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05-MayDavie High Team Finalist In Moot Court Competition Friday Friday in Raleigh, teams from Davie High and Durham wil) meet headon in an end-of-season playoff. The contest has been surprisingly unpublicized. The pidyers are not bouncing a basketball or passing a football. Their weapons are ideas and their goal is a favorable decision by three N.C. judges. The players are the finalists in the moot courl competition, a mock trial in which students argue othetical cases. The moot court Young Lawyers Division of the N.C. Bar Association, is in honor of I.^w Day 1983. Law Day is ah annual, national celebration of the American system of justice. Teams from Davie High School and Durham will argue the case as if it were on appeal to the U.S. Supreme Courl. Arguing for the state will be David H. Scott and Tonya L. Turner from Davie High. Arguing for the petitioner will be Barry Mims and Todd Yeary of wifi be held at 10 a.m. Friday, May G.'on the 7th floor of the Federal Courthouse and will be judged by some of N.C.’s most illustrious judges. Sitting on the bench will be Justicc J. William Copeland, N.C. Supreme Court; Judge, James H. Pou Bailey, N.C. Superior Court, and Judge Sidney S. Eagles, N.C. Court of Appeals. The contest, sponsored by the Durham High. Tonya is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Tommy Turner of Rt. 8, Mocksville and is a sophomore a( Davie High. David is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Wayne Scott of Rt. 2, Advance and is a senior at Davie. Both are members of Ihe Forensic Society at Davie. ^ The case concerns a Fourth Amendment automobile search and seizure issue.The moot court competition is only one part of a statewide Law Day celebration sponsored by the N.C. Bar Association. One-hundred immigrants will become U.S. citizens at a mass swearing-in cert!mony conducted by Federal Judge Franklin T. Dupreee. U.S. Senator John East will speak. Winners of a high school essay contest and an elementary school art contest will be honored. U.S. Senator Sam Ervin will be awarded Ihe N.C. Bar Association's Liberty Bell award.In 1958 President Dwight D. Eisenhcwcr signed a presidential proclamation establishing a special day of celebration of American law and justice. This year is the 26th anniversary of Law Day. The theme is “ Sharing in Justice,” which emphasizes the participation of every American in the shaping of our system of law and justice. DAVIE C O U N T Y P.O. Box 525, MocksvUle, N.C. 27028 (Ü6PS 149-160) 40 Pages $10.00PerYearinNorthCarolina THtiPsnAV m a v i q s -j fc- i i oc$15.00 Per YearOutside North Carolina . THURSDAY, MAY 5,1983 ^ Issue - 25 cents Superior Court Judge Peter W . Hairston congratulates Tonya Scott as finalists in the state moot court com petition. The bavie *ea_m w ill face Durham in an end-of-seascn playoff in Raleigh Friday. The event is staged m honor of "L aw Day 1983". County Commissioners Study Preliminary Budget Requests Asbetos To Be Removed The Davie County Board of Commissioners spent its meeting Monday listening to preliminary budgel request from several county departments. Speaking on behalf of the Davie County Sheriff’s Department, Tom ■ The Davie County (School Board has earmarked $30,000 from its 1983- capital outlay budget for the, removal.oiasbestos from ceilings at Davie HifeJj School.'v : Dr. r iJ ^ . Sinclair, - school superint|nBe^V told Vavie' County commissipneKMonday that while -some asbestos ^bs* found in local ;schools, the sysiem as a whole was found in v ^ ' good shape. He pointed out problems facing the Salisbury-Rowan County Schools... the removal of $600,000 of asbestos with the figure still rising. “ We feel very fortunate to have such a small amount of asbestos in our schools, especially when compared to the severe problems facing other systems,” he said. In compliance with federal regulations, local school officials conducted a study to deterrnine if asbestos was used in Davie schools. Reports show small amounts were found in certainareas of Mocksville Middle Schools, but are en­ capsulated to the extent that they post no health problem. . State investigators found asbestos in the lobby of the Davie County High School administrative building ahd in the lobby of the gymnasium. No asbestos was found in classroom areas of any local school. Dr. Sinclair said school officials were given the option of either encapsulating the asbestos at Davie High or removing it. He said plans thus far call for its removal. Work is expected to begin just as soon as the 1982-83 school year ends in June. Davie Has Largest Percentage Increase ' Davie County showed the largest percentage increase- I2.S0 perccnl~of any county in (he slate in I9R2 sales and use tax collections. Statewide, 71 counties had an increase in collections, and 2.<) had a decrease. Rowan County’s 1882 collections were $10,245,781. up from $!l,860.838 in 1881. Davic County's 1882 collections were $1,617,712, up from $1,433,351 in 1881. The figures were furnished by the N.C. Department of Revenue. M rs. D ia n n e A n d e r^ n H eads D avie U n ite d W ay Mrs. Dianne Anderson has been elected to serve as president of Davie County United Way for this- year. Other officers elected at the, April meeting are Benny Naylor, Vice President of Budget; Allen Martin, Chairman and Mrs. Ruth Foster, Vice Chairman of Appeals. Mrs. Carmen Walker will continue lo serve as sccretary-treasurer. New directors who were elected al Ihe annual meeting earlier are John Carman, Randy James, Jim Bailey, Frank Matthews, Buddy Alexander, Jeff Albarty, Perce Musselman, Henry Howell, Russ Payne, W. J. “ Jim” Wilson, and Mrs. Carolyn Cartner. The group approved funding for the 1983 year to be handled as in the past, with recreation groups receiving their yearly allocation at Ihe end of Ihe first quainter, and others receiving >/i of their allocations at the end of each quarter. Agencies are being funded at 96 percent of their requests for the vear as follows: Davie County Lillie League Baseball, $4800; Davic County 4-H Fund, $3984; Uwharrie Council, Boy Scouts, $16,512; Davie County Group Home, W800; Juvenile Service Fund, $999; (Continued to Page 2) Dianne Anderson Foster, chief deputy, told com­ missioners that the department's 8 patrolmen cannot effectively patrol the county. He explained the department needs two people who do nothing but work in the court and serve civil papers. Because deputies spend much of their time serving papers-- 3,476 in 1982-they often have a response time of 1-1'/i hours on non­ emergency complaints from citizens. “ That doesn’t look good,” he said. The number of papers being served this year is running 8-10 percent above last year, he said. He said the county would not have to pay the two employees as much as deputies, and that they could drive small economy cars rather than patrol ears. He also agreed with commission chairman Bill Foster that the department might be able to do away with its court caller, instead using one of the two new employees, who will have to wear uniforms while in court. The county now pays a court caller $21.75 a day, or $4,825 a year, Tom Foster,said. In April, the chief deputy said 25 eight-hour shifts were worked with only one man on duty, he said. “ We're not doing any effective patrol work in this county,” he said. The sheriff's department has eighl uniformed deputies who patrol Ihe county, work in court and serve papers, along with two officers in the detective unit. One man works as a plainsclothes detective and also serves as the juvenile officer. The department also needs to replace eight vehicles and eight walkie-talkies, he said. The commissioners heard relatively good news from Connie Stafford, director of the county health department. The department is requesting only 2.4 percent more in local money than it did last year, $179,259 compared with $175,000. The department also is paying 27 percent of its local budgel wilh fees, Ms. Stafford said. In the first six to eight monlhs when the health deparlment began charging fees, 25 percent of the clients quit coming. “Now we have more patients than we did before we started charging,” she said. The health department is requesting no capital outlays and no inclividual salary raises, only Ihe step increase advised by Counly Manager Charles Mashburn, she said. The largest increase is in the home health program, which is the only totally self-supporting program, she said. More doctors are referrmg patients to this program, she said, causing .the number of visits the deparlment makes to homes to go up from 3,000 a year lo an estimated 4,000 this year. The health department’s total, proposed budget is $589,886, of which $179,259 or 30 percent, comes from Davie Counly. The remaining money comes from the state and from local fees. County School Supertintendent Joe Sinclair presented a $9.5 million budget, of which $1.5 million comes from the county. The county money includes a $109,500 capital outlay budget which has in il $30,000 for the removal of asbestos from' the lobby of the high school. (See separate story) Also included is $3,000 to change the well waler system at William R. Davie School lo the county system and money to start typing programs at North and South Davie Schools. Sinclair said the board included a 5 percent,increase for locally paid teachers, based on the assumption Ihat the state would include a similar increase for its teachers. A dental insurance plan, estimated at $40,000, also is included in the budgel for the first time. “ We do need it all,” Board of Education member Jim Jones said. “ It'S a bare-bones budget. Il’s all going for our top priority and that's our students. If we don't do our best for our students, we're lagging behind.” The Department of Social Ser­ vices is requesting a 5.9 percent increase from lasl year, including a 4.7 percent step increase in salaries. The total budget is $3.3 million, with the county's share at $464,480 or less lhan 15 perceni of Ihe total budget. The federal government pays 62 percent and Ihe state’ 24 perceni. Local U n e m p lo ym e n t R em ains A t 13% S p e c i a l O l y m p i c s ie r g , a Swedish exchangeW inning is funi ____student and a Davie _____ _____________________ Parnell a hug after winning an event. See story on page 1- D. (Photo by Deree Eaton.) {gh Jr. Civlran, gives little Shawniin . - - - Unemployment . — .ic County remained at 13 percent for Ihe monlh of March, Ihe same as February. However in 72 counties of the slale, Ihe unemployment rale decreased according lo figures released by Glenn R. Jernigan, chairman of the N.C. Employment Security Commission. The statewide lolal unem­ ployment rate was 9.8 perceni in March, down moderately from 10.2 percent in February. The national unadjusted rale was 10.8 percent in March, down from 11.3 perceni in February. Davie’s rale was based on a labor ■force of 9,420, of which 8,200 were employed and 1,220 unemployed. Neighboring counties -showed Davidson with 12.1 percent; Rowan, 8.1; Iredell, 12.9; Yadkin, 8.3 per­ cent; and Forsyth, 7.2 percent. Jernigan said, “We're encouraged by the fact that unemployment decreased in almost 75 perceni of Ihe state's counties. Mountains and shore counties continue lo have seasonally high unemployment rates, but we anticipate im­ provement as better weather conditions encourage tourism." In March 1983, 64 counties recorded double digit unem- plovment. In the samp month a vear ago, GO counties had unemployment rales of 10 percent or more. Dare County registered the. highest unemployment rale, 37.0 percent, which meant thal 1,020 were unemployed in a labor force of 2,760. Other counties with highest unemployment were Swain, 31.1 perceni; Clay, 28.4 p ercen t; Graham, 24.6 percent; Ciierokee, 22.4 perceni; and Tyrrell, 19.6 perceni. Counties with the lowest unem­ ployment rates wero Orange (3.5 percent), Durham (4,8 percent). Gales (4.9 percent). Wake (4,9 percent), Watauga (6.3 percent), and Mecklenburg (6.4 perceni). On The Inside Sheriff’s Department, Wrecks Police,Pg-2 Sculptured Dolls Pg.-^ . Tasty Desserts Without Sugar Pg.-l-B New Program Aids Knglish Students Math & Pg.-3-B Social News Pgs.-G-B, 7-B, 8-B Schools Observe N.C. Heritage Week Pg.-l-C S|)orts Pg.-3-C Plants Recover Troni Kreeie Pg.-B-C Auxiliary Aids Hospital Pg.-7-C Special Olympics Pg.-I-D Church Listings Pg.2-D Obituaries Pg.-3-D Public Notices Pg.-5-D RealKstate Pg.-li-D Classilieds Pg.-7-D 2 - DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, THURSDAY MAY 5, 1983 Teenagers Face Theft Charges Two Dnvic Couniy leenngers facc five counls of larceny and Ihree : counls of breaking nnd entering in a rash of Ihefls occurring locally over Ihe pasl G weeks. A fifteen‘year-old male is-also charged in conneclion Wilh the Ihefts. - Tom Foster, Davie County Sheriff’s Department chief deputy, said that Brian Thomas, 17, and Brent Thomas, 16, face breaking, : entering and. larceny charges in- •bluding the theft of three motor Vehicles, tools and a go-cart motor. : All items have been recovered by Ihe Sheriff’s Department. The two are charged in connection with the theft of a 1977 Ford from : Ervin Motor Company; a 1969 GMC Truck from the Moose Lodge • Parking lot; arid a 1980 Toyota ; Truck from Edwards Insurance - Agency Parking Lot. Foster said the ; 1977 Ford and the 1969 GMC truck ■ suffered substantial property ! damage. The Toyota was recovered • intact. - In addition, the two face breaking, ; entering and larceny charges for • the theft of tools from Shorty’s Saw : Shop on Cana Road, plus the theft of - a 5 horsepower gocart engine stolen ; from Davie County Hospital. A court date has not been set. : Investigation is continuing, ‘ conducted by detectives John ' Stephens and Mike Smith. Foster ; speculates that the investigation •'.will clear up additional breaking, : entering and larceny cases. D avie O bserving H o sp ita l W eek Hospital Family Listed Tom I' oslcr, chlcf Deputy Davle County Sheriff's Lcpartment, at­ tended n uppcr-icvet management coursc at the Career Development Centcr in Winston-Salem. This to hour course was hosted by the Winston-Salem Police Department. The Coursc was taught by In­ structors from the National F.B.I. Academy at Quantico, Virginia. The coursc was attended by Twenty top level law enforcment officers from the Triad Area. Fire Log S h e riffs D e p t. Peggy Jean Brown, 38, Rt. 1, Advance was arrested April 26 and .charged with one count of failure to appear. Particia Swink Bouldin, 26, Rt. 6, 'Mocksville was arrested April 28 and charged with one count of writing worthless checks. Donald Gaston Allen, 21, Rt. 2, Advance, was arrested April 28 and charged with one count of DUI. ■- John Walker, a teacher at Davie High School, 601 South, Mocksville, reported larceny of a 5 horsepower 'motor April 26 valued at $50 from the school. i James Christopher Nettles, Rt. 4, Mocksville, reported larceny of a wallet while in a Physical Education :class at Davie High April 28. - Stanley Preston, Rt. 2, Mocksville, reported larceny of a : wallet April 28. Brent Daniel Thomas, 16, Rt. 3, ■Mocksville, was arrested April 28 and charged with three counts of larceny of wallets. Margaret Cartner, Duke St., Cooleemee, reported breaking and entering April 30. Alney lidford, Winston-Salem, reported breaking, entering and larceny April 30. James Henry Myers, 34, Rt. 4, . Mocksville, was arrested April 29 and charged with non-support. “ Miller F. Shelton, 36, Tennessee was arrested April 30 and charged With DUI - Ocie S. Dyson, Rt. 6, Mocksville, reported damage to personal ■property May 1. An estimated $20 in rdamages was done to his mailbox and post. : Wayne 0 . Lakey Rt. 1, M ocksville, reported larceny ;damage to personal property May 2. •Approximately $170 in total was .damaged to stolen. Cooleemee Fire Department responded to an oil stove fire on Watt Street al the Thompson residence April 27 al approximately 11:30 a.m. .* M ocksville Fire Department responded to a car fire at Country Lane Apartments April 27 at ap­ proximately 1:38 p.m. Jerusalem Fire Department responded to a personal injury on Daniels Road April 28 at ap­ proximately 12:53 a.m. Fork Fire Department responded lo a personal injury ort US. 64 East al Hendrix Barbeque April 28 at 10:32 a.m. Center Fire Department responded to a woods fire at 5:00 p.m. April 28. Wm. R. Davie Fire Department responded to a tractor fire on Main Church Road at approximately 5:45 p.m. April 28. Farmington Fire Department responded to a vehicle fire on 1-40 East at the rest area April 28 at 10:00 p.m. Mocksville Fire Department responded to a personal injury at Country Lane Apartments April 30 al 3:00 p.m. Fork Fire Department responded lo a grass fire on the Turrentine Church Road April 30 at ap­ proximately 6:12 p.m. Wm. R. Davie Fire Department responded to a car fire on the Bracken Rd. at the Lester Naylor residence April 30 at 11:30 p.m. Center Fire Department responded to a brush fire at . the Chaffin residence on Sheffield Rd. May 1 at approximately 7:55 P.M. Farmington Fire' Department responded to a personal injury on Ihe Farmington Rd. at N. Davie Jr. High School May 2 at approximately 1:55. M ocksville Fire Department responded lo a brush fire behind Davie High School May 2 at 2:25 ^ re a w id e D e ve lo p m e n t F u n d A ssists A g e n cie s Eleven Winston-Salem based •■'agencies have received allocations ; through United Way’s areawide • 'development fund.to provide human !-care programs for residents in ;TDavie, Stokes, and Yadkin Counties. Volunteers on the areawide : development committee allocated ■ Ihe total fund, $35,045, lo which the ; three-county area plus Forsylh contributed a portion of their : campaign dollars. - The. areawide development fund ; sten'is from the new areawide ! program which is a cooperative ; effort among Yadkin, Stokes, Davie . . and Forsylh County lo improve ; service delivery and fund-raising • for the people in this area. , ; The funds were available only lo , ;Uniled Way Winston-Salem, based agencies who already provided :services Jo residents in Stokes, •Davie and Yadkin. "The money allocated is intended to expand ^Ihose existing services and lo en- ■courage these agencies to think of •innovative ways to better serve 'these residents,” Hardin said. ; Agency programs funded Ihrough the areawide fund and theif amounts are: Children's Centcr for the :Physically Handicapped - $1,000 will 17.40 Inches Of Rainfall For 1983 A lolal of 17.40 inchcs of rainfall has been recorded in Davie During the first four months of IU83. This is 7.38 inches more than were recorded for the first four months of 1982. During the month of April 1983, a total of 4.97 inches of rain fell in Davie as compared to only 2.9U inches in I!I8:'. provide a summer scholarship to a Stokes County child who has limited physical capabilities and will provide adaptive communication equipment for a DavieCounty child who has severe cerebral palsy. Family Services - $4,500 will provide for various counseling programs for residents of Stokes, Davie and Yadkin. Council on Drug Abuse - $5,000 will go for educational programs on drug abuse in the school syslem, civic organizations, and churches in Ihe three-counly area. Also special programs will be offered for senior cilizens regarding abuse of prescription and over-the-counter medications. Battered Women's Services - $4,500 will help provide shelter and counseling for women who are victims of physical abuse. YMCA - $2,000 will provide scholarships for aboul 40 needy children from Davie Couijty lo attend day camps. Forsyth Cancer Servicc - $4,000 will provide medication for cancer patients who cannot afford lo pay for it. Also they will loan equipment and comfort items for Ihe patients. Camp Opportunity - $3,000 will support a camp that focuses on Ihe needs of physically and sexually abused children from Ihe three- counly area. Salvation Army - $4,082 will provide fuel assistance for poor, handicapped and elderly in­ dividuals m the three-county area. Telephone book listings • $3,500 will provide a listing of United Way agencies in each County’s telephone books lo help residents find help when they need it. Volunteers who served on Ihe areawide allocations subcommittee were: Yolanda Hardin, chairman, Winslon-Salem; Bill JenI, Yadkin; Carol Wiles, Stokes; Bennie Naylor, Davie. Davie Couniy Hospital will ob­ serve National Hospilal Week from May 9 Ihrough 13. During this week, several special activities will be occurring. On Tuesday, May 10, Davie County Hospilal Auxiliary members will olfcr refreshments lo public visilors to the hospital. On Wednesday, hospital Medical Slaff will be honored wilh a special breakfast. Also on Wednesday, hospital auxiliary members will be shown Ihe appreciation of the hospital with an Appreciation Brunch in Ihc hospilal cafeteria. Thursday will be the day Davie Couniy Hospital employees are honored. A Service Pin Award ceremony will be held Thursday aflernoon in the cafeteria, wilh guesI speakers invited. Following Ihis ceremony, ice cream will be provided for all employees. Olher groups associated with the hospital have been invited to share in Thursday’s activities and help honor hospital employees with their presence. The theme of National Hospital Week is “We Treat You Like Family” . The employees of Davie Couniy Hopsital have that type of goal in serving patients. Employees sirive to provide the best service possible, while remembering to treat the patients depending on them as they themselves would wanI to be treated. The following people are part of the Davie County Hospital Family: NURSING Pal Kelt, Gwen Cleary, Pauline Gregory, Nancy Cook, Martha Phipps, Barbara' Graves, Grace Lowe,, Louise Sushereba, Carrie Bullock, Bessie Sechrest, Ruby Lyons, Margaret Edwards, Joyce McLelland, Lucille Binkley, Wilma Smilh, Becky Wallace, Julie Henderson, Edmonia Hollis, Minnie Ijames, Beth Bowden, Lois Call, Aulah Joyner, Jean Snead, Tammy Beauchamp, Betty Carter, Lisa Allen, Beverly Merrell, Carolyn Moore, Pat Atkinson, Joyce Cregar, Nell Wyatt, Edith Burton, Willie White, Rhonda Hendrix, Charlene Taylor, Betty Cartner, Ivy Joyner, Nannette Johnson, Maybelle Orrell, Debbie Dulin, Ann Byers, Kathleen Fleming, Linda Ijames, Leola Barnhardl, Carla Hursey, Leona McCulloh, Dorothy Walker, Clara Mae Foster, Ruth Pierce, Ann McCurdy, Susan Chinn, Anita McMillan, Herman Lane, Jr., Gale Shaffer. Basle Roberts, Jr., Ernest Daniels, Jr., Henry Grant, Roberl Summers, Lulher Ashley, Mary Luffman, Judy Harpe, Kalhy Harpe, Martha Medlin, Mary Brock. Beatrice Hendrix, Virginia Pope, Anna Owings, Deanna York, Flora Hancock, Linda Dyson, Reta Dwiggins, Martha Evans, Juanita Lagle, Elaine Fosler, Cynthia McDaniel, Annie Cranfill, Jessie Boger, Shae James, Lynn Doss, Lenora Secor, Cindy Mandrano, Barbara Williams, Brenda Robertson, Sandra Cross, Grover Summers, Calhi Blakeley. Ann Anderson, Pal Foster, Norma Robertson, Emma Sue Allen, Nellie Gales, Rosalee Fesperman, Debbie. Poole, Scott Coble, Deb Howie, Ann Stiller, Mary Lou Coley, Vivian Cook, Martha Randall, Judy Burrell, Janice McDaniel. LABORATORY Elaine Satterfield, Hilary Wilson, Wilhelmina Ferguson, Irene Stroud, Joyce Prillaman, Janice Snow, Judy Koonlz, Dianne Vestal. PHYSICAL THERAPY Harvey Silverman, Pat Dull, Della Silverman RESPIRATORY THERAPY Tom McMillan, Alice Wall, Kathy Hall, Sharon Ellis, Kim Manner, Sieve Halverson. SOCIAL SERVICES Gay Anderson EKGKalhy McCulloh, Dorcas Brogdon X-RAY Judith McBride, Betty Monsees, Debra Blankschen, Debbie Beck, Carole Leffman, Pam Speer. PHARMACY Ann Wells, Rulh Smith, Sandy Parks, Betty Myers.ANESTHESIA Mary Fowler MEDICAL RECORDS Lee Coble, Sarah Bailey, Carolyn Foster, Lelhia Johnson DIETARY Jane Bullard, Millie West, Verla Cartner, Shirley Lanning, Faye Chaffin, Kay Latham, Frances Kimbrell, Jean Green, Sharon Athey, Jo White, Pat Boger, Becky Cartner, Margaret Powell, Dot McDaniel, Edith Miller, Bertha Foriune, Katie Peebles. PLANT OPERATIONS Oscar Koontz, Ron McCullough, Rick Townsend HOUSEKEEPING Howard Wishon, Jr., Colleen Padgett, Jeff Clark, Clay Petty, Jr., , W.M. Bowles, Lucille Broadwav. D uke C ancels N u c le a r P la n t C o n s tru c tio n Duke Power Company officials announced last Friday that the construction of the nuclear plant at Cherokee, S.C. would be cancelled. Duke Chairman William S. Lee said current studies show that power supplied by Cherokee would not be needed until 1995, five years later than originally predicted. He said rising construction costs and interest rales would have boosted the price of the plant to $6 billion. "In a nutshell, this stretch-out (of construction costs) has caused Cherokee to lose its economic ad­ vantage over alternative types of generation that can be brought into service in order to meet the public need,” said Lee. The three-unit plant in Cherokee County was an­ nounced in 1974. At ils peak in 1980, 1,800 employees were at work on the 3.840 megawatt project. Lee said the company will ask the North and South Carolina utilities commissions to allow it to recover all of the money spent on the plant through rate increases to customers. He said the increases would be spread out over several years. “ This decision will benefit our customers,” said Lee, “ We expect future rale increases lo be minimized because alternative forms of generation will have a cort advantage greater than the can­ cellation costs of Cherokee.” ■ In 1982, the North Carolina Ulu l ilies Commission allowed Duke lo recover construction costs from the cancelled Perkins planl near Mocksville. Duke withdrew a construction permit application for the Davie County planl in February, 1982, citing high costs, regulatory uncertainties, and slower increases in power demands lhan those forecast by the company. The company’s board of directors approved Lee’s Cherokee recem- mendation at their annual shareholders meeting. Lee said a reexamination of the Cherokee planl showed lhat lower customer demands can be met by the company’s Oconee, McGuire and Catawba plants, teamed wilh ils Marshall and Belews Creek coal-fired units. Officials said discussion with olher electric companies in the region led them lo conclude lhat none would be willing lo share a substantial part of the Cherokee costs. Lee said work is about 17 pcrcent complele on Unit 1 at Cherokee. Work on Units 2 and 3 was cancelled last November.Cherokee County officials ex­ pressed disappointment. "I was looking forward to the couniy really progressing,” said Cherokee >, County Treasurer Catherine Gibson. "I’m sure Ihey would have doubled or even eventually tripled our lax revenues.” .. Charles Ballenline, utilities director for Ihe South Carolina Public Services Commission, said when Ihe utility cancelled the other Cherokee units and a unit in North Carolina, it asked the PSC to allow gradual payment of' construction cosls over a five-year period. Duke also requested that the unpaid amount be included in its rate base. The PSC allowed Duke lo recoup ils costs over a ten-year period but ruled against a return on the unamorlized balance, he said. Lee also complained that political reaction from stale