: male - Greg Kiziah. 43:34: David Hall. 44:48; Albert Yczarski. 48:30. 50-54: male - Rick Di.shman. 45:30. Ira Bradley. 45:39: .Steve Beshears 45'54. 60-64: male - Jack Imbraham. 50:09; Jack Lucas. 53:52. 65-69: male - Dick Rosen. 1:02:39; Robert Conner. 1:09:35. 70 and Over: female - .Margaret Hagcrty. 1:22:30. County Public Ubrary Mocksville, NC "St. Vai\vit»s Or h^5\$\ r^\5$46^i-Q ^r? ®Q_ =c|-gO -Smma. sRunners in the Shamrock 10K start their 6.2 mile journey through Mocksville on Yadkinvilla Road.X?aSL. - ,-Ts •' Photos by Mike Barnhardi m: 93M "" > "«•*'ir: 4k'^fjRunners and walkers of all ages entered the 13th annual 5K Shamrock Run and Walk sponsored by St.Francis of Assissi Catholic Church in Mocksville I • . v-*-••>'••.. 't-v5-'^? '."Js-a' Volunteer Sherry Burgio takes a number from Tim Kochy. It was the first Shamrock Run for St. Francis' new pastor, Father Andrew Draper. County Public Ubrary Wocfrsvj^/t, NC - DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, March 29,2001 o '—^ CJ rN rt Catholic Daughters of the Americas Court, St. Francis, take part in the installation ceremony. Catholic Daughters Installed The instailaiion of the Catho lic Daughters of the Americas Court, St. Francis of Assisi Catholic Church, took place on Sunday. Jan. 7. at the 10:30 a.m. Mass. Special guests present were: Stale Regent, Doreen Warren: Past State Regent. Lucille Kroboth: Past State Regent. Geri Butler; State Membership, Mary Ann Grabashy. Also present were members from the Salisbury, Charlotte and Greens boro Courts of The Catholic Daughters of the Americas. Fa ther Joe Kelleher, retired, of Winston Salem presided. Officers for The Catholic Daughters of the Americas Court, St. Francis of Assisi. are: Regent: Orpha Russell; Vice Regent: Donna Sharpe; Record ing Secretary: Clare Hunckler, Treasurer: Cherie Graham; Fi nancial Secretary: Jean Jones. Members are: Addie Burks, Angelique Zickmund, Annette Peak, Barbara Kollins, Cherie Graham. Christina McGowan, Clare Hunckler, Dolly Campbell. Dolores "D" Spry, Donna Sharpe, Betty Kissee. Freddie Sprinkle, Janet Church. Jean Jones. Josephine Ciciulla, Kathie Streit. Laura Powers. Linda Harris, Mary Carter, Maureen Gildein, Mitzi Grey, Nancy Gerrety, Nancy Lucky, Orpha Russell, Pat Zickmund. Phyllis Stevens, Rebecca Rcbbe. Rosemarie Rowland, Sandra Ginther. Sarah Fahey, Teresa Dandison. Catholic Daughters was founded in 1903 by the Knights of Columbus and is the largest national organization of Catho lic women in the world. The or ganization is dedicated to strengthening the spiritual fife of Catholic women through Christ and His Church. They are orga nized in 42 states. Puerto Rico, Dominican Republic, Mexico. Virgin Islands, Guam and Saipan. The St. Francis of Assisi Catholic Daughters meet at 7 p.m. the first Monday of each month at the church on 862 Yadkinville Road, Mocksville. The pastor is Father Andrew R. Draper. TOR. * Catholic lay and religious women, 18 years of age or older, who love and support the church and wish to participate in social and charitable activities, are wel come to join The St. Francis of Assisi Catholic Daughters. Davis County Public LibraryMocksville, NC DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, March 29,2001 Shamrock Run Draws 266 Athletes To Mocksvilie ^ \A V 0 ^ {a ^ Robert Miller didn't set the Shamrock Run record when he OFOSsed the finish line in the Sk (3.1 miles) road race March 17. : And he didn't set the record when he crossed the finish line i(i the Shamrock Run lOK. ; But he did set a record by \Vinning both races in the 14th annual event sponsored by St. Francis Catholic Church in Mocksvilie. : A total of 281 people signed up for either a 5K fitness walk. 5K run or lOK run, a long way from the 33 who participated in ! the first Shamrock Run. Miller finished the lOK I course in an even 35 minutes, - beating out Russ Fiedig (35:31) and Rodney Jackson (36:17). He