legislators is cutting into Duke’s profits. He said Ihe N.C. Utilities Commission has granted only one-third of Duke’s recent rate hike requests. The company also announced that firsl quarter earnings on common slock increased lo $99 million, up from $83.2 million in the first quarter of 1982. For the 12 months ended March 31, earnings per share were $3.21 compared with earnings of $3.19 for Ihe same period last year. Common slock earnings totaled $303.6 million for the year, compared with $283.4 million for the previous year. Lee said the cancellation should • , not be taken as a judgemenl against Ihe nuclear industry. “ Caniellation of Cherokee in no way diminishes our confidence in Ihe conlinued outslanding contribution of nuclear energy to our region,” he said. “ Our resources will be directed to the Calawba construction project. With Catawba’s completion in 1987, nuclear power will be meeting about 50 percent of our customer’s needs for electricity safely, reliably, and cost-effectively.” April - Cruel And Unusual Tha monlh of April proved to be cruel and unusual weallierwise. The monlh began on April 1 with a high temperature reading of 64 and a low of 40. The weather then deteriorated, with little interruption from the sun, unlil Tuesday, April 26, when Ihe high was 76 degrees. From the 18th through the 22nd low lemperatures were 32 degrees or lower.II rained 13 days, and was overcast a large number of days when it didn’t rain. Total rainfall for Ihe month was 4.97 inches. On Monday, April 18th, it snowed. II was Ihe latest snow on record. The low temperature was recorded as 25 degrees on April 19 bul readings in Ihe couniy dipped to around 20. The cold ruined most of the tomatoes and peaches, and damaged apples, flowering bushes, trees, etc. .Only toward the end did April shapeup like its reputation. The high reached 75 or higher and skies cleared last week, Wednesday Ihrough Saiurday. Highs reached 70 only eighl times all month long. Lows were below freezing 8 days. Dawn Baldick, Shelby Bell, Mary Broiiks. Beverly Hardie, Tcrrie Millirons, Carolyn Dillard, Carol Murph, Dan DesNoyers. FISCAL SERVICES Russ Payne, Priscilla Clark, Dale Wall, Lola Hellard, Audrey Lam- berlh, Marsha Correll, Kim Goins, Lisa Dulin, Ann Corum, Meshelle Grant, Anne Hancock, Bonnie MiUer, Sue Baldick. DATA PROCESSING Marjorie Hellard, Sylvia Draughn. PURCHASING Sadie Rice, Jenny Ashley, Sieve Moxley.RECEPTIONIST Laura BogerADMINISTRATION John Frank, Elizabeth Hendrix TRUSTEES Mary Ann Barnhardl, Joel Ed­ wards, M.D., Ray Godbey, Mike Hendrix, Lester Richie, Edward Rosser, Charles Sellers, Jack Ward, Alvin Whitaker. AUXILIARY Sadie Burton, Mr. and Mrs. Bill Callison, Ethel Collins,Jane Crow, Mr. and Mrs. Gerry Dull, Irene Fuller, Linda Giles, Mr. and Mrs. A.T. Grant, Sara Green, Mrs. Ralph Hall, Louise Hammer, Mrs. Cor­ nelius Hargrove, Mr. and Mrs. David Hendrix, Mr. and Mrs. Johnny Hendrix, Mr. and Mrs.Otis Hendrix, Mr. and Mrs. Steven Jordan, Doris Miller, Mollie Jo McC^lamrock, Ellie Sain, Ruby Southern, Treva Spillman, Robert Swindler, Polly VanHoy, Mr. and Mrs. Odell Williams, Mrs. Charles Bahnson, Alice Barker. Mary Brock, Mr. and Mrs. Francis Clark, Mr. and Mrs. Carroll Foster, Mrs. Earl Furches, Mrs. Clyde Glascock, Mr. and Mrs. Ray Harding, Mrs. Frink Honeycutt, Worth Hendricks, Faye A. Hosch, Wayne Long, Mrs. Knox Johnstone, Mrs, Ted Junker, Mrs. Lester Martin, Mae Markland, Florence Mock, Mary McGuire, Jane McGuire, Sara Owings, Doris Ruby, Mr and Mrs. Bruce Rollins, Mr. and Mrs. Ed Russer, Virginia Shutt, Mr. and Mrs. William Spencer, Virginia Waters, June Young, Norma Ruark. MEDICAL STAFF Joel Edwards, M.D, B.M. Foster, M.D., Ray Hartness, M.D., George D. Kimberly, MJ3.,' W.M. Long, M.D., S.P. Minwalla, M.D., F.W. Slate, M.D., Phillip B. Kim, M.D., Kenneth Gallup, M.D., Bruce R. McCune, M.D., Philip McKinley, M.D., Charles R. McMurchy, M.D., Patrick Currie, M.D., Paul J. Beerman, M.D,, James E. Crowe, M.D., Frank E. Pollock, M.D, John M. Kelsch, M.D., Allen Edwards, M.D., Hanna C. Kutteh, M.D., William W. O’Neill, M.D., Landon E. Weeks, M.D., Ann Q. Bogard, M.D., Charles V. Taft, M.D., Jason M. Crandell, . M.D., Bruce D. Walley, M.D. U n ite d W ay (Continued from page I) Davie Couniy Chapter, Red Cross, $3840; Tarheel Triad Girl Scouts, $15,456; Davie County Arts Council, $4800; Farmington Community Assoc., $1472; Cooleemee Recreation Assoc., $3840; Assoc, for Retarded Citizens, $5856; Pinebrook Little League Assoc., $2400; Mocksville-Davie Youth Baseball Assoc., $1920; and N.C. United Way & Agencies, $6299. Applications lo be filed for requesting funding for 1984 are being sent out with the first quarter allocations. It was decided that the deadline for filing applications will be extended to June 30, and none will be accepted after that date. Applications are now available to any olher group wishing to apply for funding for 1984 also. If you wish to receive an application, you may call Carmen Walker at 998-5555 (work) or 998-4818 (home). Anyone wishing assistance in completing these forms should also contact Carmen Walker, as assistance from Shannon Farrell of the Forsyth County office will be available to anyone requesting help. E. C. Tatiim , Jr. Tatum Head» Democrats The Davie Democratic Con­ vention was held at the County Courlhouse Saiurday, April 30 at .1 p.m. After the business session', presided over by chairman E.C. Talum, Jr. the following officers were elected: \ Chairman-E.C. Tatum, Jr.; first vice-chairman-Patricia Latta; second vice-chairm an-Chuck Godwin; third vice-ehairman-Roy Collette, III; secretary-Elizabeth Martin; treasurer-Emily Kempi Slate Executive Committee-Dor Ramey Kemp; functions chairman- Lib Anderson; publicity-Liz Biack­ welder; president of Davie D em ocratic W om en-Frances Miller; North Mocksville Precinct Chairman-Liz Biackwelder; South Mocksville Precinct Chairman- Linda Reeder; Jerusalem Precinct Chairman-Sid Smith; Cooleemee Precinct Chairman-Johnny Allen; Fulton Precinct Chairman-Richard Hendrix; North Calahain Precinct Chairman- Edgar Cartner; South Calahain Precinct Chairman-Mark Thorn; (Clarksville Precinct Chairman-Frances Beck; East Shady Grove Precinct Chairman; Tama O’Mara; West Shady Grove Precinct Chairman-Jane Bullard;- Farmington Precinct Chairman- Laura S. Martin and Smith Grove Precinct Chairman-Sadie Blalock. Boar^Of Ed. Approves iîssignment The Davie County School Board^ held its regular monthly meeting Monday at the School Ad­ ministrative Office. During the meeting, the board approved its annual pupil assign'-: ment plan which indicates no change from assignment policies now in effect. In other business, the Board of: Education: -Named a policy committee for the 1983-84 school yekr. Members; include Mrs. Frances Beck, Joe; Everett, Vernon Thompson, Mrs;- Elaine Strider and Steve Lindsay.- -Approved Vocational Education: policies for tlie 1983-84 year. -W as reminded of “ Public! Education Day” , set for May 25 in ■ Raleigh. -Gained information about a new social studies curriculum which will be initiated next year. Presentation: was made by Elaine Strider,- general supervisor. Driver Charged A Trinity man was charged with failure to reduce speed after: striking another vehicle on US 64, East, April 21 at 5:30 p.m. According lo Ihe Highway Patrol report, Billy Gray Marsh, 28, Rt. 3, Stalesville, was traveling cast on US 64 and was yielding to oncoming Iraffic when Herbert Mark Potts;' 22, RI. 1, Trinity was unable to slow his vehicle, a 1971 Mack truck, Potts slruck the Marsh vehicle in the rear.Estimaled damages to the Marsh vehicle was $300. Investigating; officer was Trooper J. L. Payne. ; 127 South Main Street M o c k iv iU C (.iJ .C ., Publijhed every ilhuiiday by the DAVIE PUBLISHING COMPANY MOCKSVILlE CAVIE ENTERPRISE RifcORD 1916-1958 W99-1958 ■ COOLEEMEE JOURNAL 1901-1971 Gordon Tomlinson..'...............................................iditorJubUsher Kathy Tomlinson Robin Firgusson Becky Snyder..-......................................... J)iiectqt of Advertiiing Second CUss Postage Paid 4n MocksviUe, N £. 27028 SUBSCRIPTIQ^l RATES ^ngle Copy ¿5 Cents $10.00 per year In North Carolina $1 SU)0 per year outilde North.Carolloa Pottmarter: Send address changes to Davle County Enterprise Record P.O. Box 52S, Mot^svllle, N.C. 27028 DAVIe COUNTY UNTbRl’KISi: R irU K U . THURSDAY, m a v 5. 1983 - J MOCKSVIUE, N.C. OPEN FRIDAY NIGHTS TIL 8:30 GIFTS FOR THAT SPECIAL W OMAN IN YOUR LIFE H EIR ESS DUSTERS LIGHT CASUAL COVER UPS ASSORTED PRINTS POLYESTER AND COTTON Usually ‘15 - '16 *1 1 “ MISSES AND JUNIORS SU NDRESSES ASSORTED STRIPES ASSORTED STRIPES AND PRINTS Usually *40 To *46 * 2 8 “ S E L E C T G R O U P PLAYTEX FOUNDATIONS 20%OFF O N E G R O U P HANDBAGS VINYL AND OTHER MATERIALS ASSORTED COLORS Usually »12 ■ »14 O N E G R O U P KNIT TOPSBOAT NECKS TANK TOPS ALSO COLLAR MODELS Values To‘14 ^ 3 ^ T o W HEIRESS PANTIESASSORTED STYLES 20%to OFF S P E C I F I C G R O U P LADIES SHORTSPOLYESTER AND COnON SIZES 6 -16 Usually ‘15 S E L E C T G R O U P M IS S E S DRESSES ^ 2 4 “ LONG SLEEVE AND JACKET DRESSES NOT ALL SIZES Values »34 To »52 T O »38 88 O N E G R O U P TWILL SHORTSASSORTED FASHIONSDETAILS INCLUDING CARGO POCKETS PLEATED FRONT POLYESTER AND COTTON _ ERE .WARE,.- R e v e re W are A Revere Ware 8-piece Stainless Steel Cookware Set. The efficiently to cook. Copper Bottoms conduct heat more evenly and save energy. 3/4, and 2 quart covered saucepans, 4V4 quart covered dutch oven, 9’ measurer. ' Reg. 89.95. . . beautiful way Set includes ’ skillet, 1 cup ...........59.88 MISSES AND JUNIORS TENNIS SHORTS SOLID COLORS Usually »14 $ 2 0 8 8 O N E G R O U P QUILTED PU\CEMATSASSORTED PRINTS Values To ’4“ $J97 KITCHEN RUGS ASSORTED COLORS Usually »5 fOSS O N E G R O U P LADIES BLOUSES ASSORTED STYLES Usually *9 ■ *36 88 TO *24“*6 O N E G R O U P BATH TOWELS SOLIDS AND FANCIES ^2“ and 5 3 8 » C O R D U R O Y BED RESTPOLYESTER - COTTON RAYON ASSORTED COLORSUsually U5 n i 88 C O R N IN G W AR E1^ QT. COVERED CASSEROLES 2 QT. COVERED CASSEROLES IVi QT. COVERED CASSEROLE PIE PLATESValues To ’22* $359 TO $ 1 1 4 7 5 PC STAINLESS STEEL BOWL SETINCLUDES 8 QT., 5 QT. , 3 QT., \yi QT. AND y* QT. Usually »16» Set ! 1 2 88 GLASS SERVING TRAYSBEAUTIFUL TRAYS WITH SILVER PLATED HANDLESAsbRTED SIZES Usually »8“ To »11* $ 4 2 5 „ $ 5 7 5 PTALTZGRAFF D IN N E R W A R E • VILU\GE • HERITAGE 25%OFF 4 - DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, THURSDAY, MAY 5, 1983 Library News • Supporl Friends of Ihe Library. Attend the meeting Monday, May 9, 7:30 p.m., in the library's multipurpose room. •Garden Way’s Joy of Gat-dening has been placed in the library in o f l Old Time Songs for Singing, by David Holt The slory time film for Tuesday, May 10 is Frog Went A Cnnrtin. Bookmobile Routes: memory of Duke Tutlerow, given by David and Robin Fergusson. The Collector's Cabinet has been given in memory of Nell Hollhouser by the Cherry Sireet Neighbors. NEW BOOKS: Adull Non-Fiction: ■ Yadkin Passage, by Floyd Rogers ^McCall’s Big Book of Ncedlecraft ;Why Arc They Starving Them­ selves? Understanding Anorexia Nervosa, by Elaine Landau 'Garden Way's Joy of Gardening, by Dick Raymond ;Too Hot to Handle? Social and Policy Issues in the Management of Radioactive Wastes, by Charles Walker and others, eds. ; T H c Complete Book of Long Distance and Competitive Cycling, by Tom Doughty and others ■The Collector's Cabinet, by Rulh Serges •How to Find Work, by Jonathan Price Adult Fiction; • Ancient Evenings, by Norman ■ The Chessboard Queen, by Sharan' Failure To Reduce Speed Newman Tuesday, IMay 1(1: Library to Presbylerian Church in Cooleemee; from church lo Cooleemee Day Care Cenler; 801 N. across GOl, to Will Boone Rd., to Deadmon Rd., to GOl N. back lo Library. H crtiiesday, May 11: Library (o 64 E. lo Fork-Bixby Rd., Cornalzer Rd., Mocks Church Rd., 801 S. (community stop at Advance Discounl), Peoples Creek Rd., back lo 801, cross 64 to Riverview Rd., 64 W. (0 library. LIBRARY HOURS: W e d S a y 9:00-5:30 L lu rd a y 9:00-2:00 Teenager Charged With A Harold B,ay Hariling Harding Named Veteran Officer •Forefathers, by Nancy Cato "Ararat, by D. M. Thomas Young Adult Fiction: .'Things Are Seldom What They Stem, by Sandra Asher Children's E Books: /Basil and Maggie, by Elise Primavera ; Round Trip, by Ann Jonas In My Treehouse, by Alice Schertle J, Fiction: .'Scrappy, by Osmond Molarsky Storytelling Records: Stories Old as The World, Fresh as the Rain .’Legends From the Black Tradition JRcally Rosie Jians Christian Andersen in Central Park ■Tales to Grow On ^Richard Chase Tells Three "Jack" Tales From the Southern Appalachians • -,The Hairy Man and Other Wild Tales Cassette: A Davie teenager was charged wllh failure lo re(iuce speed after a collision on Farmington Road May 2. According lo Ihe Highway Patrol report, Madelyn Claire Sheridan, 19, was charged after striking Michael Everett Iiiurph, .28, Rt. 1, Woodleaf, in the rear. Damages to the Sheridan vehicle, a 1974 Chevrolet, were estimated at $1500. Estimated damages to the Murph vehicle, a 1978 Chevrolet, were $100. Investigating officer was Trooper J. L. Payne. GOP Committee to Meet May 9 The Davie County Republican Party Executive Committee will meet Monday night May 9, 1983 at 7:30 p.m. at the Davie County courthouse. This is an open meeting and all Republicans are invited to attend. Harold Ray Harding, Rt. 2, Mocksville has been appointed counly Veteran's Service Officer by Ihe Davie County Board of Com­ missioners. The appointment was effective May 3. Harding is a veteran of World War II and a retired employee of R.J. Reynolds in Winston-Salem. He replaces the late Duke Tutterow who served as county Veterans Service Officer from 1976 until his death last month. The Veterans service Office is located on Ihe first floor of the Davie Counly Office Building in downtown Mocksville. The office is open from 8 a.m. -12 noon Monday, Thursday, and Friday, and from 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Tuesdays. The office is closed Wednesdays. Davie Teenager Charged In Wreck A Davie teenager was charged with failure to decrease speed after a Iwo-car collision on US 158 April 30. According to the Highway Patrol report, James Carlton Hixon, 30, Concord, was slowing to allow a vehicle to make a left turn inlo a private drive. Wesley Scott Boger, 16, Rt. 2, Mocksville, was unable to slow his 1965 Ford, and struck the Hixon vehicle in the rear. Damages lo Ihe Boger vehicle were estimated L e tte rs To E d ito r Dear Editor: il recently read a letter by Richard Smyth of Chapel Hill concerning the upcoming election of the State Chairman of the North Carolina Republican Party and I feel I must répond.^Smyth states that under the ciirrent Chairman, David T. Flaherty, the Republican Party is rüled by the Congressional Club. This is nol true. I know this first­ hand because I, too, was employed by the Republican Party and am presently Assistant Treasurer and have seen the manner in which the organization operates. We are an independent, self-sustaining pdlitical party.•1 also received and read a handout by Ray Warren, a former part-lime NCGOP employee of less than five m'onths. Ray demanded the position of Executive Director with a salary oi-over $20,000 (of which no position exists). Our Chairman refused this ambitious request and Hay quit. .Since this incident it has been apparent through his actions, ac- ciisations and alliance with the. minority candidate for Slate Chairman that Ray is speaking as a disgruntled employee al the ex­ panse of splitting our Party. ■By working al the Stale Headquarters, I was in a position to see our Chairman working fairly with all Republicans, whether they be moderates, conservatives, anti- Congressional Club or pro- Congressional Club. I can also see • first-hand how someone like Ray Warren could turn this positive working relationship around to rhake the situation differeni lhan it really is. ^In the past two years. I have seen our Parly grow substantially in all areas: recruitment of candidates, financial assistance lo candidates, involving more good Republicans in piarty activities, and purchasing our own in-house compuler-the list goes on and on. : We've come a long way, and we nieed to continue this trend of building the Republican Parly in North Carolina. We musl not allow someone who is obviously seeking his own personal gains lo divide our parly. • We really need to examine Dave Blaherty's list of supporters who are endousing his re-election. This lisl includes Congressman Jim Martin and Jim Broyhill, Senators Jesse Helms and John East, 25 of 28 Central Committee members, over 65 County Charlmen and 9 of 11 District Charimen. This represents a broad spectrum of Republicans - moderates and coservatives • who have come forward lo endorse Dave Flaherty's re-election. : Therefore, I strongly support Dave Flaherty, the man with proven ability lo manage Ihe North Carolina Republican Parly for the riexi iwo years. Barbara H. Caldwell 7800 Blackwing Courl Raleigh, NC 27609 PH(919)847-0536 Dear Editor: I am writing Ihis letter in response to the recent ad­ vertisements placed in most of North Carolina's newspaners by Ihe Helms for Senate Committee. 1 am also writing in the interest of ac­ curacy and truthfulness about the purposes and goals ot the North Carolina Campaign Fund. We are now a full eighteen months away from the November, 1984 election, bul deceitful political advertisements are already beginning lo appear as Senator Helms and his Congressional Club gird for 1984. The handwriting is nol only on the wall, it is also on the radio and in the newspapers, in the. form of thousands of dollars already spenl-on negative advertisements against our Governor and the Democratic Pary. The Helms for Senate Committee has slarled holding “ news conferences" to peddle their distortions, innuendos, and untruths, no doubt in the cynical hope and expectation lhat the truth will fail to catch up wilh the falsehood.For example, a spokesman for the Helms Comniiltee reported the “news" lhat it was costing the taxpayers $66,000 a year fo. me to leach al the Universily of North Carolina al Chapel Hill. The truth is lhat the Z. Smilh Reynolds Foun­ dation provided a foundation grant lo endow the professorship I hold. Furthermore, my activity with the North Carolina Campaign Fund has not taken one minute away from my responsibilities as a teacher. In­ volvement in the process of politics and government is a duty of every North Carolinian. If I were in­ terested only in a place on the public payroll, I would nol have resigned a lifetime appointment as a federal judge to run for public office in 1964. The Congressional Club and the Helms for Senate Committee denied lhal Ihey plan to spend millions of dollars in out-of-state political contributions on their 1984 re- G ive Her The Best( This Mother's Day We offer a wide selection of name brand ¡Perfumes & Colognes Russell-Stover Candies! And Heartwarming Mother’s Day Cards Foster-Rauch Drug Co. Wilkesboro Street Phone 634-21^1) at $300. Estimated damages lo the Hixon vehicle, a 1981 Oldsmobile, were $650. Investigating officer was Trooper J. L. Payne. R eport From R aleigh by Rep. Betsy Cochranc The House Natural and Econimc Resources Commitle, on which I serve, sent a bill lo the full House lhal would allow income lax credit for land donated lo the state or lo non-profit group for conservation purposes. An individual or cor­ poralion who donated land lhat was useful for public beach access, public access lo public waler or Irails, fish and wildlife con­ servation, dr olher similar land conservalion would be eligible for (ax credit. Current law only allows an income lax deduction for such a gift. Creidt would be limited to 25 perceni of the fair market value, up lo a maximum of $5,000. The unused portion may be carried over up to five years. The value of the donation beyond Ihe allowed credit would continue lo be eligible for a charitable contricluion deduction. In the Corrections Committee meeling on Wednesday, wc learned lhal it costs $8,500 per year to house and maintain each prisoner. Probation is less expensive than jail and Ihe Paroles Commission is recommending lhat we hire 40 more probation officers. The average case load for a probation officer is around 110 but can run as high as 185 in Ihe larger metropolitan areas. Intensive probation will allow the case officers lo spend more time wilh each petitioner and hopefully keep Ihem oul of prison. We now have 52,000 persons on probation and we learned lhal 15 percent of those will end up back in prison. Because so many of our folks attend the Hospilal Auxilary's antique show each spring, I thought you be interesled in a bill the House passed that would provide special licenses for pre-1949 cars, "streei ■rods” . For a $10 fee, in addilion lo regular fees, a license plate will be issued bearing Ihe additional words “sireel rods". Innocent victims of crime will receive compensation if the bill passed in the House this week passes in the Senate. The bill establishes a Crime Viclim's Compensation Commission within the Department of Crime Conlrol! and Public Safety to compensate- victims, Iheir dependents and third! persons for economic loss from, crime greater lhan $100, bul less- Ihan $20,000. Economic loss in-: eludes expenses for burial, work- loss and replacement services. A bill lo allow Chowan Hospilal to- garnishee wages after 180 days of. unpaid hospital bills was sent to a' Judiciary Committee after a second reading. The Bill would; allow Chowan County lo altach- wages, rents, bank deposits or other! intangible properly. This- legislation could have far reaching" effects if other couniies decide to propose similar legislation. The House passed and sent lo the Senate a bill lhal will require Ihe Deparlmeni of Human Resources to regulate and license hospiccs, the coordinated programs of home and inpatient care for terminally ill palienis and their families. Eperls projeci $80 million dollar shortfall m lax revenues. If we can't make enough deductions in the budget, there will be some form .• of new taxes. Fires Fires kill more children each year than any olher accident. A child is seriously burned every four minutes. election campaign. The truth is that Senator Helms and his'Club raised over $7 million in 1977-78 to run against an opponent who spent less than $250,000. They raised over $9.7 million in 1981-82. The truth is lhat since 1977, the Helms political money machine has raised and spent over $18 million in its efforts lo make the baneful influence of the radical right fell in the political life of our state and counlry. If lhal richest of all political money machines intends lo act any differently in 1984, why did it promptly and flatly turn down our committee's offer to cease raising out-of-stale campaign funds if they would do the same? The North Carolina Campaign Fund would prefer not to solicit any out-of-state political contributions. We have no choice, however, if we are going lo be able lo compete and to marshal the financial resources that will be necessary to tell the truth. We stand for quality in the political life of our stale, for educational and economic op­ portunity for all the people, for fair play and tor simple decency and honesty. Our committee is deter­ mined lhal Ihe stale not lose to the kind of leadership ottered by those whose only real political experience has been in appealing lo prejudice, tear and ignorance, instead of to our belter inslincts. Sincerely, L. Richardson Preyer Chairman Beautify Baths Beautify the bath by adding planls. Choose those that adjust well to moisture and which do nol need a lot of direct light. M O C K S V I L L E . N . C . sffer-каае l^ruo Company I I F M .f*. Phone: o34-2141 DAVIU COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, THURSDAY, MAY 5, I98.Î - 5 : G f A é ü» - t ÿ « « ' : ' ! : : i • 'i . ' ; An exhibit showing the many contributions of the Mocksville Women's Club will be on display throughout the week iff the Davie County Public Library. The display is in conjunction with 'Federation Day' proclaimed for April 24 by the General Federation of Women's Clubs. Exhibit Depicts Contribution Of Women’s Club An exhibit showing the many contributions of the MocksviUe ' ’Women's Club has been placed in Ihe Davie County Public Library to be displayed throuehout this week. The exhibit and other functions are held in conjunction with Federation Day sponsored by the. General Federation of Women’s Cliibs. The Mocksville Women’s Club is part of G.F.W.C. District 6, one of 16 districts in the state. The General Federation was organized in 1890 with 51 Charter Clubs. Clubs In North Carolina were federated in •1902 with membership at' 12,000 in ^ clubs. • -The Mocksville Women’s Club hosted a coffee last week at the home of Clara Corriher in honor of eight new members joining the organization. Approxim ately 40 club rnembers attended the event. New members recognized are Mrs. Clarence Neuman, Helen Eaton, Mrs. Leslie Daniel, Mrs. Frank Brown, Mrs. Will Hyman, Mrs. Francis Greene, M rs. Tommy Turner, and Mrs. Claude Hicks. A cake, bearing the emblem of the General Federation of Women’s Clubs, was served during the coffee. The M ocksville Club was organized in 1962 with Betty Hall serving as president. There are seven charier members. During the past 20 years interests and special departments have been: Education, Public Affairs, Con­ servation, Home Life, International Affairs, and the Arts. A few of o’.:r projects include the Jbrary, starting Ihe improvement of Rich Park, beautification of the W H A T A B E A U T IF U L WAY TO SAY Happy çpVlother’s Day , • S h e ’s s u c h a s p e c i a l , . l a d y , a l l y e a r I : t h r o u g h . O n h e r b i g 1 ■ d a y , w h y n o t h o n o r h e r i n a s p e c i a l w a y ? W e h a v e : j b e a u t i f u l k a r a t g o l d j e w e l r y t o p l e a s e t h a t r e m a r k - ; a b l e w o m a n . C h o o s e f r o m o u r f i n e c o l l e c t i o n o f ; : r i n g s , b r a c e l e t s , n e c k c h a i n s a n d m o r e . A f t e r a l l , ■ v r r i T ' i J T i v i p n ' t Q i ? , ; t h e r e ’s n o o n e e l s e l i k e N O I H I N G ; h e r — a n d n o t h i n g e l s e F E E L S L I K E : l i k e r e a l k a r a t g o l d . R E A L G O L D Foster’s Jewelers 171 N . M a in Street M o ck sv ille , N .C . Y o u r Q v f i U t y J e w e l e r Town Square and Brock Center, sponsoring Arts on the Square, Providing uniforms for the High School Band; a yearly scholarship fund, equipment for the two junior high schools; sending a student lo Ihe Student Legislature, helping the local Civic Clubs to get a Chamber of Commerce, and this year the club is helping send a handicapped sludcnl lo Ihe Special Olympics in Louisiana. Juanita Bryant, national president, is a member of a Dislrict 6 G.F.W.C. Club. Dot Smith, member of the Mocksville Clubj'has held Iwo lerms of office on a district level. Jerusalem VFD Members Receive CPR Certification Eighteen members of the Jerusalem Volunteer Fire . Department and Auxiliary have received certification in cardio­ pulmonary resuscitation (CPR). The 16-hour course taught by Johnny Frye, Davie Emergency Medical Service director, and Martha Randall, registered nurse. Receiving certification are Richard Fosler, Carolyn Foster, Kim Fosler, Vickie Williams, Harry Williams, Edith Waller, Teresa Broadway, Ronald Beck, Donnie Waller, liellis W aller, Marie Broadway, William Broadway, Paula Williams, "Edwin Williams, , Crystal Ludwick, Voel Honeycutt, Glenda Ludwick, Ltiis Broadway. MocksviUe To i^ld Kindergarten Orientation Mocksville Elementary School is now preparing for kindergarten orientation on Friday, May 6 bet­ ween 1 and 2 p.m. If your child was born between Oclober 17,1977 and October 16,1978 he or she is eligible to altend kin­ dergarten next year. This orien- lalion is for sludenis and their parenls. At this time you will fill out some forms, and sign up for the kindergarten screening. Please bring the child’s birth certificate on May 6 so a copy can be made for the child's cummulative folder. Free For M others With this c o u p o n t o t h e first 2 4 m o t h e r s , a 1 4 K a r a t g o l d N o . 1 M o m C h a r m o n F r i d a y a n d t h e first 2 4 o n S a t u r d a y N o p u r c h a s e n e c e s s a r y ! Foster’s Jewelers Pick Up Free Flowers le Sure And Register At Foster Jewelers For Gift Certificate $100.00 G ift Certificate by the ^''erchaгts 1 • Oldest /'/'other 2 - Youngest Mother ---------------------------------------------------------------------------- Not Them! Billy Gene Polls of Mocksville Insurance Agency has reported that he is not the Billy Joe Potts charged with breaking and entering as listed in the Sheriff's Department report in Ihe April 2B issue of the En- terprise-Ii coord. Randy Lloyd Thompson, son of Mr. and Mrs. Vernon Thompson, also reports that he is not the Randy Dean Thompson listed in Davie Counly District Courl proceedings last week. Lodge No. 134 To Meet Mocksville Lodge No. 134 will have their regular meeting, Friday, May 6th al 7:30 p.m. at the Lodge Hall.There will be work in the Master Masons Degree. All members and guests are m- .-.viled to attend. " T f io c ie L m M M U ■ ■ ■ ■ M i l II M i l lB . C . M O O R E & S O N S , IN C • M o t h e r ’ s B a y G if t s Show M om your love and appreciation Sunday, M ay 8th ladles' espadrilles 1 2 9 9 Silicici)) uppers In nivy. while and green. Sizes S'> lo 10. ladies' leather sandals 103® Leather uppers with nalurit labric band. Sires 5'; lo 10. Navy and brown. terrycloth sculfs 400 White, blue, pink and biige Sizes S-M L XL. Machine washable basket buffet reg. 8.99 0 5 7 Anchor Hocking*. I'l ijl. c«(erole ind covcr. r> ql ullllly dl>t> md 8‘ tguarc diih. towel ensembles WASH CLOrn 149 HAND JOWEi 2 6 9 BJiïH ÏOlV£l 3 9 9 Colton, lace bordered. Sheared hemmed 6 - DAVIE COUtMTY ENTERI’ KISE RECOIU). THURSDAY, MAY 5, 1983 W oodm en O f The W o rld H o ld s A n n u a l B a n q u e t Jack Koontz and Kathy Cartner were honored with Mr. Woodman and Woman of Woodcraft, respectively. These two awards were voted on by lodge members by secret ballot, and then the nominat ons were sent to the home office in Omaha, Nebrasl<a, to be approved. They are pictured above with Bob Payne - State Manager and Bruce Rollins - Field Representative. The local Woodmen of the World (WOW) Lodge No. 323, Rangers and nangerelles held Iheir annual awards banquet April 25, al the Davie Academy Community Building. After the members and their families enjoyed a covered dish supper, an awards presenlalion was held. Mike Cartner and Dottie Sigmon were awarded with cer- lificales for Iheir first places in Ihe rifle range competition. Ap­ proximately 20 children ranging from 7 to 15 years of age competed. Tliey were awarded for their gun safety, target practice, and sharp shooting abilities. The ‘Mr. Woodman' award was presenied lo lodge member Jack Koontz. Kalhy Carlner leceived the 'Woman of W oodcraft’ award. These awards were voted on by secret ballot by Ihe lodge members. Scolly Angell was presented Ihe Outstanding Conservationist Award. This was also voted on by secret ballot and the nominations were sent lo the home office in Omaha, Nebraska. The Honor Plaque for Out­ standing Cilizen Award was presenied lo Jack Koontz. He received this award for working in Ihe community, church, and giving his lime unselfishly. Mark Williams, vice-president of Ihe Davie County Farm er’s Association was presented $400 by the WOW. Jacl< Koontz was presented with the Honor Plaque for the Outstanding Citizen. He was given this award for outstanding service in the community, church, and unselfish^. Miclcey Cartner presents the award, assisted byhis time iruce Rollins (right) and I . Cartner presen Ob Payne, WOW State Manager. Photos and Story by Deree Eaton Scotty Angell was presented the Outstanding Convervations Award. He was also nominated by the lodge members and his resume was-^ent to the home office in Omaha,Neb. Pictured with him are Bob Payne and Bruce Rollins. Ranger leader Jack Koontz and Rangerette leader Kathy Cartner congratulate lirst place rifle range winners for the r gun safety and sharp shooting at target practice at the Nafional Guard Armory. The boys winner was Mike Cartner. tie Sigmon was the winner for the girls.Mark Williams, vice-president of the Davie County Farmer's Association, was presented $400 from the WOW No. 323 for his club. Shown presenting the check is Jack Koontz and Bruce Rollins. ^ c u rv 0 U (/< z// W lird io b e P la n n in g C o lo r A n a ly s is S k in C a ro M a V e -iip D e sig n A d^cc, N.C. 9 9 8 - 5 6 0 4 9 9 6 > 5 8 0 & J Legislative Report By Senator Robert M . t>avu The visit by some 200 students from Ledford Junior High School in Thomasville last week reminded me that not nearly enough people, students or adults, seem to take advantage of the opportunity to visit their slate captial. There is much to see and do in Raleigh, and wilh the Norlh Carolina General Assembly in session, many visitors can meet and talk with Iheir elected representatives and observe fir­ sthand as laws are debated. The Ledford students, one of many student groups from the 23rd District that we’ve met with this session, seemed really to be en­ joying themselves. With spring in full bloom, it occurred to me that now would be the perfect time for a visit to Raleigh. Mrs. Peggy Fisher at the Slate Visitor’s Cenler, agreed wilh me. According lo Mrs. Fisher, the cenler normally schedules over a- 1,000 groups for lours of the capital city during the springtime. Unfortunately, fifteen days in May already appear booked up. Mrs. Fisher said lhat they try despei’ately lo arrange for everyone lo come that wishes, but sometimes city fire codes and the minimum time needed for guided lours can fill a day up. Mrs. Mary Biggs, in charge of lours at the General Assembly, reports that over a thousand students a day have been touring the legislative building for the pa£t few weeks. “ We love it, and it’s a fantastic opportunity for the students,” Mrs. Biggs said. We love il, loo. Bul the General Assembly isn’l the only thing lo see in Raleigh. The Visitor’s Center schedules tours of the State Capital, where the governor’s office is located, and where Ihe legislators met until 1963, There are even limited tours of the governor’s mansion, but everyone can see Ihe great architecture and beauty from outside. Most groups try to see at least two of the three museums in Raleigh, loo. The Slale Museum of Nalural Hislory has a gift shop where North Carolina souvenirs can be pur­ chased. Then, if there is any time left, Mrs. Fisher can arrange a tour of WRAL lelevision station, or even the Raleigh News and Observer' newspaper facilities. She also recommends the Mordecai Historic Park, where the birthplace of An­ drew Johnson (he succeeded President Lincoln) is located, or the Joel Lane House-the oldest home in Raleigh. Finally, with a tight schedule, Mrs. Fisher admits lhat she even has connections with some the local fam ous.proprietors of somi hamburger franchises.' Try to come to Raleigh-as family or with a group. Howard Reunion Set For Sunday The Howard reunion will be held Sunday, May 15, at the Smith Grove Fire Department. Lunch will be served at 1 p.m. Glenn Howard, president, and Taylor Howard, vice-president urge all the Howard descendants, frien and neighbors to come and bring a picnic basket and enjoy the food and fellowship together. A young havKk is called G E . W E BRING G O O D THING S TO LIFE. DOW N HER^S DAY SALE OW N M O C K S V ILLI SALE ENTIRE STOCK PRICE Men's, Women’s, Childrens Shoes... Leather & Canvas Tennis Shoes. Belts, Socks, Handbags EVERYTHING S m ith 's S hoe S to re Court Square Mocksville, N.C. MOCKSVILLE FURNITURE & APPLIANCE lO l North M ain Street M ocksville, N.C. 634-5812 DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD. THURSDAY. MAV 5. 198, Mark Stephen KIdridgc, senior business and accounting major, son of Mr. and Mrs. Joe B. n:idridge of liox nSH, Bermuda Run was one of one hundred thirty-nine students at Uitf University of Norlh Carolina at Chapel Hill, initiated into Phi Beta Kappa, the nation’s highest scholastic honorary society, in ccrcmonies in Alemorlal Hall Monday, April 2.'i. Featured speaker at a banquet following the ceremony was D r. George A. Kennedy, Paddison professor of classics at UNC-CII. Joy Walden of Greensboro is presideni of the UNC-CH chapter of Phi Beta Kappa. Michacl Rupen of Chapel Hill is vice president, and Robert Haynes of Salisbury is recording secretary. D r. John Nelson, professor of hislory, is faculty adviser. Students in the Division of Academic Affairs arc eligible for admission to Phi Beta kappa. A junior must have a .1.7 grade point average on a 4.0 scalc and 75 credit hours. Seniors must have a :i.li GPA and IDS credit hours. Rosemaiy, A Mint Plant Rosemary, a plant of the mint family, is known to many as an herb used in the cooking of meats, especially lamb, or added to salads for its bright green color and characteristic aroma. The quality of ils odor has found diverse uses as an essential oil in perfumery, in incense and for making of sachets and moth bags. Typical of plants of the Mediterranean region, it thrives in poor but well-drained soils in hot sun. It is a valuable addition to the gardens of ; Piedmont North Carolina, where it may require the addition of lime to the soil lo reduce the native acidity, and it does well in containers on patios and decks. In this region, it is a low shrub, two lo three feet tall, with narrow leaves like short pine needles. The flower clusters appearing in May and June are tiny and pale blue, accounting perhaps for the name, Rosemary, which is derived fromthe Latin “ dew-of-the-sea.” An early legend also ascribes the flower color to a blue cloak placed by the Virgin Mary on a Rosemary bush to dry. Rosemary has long been associated with remembrance. The early Greeks and Romans twined sprigs of it in their hair to improve their memory. It was strewn symbolically at weddings, funerals and other memorable occasions. Herbalists employ Rosemary tea to aid digestion and relieve headaches. Many cosmetic uses making use of the agreeable odor of the Rosemary leaves have been proposed. They may be added to coconut or other oils for skin cleansing. Decoctions made by boiling a handful of leaves and flowers in a cup of water for five minutes and straining have been used as a skin freshener or as a hair rinse to highlight dark hair, or, diluted in warm water, as a soothing foot bath. Some herb enthusiasts add crushed Rosemary leaves to oatmeal in a bath bag for a body rub in the tub. Rosemary and other herbs may be seen in the herb garden at the N.C Botanical Garden in Chapel Hill. Visitors will not only enjoy the fragrance but will be reminded of new gardening possibilities for vegetable or flower beds or even for a few aromatic pots in a sunny window. Food Lion Signs Leases In New Locations Food Lion, Inc. has announced the signing of leases for several new locations as follows; a 21,000 square foot store to be built at the in­ tersection of Highway 51 and Fairview Drive in the Town of wml Hill, Norlh Carolina. A 25,000 square fool slore lo be built at the in­ tersection of Highway 137 and Slone Drive in Ihe City of Kingsport, Tennessee. A 25,000 square foot slore lo be built al the inlerscclion of 1-240 and 1-40 in the City of Asheville, North Carolina. A 21,660 square fool existing slore which will be remodeled; this slore is located on N.C. Highway 14 and East Meadow Road in Eden, Norlh Carolina (Eden Mall). A 21,000 square foot slore to be built at the intersection of Bypass 23 and Business 23 in the City of Big Slone Gap, Virginia. The opening dales for these new locations have not been sel. Food Lion presently operates 191 stores in North and South Carolina, Virginia and Georgia with new stores presently under construction in Carrboro, Durham, Louisburg, Spring Lake, New Bern, Mayodan, Summerfield, Wilmington, Con­ cord, Tliomasviile, Shelby, and Mini Hill, North Carolina; Sumter, Norlh Myrtle Beach, Orangeburg, and Greenwood, South Carolina; Roanoke, Lebanon, Lunchburg and Newport News, Virginia; Johnson City, and Kingsport, Tennessee. F O O D L IO N Those prices good thru Saturday, May 7,1983 Fresh Daily • 5 Lb. Pack Or More 4 Lbs. Quart SNlft - SlleU FREE Hsily Farms - find* A R«d - Ripe C a lif o r n ia Strawberries $ ^ 9 9 $ Ì5 9 4/M 99. 3St Oft - 64 Oz. Oowny Fabric 16 Oz. Bottlat - Carton of 8 Coca 7.25 Oz. - Food Town Macaroni 10 Oune* Jeno's Softener Cola & Cheese Pizza ♦ Quart Duke's Mayonnaise 6.S Oz. - U . Chunk Tuna, In Oil C hicken O f The Sea Why Pay M .09 C .C . i l l 4 /8 9 6.5 0>. - llKir/Kldniy/Hiirly Slint ■ Cal Food Purina 100 2/99* t Lb. - Quarters V4rs. Filbert's 3 / $ | 0 9 16 Oz. - Frineh/Cul' l v . ‘ I ' ' - I 32 Ounce 14 Oz. Can - A ttorled Del Monte Catsup Alpo Dog Food 24 Ct. • Family Del Monte Green Beans g i Upton Tea Bags 1 0 0 > . ■ C a t llib ir r y 'T a x t P ili/ B u n liir H ill Hot Dog Sauce Half Gallon • SO* OfF Liquid Wisk F riitf |«t4 If Ntfkitflllt lion S ttrii •■ly 8 - DAVIECOUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, TH U R SD Y Y , M AY 5, 1983 F i r s t P r o j e c t Making sculptured d o lls w a s an en|oyable Davie Hom em akers C lu b . M o th e rs and babies ect for the newly formed East include (I to r) Jo Cheek, Polly Bailey, Minnie C o rn a tz e r, G ra c e Parrish, Doris Walker, (back row, I to r) Louise Peters, Charlotte S m itii, A u d re y G ilbert, Janet Parrish, and Ruby McKnight. Jo Cheek and Polly Bailey hold their "babies" in a project. Mrs. Cheek added that her baby has its own nigh chair. S c u lp tu re d D o lls B rin g M a te rn a l R esponse Doris Walker, who instructed the group in m aking sculptured dolls, applies a rosy coat of rouge to this baby ^ r a lifelike appearance. The dolls can be laundered. © R O O T S ^ AND R O O T S S H A M P O O THE SHAMPOO FOR DAMAQEO HAIR ,. , Try Roots 8up«rgro for mor*' baaulllul, luttrout hair. Help« ■top dandruff, Itchy scalp. Now you can hava longer,: Ihlcfcar hair. Tha only product : ot Its kind thal actually rspairs ih« dwnaga of parms and blaachsa, cold wavas, and dry : hair. Actually regrows and . langlhena your hair. ; ALSO TRY AT B.J. Roots Pressing Oil fostenRauch Drug Co. W i l k e s b o r o S t . M o c k s v i l l e Pino-Farmington Homemakers Meet T h e P i n o - F a r m i n g t o n Homemakers Club met W ednesday, April 27 al Ihe home of Mrs. N orm a Olson. The President called the m eeting lo order. Mrs. Olson gave the devolionals and read a poem that she had wrilten, so fitting for homemakers. Marie Miller gave the lesson on "Filness is a Slale of Mind.” To be healthy one musl eat the right foods and take regular exercise. She passed oul a booklet wilh several ways to start on the road to fitness forever. She demonstrated the basic exercises lo be performed each week. Mrs. Stella Teague gave som e good hints on family life. Marie Miller attended the D istrict Spring meeting at the Benton Convention Center in W in slon- Salem and gave a reporl on it. The meeting closed'wilh the clu b collect. ' Beautiful handmade q u ilts, pillows and afghans were a pleasure to look at. The hostess served d eliciou s refreshments to 15 members in ­ cluding Mrs. Gilmer Ellis as a visitor. Flower plants and v eg eta b le plants were exchanged. The next meeling will be at M rs. Floyd Dull’s. B v Kathy Tomlinson “ I c a n ’ t seerh to get his hair s m o o th ,” she said, affectionately r u b b in g the infant’s head. She g e n t ly tu rn ed the baby’s face to w a r d h er, giving the unruly locks a n o th e r pat. T h e others nodded in agreement, e a c h ca refu lly scrutinizing their o w n b a b y to assure each strand was in p la ce . T h e infants settled comfortably in th e ir m oth er’s laps, lavished by h u g s an d affectionate pats. There w e r e no interruptions to quiet a c r y in g infant or change a soiled d ia p e r . In fa ct, the babies were o b liv io u s to the world around them. A n d o b liv io u s they should b e .......a ftera ll, they’re on!y dolls. M e m b e rs o f the East Davie H o m e m a k e rs Club have taken their r e c e n t p ro je ct of making sculptured d o lls seriou sly. They’re more like n e w additions to the family than fib e rfille d dolls. During a meeting la s t w eek at the home of club m e m b e r D o r is W alker, women s h a r e d ideas on their recently c o m p le te d proiect. L eA n n is so glad to see Aunt Doris a g a in ,” one w om an said jokingly as s h e en tered the door, quickly poking th e b a b y into the arms of her h o s te ss . “ W ell, m y baby doesn’t look at­ tra ctiv e in a w ide collared dress,” s a id an oth er, quickly adding that it m u st b e changed. As the women c o n v e r s e d , ea ch unconsciously b o u n ce d their dolls on their laps as if the infants w ere indeed real. The newly formed club voted lo make sculptured dolls as its first project with Mrs. Walker providing instructions. Club members met weekly wilh enthusiasm for the project growing wilh each session. The sculptured dolls have the undeniable look and feel of a real baby. They are constructed of a flesh colored polyester stretch fabric and designed complete with dimpled cheeks, knees and elbows. Carefully layered yarn is attached to form a lush head of hair. Hand painted eyes and rouged cheeks add the finishing touches. To make the “babies” even more lifelike, each is dressed in frilly dress complete with either ruffled panties or a diaper. The club women agree thal they have grown quite fond of Iheir in­ fants. "More women own sculp­ tured dolls than children,” laughed Jo Cheek, club president. “Mine has its own high chair.” The group concluded that they can’t bear to part with their new creations, with others under con­ struction for family and friends. “ It’s really been an enjoyable project,” Mrs. Cheek said. “ We’ve all become very attached to our babies.” C a ro lin a R eview B y T e rry M o b le y TABLED—In recent weeks, there has been slightly more attention focused on North Carolina’s death penalty law because of a bill in­ troduced in Raleigh by Sen. Bob Davis, D-Rowan. Attorney Davis’ bill would change North Carolina’s method of execution from the gas chamber to intravenous injection. The injection, basically a solution of ^ iu m penetrol, would painlessly put- , the condemned person “ to sleep.” In very simple, uhexploitive terms, the change makes sense. Objections have arisen, however, from some opponents of the death penalty who want the method of execution to remain “ as ugly as possible.” The ugliness could keep the number of executions at a minimum, opponents hope, and maybe even give rise to a public outcry for repeal of the death penalty. Last week, freshman Senator William N. Martin, D-Guilford, decided not to wait for that hoped for public outcry, and introduced a Senate bill that would have repealed the death penalty in North Carolina. - Sen. Ollie Harris, D-CIeveland, in a seldom used point of parliamentary procedure, im­ mediately called for a Senate vote to table (kill) Martin’s bill. Normally a bill is first referred to committee for study before any final action is taken. Still, Harris’ action was well within parliamentary bounds. The Senate voted, 24 to 19, in favor of Harris' motion. With that, a controversial bill with great emotional value and headline opportunities-but no chance of passage-was easily aborted. Those were the pertinent facts. Others suggested there were more pertinent facts. Martin in the only black member of the North Carolina Senate body. Since proportionately more blacks in the past have been sentenced to the death penalty, it is suggested (perhaps rightly) that propor­ tionately more blacks disfavor the death penalty. After the tabling motion and successful vote. Sen. Russell Walker, D-Randall, the state chairman ot the North Carolina Democratic Parly, called for a short recess to allow the Democratic membership lo caucus.. In the caucus. Walker called his', fellow senators onto the carpet over the action against Martin’s bill, and ■ told them the vote was a “ direct slap” against the black voters of the . state. During his several minute harangue. Walker singularly connected the Marlin bill and black voters, reporled calling the biU’s defeat “ a disgrace.” Walker wanted the tabling motion reversed. Harris responded. "This isn’t á black-white issue,” the senator said, “ this is a moral issue.” The tabling motion stood. Outdated Medicines , Clean oul the medicine chest and destroy all outdated or unlabeled prescriptions. To preveni the danger of children’s finding old medicines in the trash, flush tablets or liquids down the toilet. M O T H E R S D A Y T h is Su n d ay W ill you get her the same old thing? or something really special? DIAMONDS WATCHES GOLD JEWELRY GIFTWARE F r e e W ra p p in g on m ost purchases w it h p e rso n a l service sure to please. C o m e o n in T o d a y , w a n t y o u ? Ç[)€i/V€e^ dow ntow n Mocksville “ F o r a d a y siire to re m e m b e r” ) S ' DAVIECOUNTY ENTERI’ RISE RH CO RD .T H U R S D A Y . M A Y S . 1983 - 9 8 I I o t i p j c r L n j I r STARTS AS AVALUE ...STAYS AVALUE! A nd D a n ie l F u rn itu re H as The BIG 17.2 CU. FT. CAPACITY I\i0-FR0ST REFRIGERATOR-FREEZERI- 17.2 Cu. ft. of storage space freezer section 1112.41 Cu. ft. fresh food capac­ ity ® 2 Freezer door shelves H 2 Easy-Release™ ice trays i] Equipped, for optional ice maker El Covered dairy compartment 11 Removable egg trays ® Large twin fruit and vegetable bins. Almond Only M S,'- EQUIPPED FOR OPTIONAL AUTOMATIC ICEMAKER l l ^ ^ l ENERGY-SAVER SWITCH M o d e l C T F 1 7 C B SHE'D PICK FOR HERSELF Sofa Bed And Chair S iiiiiliu r to illu s tr a tio n now SELF-CLEANING, 30" OVEN-RANGE SALE! EASY-CLEAN OVEN-RANGE SALE! SAVE ON SLEEP SOFAS M a n y s i z e s a n d d e s i g n s t o s e l e c t f r o m , p l u s a w i d e c h o i c e o f f a b r i c s . E l e v a t e d h e a d r e s t s a n d r e v e r s i b l e m a t t r e s s e s . : J!! Í ( ' Ul A v a i l a b l e i n q u e e n , f u l l INFINITE HEAT ROTARr CONTROLS STAY-UP CALROD* UNITS o r l o y e s e a t . \ Traditional '3 8 9 Early American 95 V T ' Similiar to illustration _____ , f> l sm-upCA1.R0D» UNITS Hardrock Maple Rocker 30" Oven-range with stay-up Calrod® surface heating units ^ Automatic oven timer @ Lift-off oven door ^ Re movable trim rings/pans @ Surface unit "O N " indicator light. Model RB734A *4 6 9 “ 40" RANGE AT A GREAT LOW PRICE! ® Automatic oven tim er r c54BW and clock 0 Full-wiidth cooktop lamp (1!. Lift-off oven window door U Sur­ face unit "O N " ligtnt. Ottoman ’39“Similiar to Ulustration just *5 3 9 ^ .C d i n e t t e s ) ECONO 120 SYSTEM! CLEAN DISHES WITH WATER TEMPERATURES AS LOW AS 120“ POTWASHER" DISHWASHER WITH POWER-SCRUB ■ CYCLE ENERGY-SAVER DRY CYCtE a 9 Cycle built-in with Econo 120 System to save water, energy, money B Light Wash, Rinse « Hold cycles Q Crystal CiearTw rinse dispenser E3 Soft food dis­ poser H Sound Insulated. REVERSIBLE COLOR FRONTS Model HDA865 just *419* It’s a great time to buy .. and select! Choose the dinette to fit your decor! C O L O N I A L C H A R M Plastic top oval table and 6 chairs in warm m aple finish. ’3 9 9 *S im ilia r to illu s tr a tio n Similiar to illustration SAVE ON M ATTRESSES F i r m o r e x t r a f i r m m a t t r e s s e s o r b o x s p r i n g . F l o r a l p r i n t c o v e r s o v e r s t e e l c o i l i n n e r s p r i n g Size Set 199 Table And 4 Chairs 95 s Ä » 1 2 9 * These Prices Good Through Saturday M ay7,19B 3 ■ l a n i o i * Model FH15CA □ 15.3 Cu. ft. capacity Adjustable tempera­ture control □ Counter balanced lid, recessed handle □ Defrost water drain □ Foam case in­ sulation. just «419« D A N IE L Furniture and Electric Co., inc. P h o n e : 6 3 4 - 2 4 9 2 South Main Street^ at the Overhead Bridge M ocksville, N.C. 4 Piece Bedroom Suite Similiar to illustration 10 - DAVIH COUNTY ENTERI’UISI- RECOKD, THURSDAY, MAY 5. 1983 UFO’S? No Just A School Project Students at William R. Davie School launched 280 balloons Monday, April 18, in the snow and rain in observance of “National Library Week.” Each balloon had a message from one of Ihe siudents inside and each was hoping to receive a return message from someone who miglit find the balloon when it fell. The first message was received from Iredell County, two days later. This balloon sighting was about 20 miles from the school. Mrs. Sue Johnson, Media Coordinator in charge of the balloon launching, said the wind was blowing in the direction of Iredell County so this was not such'a great surprise. All the balloons were headed in this direction when they were launched. ■ However, the surprise came when they began hearing from other places where their balloons had been sighted. Three were found in Old Well, Virginia, 180 miles from the school, and all were found by one person. Another note came from Mrs. Louise Groce of Groce’s Dairy Farm in Iredell County stating that her dog, “Pluto” had found a balloon. There was one found beside a railroad bridge and another on a golf course in Eden, another in a shopping center in Charlotte, which is in a completely opposite direction from the direction the balloons initially began. ;l' There were balloons found in ^Rockingham County, . Danville, Virginia and one note even stated ;(about the balloon found) that ‘.‘somehow it got burned a little.” This was a mystery to Mrs. Johnson and the kids, but the writer did not 'explain. 