finished the 5K course in 16:49, followed by Dwight Jacobs in 17:58 and Christopher Spano in 18:11. The closest finish of the day was between Rhonda Lee and Teresa Tagnani of Mocksvilie, who sprinted to the finish line with Lee a second better than Tagnani at 46:21. Kathy Seavers was third at 48:14. Christy Lee won the female 5K'race in 20:01, ahead of Addie Bracy, 21:58 and Lindsay Coomes, 22:07. All of the winners were first- time winners in the Shamrock. Favorite Margaret Hagerty, who hasn't missed a Shamrock Run, finished her usual first in the 5K and lOK races for the fe males over age 76. The course took the runners through historic downtown Mocksvilie, a re-certified course that is devoid of dogs that plagued the Sanford Avenue course, while still remaining sce nic. Twenty-six of the runners ran in both the 5K and lOK events, with 90 in the lOK and 157 in the 5K. Thirty four took part in the fitness walk, 21 of whom were new to the Shamrock. A steady group of church vol unteers did everything from keeping the times, watching for traffic to handing out food and other prizes donated by area businesses. Brad Cartner played music, and George Ray was em cee to keep the crow entertained. y <L Cj I u Hi Oavte county Public JiW Mocksvilie, - DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, March 29,2001 Runners leave the starting line for the annual Shamrock Run 5K race sponsored by St. Francis Catholic Church w Race Director Jim Gildein first the gun to start the 14th annual Shamrock Run 10K race through Mocksville streets. In Mocksville.- Photos by Mike Barnhardt Volunteers keep track of the runners and their times. Davis County Public Libraty Mocksville, NC - DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, March 29,2001 u m Triathlete Stephen Fuller- ton crosses the finish line in the lOK. Robert Miller, shown win ning the 10K race, also captured first int he 5K. Davis County Public Library Mocksville, NO DAVIE county enterprise record, Nov. 1, 2( - 0 u 0 in 'o * <1 V w CJ Bazaar co-chair Fran Wilkie concentrates on getting the piece just right. St Francis Church Fall Bazaar This Friday, Saturday This weekend Mocksville's St. Francis Catholic Church will host it's annual Fall Bazaar at the church at 862 Yadkinville Road. It will be open 3-8 p.m. on Friday, Nov. 2 and on Saturday. Nov. 3 from 8 a.m.-2 p.m. The Eatery at St. Francis will be serving Friday and Saturday. The menu will include a baked potato bar, fresh garden salad, hearty homemade chili, and homemade desserts. Ham and sausage bis cuits will be offered Saturday morning for breakfast. The bazaar will offer a bounty of original handmade items ideal for keeping or giving, everything from home and holiday decora tions. decorative clothing, to gifts for young and old, and everyone in between. A white elephant sale will add to the fun. Parishioners of St. Francis have been working on bazaar items at home and in work shops for almost a year. Pies, cakes, and other goodies will be offered. A wealth home canned jellies, jams, and salsas straight from the summer's bounty will be for sale. Drawing for the raffle of a large framed cross stitch/beaded •■Winter Elegance" by Ruth Hunckler, a hand-pieced tree skirt by FranWilkie. and a Christmas Rose afghan by Cherie Graham will be held Saturday near the end of the bazaar. St. Francis is working to build a new sanctuary. The church of fers mass four mornings a week, Wednesday evenings at 7 and cel ebrates the Sabbath with four masses; 5 p.m. Saturday. 8 a.m., 10:30a.m.. and 12:30 p.m. Sunday. ^/locKsville» Tere Freiberger (right) puts the finishing touches on an angel while Barb Kollins creates embossed gift cards. i I These handcrafted items will be sold at the St. Francis bazaar. Oavie CounlV Public UbrarvMoctevWe, NC DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, March 28. 