'J; Thus far, there have been 13 balloon sightings in various places, fiut letters are still coming into the àchool and thè kids are all hoping to hear from someone who found the Ualloon with their very own special note inside. ® ^ U 0 0 N SIGHT ings Media Coordinator, Mrs. Sue Johnson (r) and students from William R. Davie postthe notes they have received thus far on their balloon sightings which were launched April 15. The kids are (l-r) i^ouglas Rivers, Jennifer Bryson and Heather Ray. Douglas, Jennifer and Heather take a closer look at one of the letters received concerning a balloon found in Virginia. (Photos by Jim Barringer) A re R eleasing B a llo n s C ooleem ee N ew s I Residents of Davie County may spot some unidentified flying ob- Hects (UFOs) falling from the j heavens this week. Don’t panic, it’s i a project of the lyorth Carolina { public schools. I On Monday, May 2, students in j Buncombe atid Wake Counties ,! released 5,000 balloons-eaeh I containing a math puzzIe--to i celebrate the beginning of Math '■ Week, May 2-8. • The multi-colored helium balloons i are expected to travel as far as 250 j miles ahd could land anywhere. ; Anyone finding a tagged balloon is ' asked to solve the math problem ' and return it to the sender. ' Elementary students in 11 schools ' in Buncombe and- Wake Counties '. will record the number of balloons ' ‘ found, how far they traveled, how' ' ; many problems solved, etc. Mc- ;■ Donald’s is rewarding the young I statisticians with a free “ Big Mac” ¡.during the week and Wachovia ; Bank and Trust is providing the , balloons. Schools throughout the state will , place a special emphasis on bath ; during the week with math plays, , field days, math-around-the-clock, ; and other competitive activities. ! A “ design a T-shirt” contest for : Math Week which began in February resulted in more than ■ ■4,000 entries from students in grades K-fi. The winning emblem will be printed oh T-shirts and used as a fund-raising project for the N.C. Council of Teachers of Mathematics. On Friday, 110 regional finalists will participate in the Sth Annual Slate High School Mathematics Contest in Raleigh. Students placing in the top 16 positions will receive scholarships and trophies and will represent North Carolina as a team in the Atlantic Region Mathematics League Competition to be held at Pennsylvania State in June. Math Week is sponsored by the N.C. Council of Teachers of Mathematics and the State Department of Public Instruction's Division of Mathematics. Mrs. Ann Hancock was taken by ambulance to Davie Hospital Sunday where she continues to undergo Irealmenl and observation. Ralph Hoyle of Fork is a patient in Medical Park Hospital, Winston- Salem where he is recovering from surgery on Monday. Edgewood Baptist Church in Cooleemee will hold a spring revival beginning Monday, May 9, and continuing through Friday, May 13. Evangelist James Hefner will be the guest minister and Howard Carlton will be directing the music throughout the week. Services will begin each evening at 7:30 p.m. The public is cordially invited. Season passes to the Cooleemee Swimming Pool are now on sale at Davie Drug Company in the Cooleemee Shopping Center and lable Ul P lan B efore C u ttin g For N a tu ra l P in e R egeneration When it comes to reforesting Iheir harvested pine acres, too many Davie Counly landowners take an altitude of “ let nature take its course." A recent U.S. Forest Service study sltowed that owners of al least 50 percent of forest land harvested in Ihe south did nothing to reforest because Ihey thought it would come back in pines naturally according to Dave Updike, County Extension Agent. Landowners say Iheir forests were reforested naturally to pine to begin wilh, so Ihey will slick wilh that method of regeneration. Unfortunately most will end up with an under­ productive forest of "green junk.” Forests must be managed for ef­ feclive nalural regeneration. ■ Natural pine regeneration is not free, but il can be effective and much less cosily than planting seedlings if certain guidelines are followed. There musl first be an adequate supply of seed and ex­ posed mineral soil with ample sunlight and mositure. The seed supply may come from standing or from recently cut trees. As a group, pines release their seed from Oc­ tober through December and germinate the following spring. A forester can usually estimate seed production a year ahead of a planned harvest. If harvesting operations are scheduled during or soon after adequate seed fall, there will usually be more than enough seed for a new sland. When har­ vesting is done at other times of the year, seed trees must be left if natural regeneration is desired. Generally 6 to 8 seed trees per acre over 12 inches in diameter which are dominant, of good quality and with a large number of viable cones, will produce adequate seed for the next suesland provided preparation and competition conlrol is adequate. ; Nalural regeneration is usually equaled with minimum cost. This can be the result of a good har­ vesting operation. Modern' mechanical logging techniques can leave Ihe seedbed site m good condition for seedfall and ger­ mination. This is particularly true in fully stocked stands with' relatively light understory. Where brush is heavy, pre-harvesting. Irealmenls such as controlled burning, herbicide spraying or' mechanical methods of chopping or! discing may be used for seedbed preparation. Such treatments will! also increase logging efficiency.' Specify in Ihe invitation to bid and in' Ihe sales contract the conditions; desired for natural regeneration. Areas being regenerated' naturally need to be watched’ carefully through the first growing: season for pprlial or complete- failures. Plans should be ready for^ whatever measures are necessary: lo assure completion of reestablish-- ment with little delay. Natural regeneration has a- definite place in pine forest, management and should be used when cosls and projected returns', compare favorably with those of olher methods. Be certain to contact local agricultural an’d forestry personnel for professional assistance prior to limber .sale for gdvice on nalural pine regeneration. To make a one-pound honeycomb, bees must draw nectar from about two million flowers. Family passes are $60 and a single pass is $45.The Cooleemee Senior Citizens will meet Monday, May 9 in the fellowship hall of the First Baptist Church at 10 a.m. Immediately following the business meeting, the club will go to Lexington for lunch. All members are asked to attend. Wallcovering . If the wallcovering is washable, it can be cleaned with a damp cloth. Prevent streaks by washing one whole wall at a time, working from the bottom up and changing the wash and rinse waters often. PUBLIC NOTICE V'/e r'ake Free Home Delivery Truckload Sale Saturday, May 7th 9 a.m. - 4 p.m. Located at Mocksville Furniture on the Square in Mocksville. Over 150 Items Featuring Schwan's delicious Ice Cream -•Mexican Foods ’►Shrimp « Lobster ’‘Batter Fish .♦Fillets ♦Sausage Patties ♦Chicken ♦French Fries ♦Onion Rings ♦Pizza ♦100% Corn-Fed Beef ♦Breaded Mushrooms ♦Delicous Frozen Fruits Without Sugar ♦Many More Fine Foods 100% euaranteed quality on al| our products Please feel free to stop & see us! We will be accepting new customers to our routes in l'"ock$vllle St Davle County There’s no minimum purchase. No freezer plan or contract. will be availab until June 4. Social Security g iA I have a daughter, 19, and a son, 17, who need Social Security numbers. Can they get them by phoning Social Security? Your son can sincc he is under 18. However, your daughler must apply in person. Both must furnish proof of age, citizenship, and identity; you can call to find oul what proofs arc acceptable. I recently received a slalement of my earnings from Social Security, which I requested. It doesn’t agree wilh the record I’ve kept of my earnings. What should I do? Call, write, or visit any Social Security office right away. Give your Social Sccurlly number, the periods of employment Involved,. wages paid you in each period, and the employer’s name and address. You also should include Forms W-'.! or oilier proof of your wages, or if you're self-employed, copies of your lax returns for the years Involved. A Social Security representalive will help you lo gel any necessary correction in your earnings record. G R E A T ID E A ! sure to please 14 Kt. Gold No. 1 Mom Charm Is presented in a persoiinl Greeting Card -with envelope. S0.B8 Complete downtown Mocksville “F o r a D ay m re to rem em ber” Good Buys Avaiiabie Different types and cuts of meat, fish and I poultry are equally I nutritious and pot roast I is as good as steak J when it comes to| nutrition. ,C om pared w ithi many cuts of meat, I frozen perch and I whiting can be good I buys. Canned tuna I makes an economical I main dish ingredient, | as does salmon. The produce counter! has good buys on I cabbage, lettu ce,! citrus, apples, potatoes and rutabagas. Select I while potatoes without I green spots or sprouts I and store them in a I cool, dry place. If your potatoes have a sweet lasle, Ihey have been I stored at too cool a I temperature. Green I spots should be I trimmed away before | cooking. "To make every I penny counl, read labels and check Ihe I unit prices on the I shelves. Time is alspj money, but lime and I thought spent selecting I Ihe family food supply I will pay great dividends,” Mrs. j Kinlaw says. FREE C AR N ATIO N 'S To The 1st. 300 Mothers Just C om e To D ow ntow n M o cksville ALSO REGISTER AT EACH PARTICIPATING MERCHANT FOR >100” IN GIFT CERTIFICATES For Ttie J 2.Youngest Mother 3.Motlier With Most Children Register This Monday-Friday-Sat. Till 1 P.M. EACH PARTICIPATING MERCHANT WILL HAVE A VERY SPECIAL SALE FOR MOTHER’S DAY SO THIS YEAR LET YOUR MOTHER KNOW THAT YOU APPRECIATE HER ON MOTHER’S DAY DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD. THURSDAY. MAY 5. 1983 - 11 Davie 4-H’ers Honor Adult Leaders Several members of the 4-H Junior Leaders Association participated in ttie event. Featured were d tor) Ctiarlynne Ellis, Junior Leaders member; Katiiy Reilly, 4- H Council president; Erin McGee, Junior Leaders Association President; and Henry Horn, member of ttie Junior Leaders. Sevenleen adults were honored for Iheir work with local 4-H groups during a recognition banquet Friday night al Cenler Community Building. The event was sponsored by the 4- H division of Ihe Davie Counly Agricullure Extension Service and !he Davie Counly United Way. Louise Cartner, adult leader of Ihe Davie Academy 4-H Club was recognized for 27 years of volunteer work wilh a local 4-H group. Frances Beck, Clarksville 4-H Club, was honored for 19 years of service. Louise Allen, Davie Academy, was recognized for 14 years as an adult leader. S. B. Allen, Davie Academy, was honored for 11 years of service. Scrvice pins were also given lo olher 4-H adull volunteers wilh the years of service ranging from one to eight. They are as follows: Pat Reilly-Sheffield-Calahaln, Marie S a g ra v es-T ra ilb la zers, Jeep W ilson-Trailblazers, 8 years; Wilma Reavis-Clarksville, Nora Naylor-Trailblazers - 6 years;. Linda and Dallas Willard, Silver Spurs and Silver Spurs Cloverbuds - 5 years; Ann Hillebrand- Trailblazers - 4 years; Libby Sigmon, Davic Academy and Davie Academy Cloverbuds, 3 years; Frances Allman, Silver Spurs and Silver Spurs Cloverbuds, and Ruth Tullerow, Center - one year. Two new adult leaders were recognized. Ann Rollins, Cenler, and Kalhy Willard, Silver Spurs and; Silver Spurs Cloverbuds, were cited' as new adull 4-H leaders. >» Leader-ParenI Association Of­ ficers were inslalled by S. James, Sloop, exiension agenl, 4-Hf Calawba Counly. Sloop served as an exiension 4-H agenl in Davic Counly during the 1970’s. Sloop also served as guesl speaker for Ihe event. Officers for the 1983-84 year im elude Mrs. Frances Becki president; Mrs. Louise Allen, vice- president; Pal Reilly and Jeep Wilson, secretaries; and) Mrs. Dallas Willard, treasurer. L e a d e r s I n s t a l l e d N ew C o llisio n A vo id a n ce L ig h t Can Save Y o u r L ife ; The shocking facts: There are ■ 4,300,(KX) rear-end collisions each year, or about eight per minute. Moreover, there are over one ; million whiplash injuries each year, ; and women are more likely to be injured in the rear-end accident. Of : all traffic accidents, 30 percent . involve rear-ending. A new product developed for your automobile can now change all of .' this. Appropriately named the • collision avoidance light, it mounts 1 directly where drivers behind you \ are looking - on the trunk of your ,■ car, just below the center of the rear window. It brightly illuminated every time you step on the brakes, becoming a third brake light! But its dramatic effect occurs because it creates a triangular pattern of red light, warning all c of your presence. , The National Traffic Big Safety Administration conducted tests on over .7,400 vehicles over a . two-year period incolving over 100 ; million miles of driving time! Their ■ conclusions were dramatic. It was ■concluded that using the coUision■ avoidance light, rear-end accidents : could be reduced by over 50 percent. This means that over two million collisions could be avoided an­ nually! The United States Depart­ ment of Transportation conducted their own study and, in May of 1980 issued a report confirming these findings. ■ Unlike regular brake lights, which can only be seen by the driver directly behind you, the collision avoidance light can be seen through Ihe windows of several cars, thus avoiding chain reaction accidents.“ Tail-gaters,” too, will keep their distance, as the light is visible at eye level-making the approaching driver more aware of your presence. And it helps even more at night. During a one year period, none of the cars equipped with the collision avoidance light were in­volved in rear-end collisions after dark, when most accidents occur. Of course, Ihe collision avoidance light won't eliminate all rear end collisions, but even in accidents involving "CAL” equipped cars, the damage was much less severe, with repair cosls reduced by nearly 60 percent. It's a money-saver. It's a life- saver. And it's fully guaranteed, carrying a limited warranty. The same collision avoidance stoplamp used in Ihe very important government studies mentioned above is now available to the public for the first time. It is easy to in­ stall, comes with all the necessaiy accounterments, and is available in three m odels-for sedans, hat­ chbacks, and station wagons. Complete do-it-yourself instructions are included with each unit, making installation on most cars possible in minutes. No special tools are required, making the collision avoidance light an affordable life- saver everyone can take advantage of. To order, send a check or money order for $29.95 (postpaid) along with the year, make and model of your car to: Christopher Robin, Unltd. 14526 Sherman Way, Suite 1368, Van Nuys, Ca. 91405. Jim Sloop, former 4-H extension agent in Oavie, served av guest speaker durina the adult leaders recognition banquet Friday. № currently serves as extension 4-H agent iA Catawba County. ■ Baltlmore-Bixby Homemakers Visit Advance Rest Home Ten members of the Baltimore- Bixby Homemakers Extension Club visited the Advance Rest Home, Sunday, May 1. MOTHER’S DAY D iam on d8...G ifisF itfora Qtteen, M a ke Sunday really Special^....... — AU D iam ond Earrings R edu ced — dow ntow n M ocksville “F or a D a y Hure to rem em ber” Club members spent a few minutes getting acquainted with the five residents of Ihe home, after which everyone joined hymns while Shirley played the piano. The group also sang “ Happy Birthday" to Bessie, who was celebrating her birthday. Cornatzer Each resident was given a gift to open. The ladies found lovely robes made by Ruth Sheets with the material being furnished by Mrs Slella Clinard. The men had much-needed socks and handkerchiefs in theirs. After Ihe gifls were opened delicious refreshments which were prepared and taken by Lena Wall and Lizzie Jones, were served to everyone. As club members were preparing lo leave, Mr. Howell, a resident of the home, made his way to the piano and played a few songs for the group-his favorite being “Just A Rbse Will Do.” Once again everyone joined in the singing and club members went home feeling much better for having made Ihe Sunday afternoon visit. Mocksville School Menu, May 943, The menu for M ocksville Elementary School for the week of May 9-13is as follows: MONDAY -Spaghetti with meat anc cheese, green peas, carrot curls, dill chips, apple Betty, toast. TUESDAY-Pizza, corn, tossed salad, Jello, cookie. W EDNESDAY-Fish, slaw , French fries, cherry cobbler, corn bread. THURSDAY-Ham and cheese, potato salad, lettuce and pickles,' peach cobbler, bun.FRIDAY-Beef-a-roni, slaw, green beans, creamed potatoes, cookie, and roll. . r. ■ 1 A HOME IMPROVEMENT LOAN FROM FIRST FEDERAL SAVINGS... WHEN YOU WANT TO MOVE UP WITHOUT MOVING OUT ; II you leel you need a new/ tiouse bul ’ oon'l lind yoursell in a posilion to buy right now, First Federal has the allernalive.. a Home Improvement Loan... for additions renovations, repairs... lor all Ihe changes you always warned to make but pul oilbecause you knew you'd be moving on When Ihe lima comes lo sell yout house, il will be worth rriore if it's boBn updated. In laci, home improvement is one ol the besl inveslmenis going loday. So il you want lo move up wilhoul moving oul d Home ImprovemenI Loan from First Federal Savings is prot>ably the best move you could make. First Federal Savings where pulling First Things First is a way ol business. »FIRST FEDERAL SAVHMG5 ^ Main Offlea: 230 North Cherry Street Branch Onie*a: 490 Hanes Mali/3443 Bobln Hood Road/130 8. Stratford Road/2(1t Reynoida Road/3001 Waughtown Street MockiviOe Offtee: 142 Gaither Strsel cienwnoni Office: 2421 Lawijvills^aenvnon» Road 919-723-3604 12 - DAVIE COUNTY liNTBRl’ RISE RECORD, THURSDAY, MAY 5,1983 M ay Is N a tio n a l H igh B lo o d P ressure M o n th May Is National High Blood Pressure Month, as part of a nalionwide focus on high blood pressure, the Northwest North Carolina Chapter of the American Red Cross is sponsoring eighteen educational sessions lhat will teach people with little or no health background how to measure blood pressure. The sessions have received unanimous endorsement from Ihe Executive Committee of the Forsyth-Stokcs, Davie County Medical Society.The classes, which last 2-3 hours, will be held on Saturday, May 21 and Monday, May 23 - Friday, May 27. Three classes will be held each day al 9 a.m.-noon; 1 p.m.-4 p.m.; and 7 p.m.-lOp.m. Locations for the classes include selected sites in Forsyth, Davie, and Yadkin counties. A $7.00 fee which includes a workbook will be charged. Pre- registration is required apd can be done at the Red Cross Chapter House, G90 Coliseum Drive, Win­ ston-Salem, N.C. on Monday, May 9 through Friday, May 13 and Mon­ day, May 10 through Friday, May 20 from 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. “The purpose of the classes,” reports Mrs. Dot Hurley, Nursing and Health Services Director of the local Red Cross, is to enable in­ dividuals who have little or no health background to be able to correctly measure blood pressure. These days more and more people are becoming interested in learnmg self-help skills ~ skills that will enable them to take better care of Iheir health. Since blood pressure is a vital sign of health and illness, knowing how to measure it is im­ portant for many people. The friends and relalives of persons who need their blood pressure measured regularly al home is another group lhat can benefit from these classes. Individuals with high blood pressure can have five or six measurements taken over a period of lime that is convenient to them and in a setting that may be less sire.ssful for them than a doctor’s office. They can Ihen report the findings to the doctor who will be belter able to regulate their treatment.” The classes consist of self­ learning with a workbook, demonstration and lecture, prac­ tice, and testing. Each student who successfully completes the class will receive a Red Cross certificate. Class size is limited to G-10 studenis. Instructors for the classes are volunteer instructors certified to teach by the Red Cross. For more informalion call 724- 0511. See how inconspicuous modern hearing help can be. C o ™ the all-wlthin-the-ear hearing ild at: A ID S E R V IC E . Foster Rauch Drug Stors ^Wllkesboro St., Mocksville Coll for oppointment for FREE Hwrlng Test 634-2141 Dattcrics, Molds and Scrvice for all types vi aids SHOP WITH us AND COMPARE OUR MEAT AND PRODUCE PRICES TO ANY OTHER STORE IN THIS AREA. YO U 'U FIND THAT OUR LOWER PRICES CAN SAVE YOU M ONEY EVERY WEEK! I E23!COOIECfflEC we welcome FOOD STAMP SHOPPERS L ocated On H wy. 801 C ooleem ee. N.C. W e A ccep t WIC V ouchers And Federal F ood Stam ps. Store H ours: M on.-Thurs. 8:30am -6pm . Fri. 8:30am -8pm , Sat. 8:30am -6pm , C losed Sundays. Quantities R eserved. SU PER MARKET WE GIVE YOU TH E LOW PRICES OTHER STORES TALK ABOUT PLUSTH E COURTESIESOF A HOMETOWN SUPERMARKET! USDA GRADE A FRESH FROZEN H E N S 4-7 IB. AVG. Lb. USDA CHOICE FAMILY PACK C U B E D S T E A K USDA INSPECTED FAMILY PACK P O R K C H O P S SWIFT PREMIUM H O S TE S S H A M 4-Lb. Ham 7 79 SUNNYLAND HOTEL BRAND B A C O N e SUNNYLAND ALL MEAT F R A N K S USDA CHOICE PEELED & DEVEINED B E E F L I V E R BEEF4-LB. PKG. O R M O R E Lb. USDA CHOICE 100% PURE G R O U N D | 0 9 USDA CHOICE EXTRA LEAN G R O U N D C H U C K USDA CHOICE EXTRA LEAN S T E W BEEF USDA CHOICE FRESH S IR L O IN S T E A K USDA CHOICE T -B O N E S T E A K USDA CHOICE • C L U B S T E A K USDA CHOICE FRESH P O R T E R H O U S E S T E A K Lb.1 79 Lb., Lb., Lb., 79 189 189 с , VECETABU«hortenlfli Sait HY-TOP ALL VEGETABLE SHORTENING "ct 99*^ HY-TOP QUALITY BEANS ^ _ LIMAS 3/*1 HY-TOP QUALITY SWEET PEAS HY-TOP PLAIN OR IODIZED SALT HY-TOP QUALITY PEAS BLACKEYES 5-LB. BAG HY-TOP 16-Oz. Can 3/M 5 /Ч 3 /n E E t r a F b e CRANUIATED S»g«i SUGAR 99* HY-TOP CREAMY OR CRUNCHY PEANUT BUTTER 9 9 «I B - O z . • J a r “Mayonnaise HY-TOP QUALITY MAYONNAISE 7 9 «3 2 - O z . Ja r L A R G E L O A V E S ! H Y - T O P Q U A L IT YBREAD1V4-Lb. Loaves HY-TOP QUALITY PIE SHELLS HY-TOP NON-DAIRY WHIPPED TOPPING H Y - T O P Q U A L I T Y 5 t L B . B A G FRENCH FRIES C O B L E F R E S H M IL K 199 Gal. I A S S T . F L A V O R S C O B L E ICE MILK F R E S H F R O M JUICE lii-Gal. Carton FRESH FROM FLORIDA! OLD SOUTH ORANGE 64-Oz. Carton JUS SQUEEZED LEMONADE HY-TOP GOLDEN QUARTERS MARGARINE Й-Gal. Carton lb. Pkg. HY-TOP QUALITY CUT GREENBEANS HY-TOP SLICi BEETS 16-Oz. - Can HY-TOP SLICED OR WHOLE 16-Oz. Can' HY-TOP WHOLE KERNEL OR CREAM STYLE PLUS BTL. DEPOSIT HY-TOP QUALITY TOMATO KETCHUP HY-TOP CHICKEN, BEEF OR LIVER 15!6-Oz. CanDOG FOOD HY-TOP QUALITY FISH OR CHICKEN C A T - ,514 F O O D °C a n Desertstone Dinnerware This W e e k ’s Feature: S a u c e r FLORIDA S ee O ur S tore D iplay! CARROTS . 1 9 ^ HY-TO P A L L PU R PO SE LA U N D R Y DETERGENT 5 9 c lr 99 EASTERN WHITE GENERIC (PLAIN LABEL) PAPER TOWELS - 3 9 ^R o ll W Ж CALIFORNIA NAVEL POTATOES I ORANGES 20 Lb. 199 I 4 Lb. QQ(t B a g I Д B a g Ж ш GENERIC BATH R O O M TISSUE v 4 - R o l ^ P a c k 59 VALUABLE *1.00 SAVE *1.00 T H I S C O U P O N IS G O O D F O R *1.00 OFF O N Y O U R N E X T G R O C E R Y P U R C H A S E O F $ 1 5 O R M O R E A T C O O L E E M E E S U P E R M A R K E T . LIMIT ONE COUPON PER CUSTOMER, PLEASE VOID AFTER SATURDAY M AY 7. 1983,___________ ■ ■ I ■ С OU PO N Bryan serves Eggplant Espandl/ a delicious tomato 'sauce served over brown rice. K n o w s troip exiensive meaicai studies that a high fiber, high vegetable diet Is much healthier than one evolving around meat. Her children, Susie and Bryan, prepare to sample a meatless meal of eggplant español and spinach lasagna. Mrs. Mazat will show families how to eat more nutritionally while cutting food bills during a four-day class at the Mocksville Seventh Day Adventist Church. A T a s t e f u l W a y T o L o n g e v i t y Mrs. Mazat began converting her family's diet to al vegetables about eight years ago. It was a gradual transition, but one that now excludes all meat, poultry and fish from their menus. Ever wonder if it’s possible to plan a meal without meat and make ll a fabulous meal to be remem­ bered? Or perhaps, the budget mandates . putting the monthly food bill without compromising nutrition. ; ^ Whichever the case, a four-day class taught by a local dietitian could offer a feasible solution to bolh. ! Jean Mazat, registered, dietitian, will demonstrate how to cut down on the food bill while slill providing exciting family meals. During the class set for May 2,12, 26 & 19, Mrs. M azaf plans to show that a vegetarian diet is not only economical but nutritionally balanced as well. She will also address the problems faced by millions of Americans placed on restricted diets. Mrs. Mazat said lhat culling down on sugar, salt and cholesterol can be tastier than continuing your present diet. Americans are taught almost at ' birth lhal a meat must accompany every meal,” she said. "Consuming excessive animal fat has been proven a contributive factor to many health problems including heart attacks, high cancer poten­tial, and a lack of endurance. It is no wonder that many health conscious persons are turning lo a non-meat diet,” she said.Mrs. Mazat, who works as a clinical dietitian al Rowan Memorial Hospital, has studied the relationship of health and diet for several years, and concludes that it is much healthier to eat more high fiber plant foods and less meat products.Equipped with recipes, she will show class enrollees how to make delicious lasagna, sugar free desserts, and olher goodies while culling down on meat, sugar, salt and fat.Mrs. Mazat hasn’t always been a vegetarian. She began moving in lhat direction 8 years ago and has now removed all meat, poultry and _ D A V IE C O U N T Y ‘ - F e a t u r e I B M a y S, 1 9 8 3 P h o t o s b y R o b i n F e r g u s s o n S t o r y K a t h y T o m l i n s o n fish from her family’s meals. She said diet change was a gradual process allowing a transition period of adapting tastebuds and changing meat casserole recipes to meatless ones. Her family also adapted a taste for more natural foods and whole grain flavors."As a nutritionist, I was careful lo follow good nutrition principles in planning family menus,” she said. "No one can afford to be careless in changing to a vegetarian diet. She added that there are no complicated formulas and rules in a vegetarian diet, bul menus must consist of a large variety of ordinary unrefined foods in a sufficient quantity to maintain ideal weight.Mrs. Mazat said that converting everyone to a vegetarian diet isn’t her sole purpose, but she does hope to show the entire diet need not evolve around meat. “ It's sur­prising how many people just eat meat ■ and potatoes,” , she said. “There is a whole world of versatile vegetable dishes that are much more exciting and nutritionally balanced.” .Cooking classes will be held May . 2 ,12,26 & 19 from 7:30 - 9:00 p.m. al the Mocksville Seventh Day Ad­ ventist Church on Milling Road. Cost is $2.00 per night or $6.00 for all classes. Pre-registration is required , and can be made by calling 634-2545 Thursday or Friday. The four day class covers such topics as complete one-dish m eals; breadmaking, brfeakfast menus, desserts; dinner entrees and lowfat entrees and desserts.One of the many recipes to be sampletJ during the class follows: EGGPLANT ESPAÑOL 1 medium eggplant, diced (about 4 cups) (peel only if desired)Vi medium green pepper, diced (aboiil V¿ cup)1 medium onion, sliced (about cup)'/j lb. fresh mushrooms, sliced, (about 2 cups)1 28-oz. can tomatoes, cut in pieces (3VÍ! cups)1 6-oz. can lomalo paste 1 tsp. basil V¿ Isp. oregano 1 tsp. salttsp. cumin (optional) 1 tsp. paprika 'A Isp. dry minced garlic (Continued lo page 2B) Fresh strawberry crepes are a perfect dessert. It's low in sugar yet satisfies that craving for something sweet. Jean Mazat, registered dietitlaiv (right) and Ann Livengood know that a vegetarian diet is not only nutritionaily preferred but very versatile. Foods areseasoned with flavorful herbs and spices. Susie and Bryan Mazat wouldn't consider eating a steak or a hamburger. They find their all-vegetable diet to be tasty and very satisfying. 2В - DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD. THURSDAY, MAY 5 , 1983 A Tasteful Way To Longevity (Continued from Page IB) 1 bay leaf Saule eggplant, green pepper, onion and mushrooms in oil-rubbed frypan. Add water a tablespoon at a time as .needed to keep from sticking. Add remaining ingredients anti simmer over low-medium heat until eggplant is tender and flavors are blended (about 1 hour). Remove and discard bay leaf. This is a good make-ahead vegetable. Combines well as a sauce with olher vegetables (i.e. green beans, summer squash) and many meat analogs. Clay Cookers ■ One of the firsl cooking 'utensils' ' was probably wel mud. It was used > lo coat a chicken or fish, which was ; then put among the embers to cook. ; The moisture in the food was sealed in by the hardening mud, which was presumably high in clay ; content. When it was time to serve « dinner, a rock was used to crack the ' clay shell upen, the skin was peeled V oft and the gently steamed meat was eaten. ' A baking utensil which follows ; these lines today is the rough clay ; .pot. Before using, the pot is soaked ;■ in cold water until it is wet. Then the ■ food is put inside, and placed into a i cold oven, says Nadine Tope, ex- ^^'•lension food specialist. North l ;Carolina State University. - : He recommends washing the clay i pol5 on the bottom rack of the dish- washer and then placing it in an oven set on low to allow the C • moisture to bake out. Or set the pot ; , and top out on the counter for a few ■', days to allow it to dry out. Ann Livengood, class co-instructor, places brown rice in a serving bowl prior to the meal. She and her husband. Archer, have found that many health problems have disappeared since converting to a vegetarian diet. i l l ' ' , 'ï i V ' The eggplant español is very similar to a rich spaghetti sauce. It^s a balanced meal when served with a fresh salad and whole wheat bread. Folk-WaKAndJolk-ü)re Green-up in the hills. For some it is heralded by an influx of rodins. Others listen for the voice ot the peepers. And still others watch tor Ihe sight of branch lettuce along a mountain stream. But tor a special breed it is the appearance of the two-leafed ramp, . joined by the shy morel mosing its way through the matted leaves of ah abandoned apple orchard. II is hard to decide which provides more excitement. Probably the -morel since finding this sweet- ,mea(ed mushroom is akin to a youngster’s locating a batch of Easter eggs hidden by a disbolical, • older brother.Often it is simply a matter of ' finding a likely spot, then falling to one's knees and scratching like a barnyard chicken through the ground cover until the first tiny , mushrooms appear. After that the search becomes easier. . And as Ihe season advances and Ihe morsels grow larger, they begin pushing themselves up into plain view. It is the early ones, though, which provide the sweetest taste and the most excitement. Served in Ihe same variety of ways accorded domestic mushrooms, they put the "tame ones” to shame. The ramp is another matter. by Roger Whitener tourists and reporters to the.degre'e that the average individual is reluctant to sample this delicious plant ot the lily family. No wonder. Try inhaling the odor of 40 to 50' pounds of frying garlic instead of ramps at a spring festival and then decide which is stronger.Or have a good whiff ot wild onions when you mow your lawn for the first time in the spring.If there is a real difference it is ■ the staying power of the ramp. The odor seems to permeate the entire body and last for a day or so.Ned Austin, Boone actor-barber- teller ot tales, has a story about a Beech Mountain lady noted for a large brood ot children and a strong inclination toward ramps <rom season’s beginning to end. According to Ned the good lady Strong of smell and taste by com­ parison it has been vilified bv supply of breast milk and was sometimes known to delay the weaning process ot her offspring even into thè talking age. One such youngster, a precocious male, attached him self to his mother one tone spring day and immediately come away spitting. “ Hey, Paw ,” he yelled. “ Give me a chaw ot tobacco real quick. Maw’s been at the ramps again!” And Palmer Triplett, who lives east of Boone and knows much HOME COOKING Baked Chicken Pork Chops HOMEMADE VEGETABLES C a n d le d Y a m s Marinated Beef Strips Hamburger Steak IW a s h e d P o t a to e s t a n a t e a Y a m s C u c u m b e r S a la d M a c a r o n i« . C h e e s e G r e e n B e a n s 4 M u c h M o r e P o t a to e S a la d SPECIALS- TUESDAY A L L Y O U C A N E A T ! F l llB t o f T r o u t w / f r e n c h fa te s , 01 b a k e d p o t a t o c o ld s la w a n d hush pUpples K'EDr'ESOAY A L L Y O U C A N E A T ! P e r c h w / f r e n c h f r ie s , o r b a k e d p o t a t o c o ld s la w a n d h u s h p u p p ie s $ 2 . 7 8 TH U R S nA Y P o p c o r n S h r im p w / f r e n c h f r ie s , o r b a k e d p o t a t o c o ld s la w a n d h u s h p u p p ie s « 3 3 5 H O U R S O P E N : T u e s . - W e d .- T h u r s . 4 t o 9 p . m . I S ' ' ■ ■ l y ______________ C L O S E D M O N D A Y F r id a y a n d S a t u r d a y 4 t o i j * S u n d a ___________ . . . . . D .m . 1 2 N o o n T o 8 : 0 0 P . M . surio /iY S P E C IA L .piut nf PlniinHar & I P o p c o r n S h r im p C o m b in a t io n v / f r e n c h f r ie s o r b a k e d p o t a t o e 'O ld s la w a n d h u s h p u p p ie s ^ ^ H lG H v a a Y 6 0 1 c/KXK6V /U f ,cMORTi{ САЮ Ш А 'P H O H H IO H i < ) Ъ к - 5 Ш Money Management A vacation in the great outdoors doesn't have to cost an arm and a leg it you use your head~and a little financial savvy. According to the North Carolina Association ot CPAs, there are ways to combine your vacation with a tax-deductible activity, or to afford a better vacation by using your budget wisely. By law, the costs of a personal vacation are not tax deductible. However, provisions allow you to deduct certain travel expenses related to charitable activities or your business. Each year a number of taxpayers combine a vacation in an unusual setting with participation in scientific research expeditions sponsored by nonprofit organizations. Research ranges from excavating an Indian village in South Dakota, to studying ecological damage to caves in the Transylvanian Alps, to researching animal breeding habits on the Galapagos Islands. The cosls of such a vacation, including air tare, food and lodging, can be deducted as a contribution to the expedition’s tax exempt sponsor. The sponsors include the University Research Expeditions Program ot the U niversity of California lo Berkeley, and the Earlhw atch organization in Belmont. Massachusetts. If such a vacation seems too exotic, there are other ways to combine tax savings with an out­ door vacation. Try merging a vacation with a business Irip. If you travel to another part of the country for business, your round- trip travel costs are deductible. But once your work is finished, you can vacation in the area by camping, hiking or canoeing in nearby parks or resorts. When you plan an outdoor vacation, be sure lo consider all costs, CPAs say. In addition to travel, special equipment, food and lodging, don’l forget lo budget for such incidentals as film, trail and highway maps and park entry fees, Ihings often overlooked. Consider your cash flow situation wilh these trips. CPAs say some of Iheir clients have had to register as much as a year in advance tor some of the popular river trips. Vou may also be required to pay for part of the trip cost monlhs in advance, and the balance wilhin several weeks of beginning Ihe trip. Remember, in some cases you may forfeit your deposit it you cancel your trip after a certain dale.CPAs cannot lell you where to go on your vacation but they can certainly help you plan to pay tor it. Vacation spending can really add up, but by following sound financial rules you'll be able lo save and nol miss oul on any fun. University Of Nortli Carolina At Greensboro To Have Commencement Exercises May 15 about mountain plaiit life, attests to the warmth given off by a bait ot ramps. “ I usually eat a mess ot ramps in Ihe spring when I plan to do a little stream-fishing and it’s still a mite airish. You’d be sur­ prised how much heat they throw off.” But regardless ot purported heat and smell, neither the gourmet or gourmand should shy away from sampling this delicious plant. It may be eaten raw and is often used in salads, soups, stews, and the like. Nearly 2,000 men and women are scheduled to be awarded degrees on Sunday, May 15, during Ihc 91fI annual commencement of the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. The ceremonies will begin at 10:30 a.m. in Ihe Greensboro Coliseum. During the exercises, degrees at the undergraduate, m aster’s and doctoral levels will be awarded. Featured speaker will be Dr. Barbara S. Uehling, chancellor of the U niversity of M issouri at Columbia. Dr. Uehling heads the largest branch ot the four-campus Universily of Missouri syslem. Wilh more than 25,000 students, the Columbia campus has an operating budget of more than $200 million. Dr. Uehling’s topic for the com­ mencement address w ill be “ Trends: Mega, Mini and Mine.” Once again, Ihe graduating class at UNC-G Ihis spring will be among the larger ones in the University’s history. The total includes nearly 1,400 undergraduates and between 550 and 600 olhers who will receive graduate degrees. The latter figure includes 49 doctoral degrees. In addition, UNC-G will award two honorary doctoral degrees. Receiving the honorary degree of Doctor of Laws will be former United States Senator Sam J . Ervin of Morganton. The honorary degree of Doctor of Fine Arts will be conferred upon Edward T . Cone, a distinguished pianist and author who is a professor ot music at Princeton Universily. Commencement weekend ac­ tivilies at UNC-G will begin ■ on Friday morning. May 13, with the opening of registration in Alumni House. On Saturday, May 14, five Alumni Service Awards will be presented during the annual meeting of the UNC-G Alumni Association. The awards are made each year to recognize alumni who have made signiticahl contributions to the “ liberal arts ideal” by serving olhers. Approximately 550 alumni are expected lo attend the .annual meeting, which will be held at 10; 15 a.m. in Aycock Auditorium. Lois B. Haynes of Salisbury, president ot the alumni association, will preside at the meeting. Thereafter, an alumni, brunch-lunch will be held from 11:30 to 1 p.m. in Cone Ballroom of Ellio tt U niversity Cenler. During the meeting, alumni election results will be announced and a reporl of prospectus III, UNC- G’s $12 million major gifts cam­ paign, will be made. Alumni class reunions planned for this year include Ihe classes of 1923, 1928,19.33,1938,1943, 1948, 1953, 1953, 1963, 1968, 1973 and 1978. Class celebrations will be held on Friday eveing. May 13, on various locations on campus. Other spccial activities planned for Saturday, May 14, include: Master of Fine Arts degree thesis show and annual Student Exhibition, Wealherspoon Art Gallery, 2-6 p.m. ; senior recognition ceremony, School of Home Economics, Aycock Auditorium, 2 p.m .; commencement recital, Lawrence E . Hart Recital Hall, Brown Music Building, 3 p.m.; alumni mayhem. Faculty Center, 4- 9 p .m .; Chancellor’s reception honoring graduates, faculty, parents, alumni and friends, palion, Elliott University Cenler, 5-6 p.m.; special dinner tor graduates, parents and friends. Slate Dining Hall, 6:30 p.m. Fo llo w ing com m encem ent exercises on Sunday, May 15, will be: a recognition ceremony for graduates of the School of Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance, Greensboro Coliseum, 12:30 p.m .; a , reception honoring graduates ot the School ot Business and Economics, alumni, faculty and their families, rear courtyard, School of Business and Economics Building, 1:30-3 p.m .; special exercises honoring graduates of Ihe School of Nursing, 2:30 p.m., Aycock Auditorium; and a diploma ceremony for graduates of the School of Educalion in Cone Ballroom ot Elliott University Center, 2:.30 p.m. Others participating in the commencement program on Sun­ day morning, along with Dr. Uehling, will be: UNC-G Chancellor William E. Moran, E. S. (Jim) Melvin, chairman of the UNC-G Board of Trustees; Kendra Srhilh, a UNC-G senior from Greensboro, who has bt-en selected as senior class speaker, and Dr. Lois Edinger, vice chairman of the University’s Faculty Council, who will be Ihe presiding officer at the g r a d u a tin g c e r e m o n ie s . Representing UNC’s General Ad­ ministration in the program will be Dr. Raymond H. Dawson, vice president for academic affairs. Special music tor the occasion will be provided by the Unversity Chorale, under the direction ot Dr. Richard Cox, a professor of music, and by Ihe University Com­ mencement Band, under the direction of Dr. John R. Locke, an assislant professor of music. ASCS Office Is Reviewing All Flue-Cured Tobacco Farms The No Net Cost Tobacco Program Act of 1982 amended the flue-cured lobacco law lo provide that a person who owns a farm tor which Ihe total basic allotment of flue-cured tobacco exceeds one half ot the farm ’s tillable cropland shall forfeit the amount of allotment in excess of one half of the farm ’s tillable cropland. Tillable cropland is cropland (excluding orchards, vineyards, land devoted to trees, and land being prepared for non-agricultural uses) which the County ASC Committee determines can be planted to crops without unusual preparation or cultivation. Any required forfeiture of allotment and quota would lake place after December 1, 1983. If a farm is acquired after December 1, 1983, the excess allotment would not be subject lo forfeiture before July I ot the year after the year in which the farm is acquired. A person can prevent forfeiture of excess allotment by: 1. Selling the excess allotment and quota; 2. Purchasing additional tillable cropland lo combine with the farm ; or 3. Converting land to tillable cropland status. The Davie Counly ASCS Office is now in the process ot reviewing all flue-cured tobacco farms in the counly to determine if the farm has adequate tillable cropland. All farm owners will be receiving a letter in the near, future advising them whether or not forfeiture will be required.If you have any questions about the tillable cropland limitation, please contact the Davie County ASCS Office. ANTIQUE BRASS HEADBOARDS YOUR CHOICE TWIN SIZE $38 FULL SIZE ^ 48 Look For M a y J a m b o re e S ale C ircular C om inj O u t This W e e k en d For E x tra S pecial Prices A n d F ree G ifts Look to Arm strong for authentic Colonial charm and genuine value. 4 - p c . g r o u p dnmn. n w . 4-dfwwf d e l, fuO'qunT»^u* A R M S n C N id ^ FURMTURE ■ . ^ gURHETTS g ó M M Ü R Ñ K H ÍÑ G ^ i 124 Wiikesboro Street Mocksville, N.C. The rustic warmth ol Arm- slronfl’s "Northlletd Manor” is enriched by a honey pine finish with scalloped bases and brass'ball drawer pulls. Crafted ol all-wood products at a very affordable price. 634-5739 DAVIECOUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD.TIIURSDAY, MAY 5. 1983 - 3B Jeff Bales tutors Leslie Bennes through a new program geared toward assisting students in math and Endish studies. The program is free to the public and Is sponsored by the Davie County Public Library. New Program Aids Studentsin Math & English Students needing extra help with English and math can get assistance through a new tutoring program at the Davie County Public Library. There is no charge for sessions wilh the program’s main objective described as offering help to students needing assistance in Math and English. Jefferson D. (Je ff) Bales, beginning Monday, May 2nd, will conduct an adult and continuing education and tutoring program at the Davie County Public Library Monday through ITiursdays from 2 p.m. through 8:30 p.m., and other days and hours by appointment. His tutoring w ill include, ages elem entary through adult education. .In addition to the math and English tutoring, Mr. Bales will also offer the following services: (1) Assistance with the Graduate Equiv§lency Diploma (G .E.D .) and Scholastic Aptitude Test (S.A.T.) preparation; (2) ■ Resume preparation and advice for job seekers; and (3) assistance in locating library research material and feneral use of the library. Mr. Bales of 771 North Main St., Mocksville, is the son of Mona and the Late Douglas Bales of Mocksville. He was bom June 6, 1952, in Hannibal, Missouri. In 1974, he graduated with an AB degree in English at the University of North Carolina, Chapel H ill, with ' completed courses in financial a c c o u n tin g , m a n a g e m e n t accounting, advertising layout, MocksviUfi Discount Drug Monday - Friday.. . 9:30 to 6 _ Saturday 9:30 to 1 (m w iDMMflwnent/new Pharm adtt/ntw prioM) i ñ N . M a I n S t . M o c k i v lll « , N £ .•34-2111 ITEM ............LO /b V R A L.............................. PRICE . $ 8.49 2 1 & 2 8 .. .. ..8.49 100................ 21 & 28. 21 . ...............11.49 21........... 8.49 TOO............ 100................. . 29.79 100....... TOO.................. 1 3 .0 9 100................ .26.79 100._______ 100...............................D ia b in « e 2 5 0 m g ...V ..... . 26.99 100................. 100........ . 22.99 100 .________ 100................ 100...;...,. 24.89 21..................... 17.99 100......................... r<4lnipreu 1 mg...........'............ ..1 4 .9 9 100....................... Minlpress 2m g................. 20.98 ..2 8 .9 9100...........................Corgard 40m g....................... 100.........4 9 .9 9 100...............40.9¿ w -• 41.99100................... W h U-ÌÒÒ- In ^ i^ - p ^y^*"9es. .. 30........ 28................... Tha above items requite a physician's prescription. Other new low piices, Call and check with us. All prices reflect 10% cash discount | radio, television, and motion picture . writing. He was also a m.ember of the UNC Jazz Band. Continuing his studies at the University of North ■ Carolina at Charlotte in the College of Architecture he earned 14 credit hours in studio design, graphic design, photography, slide presentation, and videotape. During the year of .1975-76, he had summer session at the University of r.'orth Carolina studying the “Principles of Advertising and at Georgetov/n U niversity of Washington, D .C., studying special "Creative Writing’’. Continuing his education, he was at the Forsyth Technical Institute in Winston-Salem (June 1980-May 1982) taking a special course in accounting and electronic data processing. His business background shows experience in real estates sales for six months in 1973. He then re­ entered the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill to do library research and collation of material leading to the publication of the approved edition of Jam es B^nimore Cooper’s “ Pathfinder” , by Professor Richard Rust. Leaving his studies at UNC- Chapel H ill, Mr. Bales went to work for W XII-TV (Channel 12) in Winston-Salem. In this job he was responsible for the conduct of Channel 12 news department Instapol Opinion surveys, including .research and writing of survey questions and actual operation of electronic and telephone equipment. Several years ago Mr. Bales suffered > severe injuries in an automobile accident which left him with some physical disabilities. Since his serious injuries and disabilities Mr. Bales has pursued careers that involved direct sales with opening new accounts in an eight-county Eastern N.C. Division territory and eastern division traveling six states. For one year (9-1979-2-1980)....he was a licenses agent serving Richmond-Madison County District, Kentucky Agency. From May 1980 to August 1981, he served on the front desk of the Hyatt House, Winston-Salem, registering guests, preparing statistical occupancy and revenue reports for management. From Sep,.smber ■ 1980 to May 1982, he served as math and accounting tutor for the Forsyth Technical Institute of Winston- Salem. Jerusalem VFD To Have Barbecue Jerusalem Fire Department, Rt. 4, Mocksville, will sponsor their annual Texas barbecue and barbecue chicken, Saturday, May 7, from 10 a.m. until all is sold out. Take out boxes will be available. H nm B Im p rn u B w ith B In a n VDU c a n 't im p ro u B n n ... Naturally, you want to know that you're getting the best terms possible on a loan. Loans Up To ^25,000 F l e e t F i n a n c e n t e r 1111 Yadkinville Rd. Willow Oak Shopping Center Mocksville, N.C. Phone:634-3596 Enjoy T h e W oods In The S p rin g Spring is the time for the woodland lo come alive after a long, cold winler. To enjoy the woodland in the spring you must start at the very first signs of new life. Wildflowers such as eastern trout- lllly, hepallca and bloodrool will start the season off with very showy, dclicate flowers. As the season progresses, additional wildflowers will be noticed. Some of Ihc most spectacular arc Lady- Slipper orchids, trillium s, iris, Jack-in-thc-PuIpit and Mayapple. For a most memorable family outing Leon Harkins. Extension Auditions Scheduled For beai Comedy Auditions will he held Wed­ nesday, May 4 and Thursday, May 5, at 7 p.m. at the South Davic Jr. High School for the upcoming Comedy “ Look Who's Laughing" to be presented by the Davic County Arts Council June 2:1, 24 and 2!ith. Capt. James M. Latham, formerly ' of Mocksvlllc, was a member of the U.S. Air Force Crew chosen to return the bodies ot those fatally wounded 'during the bombing of the U.S. Embassy in Bcruit. The air. crew landed the C-141 transport at Bcriut in the midst of tight security and were on hand for the ccrnionies honoring those who had served at the Embassy. Capt. Latham is a pilot assigned to the 41st. Military Airlift Squadron al Charleston Air Force Base. Mr. and Mrs. Harmon I.alham of Mocksville are his parents. Health Watch | CHANGE YO UR L IF E S T Y L E Do you wanl lo be healthier? Live longer? You can, but you might have to change your lifestyle a little. Our lifestyle, the way we live, is the major obstacle to our living healthier, longer lives. According lo the North Carolina Medical Society, it is also a major force in rising medical costs.Simple things like fastening our seatbelts could save over 25,000 lives annually. And our other bad health habits are just as much to blame for needless deaths, illnesses and resulting medical care costs. We continue to eat too much, drink loo much, smoke loo much, and exercise loo little.Our knowledge and behavior are the keys to a longer life. For in­stance, if science could im ­ mediately elim inate cancer, it would add only one year to our average life expectancy. If smoking were stopped, it would add five y e a r s .The solution to our dilemma is contained in the term "preventive medicine.” This means learning how to avoid gelling sick in the first place rather than relying on treatment after the fact. According to growing numbers of doctors, little research being carried out today will make any difference in our life expectancy. But educating people on how to take care of themselves will. Sadly, though, the area which would be most productive is the most resistant to change. Com­ pounded over a period of a lifetime, our lifestyle is responsible for in­ creased rates of heart disease, cancer, and other debilitating conditions. But the. nation’s two biggest killers, heart disease and cancer could be dram atically curbed if we would only take care of ourselves. An ounce of prevenlion is slill worth a pound of cure. And it’s a l.ot less expensive. Left-Overs Economize by using left-over foods. “ Odds and ends” of meats and vegelables can become a stew or soup. Or combine them wilh other ingredients to make a new dish. Leftover vegetables can sometimes be put into a salad. A h o r s e fo c u s e s it s e y e b y c h a n g in g t h e a n g le o f it s h e a d , n o t b y c h a n g in g t h e s h a p e o f t h e le n s o f t h e e y e , a s h u m a n s d o . Forest Resources Specialist, suggests a field trip into the nearby woodland lo Identify wildP.mvprs. First obtain a Field 'Guide to Wildflowers andbecome familiar with not only the colors and shapes of the wildflowers but where they grow as well. Some wildflowers like the moist rich soil along streams while others prefer Ihe conditions of a pine or hardwood forest. Once you have examined the local area a more extensive outing could be to the mountains around Ihe last of April or first of May. At Ihis lime you will find late spring wildflowers blooming al the lower elevations and as you rise in elevation, the early spring flowers will be blooming.For these family outings be sure to lake your identification books, notebook and pencil for field notes and a camera. Your clothing should be adequale for a variety of weather conditions and should includc comfortable hiking boots, long pants, long-slecve shirt, sweater or jacket, a cap and rain gear. Be sure lo carry water and snacks as well. One major thing to keep in mind ' when taking small children on hikes and outings: go very slowly and do not try to walk too far. Explain things as you walk. Let the children help find the pictures of the wild­ flowers in the book. Make a list of all tho flowers you find and review il when you get home. One more suggestion: do not pick Ihe flowers but leave them for olhers to enjoy: MOTHER’S DAY SALE 1 9 x 1 3 B A M B O O T R A Y Beautifully, Handmade.Bamboo Serving Tray Large 19x13 Inch Size...A Thousand Uses... You'll Want Several...Buy A Set i)U A L WAVE"" M lcrow avei S3TStem Designed to Cook Froxn Top and Bottom SPEOAL » 2 8 8 * 2 P o w e r L e v e ls H ig h & L o w / D e f r o s t • S p a c io u s 1 4 C u . F t . M o d a lJ E T a o o O v e n C a v it y i2" dlOQOnol BLACK A WWrTE TV- 12XE2104T/VMo)död-ln convino harìOie. lena Cotto or Voniiio finijt\ W H I L E S U P P L I E S ^ 7 8 ■ A C T ^ WL A S T TIGHT MONEY! NO PROBLEM-WE FINANCE Mosel W)Ï45600B G E H E A V Y - D U T Y i' W A S H E R _ , - 2 c y c le s — re g u la r a n d p e rm a n o h l p re ss. 3 w a s h /rln s e le m p e ra tu re com bK N ations w ith e n e rg /*s a v in g c o ld w a te r s e te ctio n s . S o a k c y c le . G E H E A V Y - D U T Y , C O M M E n C J A L D R i W ith p e rm a n e n t p re s s a n d tim e a re g u la r c y c le s . 3 d ry in g o p iio n s in c lu d in g n o 'h e a l a ir-ffu f(. F orce« la m e n a m e l fin is h d ru m . R e m o va b le u p -(ro n t lin t fille r. BUY HERE! PAY HERE! R e g . $ 1 9 5 5 T o o l S e t I n c lu d e d w i t h p u r c h a s e o l ' T h is I J p r lg h t 4 position Dlal-A-Nap'*^, ruQ h e io M a d lu s tm o n i C leans d iffe re n t c a rp e l h e ig h ls . Powet Driven 12" boater I ar b ru s h ro ll g e ts d r >p d o w n d in . 