2002 St. Francis Si. Francis of Assisi Cacho- I Uc Church broke ground March n 17 on a new church building. nConstruction on the new P church that will seat approxi mately 300 people should begin within a week, said Vincent Mannino. chair of the building committee. The Most Rev. William O. CurUn. D.D.. bishop of the Dio cese of Charlotte, brought the message at the Sunday Mass ] prior to the groundbreaking cer- ehiony. ^ u -.-k He congratulated church members on the new building. but told them not to lose their perspective. "You've got a sense of what a community is ... it's a love of Jesus." Curlin said. "Don i ever lose that sense. Jesus. Jesus. Jesus, that's what the church is. The church has grown to in clude 175 families, and needed more space than available inbuilding on Yadkinville Road - The new church is being built in a field behind the present structure, and will face Valley Breaks Ground For New ChurchBm G. cur,in"^ns to McCsville Mayor Francis Slate. Road. Mannino said. It will in clude five classrooms, and tne old church will be convened into a fellowship hall. They hope to be in the new building by Chnst- mas. . ,, The design will be a similar look to the new CCB building next door, Mannino said. "There was a lot of hard work and a lot of donations, and do nations don't always come by t 0- money, they come by the ge^- osity of our town," he said. "The community had a lot to do with ' Mocksville Mayor Francis Slate. State Rep'. Julia C. Howard and Chamber President Joan Carter were on hand for the groundbreaking ceremony. The church was full ol parishoners - some of the same people who have made the new building possible. They supported church functions such as holiday dinners and dances. Mannino said. ••I would like to thank all ot the parishoners in supporting this dream we have. mi groundbroaking. ••It-s going to be nice. I have to thank Father (Andrew) Draper for giving me full reign ... and so many people ... all the parishoners. , o Oavi# County PufeliGUbraiy Mocksvfffft, N6 DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, March 28,2002 Itwas packed at St. Francis of Assisi Catholic Church with the Most Rev. William G. Guriin spoke for the groundbreaking «^ony^Photos by Mike Barnhardt o Davit County Public library Mocksvllle, NC Sister proves it's never too late for ministry By JOANITA M. NELLENBACH Correspondent M()('i\SVILLK — fdiiK's granciiiiH; lu'i'e conies grandma," tlie teen ager shouted as Sister Susie Dandison exited the Helmont Ahlx'V College stage, diploma in hand. Someone tried to correct him: No, that \\as a nun. .loshua Rrincefield. how- e\'er, l\iKn\ wliat he was talking ahout. Mercv Sister Teresa Susana Dandison — ' known to everyone as Sister Susie — is mother ot four and grandmothei- to 1 I. Before siie earned that diploma in 1995, ' slu- raised a family and he<"ame a Sistei' of Merey of Relmont. in her native Buenos Aires, Argen tina. she and her par ents were Catholic hut ' didn't attetid church regularly; she doesn't recall her Cath.olic- /^^'^ohool teachers think ing of her as a ix)teniial ' sister, Susie married .lohn Dandison, an Argentinean of Knglish de scent, in 1950 when she was 17. They arri\'ed in North Carolina in 195.5, after spending time in Uruguay, F.ngland and Georgia. Tliev ii\'ed in Sali.shur\', where their four cliildreii attended Sacred Heart School. Susie was involved in the sciiool and in Sacred Heai-t parish. John traveled, selling industrial chemicals. In 1971, their oldest daughter mar ried and their oldest son had Just gi-adu- ated from high school when .lohii dietl of a heart attack. Susie devoted herself tt) die children still at home. She also worked and went to , ^.school part time and ministered to the ' , witlowc-d, .separated and divoreeii. Fven- ; tualiy siie ttxik a Job in inventoiT conirol 0at Ingersoil-Rand. Three vears after iier hushaiul's death. 