660 cu. Inch top- loading disposable dust bag • B rillia nt headlight Model 1428 I. G E P O T S C R U B B E R ; D I S H W A S H E R 8 c y c le s in c lu d in g P o w e n S c y c le . 3>)evel w a s h a c tio n . S o u n d in s u la te d . T u ff T u b ^ in te rio r. ^A VE «20 A L L N E WWHISK ^ 4 8FULL PO W ER^^ EUREKA HAND VAC P o rta b le , v e is a lile a n d lig h lw e ig til W ith p o w e r lu l 3 .3 a m p m o lo i. la rg e c a p a c ity d is p o s a b le d u s t b a g . I in g e tlip o n / o lf s w itc h N o . 1 6 5 T IR E C O * Retail Division of Brad Ragan. Inc; 962 Yadkinville Road Phone: 634-6115 Manager— Rusty Carinichaei._________ 4 В — D A V IE COU N TY BNTERPRISE RHCORD. THURSDAY, MAY 5, 1983 Mem bers of the Davie High VICA Club brought home top awards during state competition. Winners include (I to r) David Scott, Kim Shanks, Dale Smith, John nti ■ ‘ ■Gunter, and Brandon Sagraves. N V IC A C lu b W ins H igh H onors T h e D avie High VICA club p.ir- tic ip a tc d and took high honors in the S ta te V IC A skills and leadership co n te sts held in Fayetteville, April 21-23.D a v ie had eight students to le in various skills and events. They were as fo llo u 's ; ‘ David Scott and Scott H o w a rd - Prepared Speech, Kim S h a n k s - Job Interview, Barry R iv e r s - A ir Cooled Gasoline participate l e a d e r s h i p Engines, Brandon Segraves and Arnold Weatherman - Carpentry, Dale Smith - Bricklaying, and John ■Gunter - Blocklaying. Out of the eight participating, Davie had tour (0 place in their respective events. They are David Scott - First in the stale in Prepared Speech, Kim Shanks - Fourth in the Slate in the Job Interview, Dale Smilh - Fourth in the state in bricklaying, and John Gjjnter - First in the state in Blocklaying.“ All eight sludenis represented Davie High well and we are most pleased with their performance,” staled Monte Taylor, class in- slructor. He added, “ It took a lot of hard work and preparations and each shouid be commended.”Accompanying the group' were Monle Taylor and James Nance, club advisors. Scientists A t U N C - C H D i s c o v e r Cases Of Mental Illness Can BeCaused By B-12 Deficiency F o lk -W a y s A n d Folk-Lore By Roger Whitener N o te : Childrens author Jesse J a s p e r Jackson of Bodenheimer D r iv e , Boone, and New York City d ie d A p ril 16, at age 75. He was a .w riter-ln -resid en ce at ASU. F o lk heroes, more often than not, h a v e tended to be men of action: w a r r io r s , explorers, athletes, and th e lik e . J e s s e Jackson was an exception. H e w a s a w riter of children’s books ra n d a teller of stories. C a ll him a regional folk hero. Of ■ A p p a la ch ia n State University, of B o o n e and Watauga County, of co u n tle ss sm all towns and public sc h o o ls throughout western North C a ro lin a and areas of the Piedmont. S c h o o l youngsters especially lo v e d and respected the man b e c a u se he loved and respected th e m , and because he spoke to them in a language they knew. - T h e y also liked Jesse Jackson , b e c a u s e he had been there, had k n o w n and written of the hardships o f th e young-of being abused by a d u lt s , bullied by their fellows,' b e tra y e d by those they loved. T h e y like him for honesty, and his s e n s e of humor, and his knack of a w a r d in g even the triv ia l his s e rio u s attention. A Hardin Park (B o o n e ) Elem entary School student o n c e flabergasted his teachers by a s k in g about the pigmentation of his h a n d s : “ M r. Jackson, why ar< h a n d s black on the .w h it e on the inside?” J e s s e ’s grave response: “ Why s o n , I guess 1 really don’t know. I ’ve t r ie d every way I know to make th e m black on both sides, but there d o e s n ’t seem to be much I can do a b o u t it .” Tow nspeople thought of Jesse in a s p e c ia l w ay. Perhaps in part b e c a u se of the good theings their c h ild re n said aobut him. They like h im a lso because he had not brought N e w Y o rk City ways to Boone and b e c a u se he took time to listen and to le a r n their w ays. T h e y like him because he’ could a p p re c ia te a good story and tell a T H E R E ’S NO B U S IN ESS L IK E S M A LL B U S IN ESS , are your outside and good one in reiurn, often slyly poking fun at familiar sterotypes, black and while. Two days into the ASU Christm as vacation last December, a downtown Boone resident hailed Jesse in a super­market and asked why he had not gone back to New York for the holidays. I“ That’s just what my wife was asking on the telephone,” he replied. “ Look here, woman, I said to her. I know why you want me there--to play errand boy for you. I want you to know that I ’ve come up in this world down here. This university is about to confer an honorary degree on me and here you are asking me to run errands. Get yourself a colored boy.” (All delivered with mock indignation and with a mischievous gleam of eye.)Academic colleagues and fellow writers also looked on Jesse as a very special person. They spoke with adm iration on his early determination to become a wtiter against heavy odds: fighting for public library privileges as a youth in Columbus, Ohio ( blacks were not granted library cards until 1962), writing in his off-hours from a variety of jobs, searching for someone to read and advise him on his writing attempts, waiting for the one break that might propel him on his way.ASU’s Tom McGowan (English) recalls Jesse’s account of that break:“ In his early 40’s,” said Jesse, “ I was working in the Columbus (ohip) post office and trying to make some progress on the manuscript for Call Me Charley. One day I drop You're center stage, in the spotlight, doing a juggling act for sixteen houre a day. W hen the curtain comes down, you w o rry about dropping a ball tomorrow. B u t the act is all yours and you want it that way. 560,000 small businesses like yo u rs incorporated during a tough 1982. There are 13 million of you now, providing 3 out of 5 new jobs. That's a cast of 50 million workers. Take a bow, small business. Encore! Sm all Busmess Week M ay 8-14 some letters and when I stopped to pick them up, I noticed the return address: Dr. Francis T . Utley, Dept, of English, Ohio State U niversity (also .an eminent folklorist, Jesse recalled). “ This is the man who could help me, I thought. After discussing the idea with my wife, I gave him a call and aasked if he would consider reading my manuscript. He said he would, and after reading it he in­ vited me to discuss it over lunch at the University Ciub. I thanked him bul told him the luncheon site might not be a good one since I was a black man. At lhat he insisted that I come, made useful suggestions aboul writing, and recommended lhal 1 attend sessions at the Breadloaf Writers’ Workshop. He also helped me to gel a publisher’s advance on my book.” Wilh the publication of Call Me Charley (Harper’s 1945) Jesse was on his way as w ilier, lecturer, and consultant. Five additional children’s books appeared, in­ cluding the award-winning Make A Joyful Noise Unto the Lord; The Life of Mahalia Jackson. Appalachian State U niversity capped his honors in the spring of 1982 by awarding him the honorary degree of doctor of humane letters. Mrs. Jackson was on hand for the ceremonies. She also was present al a community-campus memorial service last week when the establishment of a Jesse Jackson scholarship was announced. Jesse Jackson: Appalachian folk hero.Readers are invited lo send folk material lo Rogers Whitener, Ap­palachian Stale University, Boone, North Carolina 28608. M a k e a la b e l In a h u r r y f o r a n a lu m in u m f o il- w r a p p e d fr e e z e r p a c k a g e b y w r it in g o n a p la s t ic b a n d a g e . P e e l o f f t h e b a c k in g a n d a p p ly t o f o i l . E. Davie Homemakers Club Holds Meeting East Davie Homemakers Club met Wednesday, April 13, with Mrs. Polly Bailey, with eight members attending.Devotions were given by Mrs. Charlotte Smilh.During business, reports were given by Ihe following: Mrs. Ruby M cKnight, Grace and Ja rre l Parrish, Mrs. Joe Cheek, and Mrs. Grace Parrish. The club is now working on a quilt lhal will be sold later. Following the program, refresh­ ments consisting of chicken salad, pimento cheese sandwiches, ham biscuits, deviled eggs, pickles, coffee and tea were served. " E x u b e r a n c e is b e a u t y . " W ill ia m B la k e By David Williamson Scientists al the Universily of Norih Carolina at Chapel Hill nave found lhal al least a few cases of incapacitating mental illness arc caused by a hidden vitamin B-12 deficiency and can be treated successfully by supplements of that vitamin. Two middle-aged patients who have behaved bizarrely before being admitted to N. C. Memorial Hospilal bul showed none of the physical signs associaled with vitamin B-12 deficiency improved dramatically afler the Iherapy.Drs. Dwight L. Evans, Gail Edelsohn and Robert Golden described the cases and treatment in the Am erican Journal of Psychiatry in February. Respec­tively, Ihey are assistant professor of psychiatry al the UNC-CH School of Medicine, fellow in child psychiatry and chief resident in psychiatry al N C. Memorial Hospital.“ We don’t expect this problem lo affect a lot of people, bul it will affect a few people tremendously,” Golden said in an interview. “ It’s correctable, and il’s somelhing thgt doctors ought lo be aware of.” One of Ihe patients was a 47-year- old woman who had been seeing unidentified flying objects, who had lost eight pounds in two weeks and who believed lhal Jesus had commanded her lo board a space ship. The olher was a 58-year-old woman who had Ihreated her fam ily, who had experienced hallucialions, and who was con­ vinced lhat her physician was Henry Fonda. Laboratory blood studies and tests of neurologic function, which are traditionally relied on to un­ cover vitamin B-12 deficiency, among other conditions, all proved negative. Golden said. There was no scarcity of red blood cells, no misshapen cells and hence none of the lelllale anemia that medical textbooks link with insufficient vitamin B-12. Precise measurement of the vitamin levels in the patients’ blood- a lest usually, omitted after negative findings in the more common lests-showed those levels lo be abnormally low, however. Brain wave (EEG ) readings also Were somewhat unusual. After pinpointing the problem, the UNC-CH psychiatrists gave the women injections of vitamin B-12, and Iheir symptoms disapppeared. When lasi heard from, bolh were doing well on replacement Iherapy. Nol exeryone who suffers from psychiatric problems needs lo have a vitamin B-12 lest. Golden said.“ Somebody who is going Ihrough a difficult change in their life al home or al work and requires hospitalization lo belter cope' wilh lhal would be an unlikely didale,” he said. "Bul somebody who has grossly disordered behavior, hallucialions or delusions and symploms like confusion, disorientation and memory impairment, that suggest a physical cause, ought to have a Ihorough evaluation including being checked for vitam in B-12 deficiency.”Previously, scienlisls have spcculaled lhat the mental problems arose as the anemia resulting from too little vitamin B- 12 prevented the brain from getting enough oxygen," Golden said. The UNC-CH work appears to disprove lhat theory, because the palienis had no trace of anemia.Any relatively normal diet sup­plies enough vitamin B-12 for the body’s needs, he explained. Mosl of Ihe problems arise from poor ab­ sorption of the vitamin in the in- leslines, eilher because of a lack of a substance called intrinsic factor, which promotes absorption, or for olher reasons.Golden and his colleagues, who have since found a third victim of Ihe deficiency, stress that Ihey never recommend any form of vilpmin therapy for psychiatric conditions unless there is a specific reason for doing so. While several forms of mental illness result from vitamin and olher chemical deficiencies, they say, replacing substances in the body that don'l require replacing can have serious consequences. A r a is in d r o p p e d in a g la s s o f f r e s h c h a m p a g n e w i l l b o u n c e u p a n d d o w n c o n ­ t i n u a l l y f r o m t h e b o t t o m o f t h e g la s s t o t h e t o p . L u t h e r P o t t s Potts Qualifies As RHU Underwriter The Nalional Association of Heallh Underwriters announces lhal Luther B. Potts of Davie Realty and Insurance has qualified lo become a Registered Professional Disability Income and Health In­ surance Underwriter, “ RHU” .NAHU acknowledges that the altainment of peer and public . professional recognition is a desirable goal. Thai such recognition should be based on education, competency, integrity, stability and proficiency achieved Ihrough practical experience.Objectives of the RHU program are lo raise the professional stan­ dards and improve the methods involved in Ihe sale and service of disability income and health in­surance by giving special peer recognition lo those who, by passing suitable examinations and fulfilling prescribed slandards of per­formance and conduct have demonstrated a high level of competence and ethical fitness for Ihe sale and service of disability income and health insurance. Also, lo identify persons with acceptable knowledge of 'he principles and practices and related disciplines and laws governing and affecting Ihe sale and service of disability income and health insurance and to encourage a continuing program of education and professional development and professional activities. Caffeine Free Coca-Cola USA and Doctor Pepper plan to jump on the caffeine- free cola band-wagon, following consumers’ enthusiastic response to Pepsi’s caffeine-free regular and diet colas. G O L D - A - R A M A 2 0 - 7 5 % O F F ! B e a u t i f u l g o l d c h a i n s , c h a r m s , r i n g s , e a r r i n g s & m o r e r e d u c e d ! M O T H E R ’ S D A Y S U N D A Y , M A Y 8 t h L a y a i u a y n o w f o r M o t h e r ’ s D a y , G r a d u a t i o n s , W e d d i n g s , A n n i v e r s a r i e s , F a t h e r ’ s D a y , a n y s f j e c i a l o c c a s i o n ! $34,95 $22^5 7" Bracelet 14kt. GOLD HERRINGBONES 16" Chains ............$47.95 18" Chains ............$52.95 20" Chains ............$56.95 24" Chains ............$63.95 30" Chains ............$80.95 70.95 78.95 85.85 94.95 120.95 14kt. G O LD SERPENTINES 7"Bracelet___.......11.95 ... 16.95 15"Chains..............19.95 ... 34.95 16"Chains..............23.95 ... 35.95 18"Chains.............24.95 ... 37.95 20"Chains..............26.95 ... 40.95 24"Chains.............29.95 ... 47.95 $]g95 15" chain FREE 14kt.G 0LD Floating heart with purchase of any 14kt. gold chain 18" or longer These are middleweight chains SURPRISE HER WITH THE UNEXPECTED THIS MOTHER’^ DAY! 14kt. GOLD BEAD SALE! 3m m 5m m 7m m 2 9 c 99" S - ^ 4 9 — G R A D U A T I O N & . M O T H E R ’ S D A Y I D E A S — 14kt. Small Initials 14kl, Large Initials Heart w/diamond Ouaniities « limit 6 per person Oiler Ends May 7th 5 w ays to o%vn! • Cash • Layaway • Custom Charge • MasterCharge • V ISA 90 days same as cash with approved credit! Limited ...1 0 .. .. 2.50 .. 50.. . 19.95 .. 28..14 , 153..76.50 .. 69.....'3 5 0 Ою<тюпО $Q99 MktGOLD • SHELLS • SAND DOLLARS MkL GDLD • Italian horns • Pulleil hearts • Starfish.......0 ' dow ntow n M ocksville 634-5216 " Q u a l i t y , s e r v ic e & s e le c tio n s in c e i 9 6 0 " RING SIZING — DIAMOND SETTING — CHAINS REPAIRED — WATCH REI’AIK Look In Your MaUboxFor Our Mailers O r Come By & Pick Yours ____________U p ]____________ DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, THURSDAY, MAY 5, l ‘)83 - 5B R e g i n a A n n W h i t t a k e r B e c o m e s B r i d e O f R o b e r t l o u i s T a k a c s S a t u r d a y Miss Regina Ann Wliiltaker of Mocksville, N.C. and Robert Louis Takacs of Burwick, Pa. were united in marriage, Saturday, April 30th at 3 p.m. in a double ring ceremony at Blaise Baptist Church in Mocksville, N.C. Officiating this ceremony was the Reverend David Hyde, pastor. A program of wedding music was presented by Mr. and Mrs. John Chandler, vocalists with Mrs. Betty Angell and Mrs. Cindy Pope at the piano and organ. The bride, given in marriage by her parenis and escorted by her father wore a formal gown of candlelight bridal satin designed with puffed sleeves accented at the shoulder with silk flowers the color of the gown. The bodice was designed with a sweetheart neckline and was overlaid with beaded . alencon lace, scalloped at the neckline and waistline. The full skirt had an overlay of sheer net with re-embroidered lace and edged in shiffli embroidered scallops. Her waltz length veil of illusion was held by a bandeau of lace and silk flowers. She carried a bouquet of silk roses and babies’ breath. Miss Jennifer W hittaker of Mocksville was her sister’s maid of honor. Bridesm aids were M rs. Dana Biackwelder of Mocksville,• Mrs. Barbara Hendren of Linwood and Miss Kathy Takacs of Berwick, Pa., the bridegroom’s sister. They wore full skirts of mauve and an overblouse of ivory, trimmed with lace with which they used a ribbon sash the color of the skirts. They carried bouquets of silk flowers in spring colors. John Sheptak of Westchester, Pa. was best man. Ushers were David Sheep of Shelby, Alan Hendren of Linwood and Mitchell Whittaker of Manassas, Va., brother of the bride. ' The mother of the bride and bridegroom chose formal gowns of mauve. Their corsages were roses. • The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Roger L . Whittaker of Rt. 6, Mocksville, N.C. She is a graduate of Davie County High School and Davis Hospital School of Nursing in Statesville, N.C. She was .employed by Forsyth Memorial Hospital. . The bridegroom’s parents are Dr. and Mrs. Takacs of Berwick, Pa. He is a graduate of Berwick High School and Catawba College in Salisbury, N.C. His employed by Pennsylvania Power and Light Co. in Berwick, Pa. After a honeymoon cruise in the Caribbean, the couple will make their home in Berwick, Pa. RECEPTIO N ■ Im m ediately following the wedding, a reception hosted by the bride’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. Roger Whittaker was held in the fellowship present. BRID A L SHOWERS Friends and fam ily of the bridegroom-to-be hosted a miscellaneous shower for Miss Whitlaker on March 13 at the Country Club in Burwick, Pa. ................. Mrs. Betty Angell, Mrs. Relha Whitaker, Mrs. Judy Whit­ laker, Mrs. Shirley Rollins and Gaye Rollins hosted a miscellaneous shower for Miss Whitlaker al Blaise Baptist Church Fellowship building on April 8. Mrs. Francis Beck and Susan Woolen hosled a kitchen shower for Miss Whittaker al their home on April 16. Guests brought their favorite recipes and a gift for the kitchen. MRS. ROBERT LOUIS TAKACS ... was Regina Ann Whittaker hall of the church. The guests enjoyed wedding cake, nuts, mints, pickles, sandwiches, cheese pennys, wedding cookies and punch. Assisting in serving were Mrs. Judy W hittaker, M rs. Retha Whittaker, Mrs. Shirley Rollins and Gaye Rollins. REH EA RSA L DINNER The bridegroom's parents. Dr. and Mrs. Alfred Takacs hosted a dinner for the couple, wedding party and friends Friday evening, following the wedding rehearsal, at Ramada Inn in Clemmons. W HITE B IB L E CEREM ONY _ The BYW of Blae Baptist Church honored Regin Whittaker, bride-elect of Robert Ticacs with a white bible ceremonjfan Sunday night, April 14th in thetactuary of the church. Robert escjted Regina lo the alter where th' sat on a garden bench.Mrs. John Chandler ing, “ Bless This House” . The ch'ge to the bride and bridegroom 'as done by Ihe BYW and WMO Uies of the church, after wnich (vyn Angell presented the bride ai/hite bible. Following this • the bride and bridegroom-to-be werigreeted at Ihe front of the church jr the guests _ fellowship Hall. Mrs. Dana Biackwelder, Miss Robin Harrelson and Miss Rhonda Burrell honored Ihe bride-to-be with a miscellaneous shower April 15 in Slatesville. Attending were former classmates and the bride-to- be be’s mother. Mr. and Mrs. Roger Whittaker, the bride’s parents honored the couple, the bridegroom’s parents and oul of town guests with a cookout at their home, on April 30. Mrs. Edie Polls hosted a card parly .‘.pril 22, at her home. Refreshments were served lo ten guests. St. F r a n c i s O f Assisi C h u r c h N e w s Saturday evening April 30th, 19 young people were confirmed al St. Fran cis Catholic Church, Mocksville. Bishop Micháel Begley, Charlotte Diocese, officiated at the Mass and Confirmation Rites. The following were confirmed: Richard Percival, Aaron Percival, K erry Volk, Nichole Haithcox, Nicholas Slogick, E ric k Streit, David Streit, Mary Queen, Steven Leichner, Scott Kollins, Christopher Marshall, Sean Sprinkle, Mary Ann Meola, Joseph Meola, Shawn McGuire, Charles Ginther, Martha Anne Wright, Thomas Baldwin and William Rowland. Following services a covered dish dinner was served in the fellowship hall. Sunday morning May 1st 4 children received t& ir -First Holy Communion at Mass celebrated by the Pasior, Noel McSweeney. The following were honored: Michael Jenkins, Jonathon Sink, Stacey Streit and Kevin Queen. A reception was held following Mass in the W A T C H - A - R A M A N A M E B R A N D W A T C H E S U P T O > 0 % O F F C o m p l e t e w a t c h r e p a i r d e p a r t m e n t : c l e a n i n g , r e p a i r i n g , d ie w a t c h b a t t e r i e s & m o r e — W E S E R V I C E W H A T W E S E L L ! B ulova &. 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H a g e r t y J e w e l r y C l e a n e r Y o u r s F R E E f o r th e a s k in g ! .0 1 Iw . $ 0 9 9 Reg. $19.50 G e n u in e D ia irw n d E a rrin g s .02 tw. 4 Cl. Iw. Vt cl. tw. 14kt. gold I4kl. gold 14 cl. tw. Reg. $35 *88 Reg. $110 $ 1 6 0 Reg. $200 FREE! F R E E C O K E S lo E v e r y o n e l F R E E F L O W E R S to M o t h e r s ! Saturday, M ay 7th R I N G S A L E ! Opals Diamonds Genuine Stones Values to $225 $9995 1C& 14kt. Vedding Bands 20% Off S1996 up FREE! F R E E G i f t W r a p p i n g o n m o s t p u r c h a s e s . We make it easy! ^a/V >¿e ^€44ii'€4€/i/< dow ntow n M ocksville Phone 7 0 4 /6 3 4 -5 2 1 6 — C all for specie hours Shop Downtown Mocksville Apri 28th-May 7th O v e r $ 3 0 0 w o r t h o f G i f t C e r t i f i c a t e s t o b e g i v e n a w a y b ] D o w n t o w n l \ / l e r c h a n t s ! Booe-Surratt . Anita K. Booe and Raymond L. Surratt will be married Saturday, June 18, : 1983. Miss Booe is the daughter of the late Bobbie Booe and Mrs. Kariene Cope of Rt. 2, Mocksville. A 1975 graduate of Davle High School, Miss Booe is currently employed as Manager of Financial Reporting by Sav-A-Stop In c .. located in Jacksonville Florida. , M r. Surratt is the son of the late Archie Surratt and Mrs. Gladys Surratt of Rt. 1, Denton. A 1972 graduate of Denton High School, Mr. Surratt graduated from Elon College in 1976 and received his Master’s degree from Duke University in 1981. Upon finishing his appointment as pastor of the Farmington United Methodist Charge in June, he will be enrolled at the University of Florida to work toward a Ph.D.All friends and relatives of the couple are invited to the wedding ceremony at Farmington United Methodist Church at one o'clock in the afternoon, June 18th, 1983. Bumgarner ToPerform Saturday Noted guitarist Stan Bumgarner will perform locally May 2-7 during a series of concerts scheduled by the Davie County Arts Council. Bumgarner’s delightful informal performances include a mixture of solo pieces on the classical guitar and Renaissance lute. His concerts are highlighted with anecdotes, songs and a question and answer session. Bumgarner has scheduled a public concerl at 8 p.m. Saturday at the Davie County Public Library. During the week he will also per­ form at South Davie Junior High School, The M ocksville Rotary Club, Fran Ray Rest, Home, Autumn Care and the Mocksville based unit of the N.C. Department of Corrections. A native of western North Carolina, Stan Bumgarner received a degree in Music Education from Lenoir-Rhyne College and studied classical guitar at the North Carolina School of the Arts. A former CART-Affiliate Artist, Stan travels extensively in the eastern. United States, giving inform al performances and concerts. The 8 p.m. performance al Davie County Public Lib rary w ill culminate his week-long visit sponsored by the Davie A rls Council. T h e s ix - r o o m c o t t a g e in K e t n m e r e r , W y o m in g , w h ic h w a s t h e h o m e o f m e r c h a n d is in g p r in c e J .C . P e n n e y . I t 's a N a t io n a l H i s t o r ic L a n d m a r k a n d o p e n t o t h e p u b l ic e a c h s u m m e r . On Her Day... Sunday, May 8th Come Seé What Merle Norman Has For_Mother C h o c « A F r a r - » " “ f '® " ' M e r l e N o r m a n Baroque Koni,Araoe N e w R itu a l iine ' ^ndThe COME IN AND REGISTER For The Free Gifts To Be Given Away From The Downtown Merchants. m aa£ noRm m Tlie Place for llie Cu»tom Foce* IO O -aI^ . Main Street Mocksville 'K i' Phone: 634-3222___________ 6U - DAVIIiCOUNTY ENTliRPRISE RECORD, TMURSDAV, MAY S, 1983 Couple Celebrate Anniversary Mr. and Mrs. Buck Koster of Route 2, Mocksville, N.C. celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary, Sunday, April 17, with a reception in their honor at the Smith Grove Ruritan Club in Davie County. Hosts for the .special occasion were family members and friends. Guests called during the appointed hours from 2 p.m. until 4 p.ni^ B U m e B a p t i s t W o m e n H o n o r T h e C o p e ’s Mr. and Mrs. Mark A. Cope were given a miscellaneous shower by • : the Blaise Baptist Young Women.The shower was held in the Blaise . Baptist Church Fellowship' Hall on - April 22nd, from 7-9 p.m.Refreshments consisting of cake squares, nuts, mints, and punch■ were served. Centerpieces of fresh spring flowers were used on the' refreshment and gift tables. Special guests were M ark's ■ mother, Mrs. Willie Cope, and his sisters and sister-in-laws. Mrs. Cope is the former Teresa Alkinson of Winston-Salem. The Copes, who reside on Rt. 6, Mocksville, were married March 31st. N ew Arrívals Mr. and Mrs. David B . Potts of Roule 3, Advance, N.C. announce the birth of a daughter, Natalie Greigh, born Monday, April 25, at. Davie County Hospital.The baby weighed 6 lbs. 7 ozs. and was 19>A inches in length. Maternal grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. Franklin N. Bailey. Paternal grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. Monroe B . Potts. Mr. and Mrs. Brian Scott Nichols of Mocksville, N.C. 'announce the birth of a son, Bradley James, borri Sunday, April 24, at Davie County Hospital.The baby weighed 9 lbs. and was 21 inches in length.Maternal grandmother is Mrs. Frances Varner.Paternal grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. James Nichols.The couple have one other child, a son, Brian Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Jim m y Bledsoe of Route 5, Mocksville, N.C. announce . the birth of a son, Michael Chan- nings, born Thursday, April 28, 1983 at Davie County Hospital. The baby weighed 8 lbs. 2 ozs. and was 21>/ii inches in length. Maternal grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Potts. Paternal grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. Buddy Bledsoe. F r i e n ^ O f T h e P u b l i c L i b r a r y M e e t The initial meeting of the Friends ;of the Davie County Public Library ■will be held Monday,May 9, at 7:30 :p.m. in the library’s multipurpose room.Mrs. Audrey Madans, of the 'Rowan County Friends, will share what it means to be Friend of the ; Library and what Friends can do.Anyone interested in being a 'Friend of the Library or learning more about the organization is ' invited to attend. Justine Wayne McCiamrock celebrated his birthday, Saturday April 2nd, with 2 parties: one at Davie Dance Academy and Playschool and the other at his home on Salisbury St. A clown cake : and the trimmings were served. His sister Jennell and parents Jerry and Jennifer joined in the celebration, with grandparents. Calvin and I Ruby McCiamrock, cousins anil friends. Justin received many nice gifts which he thankseveryone for. Justin received a special plione call from grandparents in Minnesota, R o g e r a n d A l ic e G r a b b e r t . NCEOPNews The Davie County Association of Educational Office Personnel met Thursday night, April 21 at Fisherman’s Quarters in Mocksville for dinner and social get-to-gether. New officers were appointed for the new year; Pat Carson, President; Hazel Smoot, Vice- president and Audrey Freeman, Secretary and Treasurer. Oihers will hold their same offices for another year. During the past year each member from the Davie County Association of Educational Office Personnel had a secret pal. It was at this meeting the secret pals were revealed and new names drawn for the new year.Date for the June meeting will be announced later. M a r c e l l e B r o w n H o n o r e d F r i d a y Miss Marcelle Brown, bride-elect of Guy Cornatzer, Jr. was honored with a miscellaneous bridal shower, Friday, April 29, at the home of Mrs. Louise Blackwood at her home in Cooleemee, N.C. Assisting Mrs. Blackwood as co-hostess was Mrs. Janie Dyson. Upon arrival, the honoree was presented with a white silk rose corsage. The hostess gift was a SpaceSaver can opener. Special guests included the bride’s mother, Mrs. Harriet Brown and her grandmother, Mrs. Thelma Trent. Celebrate 50th Aniiversary The Rev. and Mrs. Ivan W. Ijames of Route 1, Ktksville, N.C. celebrated vith a reception in their sked by many, how they their 50th wedding anniversary Sunday, April 24 honor at the Clement Grove Fellowship Hall. When had lived with each other for 50 years, Mr. Ijame^eply was, “ It only takes one day at a time; and before you know it, those (Jfs grow into many good years.” The reception was catered by Mrs. Ruth Hkaday of Advance, N.C. Davie Jazz Ensemble To Perfort In Raleigh The Davie High School Jazz Ensemble will be performing on the Capitol Square in Raleigh, Friday, May 6 al 1 p.m.Students statewide w ill be singing, dancing, and playing their musical instruments on Capitol Square each day from 11:30 a.m. unlil 2 p.m. through May 13. The two-week performances are part of this year’s Capitol Square Arts Festival sponsored each year by the Department of Public Instruction’s Division Cultural Arts.Some ■ school choruses, bands, and dancg groups from across the state wilbarticipate in this year’s feslivitie the festival is coor­dinated a-h year by the Division in order to'ive school students an opportunlr to gain experience in the perfoning arts.For me information, contact Wandra blk. Division of Cultural Arls, Stffi Department of Public Instructi at 919-733-7467. . Celebrate Golden Anniversary Mr. and Mrs. William T. Spencer of 181 Oak Street, Mocksville, N.C. celebrated their golden wedding anniversary, Sunday, /¿ ril 24, with a reception in their honor at the First United Methodist Church feUowship building. Hosts were the couple’s children and their families: Mr. and Mrs Mack Foster, (Betty); Mr. and Mrs. Bobby Mott, (M arilyn), and daughter Eugenia ; Mr. and Mrs. Larry Spencer and sons, Scott and Brandon aU of Mocksville, N.C. and Terry Spencer and daughter, Michelle of Oiarlotte N.C. The Spencers werq married fifty years ago, April 23,1933 in Crossville, Tenn. Out of town guests attending were Mrs. Lloyd Dayton, Mrs. Clyde Roberts, sisters of Mrs. Spencer; Mrs. Carolyn Livesay and Mr. and Mrs Oliver Hughes of Crossville,'Tenn.; Mr. and Mrs. John Donnelly, Mrs. Edwin Donnelly of CrossvUle, Tenn.; and Mrs. Peggy McDermott, of Boston, Mass. Tarheel K it c h e n Around and About j a t t e n d s ” DAV NATIONAL D ISTRICT M EETIN G IN FLO RIDA Charlie Howell, of Mocksville, N.C. spent the weekend in Jacksonville, Florida, going especially to attend the Disabled American Veterans« National Fifth District Meeting, held there at St. John’s Place. Sponsors were Florida Chapter No. 26 and Auxiliary. By Cynthia J. Higgins Trying lo lose those few extra pounds that were added during the winter? You are not by yourself! This weekly, monthly or yearly ritual is one of the most talked about. subjects not only among friends but in every form of media. There are diets or gadgets for everyone ac­cording to many so-called experts. Weight reduction is a serious matter if your health is important to you. Overweight and obesity have been linked to serious health problems but'the melhod of dieting you choose may also be of serious consequence lo your general health. Perhaps you have asked some of these questions: Question: Should I have guidance from a doctor when 1 diet?Answer; Yes, especially if you plan to lose more lhan a few extra pounds. Weight changes can be stressful lo the body and a doctor can make recommendations and keep tabs on your condition.Question: What aboul diets lhat claim results in days? Answer; Some fad diets may be harmless, yel oihers may lead to malnutrition if followed for any length of lime. Fad diets are always on the best-seller list. The reason these miracle-promising diets slay on the list is lhat none of them work in the long-run for the vast majority of people. Fad diets can be very harmful causing fatigue, a break­down of muscle tissue, ketosis, increased serum cholesterol, nausea, hair loss, dry skin, elec­ trolyte imbalance which could lead lo heart abnormalities, diarrhea, abdominal cramps, irritability, plus a host of other problems. Question; Since bread and other carbohydrates are high in calories, should I cut them out of my diet? Answer; Ail diets should be “ balanced” in order to maintain bodily functions. Carbohydrates provide energy and nutrients thal are essetial. Foods conlaining large amlnls of sugar (which are also carb(ydrates) provide mostly food enerr and contain few or very lillle othenutrienls. In olher words they conjin lots of calories and nothing e^. Bread is a rich source of vitamii, minerals and fiber, and should beilen in a diet, but beware of Ihe am int.,Qucstid Can I skip a meal on my diet?' ! Answer^Skipping meals doesn’t always wfk. For instance, if you skip bre^ast, you probably will lend to a more for lunch. Eat somethin) al ail mealtimes, but choose fols low in calories, high in nutrientslnd control the amounts.Questid Whal is a balanced diet? AnswerA balanced diet contains ail of the lajor nutrients including: waler, ca|ohydrates, protein, fats, vilam insand m inerals. Theseeed lo be included in a Should I lake vitamins nutrients diet daily Questlo while I ’min a diet?Answer The value of vitaminsupplem, _ _ ________________ subject, lost doctors will agree lhat fooois the best source ' of vilamins.there are al least 50. nutrients hat are known to be essential id fewer lhan 50 percent of them in be included in sup- piementsiVhile a moderate intake of vitami tablets probably won’t harm youiuge doses of vitamins A and D cane harmful because they are store<n the body. There’s just no substltion for the complex makeup al balance Mother Nature has in hefoods. Questlol Isn’t a starvation diet Ihe answi? Answcr¡Definitely not! If you starve yfrseif, you have less energy anare more depressed and irritable, fou will start to lose F o s t e r ’s J e w e le r s 171 N . M ain Street Announces R e m o d e lin g S ale N O W IN M Ó G R E S S H ere’s how C hiropractic teats A t h le t ic In ju rie s M ost athletes have come to recognize the hazards involved in th e ir activities, and are among the m ost regular patients o f chiropractic. It is im portant to consult your d octo r of chiropractic regularly, regardless o f your type o f recreational activKy. If you are a parent, it is im portant to make certain your child does n ot suffer a spinal problem . Your doctor o f chiropractic w ill detect and correct subluxations, how ever incurred, and w ill arrest o r prevent problems which they would produce. C hiropractic tre a t­ m ents can n ot only re-establish nerve function, but w ill relax you as w ell. W ith im proved health, your enjoym ent o f your recreational activity w ill be ^ enhanced. Dr. Ramey Keip 501 Wilkesboro Í. Mocksville, N.C* •PuseoU'J in Iho intotc‘ l i t lu 'lti b ojith I)) >our d iu lu t ot ih iio ji'J (he AnuTicjn C riifuiifJU 'i A>'>iki jr d Iht* Nortti CaroliiiJ Chifopt.ucii D a lly O f f ic e H o u i ^ y A p p o i n t m e n t 634-252____________________ muscle tissue rather than fat, plus Ihere is a tendency to pul weight back on quickly as soon as the diet is over. Very importantly, you do nol learn anylhing about proper eating habits.Question: Do I have to exercise? Answer; Eating less is the tried and proven method of losing weight. By cutting out 500 calories a day for seven days, you’ll lose 3500 calories, or ohe pound a week. Bul if you increase your physical activity you will burn up calories that would otherwise be stored. Exercise also improves the functioning of your vital organs.Question: What is'the best way to ' lose weight? Answer; That queslion hasn’t been answered yet, however, certain practices do seem to work. 1. Follow a balanced diet in­cluding foods from the milk, fruit■ and vegelable, meal and bread groups.2. Control the size and amounts of servings.3. Avoid high caloric foods such as fried foods, sauces, sweets, and gravies.4. Take a look al what you eat, when you eat il, and how it is prepared. Perhaps there are pat­ terns that might be causing you to add extra pounds. For instance, frying a lot of foods, or eating more lhan one serving, or eating when watching TV or cleaning up what Ihe children don’l eat or buying a bar of candy every time you visit a store. 5. A safe weight loss is one to two pounds a week. Gradual loss is more likely to stay off. '■ 6. Select low calorie snacks lhal contain nutrients also. 7. Input must equal output. The energy consumed as food must be equal lo - the energy needed lo maintain the body and for physical activity. If you consume more than is needed, the extra will be stored. If you consume less calories lhan is needed, you will lose weight. 8. Most of all, be realistic! If you have nol been exercising, don’l start wllh a strenuous program lhat you will slop in a matter of days. If you . have been consuming 3000 calories, jumping down lo an 800 calorie diet will be a shock to you. Be serious about dieting and exercise but start with a sensible realistic program. 9. Find a friend who is also dieting lhal can lend support in your “weak” moments and share tips along Ihe way. 10. Don’t let anyone talk you inlo breaking your diet. The calories lhat you consume arc nol going on Iheir hips. Enjoy the Flovors of Carolina as you try this special low-calorie recipe. i Delicious Pangburn’s Candy 10 % o " G lir WRAPPED FREE! Good Selection of Mother’s Day cards and Wrapping Paper Register to win 1 of 3 *100 Gift Certificates Sponsored by D.T.M. Saturday, May 7th Only 1 Liter Coke & Diet Coke ’1.19 Less Coupon .25 YOUR FINAL COST . 9 4 F R E E S A M P L E & C O U P O N MOCKSVILLE DISCOUNT DRUG 634-2111129 N. Main St.Mocksviile, N.C. .. _ , _____ JERRY ALLEN HAUSER ... was Tammy Mechele Hunt Hunt-Hauser Vows Spoken Tammy Mechele Hunt of East ■ Bend became the bride of Dr. Jerry Allen Hauser of King on May 1 in a ceremony at Saint Leo’s Catholic Church. F r. Prank Cancro was the officiating minister at the wedding. Miss Hunt is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. David C. Hunt of East Bend. She is a graduate of Forbush High School and David Hospital School of Nursing, and is employed at Forsylh Memorial Hospital. D r. Hauser is the son of M r. and Mrs. Donald A. Hauser of King. He is a graduate of South Stokes High School, Wake Forest University and U.N.C. School of Dentistry with a D.D.S. degree in 1982. He has established a private practice of general dentistry in Advance.The bride was given in marriage by her father, David C. Hunt. Her gown was floor length ivory chiffon with chapel length train and spaghetti straps. The gown was covered with a jacket of schiffli lace with sheer chiffon long sleeves and lace covered buttons from neck to wrist in the back. The jacket has a high neckline accented with pleated ichiffon around the neckline and cuffs of the sleeves with a matching ivory satin ribbon about the waist. The veil consists of a wreath of ivory silk flowers and fingertip ' lengih of ivory illusion. Mrs. Sherry H. Matthews of East Bend, and sisler of Ihe bride, wasB e n d j ^ a n d ^ i s l e i ^ o M h ^ r i d e j v a s ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ SUPER P A K ' ^ O ^ O IO R PORTRAIT SPECIAL ------------2 6 P o r t r a i t s I n L i v i n g C o lo r 2 -8x10 NOW ONLY . .VVhen « M IV $2.00^ Photographed D X I ^ B a la n c e o n | i | | . 9 5 D e liv e r y 20- W allets (p lu s ta x i (11x14 Also Available) » All Ages & Groups Welcome * Gene Ingram fR i. & S atu rd a y PROFESSIONAL PHOTOGRAPHER DATES: MAY 6-7 w it^ E A V A O A B L E ^ A.M.-5:00 P.M. . J f ^ W e u s e Exclusive Only At . . . B.C. Moore C o u r t S q u a r e M o c k s v ille , N £ . 2 7 0 2 8 DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RUCORD, THUKSDAY, MAY 5. 1983 7H Tickets On Sale For Symphony possible. Lei us all work logelher lo make Ihis a successful drive so lhal we may look forward lo a mosl enjoyable concerl season.” .says ...................... - .........................vllle. MRS. JESSE RAY FALKNER II ... was Dianne Elizabeth Snipes Snipes-Falkner Vows Spoken matron of honor. She wore a floor length emerald green chiffon gown w ith scooped front and back necklines, and with a matching satin ribbon around the waist. Bridesmaids were as follows: Lisa Hauser, sister of the bridegroom from King; Sandra Hutchens, niece of the bride from Boonvilie; Karen Shumate of East Bend; Christina Ford from Black Mountain and Carla Sutton from King. Their gowns were identical to that of the matron of honor. Michael Jenkins was organist at Ihe ceremony and soloist was Terry Hunt, the bride’s brother. Donald A. Hauser of King served as best man to his son. Ushers were Tim Hall and Dr. Mark Johnson, both of King; Dr. Frank Jones of Rutherfordton; Henry Fowler of Walnut Cove and Rick Francis of Boykins, Va. A reception was given the couple by the bride’s aunt, Lucille Hunt, on the lawn of St. Leo’s Catholic Church. The couple left for a wedding trip to Charleston, S.C. When they return home, they plan lo live in ' Clemmons. REH EA R SA L DINNER A rehearsal dinner was held in honor of the couple by the parents of Ihe bridegroom at their home in King on Saturday, April 30. Miss Dianne Elizabeth Snipes was married to Jesse Ray Falkner, II at a 3 o’clock wedding on Salurday, April SOth. The marriage was performed in the gardens of the Campbell House at Southern Pines, North Carolina by the Rev. W. Edward Privetle. Th^ bride is Ihe daughter of Mr. and' Mrs. Allen V. Snipes of Cooleemee, North Carolina. Her grandparents are lyirs. Richard R . Everhardt of Cooleemee and the lale Mr. Everhardt; and Mrs. G. Phil Johnson of Erw in, N.C. and the late Cecil Snipes.' Mr. Faulkner is the son of Mrs. Ea rl Hicks and the late Jesse Ray, Faulkner of Southern Pines. His, grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. Joe C. Hodges of Statesboro, Georgia and Mrs. B .F . Faulkner of Win- sterville, N.C. and the late Mr. Faulkner. Great grandparents are Mrs. Lillie Blackburn of Statesboro, Georgia and the late Mr. F.G . Blackburn.Pre-nuptial music by the flute, violin, and cello included selections from Bach; Handel, and Pepusch. Other renditions by the brass duo were heard by the wedding guests. For the processional P u rcell’s Trumpet Voluntary iri D Major was rendered and for the recessional Purcell’s Trumpet Tune in D Major was heard. Mrs. Faulkner wore an ivory gown of organza over taffeta, featuring a Queen Anne neckline and fitted bodice edged in seed pearls and chantilly lace. Her fingertip veil was held by a mat­ ching ivory headpiece edged in Chantilly lace. She carried a han­ dkerchief used by her maternal grandmother in'her wedding. The necklace of cultured pearls worn by the bride was a gift of Mr. Faulkner’s father to his mother on Iheir wedding day. Her bouquet was of daisies, roses and carnations. Miss Mary Sue Faulkner, the bridegroom’s sister, was maid of honor. The bridesmaids were; Miss Susan Spargo of Winston-Salem,, Miss Tam ra Hendricks of Mocksville, Miss Beth King of Southern Pines, M rs. D arrell Donahue of Durham, and Miss Jamie S co tt, cousin o f the bride of Cooleemee. ine ai- lendants wore white eyelet long sleeve blouses with pink matte taffeta skirls and blue chiffon cummerbunds. They carried long stemmed daisies. M r. Faulkner’s best man was W. Earl (Buzz) Hicks of Soulhern Pines. The ushers were: Edw ard Hubbard of Raleigh, Kennelh K. Cameron of Southern Pines, John A. McPhaul, III of Chapel Hill, Richard W. Snipes of Myrtle Beach and David A. Snipes of Cooleemee, brothers of Ihe bride. Mrs. Sledman Meares of Southern Pines atlended the register. Mrs. Faulkner was graduated from Davie High School and San­ dhills Community College wilh an AA in accounting. Mr. Faulkner was graduated from Pinecrest High School and attended Eastern Carolina Universily. The couple are owners of the Tobacco Shed in Southern Pines. Also, Mr. Faulkner is manager of Farm er’s Burley Tobacco Warehouse in West Jef­ ferson and is employed wilh Liberty Tobacco Warehouse in Wilson. After a wedding trip loKiawah Island, the couple will be al home on 140 North May Street in Southern Pines. RECEPTIO N A reception immediately followed Ihe wedding at 104 Glenwood Trail, Soulhern Pines. A menu consisting of King Crab Dip wilh Triscuits, Aniipaslo tray, ham buscuits, egg salad mold, mixed nuts, mints and apricot punch in addition to the wedding cake was served to the guesis. Assisting in serving were: Mrs. William R . Gales, J r., Mrs. James Scolt, of Cooleemee,N.C. Mrs. William P. Campbell of Hudson, I N.C..'cousins of tfie bride and Mrs. I.H . Pope Jr. and Miss Robin Pope. Mr. and Mrs. Billy R . Kelly, Mr. and Mrs. David Allred, Mr. and Mrs. Eugene Brauner greeted the guests. Mr. and Mrs. Ezra D; Quesenberry said Ihe good-byes. LUNCHEON A luncheon lo honor the bride- elect, Betsy Snipes was given by Mrs. Nancy Thompson at The Manor in Pinehurst on April 28th. Guests included friends of Miss Snipes and mothers of the bridal couple, Mrs. Allen Snipes and Mrs. W. Ea rl Hicks. BRIDESM AIDS LUNCHEON A bridesmaid’s luncheon was given for Betsy Snipes by Mrs. Virginia Everhardt, grandmother of the bride, and Mrs. John P . Spargo of Cooleemee at The Greenhouse in Pinehurst. A menu of broccoli and ham quiche, fruit ambrosia and blossom cooler were served to the guests. Miss Snipes chose this time to. give her at­ tendants a gift of pearl earrings. Guests included members of the wedding party and the mothers of Ihe bridal couple, Mrs. Allen Snipes, and Mrs. W. Earl (Buzz) Hicks. REH EA R SA L DIN NER On Friday evening April 29th at 8:30 Mr. and Mrs. W. Earl Hicks entertained at their home, 104 Glenwood Trail, Southern- Pines with a rehearsal dinner honoring Miss Snipes and Mr. Faulkner. The after rehearsal affair was attended by the wedding party, fam ily members and out of town guests. The buffet dinner was prepared and served to the fifty guests by Mrs. Ann Bennett and Mrs. Edna Harrington. A special toast to the couple was given by Buzz Hicks. The tickel sale and membership drive for the 1983-84 North Carolina Symphony concerl season is well underway in Davie County. The goal is lo be able lo offer Ihe people of Davie Counly a fine concert by Ihe Chamber Orchestra and a week’s residency by Ihe Brass Quintet in Ihe schools which will include an evening concerl. The fourth, fifth and sixth grades throughout Ihe county will enjoy a concerl by the Chamber Orchestra. “ Your cooperation, through Ihe purchase of tickets and con­ tributions, mjikes all of this R e c i t a l H e l d A t F i r s t B a p t i s t C h u r c h Miss Louise Stroud will present students from her piano class in a spring recital on Tuesday evening, May 10th at 7:30 p.m. at Ihe Firsl Baptist Church.The program will consist of piano solos, ducts and a trio. Students participating will be; Joanna Anderson, Jennifer Cooper, Marsha Graves, Renee Snow, Amy Badgett, Jennifer Allon, Karen James, Angie Newsome, Bracken Jarvis, Tracy Angeil, Dina Wells, Barbie Em ly, Joyce Boger, Jayne Nance, Andrea McBride, Sandy Slroud, Jody Everett, Matthew Webb and Tommy Browder. Tommy will play Mendelssohn's Rondo Capriccioso, Op. 14, which won for him first place in the slale in Ihe N.C. Federation ot Women’s Clubs Arts Council, The public is cordially invited. S p r i n g R e c i t a l H e l d A spring recital was held Friday, April 29, al Fulton Methodist Church for the piano students of Mrs. Jane Holder.Solos and duels were presented by Amy Ridenhour, Carin Bullins, Lanae Hill, Jennifer Seals, Chris and Marlha Bracken, Adam and Kelly Germek, Ashley Prevalle, Shelly Blackburn, Wendy and Traci Tucker, Verla and Slephanie Maus, Kimberly Moser, Lisa Lanier, April and Audra Holder, Andrea Walser and Nicole Marlin.Refreshments were served following the recital. Miss Louise Slroud of Mocksvil N a t i o n a l M u s i c W e e k O b s e r v e d in observance of National Music Week, May 1-8, the Thursday Morning Music Club of Winslon- Salem presented students from Ihe Junior Federated Music Clubs in concerl al Ihe Woman's CLUB IN Winslon-Salem on Sunday af­ lernoon. The program consisted of numbers by the students of teachers belonging to Ihe Federation, each teacher presenting one sludent. Representing Miss Louise SIroud’s Melody Junior Music Club was Tommy Browder, who played “ Rondo Capriccioso,” Op. 14, by Felix Mendelssohn, which won for him firsl place in Ihe state in Ihe N.C. Federation of Women’s Clubs Arts festival held at Salem College in March.A reception for siudents and guests followed the program. Education Offcials Attend National Session The annual convenlion of Ihe National School Boards Associalion was held in San Francisco during Ihe week of April 22-26. A large number of School Board Members and Superintendents from North Carolina attended the informative sessions including Dr. Joe Sinclair, Superintendent; Mr. Jack Ward, Associate Suporintendent; and several board members from Davie Counly Numerous clinics and work sessions were held with various delegations from throughout the Uniled Slates. Among the featured speakers were Dr. Henry Kissinger, D r. Zacharie Clements, Albert Shanker, Thomas Donohue, and Irvin R. Levine. The annual meelings are held-at differenl locations throughout the United Slates and provide valuable learning. sessions for both school board members and ad- minislrators S a t u r d a y O n l y S A L E 2 0 % . Everything In The Store ONE TABLE North Main Street Mocksville, N.C. reg. 6.99 Assorted Styles and Colors Canvas L-1 ' .......''V - ' -....... A. NAVY or NATURAL CANVAS reg. 12.95 LADIES 5-10 A. Navy or natural canvas B. White or camel HOURS; 10 to 9 B. M on.-Sat. 1 •6 Sun. i 196 Wilkesboro Street r'ocksville, N.C.S h o e S h o w 8В - DAVIECOUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD,THURSDAY, MAY 5,1983 PRICES GOOD THROUGH MAY 4th, 5th, 6th, 1983 ONLY! iîM o t h w ’s ‘D a y s m n s Mufiñé \ .. »Í s Murine lo o lh **»riltlffd MURINE OR MURINE PLUS .5 0Z. $119 REYNOLDS WRAP 25 SQ. FT. 2 /9 9 ’ ^ NOXEMA 14 OZ. $J99 N 1 © ,5Ч; VI€RfN.r. C0t1D<n0rfl I © ¿ 5НЖ Ю 0 IM „ ^ЧП ei -1 8 OZ.- S w is s îb n i? u !ü . 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REGULAR PRICE $ 2 . 8 8 »177 Soft, Pleasing Light GE Soft-White Bulbs 4 bulb package « |9 9 ^0 8.100 Vi ATT POTTED PLANTS LIVE LARGE SELECTION R cgubr Pricc $2.99 cacti 2 /» 4 » 1 0 " CENTRUM 130 REGULARPRICE $8.99 OFFICIAL MULTIVITAMIN OF THE 1984 WINTER OLYMPICS. 99 Quaker Stale Motor o lí 12 quart» for * 9 ” Less mall-ln mfg. rebate -*2 *° EL 326 SHARP SOLAR CALCULATOR WALLET SIZE YOUR FINAL C O STAFTER REBATE FOR 12 QUARTS 1 reb ate, ^ c r k o u s c K o \< i^ $699 SNACKS Potato Chips REGULAR т ш т BUFFERIN TABLETS lOO's $£28 PRICE BUY 1 - GET 1 FREE 89* SURE SOLID 2 0Z. 67$ 1 DIAL SOAP 3 /8 7 * HANGING BASKETS GIVE MOM A BEAUTIFUL LIVE PLANT FOR ЛЮТНЕР'ЗОАУ! $ 3 9 9 HERSHEY’S CANDY BARS KIT KAT, ROLO, HERSHEV BAR, V^TC H A M A C A LLIT REESES PIECES 00 COVER GIRL LIQUID MAKE-UP OR PRESSED POWDER $178 — R E G U L A R P R IC E $ 2.5 7 CHARMIN BATHROOM TISSUE n o t 4 P K .99* KLEENEX 6 Г m / TAMPAX 40's $238 PRICE INCLUDES .35 OFF LABEL CtfipALSASSOQNl PROFESSIONAL HEAT CURLING IRON REGULAR PRICE $10.99 ITEM NO. 8471 9PIEC E KITCHEN TOOL SET $ 3 9 9 REGULAR PRICE $5.99 ITEM NO.CMX-500 MR. COFFEE COFFEEMAKER _• Brews 2 to 10 cups. EVERYDA Y LOW PRICE $37.88 LESS REBATE*________ $ 7.00 Y O U PAY O N LY $30.88 CORTAID C ^ M OR OINTMENI REGULAR PRICE $2.83 $ 1 69 TOOTHBRUSHES 5 / $ 1 0 0 LOCATIONS IN . WINSTON-SALEM: PARKVIEW , 3075 K ER N ER S V ILLE RD. 788- 2032 ^301 ACADIA A VEN UE, 722-7145, 631 P ET ER S C R E E K PARKW AY, 723-3501; HANES m a l l, 768-9320; OLDTOWN. 3716 REYNOLDA RD ., 924-9131; 0U3 HWY. 52 N. S TA N LEY V ILLE, 377-2281; COLONY C EN TRE. KIN G, 983-2186; HWY. 66 WALKERTOWN, 595-2137; WESTWOOD V ILLA G E, CLEMMONS, 766-9156: HWY. 679-8844; HWY. 601. M O CKSVILLE, 634-6213; n6 wC0N SHOPPING C EN TER, NEWTON, W ESTGATE SHOPPING C EN TER, TAYLOR- S V iyLE , DAVIDSON PLAZA, LEXIN GTO N ; O PTICAL SHOPS LOCATED AT HANES M ALL, 768-9322; M O CKSVILLE, 634-6216 arid LEXINGTON. The Prescription People Open 365 Days A Year We Reserve the Right to Limit Quantities. Musician Dean Clawsen of Advance delighted area students with a performance of North Carolina music. He played the guitar, dulcimer, banjo and fiddle. T a r I t - eacher Sue Knox, watches as Matt Foster aims his authentic looking re^ica over the shoulder, of Patrick Bledsoe. Students made the_state maps from beans (show in background) with their nometown of Mocksville pinpointed on each. C o u n t y S c h o o k P a r t i c i p a t e I n N . C , H e r i t a g e E v e n t s Students across the county learned the richness of North Carolina’s heritage during events staged April 25-29. North Carolina Heritage Week brought a wide array of activilies highlighting the history of the state and its role in the founding of America. Wanda Abernathy, teacher a t' Mocksville Elementary, described the observance as a concentrated study of North Carolina. “ We wanled to expose students lo the rich heritage that surrounds them,” she said. Students studied the state motto, tree, bird, plus viewed many crafts thal have made North Carolina famous.Most schools across Ihe county held a "dress up day” for students, ■ allowing them to come to school attired in a costume prevalent to North Carolina history. Sluden/s’ imaginations proved creative with classrooms filling ’vith facsimiles of Indians, pioneers and colonial maidens. Community volunteers staged several craft demonstrations much lo Ihe delight of students. Events included soap making, quilting, needlework, basket-weaving and crocheting. There were also demonstrations'of churning butter, making horse shoes, wood working, and flat ironing. Music played an imporlant part in local students sludy of Norths (Continued to Page 2C) D A V i a C O U N T V F e a t u r e 1 C M a y S, 1 9 8 3 It was as if the clock turned bad_____enjoyed N.C. Heritage Week dress-up day. Mocksville Elementary students (standing) Jonathan Walsh, Brad vanhoy, (seated) Renee Fosfe Bahnson, Michelle Abernethy and Crysta I Tilley form ai school chiklren in colonial days may have appeared. colonial days as sfI day. Mocksvil ______ _ , _______'anhoy, (seated) Renee Foster, Sarah illey form appropriate picture of how Mocksville Elementary students learn about North Carolina Indians during a special program commemorating N.C. Heritage Week. It's NIkkI......