1p -■ '"Susie made Cursillo .md mc-t Sister of •.Mercv Faiiline (.1iff<>i\l. ;i memlx'i" of ihi- Merc iA /- y Sister Teresa Susana Dandison I "sS Cursillo icain. "1 told her 1 ihouglu I miglu have a \'(X'ation," Sisti.-i- Susie saitl. "I'd always enjoyect working in the eluirch. The ideaoflieinga nun didn't ajijx'al lo me. hut 1 ke[n thinking alx)ut it — against mv Ix'tter judgment. I though then- must he more to mv life than working and dating some and having a g<xxl time." The deeision to enter religious life- look HJ years. "I think what at tracted me to it was mission, and then community, and then you would have ample time fi>r prayer," she said. "I've learned that if you want hours and hours f<)r prayer you have to make time for that. We're not clois tered women; we're in ministry." Finally, .lesuit Fa- tlier Joseph VlcCloskey, whom she'd met through chiU'ismatic renewal, told her to make the leap or fiirget it. A sistei" ti"om one order had told her she was too old, but when Sisters of Mercy \ isiled Sacred Heart toi-.a celebration, she mentioned to Sisiei" Jeanne-Margaret McNally rliat she thought she had a v(x:a- tion. Sister .leaiine-Margaret asked her age. .Sister Susie rc-calletl that, "I said. Tm t(X) ok!.' and she saitl. 'Oh, no you're not.' If you're tipen to Gotl's message, you're go ing to get it. 1 was willing to talk alxxit it and discern. I fldt that Gtxl was calling me to .something." Susie entered the Sisters of Mercy of Belmont stxai after, at age .5'i, in I9S4. Her children, now married, sup- [X)i"ted her, "They were happy that I'm liappy," Sister Susie saitl. "They'd rather see me husv than sitting at h<")me." .\tt(T making her final vows in 199!, Sister Susie .served as ehaplain at Mercy South Hospital in Charlotte. She often inieriireteil for Hispanic patients who s|«ike littie or no [\ngiish. .After a while, dioiigh. she began to ihiniv about changing her miniscrv. She learned that Sister .Anita Sheerin had been assigned as pastoral administrator at St. Franci.s of Assisi Church in Mocksville. "When Anita was asked to come over hei-e, I thought ma}-lx' it was time to do .something (more) with my Spani.sh. " Sis ter Susie said. "I asked my community if 1 could come out here to do mi outreach to Hispanios, and tliey were very generous," She helps teach English to third- to fifth-graders at William R. Davie El ementary School. One way she does this is the teacher gives lier a math jirohlem, which she asks the children to solve. .A child will read the problem, and Sister Susie will help witii any words they don't understand. She helps with reading class in the same w ay. At Davie County Health Depart ment. she interpi-ets at a prenatal clinic and, occasioncilly, at the courthouse. "My minisn^ goes fi"om the sublime to tiic ridiculous. The sublime is that we have Mass in Spanish every Sunday. 1 translate for the Mass." she said. She also assists with baptismal pi"eparation. Sister Susie has no regrets about choosing a new lite; "if 1 hadn't trieil it. 1 would spend the rest of my life wishing 1 had," she said. Contact Correspondent doanita M. \'ellenbach b\ calling (S'-JS) G'JT-t-yjOt) or mail jni'll(cv.djui.net. 30 YEARS EXPERIENCE Davie Cou Moci blic Lii)rary . NC PYANO MAN HENRY C ROZELLIII 2nd Generation ♦ Piano TunetiTerhnician Piiini) Tuning, Rcp.kirs, Rcfnishin^i; Pianos Boiiylit and Sold FREE ESTIMATES 704-321-5843 The Cath#[ic Company payie County FubticJ-'Oibi'y Mocksviite, NG YOU, YOUR FAMILY or YOUR BUSINESS 5 If like to send Coni'rnluUftion^: to Risho" '^'r/lianr C Cuvlh' DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, Thursday, March 4,2004 Rocord Fie/d Expected For The Shamrock Run due expectation is one Of the ways to control ail And What better way to do itthan in the Five KilomLrRu" the starting line at 8:15 .m - ram or shine - over a cer- P?f «'h'ch begins at StFrancis of Assisi Catholic n ~ Also on tap that Saturday morning will be a 10-kilometer Run starting at 9 a.ni. and a "Tots Trot," set for a 10 a.m. start. All who register may pick up their registration packets start ing at 7 a.m. on Race Day at St. Francis Church. Age groups for the compe tition have been set for the fol lowing: 15 and under, 16-19, 20-24,25-29,30-34,35-39,40-' 44,45-49,50-54,55-59,60-64 65-69,70-74,75-79. and 80 and over. By registering for the com petition, eveiyone who legisters by March 11 (online at www.active. com) is assured a T-shirt in specified sizes, rang ing from XXL to XL, L, M, S. Preregistration by March 5 requires a registration fee of $17. Registration on the day of the race will cost $20; special price for the "Tots Trot" is $5. Registration forms are avail able at the St. Francis Church office at 862 Yadkinville Road, Mocksville. Overall winner awards, male and female, are planned. There also will be 1st, 2nd. and 3rd place awards for all age groups.' Unique walk awards are also planned. In previous years, scores of participants entered the race - and most finished it. In the 'Tots Trot," awards will be presented to the "Fast est Stroller" as well as the win ner in the five-and-under group and in the 6-10 year group. All tots must be accompanied by an . adult. According to Dr. Kimberly, "Walking is one of our very best exercises, for it tones the muscles, reduces body weight, and keeps walkers fit and trim. , All-in-all, it makes one feel bet- ter - and it makes one look bet ter, too. As each one of us ages a bit, we need to do something to keep us trim. Walking or jog ging can be very effective in that respect." Salmon said that a portion of the proceeds from the annual Shamrock Run/Walk will be presented to the building fund for the new home for A Store house for Jesus on a site already aquired along Route 64 East in Mocksville, not far from its in tersection with Depot Street. Kimberly, in discussing the health aspects of walking, said that nearly one-fourth ofAmeri cans are overweight, and the rate of obesity in this country increases atmually. A serious re sult is the increase in diabetes which is developing at an alarming rate. A few decades ago, he saidi i diabetes was not considered a preventable disease. Now, he explained, "we know that dia betes, as a complication of over weight and obesity, can be pre vented. It takes regular exercise to achieve signiflcant weight loss. The most cheap, most safe, most dependable, and most easy exercise is walking. Almost ev eryone can do it." (a \A U - vt.1 ^ ^ 4l Davie County Public Library Mocksville, HC 55 DAVm COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, Thursday, March 11,2004 Annual Shamrock Run, Race Director Dave Salmon and Dr. George Kimberly - he's the medical director of A Store- n house for Jesus - expect a record turnout for St. Francis of Assisi Catholic Church's 16th annual Shamrock Run/Walk on Satur day, March 13. ' Part of their expectation is due to the growing public intrest in, well, growth - growth of body, growth of weight, growth of appetite. And they figure that one of the ways to control all those growth factors is to exer cise. And what better way to do it than in the Five Kilometer Run and Five Kilometer Walk which leaves the starting line at 8:15 a.m. - rain or shine - over a cer tified course which begins at St. Francis of Assisi Catholic Church and finishes back at the church? Also on tap that Saturday morning will be a 10-kilometer Run starting at 9 a.m. and a "Tots Trot," set for a 10 a.m. start. All who register may pick up their registration packets start ing at 7 a.m. on Race Day at St. Francis Church. Age groups for the competi tion have been set for the fol lowing: 15 and under, 16-19,20- 24,25-29,30-34,35-39,40-44, 45-49,50-54,55-59,60-64,65- 69, 70-74, 75-79, and 80 and over. By registering for the com petition, everyone who registers by March 11 (online at www.active. com) is assured a T-shirt in specified sizes, rang ing fiom JOCL to XL, L, M, S. Preregistration by March 5 requires a registration fee of $17. Registration on the day of the race will cost $20; special price for the "Tots Trot" is $5. Registration forrhs are avail able at the St. Francis Church office at 862 Yadkinville Roao, Mocksville. Overall winner awards, male and female, are planned. There also will be 1st, 2nd, and 3rd place awards for all age groups. Unique walk awards are also planned. In previous years, scores'of participants entered the race - and most finished it. In the 'Tots Trot," awards will be presented to the "Fast est Stroller" as well as the win ner in the five-and-under group and in the 6-10 year group. All tots must be accompanied by an adult. According to Dr. Kimberly, "Walking is one of our vpry best exercises, for it tones the muscles, reduces body weight, and keeps walkers fit and trim. All-in-all, it makes one feel bet ter - and it makes one look bet ter, too. As each one of us ages a bit, we need to do something iA . ^ J ® Fitness Walk This Saturday tf\ lie •to keep us trim t 0 . Walking or jog ging can be very effective in that respect." Salmon said that a portion of the proceeds from the annual Shamrock Run/Walk will be presented to the building fund for the new home for A Store house for Jesus on a site already aquired along Route 64 East in Mocksville, not far firom its in- ^ iL vTi u ersection with Depot Street. Kimberly, in discussing the health aspects of walking, said that nearly one-fourth of Ameri cans are overweight, and the rate of obesity in this country in creases annually. A serious re sult is the increase in diabetes which is developing at an alarm ing rate. A few decades ago, he said. diabetes was not considered a preventable disease. Now, he explained, "we know that dia betes, as a complication of over weight and obesity, can be pre vented. It takes regular exercise to achieve significant weight loss. The most cheap, most safe, most dependable, and most easy exercise is walking. Almost ev eryone can do it." Davi@ Coun5y Public library Mocksville, NC St DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, Thursday, Dec. 9,2004 • United By Faith Mexicans Carry Torch Through Davie On Way To New York The Mexicans posed i Cin the parking lot at St. Francis of Assisi Church in Mocksviile on Nov. 30, smiling and shouting "Mexico" in their native lan guage. The two busloads didn'tsiay long. The group had left Mexico ty on Oct. 10, headed for St. Patrick's Cathedral in New York City. Taking turns carrying a torch, the runners quickly have made their way up the East Coast. They could only stay in Mocks viile for a brief ceremony in the church, where the torch was used to light a candle. "The purpose is to take the image of Lady Guadalupe to St. Patrick"s Cathedral," said Sister Susie Dandison of St. Francis, "The message is a united people through faith. One people di vided by the frontier and united by faith." The Hispanic presence is nothing new to St. Francis. The previous Sunday, more than 200 area residents had attended Spanish Mass. "We have a very large and a very young Spanish commu nity," Dandison said. Sister Susie Dandison: "We have a very large and a very young Spanish community," Davie County Public Libraiy Mocksviile, NC DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, Thursday, Dec. 9,2004 • The torch at right was carried through Mocksville last week as groups of Mexicans are taking it from Mexico to New York City, symbolizing the unity of the Mexican people through faith. - by Robin Fergusson Qavie County Public L Mocksville, Ctole County Public Libraiy Mocksville, NC DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, Thursday. Oct. 7.2010 -"f .r- . \ . - . . ^ - d - ,r * - y V. , H s * >/.v ^ I >: I t- i ^ f i 3 Sf. Francis Celebrates St. Francis of Assisi Catholic Church celebrat ed its 50th anniversary as a parish on Sunday, Oct. 3 with a picnic, music, his tory excerpts from parish ioner Bob Ginther, and a blessing of the new St. Francis Memorial Garden sponsored by the Knights of Columbus Council 2610 in Mocksville, Pastor, the Rev, Andrew Draper, T.O.R. is shown blessing the garden and statue. Ccti-kd(/\0' 5TjR.ftK)Cv5 Of ' ^5\Sl C8 - DAVIE COUNTY EimRPRISE RECORD, Thursday, Aug. 25,2011 I * J I f s> /S-? • i|Ka St Francis Pastor Installed On Aug. 13 at the 10:30 a.m. daily mass/ Bishop Peter Jugis (at right iri/ photo above right) installed Father John Starczewski as the pastor of Saint; Francis of Assisi Catholic Church in Mocksville, with 65 people in atten dance, including 12 knights from the Color Corps and five other Knights in baldric and tuxedos. Jugis escorts Starczewski to significant places in the- church in these photos, including front doors, baptismal font, reconciliationi room, presidehtial chair, altar,, and the tabernacle. , ;! : \ - Photos courtesy Dave Graham 25th Anniversary Special Events Planned For March 2 Shamrock Run • On March 2, the Shamro<^ Run will celebrate its 25tb anoi- veisary with the step-off for the 5K, Ae CompetitiYe Walk and the Fun Walk at 8:15 am. The lOK will begin at 9 a.ra. and the Tots Trot will start at 10. Awards ceremonies for the competitive races will be at 10:15 a.m. Sponsored by St. Francis of Assisi Church in Mocksvilie, the race has a USATF certified 5K and lOK route through the center of Mocksvilie. The race orga nizers will use the chip system by Lee Tuning for more accurate timing and faster results. A por tion of the proceeds will benefit the Daviie Pregnancy Center. « Sheriff Andy Stokes will be one of the race directors in honor p^&ev^ilver anniversary of the. race-wt^afiizers are planning food, fun and music the day of the race. The baric Beiter Cup will be awarded for the second year. Students in Davie High School are encouraged to partic ipate. The Beiter Cup will have the male and female winning athletes' names engraved on it. The DHS Media Center displays the cup year-round within the Daric Beiter Collection of social studies books. Younger students from ele mentary through middle school are also invited to participate. Any individual or team can ; join the run/walk for health and fimess. Parents are encouraged to run/walk with their children. A feature of the race is the Corporate Challenge Fitness Run/Walk to blend fitness and good health with team building. Participants are encouraged to take advantage of early reg istration by March 1 for $25. per athlete. Those who register to participate on the day of the race wiU pay $30. Athletes who wish to run the 5K and the lOK can do so for $40 using early registration and $50 for day-of registration. Student rate for one race is $20. Tots trot for $5. Early registration can be made by completing die registration form found on die brochures and mailing it with a check (made out to St. Francis of Assisi Church) to St. Francis of Assiri Church, 862 Yadkinville Road, Mocksvilie. Forms and checks can also be delivered in person. Online registration is available at wwwuictive£otn. Online reg istration ends Feb. 27. Organizers ask that partic ipants take advantage of early packet pick-up on Friday, March 1 from 4-7 p .m. Pizza and bever ages will be available for those using early pick-up. DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, Thursday, Feb. 14,2013 Davie County Pu'olin uuioiy Mocksvilie, NO C-HVA,OXHtS- C 'v^V\6L\ C - S-^ Of \ Si' ^ V 5 ^\<i ^4-tTN9^DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPWSE RECORD, Thursday, Dec. 3,2015From Mexico ToNew York, With AIn Mocksviliepn' Wednesday 'Nov. Lady of Guadalupe, The25, Sdnt Francis of Assisi message of this event is to .Catholic church in Mocks- join families separated by a .ville hosted La Antorcha border. . /Gu^dupana. — ^ Saint Francis celebrated,. ^ ^ith a procession throughico Ci^ and \yill terminate the streets, Aztec d^ces,music, food,• v of Our Lady of . songstartd the celebration ofg^M^lupe;pec. l2.Thisis theHplyMassf -. .a^torch relay organized by : 'tin Thursday, Saint Fran-theyegpyacAssp cis^ran to si^tMary's Cath- 'are olic thunA ip Greensboro: Basilica of to .deliver the/torch along•.v..^9y Y^^p^adalupe;-. -Wife images.' of'our ' "Multiple prayers Were 'said^dtears shed i^on her' 9f^erc)f Atflndianmessen.- feet;she3sTheVirgenwith-' ."^hom. .vQutia passport,*' said /Dean- •she appeare'^d to in Decem- naToires. "Sheis the mpth-^^^ber l531. er of Mejdco and Queen of^ A torch is brought along our hearts. For me it is anwith the images repre^^^^ emotion that words caning unity, love and the light not express. To constantlyof Christ. live between two culturesEach year it passes is difficult but when I par-through Mexico and crosses ticipate in events like this itto the United States. The is impossible to retain one'simages are passed town to emotions and devotion totown, hand in hand by thou- the culture and Our Lady ofsands of devotees to Our Guadalupe."MocKsvVile,ip fi ^ - DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, Thursday, Jan. 17,2019 scheduled for March 13 2 o vf> \J 2 iL d The 3lsf Amiual Sham rock Run wiU be held on the eve of St. Patrick's Day, Sat urday, March 16 in historic Downtown Mpcksyille.; Tlie Shamrock Run features. US ATF Certified lOK, and 5K races as well as an untimed 5K Fun Walk. n Racing Toes will, profes sionally time the run using a disposable chip system that will insure shorter check-in lines, less confusion on race day, better timing accuracy and faster results. Proceeds will help sup port the Guardians Ad Litem program in Davie County. This a volunteer organiza tion that advOcat6s for the special needs of abused and neglected children in the foster,program. St, Francis of Assisi Catholic Church of Mocks- villeisihe.host." . Ruimers \ register I on-line, by mail, or in per son on the day before or on March 16 at St. Francis of Assisi Church. On-line ' registration is available at wwwJiunSig- nup,com ^d closes at noon, March. 14. Or runners can register by mail by downloading the fOnh from www.Shamrock- RunNC.coirj and mailing it with a check by March 8 -to: Shamrock Run Race Director, St. Francis of As sisi Church, 862 Yadkinville Rd., Mocksville.NC 27028! Runners and Fun Walk ers, can also register at the church on die day before or the day.Of the i-aces • Tbe fee for registering for the 5K race or thW lOK race before March 10 is $25; students under 18 pay $20. The fee for runhing both races is $35 with 'students under 18 paying $25. There is ari extra fiee 6f;$10 if you register after that date. The fee for the untimed Fun Walk is $15. ; Runners ahd iFun Walk ers who register before March 1 will be guaran teed getting an official race t-shiit ,pn n race day. Race packeits will be available at 7 a.m. on Saturday, March 16. The 5 K Run will start at 8:15 a.m. and the ;10K race begins at 9 a!m;i . Award cerenjonies and festivities wM follow after the conclusion of each race. -w ■c o d *63 (l.^y^0nc- V'avVvJC>.S Or A55\S\ r^v55\0KiDAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, Tliursday, Jan. 21,2021 - ]B35^Shamrocic RunFor 31 years, folksfrom all over have beenputting on their greenrunning clothes and coming to Mocksville for theannual Shamrock Run.No more.St. Francis of AssisiCatholic Church, sponsors of the annual event,have decided to discontinue the popular event.Last year, the eventwas canceled in March asthe COVID-19 epidemicbegan."After much discussion and prayer, we haveliter-31 yearsdecided that we are notgoing to be continuing theShamrock Run," the Rev.Father Eric L. Kowals-ki, pastor, said in a letterto sponsors. "It's been awonderful 31 years."The Shamrock Runwas truly a communityevent, bringing togethermany people from diversebackgrounds to participate in a shared interestand to help raise fimds notonly for St. Francis of Assisi, but for local charitiesas weU," he said.%