(2ndYolanda Dress up day proved a detightfui experience for many Davie County students. Posing m fronf of our state tree, the Dogwood, is (I to r) Jennifer Beck, Robin Bledsoe, Susan Boger and instructor, Wanda Abernethy. 2C - DAVIECOUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD,TH U RSDAY,M AY 5, 1983 Mocksville Middle also observed dress-up day. Pictured are (front row, I to r) Julius Suiter, Mocksville Middle School principal, looks over handwoven baskets made by Mrs. Frances Williams. C e le b ra tio n O f H e rita g e W e ek (Continued from Page 1C) Carolina Heritage. Dean Clawsen of Advance captivated students with songs such as “ Coming ‘Round the Mounlain” and “ Muskrat” per­formed on several instrum ents including Ihe dulcim er, banjo, fiddle and guitar.Clawsen also held a question and answer session at each school allowing students to gain added information about North Carolina m usic. Students also enjoyed presentations on colonial living, N.C. folklore and legends, plus slides and films about their home slate.North Carolina Heritage Week^is an annual observance. Eggs May Not Deserve The Blame Shddy Grove students made quilt squares in observance of N.C. Heritage Week, witii community volunteers actually quilting the design at the school last week. Connie Creed, instructor explains the many symbols to students (I to r) Michelle Shipp, Decca Riedell, Angela Hicks «nd Michael ^ rk la n d . I’m thinking of retiring next year at age 62. Will I be able to qualify for Medicare at the same time? No. Medicare protection doesn't start until you are age 65. . My father who lived with me died last month and the Social Security check that came this month had to be sent back to the Treasury Deparlment, even though there are funeral expenses that need to be . -Social Security Questions & Answers taken care olV Why is this? , The law simply does not provide for monthly payments to a person's estate under Social Security. However, there is a lump-sum death benefit of $255 that is payable to his widow living with him at the time of his death or to a child who Was eligible for monthly benefits as a survivor. I have a daughter, 19, and a son, 17, who need Social Security numbers. Can they get them by phoning Social Security? Your son can since he is under 18. However, your daughter must apply In person. Both must furnish proof of age, citizenship, and identity; you can call to find out what proofs are acceptable. I recently received a statement of my earnings from Social Security, W h e n y o u n e e d a l o a n f o r a i w r e a s o n , r e m e m b e r , y o u r e w h y w e V e h e r e . Northvi/estem has the money to lend you for any worthwhile purpose. Need money for a car, truck, home improvements, tuition, or vacation? See us and compare. We'll handle your loan request promptly and give you the personal attention you deser\’e, as well as a convenient repayment plan at a competitive rate. We're willing lenders, because you're why we're here. Northwestern Bank You're ultyii^yeheiv. i t i which I requested. It doesn't agree with the record I ’ve kept of my earnings. What should I do? Call, write, of visit any Social Security office right away. Give your Social Security number, the periods of employment involved, wages paid you in cach period, and . the employer's name and address. You also should include Forms W-2 or other proof of your wages, or if you're self-employed, copies of your tax returns for the years involved. A Social Security representative will help you to get any necessary If too much cholesterol in the blood is unhealthy and-eggs have lots of cholesterol, should people avoid eating eggs? “ Things just aren’t that simple,” says researcher D r. M ichael Liebman. “ Restricting eggs alone w ill not result in significant decreases in plasma cholesterol levels. Total intake of fat may be a more important factor.” Dr. Liebman and Dr. Terry L . Bazzarre of the University of North Carolina at Greensboro compared groups of vegetarian and non­ vegetarian men. The subjects were matched by age, weight, height, alcohol consumption and physical activity levels. A ll were non- May Is Better Hearing May, 19B3 has been proclaimed Better Hearing and Speech Month in North Carolina by Governor James Hunt. D r.’ Craig Phillips, State Superintendent of . Public In ­ struction, will read the. Governor’s Proclamation at the May meeting of Ihe State Board of Education during a brief ceremony designed tc acquaint Board members with the issues surrounding speech and hearing problems in children and youlh.The purpose of the com­memorative month is to call at­ tention to the problems of hearing, speech, and language and the fact thal these problems can often be alleviated.A special focus of this year’s publicity campaign is the child with a mild-lo-moderate hearing loss. According lo Ted Drain, Director of the Division for Exceptional Children, Stale Departm ent of smokers. A group of individuals was identified which did not consume eggs or egg-containing producls. Another group was identified which consumed one or more eggs a day. Olher than eating or not eating eggs, both groups had sim ilar protein, fat, carbohydrate and alcohol intakes. No significant differences in the levels of blood fat (cholesterol and triglycerides) were obsetved belween these two groups.The sludy was supported in part by a grant from the American Egg Board and by the North Carolina A gricultural Research Service, Raleigh. Piihlio Tn^tnioHnn "Ynune & Speech Month with mi!d hearing losses do not realize they have a problem. Because they respond appropriately much of the time, their parenls and teachers do not suspect a hearing loss, and the loss goes undetected.. These children are frequently subjected to punishment, social iso latio n , underachievem ent, mislabeling, and failure in school and at home simply because the adults in their environment do not recognize (he problem. The emotional • and educational problems that result often spell disaster and a lifetime of frustration for such children,” according to Drain. The need for early identification of these problems Ihrough preschool and school-centered hearing screening programs, and for on­ going audiological management of these children, once identified, is critical. Self-Sealing Fiberglass G .A .F. R O O F IN G 2 1 PerSquare Extra Special Price Stock Colors Only • Shingles Edges Seal Themselves Down To Stay Down In High Winds • We Guarantee It In Writing • stock Colors Only Roofing Must Be Delivered By May 15th M o cksville B u ild e rs S u p p ly 721 South Main Street Mocksville, N.C. 634-5915 634-5916 O ver 1000 Builder M arts D avie H igh Slugs W ay To 8 -9 W in O ver N . Davidson A liomcrun by Doug James and nine sirikeouls by Dan Riddle led • Davie High's sluggers to an B-5 win over Norlh Davidson, April 27. The Eagles added this game to a 4-1 loss last week against Asheboro.In the North Davidson game the Knights opened the scoring in the first Inning with one run. Mark Robertson crossed the plate for Davie, bringing in Iheir first run.A homerun by Doug James in the sccond inning lifted the Eagles to a 2-1 lead.In the third Inning North picked up another run to tie the score 2-2. Davie's offense flew high In the IJiird with John Johnson and Doug Kelly scoring two more runs. • In the fifth Inning North Davidson added Iwo more runs to lie Ihe score al 4-4. Runs by Rodney Barkeer, Jerry Riddle, Doug James and Todd Howard in the fifth inning sparked Davie’s biggest scoring drive. The Knights made their lasl effort in the sixth inning, scoring only one run. The final inning was left scoreless. 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IP H R E R B B SO N o rth D avidson B P e re ll 3V ^. 7 5 3 3 2. Joyce,. L • 1.44 1 3 3 3 3R hodes 1 1 0 0 1 1 D ayle R id d le , W 2-2 7 t S 2 0 9 P B -W h lte , G e n try . T - 2 : 10. Girls track Team Lose To Thomasville .Davie girl's track team suffered a defeat at the hands of the •Thomasville Bulldogs April 28 by a :score of 72-54. •In the field events Machelle Pulliam threw the shot put 31 feet and Vi inch to take first place. Selena Fowler placed second with a throw of 30 feet 3 inches. Pulliam also placed third in thè discus with 93’feet 5 inches. Bonna Whitlock placed third in ' the long jump with a jump of 14 feet ' 6'A inches. In the high, jump Pat Gadson placed first,with a jump of 5. feet 2 inches. Vanessa Waller placed' second with a jump of 4 feet 6 in­ches. ■ '• In the 100m low hurdles. Waller placed third with a run of 18.73 and ^in the 200m low hurdles S. Gadson placed second with a time of 34.40. : In the 1600m run Frankie Chaplin placed second with a time of 6:07.97 and in the 400m run P. Gadson placed first with a time of 65.81. Angie Browder placed first with a time of 2:42.87 in the 800m run and Annette McGuire placed next with a lime of 2:58.40. Whitlock and Jackie Gadson placed first and third in the 200m with times of 28.10 and 29.31, respectively. Chaplin placed first in the 3200m run with a time of 14:11.66 and Davie’s 1600m relay team consisting of P . Gadson, Andrea McBride, J . Gadson, and McGuire placed first. Smith Grove To Hold Softball Event Smith Grove Community Center :':mens and ladles softball tour-’ ■■ nament will be held May 20, 21 and :;.-2 2 . For further information contact Dean Smith-998-3088; Thomas r Tucker- 998-2304; or Wayne Frye- .998-2341. " S t r o n g b e lie fs w i n s tr o n g m e n , a n d t h e n m a k e t h e m s t r o n g e r . " W a lt e r B a g e h o t In the Asheboro game, the Comets opened Ihe game in Ihe fourth in­ ning by scoring one run. Asheboro added another run in the fiftli inning lo make the score 2-0. The Comets added their lasl two runs in the sixth inning.Asheboro’s defense held Davie to only one run, which came in the seventh inning by Kirk Edwards who was knocked in by Doug Kelly. Davie now has a conference record of 3-6 and Is 4-6 overall. Davie Girls Defeat Lexington in Two Davie High girls softball team defeated Lexington in a doubleheader April 27. In the first game, Davie won, 2-1. Davie had eight hits lo Lexington’s six. Leading hitters for Davie were Donna Hendrix, who was two for Ihree, and wilh one hit each was Dawn Brown, Sherri Kelpley, Lelsa Hepier, Melissa Matthews, Teresa Smith, and Cammie Paige. The winning pitcher for the game was Melissa Smiley. In the second game al Rich Park, Davie proved victorious again defeating Lexington 6-5. Leading hitters were Brown, Hendrix, and Matthews, each with two hits. The winning pitcher for the final game was Rhonda Smith.Davie’s record Is now lO-l overall. On May 11, they will play away at Thomasville. Davie Golfers Defeat Asheboro Davie golfers completed their regular season play last week at Salisbury Country Club by narrowly defeating Asheboro. Brian Driggars led the' Eagles with a -74. He was followed by Bubba Brown with a 78, Steve Stiller, who shot an 81 and Uly Grisette, having an off-day, finished up the foursome with an 82 giving Ihe Eagles their highest score of the year, a 315. Asheboro came close to upsetting Ihe E : gles shooting 317. The Comets were led by Bruce Cagle.with a 76. Taylor Trogden followed wilh a 78, Tom Davis-81, and Barrett Burleson-82. Davie’s Brian Driggars shared low-medallst honors with Brian Skeen of Trinity. Both golfers led the field with three over par 74’s. Following Davie and Asheboro ' were Trinity-339, Salisbury-355, North Davidson-363, ThomasvHIe- 365, and Lexington-396. The Eagles will complete tlieir year by playing in a conference tournament May 9 and sectionals May 16, both at Lexington. If the golfers are successful in sectional • play, they will go on to the state ^am^ionship in Chapel Hill on May Family Tennis Set At Tanglewood Equitable family tennis tour­ naments will be held at Tanglewood this weekend. May 7 and 8. Tournament participation may be brother-sister, mother-daughter, mother-son, falther-daughter, falher-son, husband-wife. Winners advance to sectional competition. For more informalion call 766- 5396, Gene Blackwelder or Steve Kiser. • E. Davie _RuritarL To Sponsor Men's Softbail Event The East Davie Rurilan Club will sponsor an invitational Mens Soft­ ball Tournament May 12th - 15th at Bullard Field in Cornatzer. Any team who would like to enter may call Alvin Whitaker at 998-4675. Entry fee is $65.00 plus Iwo balls. Í , •>v.i A n nual D ucks U n lim ite d B a n q u et H ere M ay 1 9 th DAVIECOUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD. THURSDAY. MAY 5. l ‘)S3 - 3C Ttie Soutti Davie Junior Hiati Booster Club lias receiitly completed a cam paign to raise money for student athletics at ttie scliool. In recognition of overwtwlm ing support given by local businesses, booster club m em bers had participants' names engraved on a plaque which w ill be displayed in the schooPs showcase. Here, Booster Club president, Brad Bullock (left) presents the plaqu^ to Dr. k e rm it Buckner, school principal. Bowman Gray Races Resume Saturday Night The "Winston 200” NASCAR Modified stock car race will be the main event Saturday night. May 7, when Winston-Salem’s longest- running and best-attended professional sporl roars back inlo action at Bowman Gray Stadium. It will be the opening of weekly Saturday nighl racing for the 35th consecutive season on the municipal arena’s quarter-mile asphalt track, where many of the sport’s top names slarted their careers.Many of the leaders in the Bud- weiser-sponsored Modified series, which determines a season championship, are expected to challenge the stadium’s regulars in the 50-mile race for a purse of $10,065.Ralph Brinkley of. Lexington, N.C., will be opening defense of his sladium Winslon Racing Series championship, which he won lasl year for a record-tying sixth lime. His strongest opposition is expected lo come (as il did last year) from two Virginians, Paul Radford of Ferrum and Sateh Worley of Rocky Mount. Radford was the biggest winner lasl year, racking up nine victories which gave him a record career total of 50 stadium triumphs. As venerable as the tradition-steeped track, he’ll start another season at the ripe young age of 50.Billy Middleton of Germanton, N.C., is the defending champion In the “ Winslon 200," which he won for the second straight time in 1982. Also on the opening night’s program are twin 20-lap races for the Limited Sportsman class, a 20- lap Street Stock race and a 15-lap event for the novices of the "Blunderbust” division.Jimm y Johnson of Walkertown will be trying lo continue his rule in Ihe Lim ited Sportsman ranks, where he edged Dink Osborne of Winston-Salem for the 1982 crown. Billy Duggins of Germanton won the Street Stock tille last year, and G.R. Merritt of Winston-Salem claimed Ihe Blunderbust crown - becoming the first female champion in the stadium’s history.Qualifying trials from 3 to 7 p.m. Friday, May 6, will determine the first 12 starting positions in a 24-car field for the «'Winston 200.” Remaining berths are to be decided by more trials at 7 p.m. Saturday, May 7-rwilh the first race starting al 8:15. D w iggins M e ta l M asters C ap tu re Tourney T itle Dwiggins Metal Masters çame out winners in a softball lournament sponsored. last weekend at Cooleemee Park. Dwiggins Metal Masters ad­ vanced through the winners bracket by defeating Elmore and Trivette 13-1, Foster’s Auctioneering 9-5, and R& J. Sports 18-17. Foster’s Auctioneering advanced in their bracket defeating Rowan Cinema 8-5, Steele’s Body Shop 25-9, and was awarded thé third place trophy after R&J Sports defeated them 23-9. R&J Sports also defeated Wall’s 13-2, Wonderknit 29-2, and Steele’s Body Shop 14-8 to reach the finals. In the first finals game R&J Sports defeated Dwiggins Metal Masters 21-8 for their first loss. Dwiggins Metal Masters then came back to beat R&J Sports for the second lime 1 0 -8 . , R&J Sports was awarded the second place trophy and Dwiggins Metal Masters the championship. Ricky Glass of Dwiggins Metal Masters was the leading hitter of the tournament with a .700 batting average. Other hitting leaders in­ cluded Jeff Ward and Ron Lanning of Foster’s Auctioneering; Jeff over .800. For the homerun trophy there was a three-way tie between Ricky G lass, Russ Spry and Dickie Tolbert, all with seven. Other homerun leaders included Ron Lanning, Jeff B arker, Johnny Miller, Sherman Arnold and Terry Anderson. Dwiggins Metal Masters would like to thank everyone who had a parl in making this tournament a success. Barker of Steele’s Body Shop; Russ ........................................ ............! Tol igginsand Donnie Everhardt of Dwiggins Spry, Johnny Miller, D'ickie Tolbert )f R.& J. Sports; David Dwig Metal Masters, all with averages Four Corners | Mr. and Mrs. Michael Firgusson of Louisianaare spending the week wilh Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Shelton. Mr. and, Mrs. Earl Fleming visited M r. and M rs. Clifford Fleming Sunday night. Mr. and Mrs. L.S. Shelton Jr. spent Sunday at Shatley Springs and the mountains. ■ Mr. and Mrs. Donald Heavis of Yadkinsville visited M rs. Jack Parrish. I t is e s tim a t e d t h a t 4 , 0 0 0 la n g u a g e s h a v e b e c o m e e x t i n c t o v e r t h e c o u r s e o f h is t o r y . M o t h e r ’ s D a y Sunday, M ay 8th Anlique style diamond rings like Grandma used to wear... White or Yellow » l l g o o 3 Diamonds “Surprise hci- with the unexpected this Mother’s Day” downtown VocVsville Buy Summer Steaks At The Market Now The best buys at the supermarket meal counter are poultry, liver and some beef cuts. Wholesale beet prices are up while pork is staying about the same, says Rachel етОР SMOKING-LOSE WEIGHT S P E C IA L O F F E R on Introductory Visits B rin g a F rie n d and G E T T W O F o r T h e P ric e . o f O N E ! O ri-E R EXPIRES May 11, 1983 We Can Help! FORSYTH STRESS M ANAG EM ENT C LIN IC , INC Suffering from everyday stress, weiglil conlrol? Need to stop smoking? Pain!! We offer a Lifelim e o f S e lf. Help! Individualized weight conlrol Programs. You can even cheat and still lose w eighi!! Wc specialize in Hypnosis, Pain C onlrol, Accupressure, Physical Therapy and Much M ote!! FOR RELP CALL TCX)AY. <76&0644 (above W ilson's Guns) 260) Lewisyille-Clemmons Road, Clemmons, N.C.- Kinlaw, extension food sp e cia list, N orlh C a r o lin a S ta te University.“ Look for specials on beef loin and sirloin cuts through the middle of March. If you have the freezer space, now is the time to buy a beef tenderloin or a whole ribeye for steaks this sum m er,” M rs. Kinlaw says. Beef prices will rise this spring and summer. Those who cannot afford the large cut, might look into family- ’size packages or just buy several packages of steaks on sale."Watch waste as well as price per pound," Phyllis Cartner Sfuitn 'S/Om t j i í e é l i A a ¥ t s i f i K t n d a Paid For By Melissa Urown v ; . ' Paid For By Todd Cartner Tha Davie Counly Chapter of Ducks Unlimited has announced lhat its 3rd annual banquet will be held al Hickory Hill on May 19th al 6:00 p.m. Chapter Chairman Dr. John Roach feels the fund-raising function should be marked on the calendar by anyone who is in­ terested in the future of North America's waterfowl. "The Ducks Unlimited success story," said Roach, "is really starting to spread around. Banquets much like our chapter event held Ihroughout the counlry last year contributed towards Ducks Unlimited's national fund-raising effort which raised $30 million during 1981 alone. But what's even more important lo realize," said Roach, “ is that this nalional fund­ raising total must increase this year if the Norlh American waterfowl habitat race Is lo be won."DU’s sportsmen-conservationists founders discovered through sur­veys conducted forty-five years ago that seventy percent of North Am erica’s waterfowl production occurs in Canada. They figured out back in 1937 whal holds true today. Since Federal duck stamn dollars Jr. Legion Baseball Coach Ron Morgan an­ nounces lhat initial workouts for the M ocksville-Davic Am erican Legion Baseball squad will begin at 4 p.m. Saturday May 7 at Rich Park. All prospective players in­ terested in participating are urged to attend. cannot be spent beyond U.S. bor­ ders, sportsmen funds earmarked for walerfowl conservation are not getting to the places where the great percentage of production takes place. But through Ducks Unlim ited’s efforts, over $164 million has been raised in the U.S. since 1937. And 80 cents oul of every one of those dollars has been sent to DU (Canada) to reserve some 3 million acres of prime habitat en­ compassing over 1,!)00 'wetland projects. ' The only problem in all this is that biologists estimate millions of additional acres of habitat must be reserved in order to stabilize North America’s walerfowl population. When you consider that habitat today is diminishing due to agricultural and development pressures, and lhat DU is the only nonprofit conservation organization involved in the Canadian waterfowl habitat race, you can begin to see the significance attached to the organization’s fund-raising events.Tickets which are $30.00 each, include a one-year DU membership and a subscription lo the organization’s magazine. Call . Ronnie McKnight at 998-4367 for tickets and further details. Clothing Stain If a soft drink is spilled on yotir clothing, don’t waste time before sponging the spot with cool water. Launder the article as soon as possible.- Some drink stains are invisible after they dry. but they turn yellow: wilh lime or heat, says Dr. Harriei Tutterow, extension clothing' specialist-ln-charge. North Carolina; Slale University. The yellow stain is;- Impossible lo remove. Motorcycn^s Battle Af Farmington Dragway Sunday The Cycle Racing Associates “ Sportsnalionals" saw 120 drag motorcyclists battle it out al Far­ mington Dragway Sunday (May 1) with an upsel occurring in the powerful open fuel class. The final run in open fuel class competition had narrowed down to Larry McBride of Newport News, Va. against Paul Ray of Memphis, Tenn., bolh members of the racing team of former three time national open fuel class champion, Danny Johnson of Yadkinville.McBride and Ray were aboard nitro-methane burning Kawasakis set up and engineered by Johnson, with both riders blasting away from Ihe line with a lerrific roar. But M cBride’s cycle became "squlrrely” forcing him to let off on Ihe throttle m om entarily. Ray streaked across the finishing line lo get the win clocking an E T of 5:16 seconds at 142 mph on the one- eighth mile strip. McBride still came through with an impressive run at 137 mph with an E T of 5:40 seconds. McBride is the current CRA state open fuel class champion and had previously sel two track records at Farmington-. Two weeks ago, he' captured the open fuel class at Atlanta, Ga. in the NHRA Sum- mernationals. On a semi-final run at Farmington Sunday, McBride had clocked the top run of the day, posting a speed of 144 mph with an E T of 5:11 seconds. Before getting to McBride, Ray had beat oul Frank Spittle of Charlotte and John Sands of Columbia, S.C. . In other “ Sportsnalionals’’ action Jeff Mucarelli of Summerville, S.C. kept his hot streak going in . the super-eliminator class by defeating Tom Diffon of Fayetteville. Lucarelli, on a Kawasaki was clocked at 140 mph with an E T of 5:12 seconds wilh Diffon, on a Harley, clocking an E T of 5:60 seconds at 132 mph. Diffon had won last month al Farmington and Lucarelli had posted a record run at Ihe track several weeks ago. Super­ eliminator semi-finalists were Jim Henderson of Lumberton and Wayne Haydock of Union, S.C. Tony Persons of Independence, Va. captured the pro-competition class on his Suzuki over the Kaw asaki of Don M iller of Darlington. Sem i-finalists weré: Patricia Crafton of Hickory arid-; Terry Barnes of Gastonia. The win in the modified class wenH lo Ihe Suzuki of Jerry Bowen Tof-- Galax, Va. when he beat out the;; Suzuki of Roger Burrell of-' Stalesville. Chip Wallers of Wlii-:- ston-Salem and Randy Condrey çf-; Salisbury finished as semi-finalists.'. Doug Hale of Galax, Va. won otit-; in Ihe super-stock division on hist- Suzuki over the Kawasaki of Randy;; Sillon of Hendersonville. Coming in^ as semi-finalists were Randy Kaisei^; of Walkertown and Mike Messer qf-: Gastonia. > :* Mocksville Middle S PTO Meets Mocksville Middle School PTO will meet Thursday, May 5, at the school for their May Day program, at 6 p.m. All members are urged to attend. G i n g h a m g o t i t s n a m e f r o m a t o w n i n B r i t t a n y , F r a n c e c a lle d G u i n g a m p . ,||A SOUTH DAVIE JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL APPRECIATES THE FINANCIAL SUPPORT OF THE FOLLOWiNG BUSINESSES Funds £0 to support student athletics at South Davie Woodmen o f the W orld C lint Wilson K entucky Fried ChickenDaniel Furniture and Electric Co., Inc. M iller's Restaurant Carolina Energy E fficient Homes' Mocksville Builders Supply P&G A uto Parts Central Carolina Bank Davie A uto Parts M ocksville Sporting Goods llow ard Realty/Davic Builders C. Ray Cates and Assoiaies Monleigh Garment Company A nd y’s Union 76Sport W orld o f M ocksville Branch Bank and Trust Co. S.W. Brown Horn O il Company Davie C hiropractic Health Center Junker and Son Feed M ill MocksviUe Savings and Loan Associalion Hendrix and C orriher Construction Baker Furniture Hendricks Furniture J.P. Green M illing Company L & L Industrial Sales IngersoU-Rand Company Richard and CaroU Angell Grace M. AngellWebb and Son Electrical Contractors Bower's Dairy M r and Mrs. T.G . Angell Crown Drug Company Bar-B-Que Haus Mocksville Insurance Agency Reavis Ford Caudell Lum ber Company Hall & Vogler, Attorneys Ben Franklin Store Larew-W ood-Johnson, Inc. Foster-Rauch Drug Company Farm and Carden Service Foster's Jcrelers Jim m y K elly Insurance Agency Don's Jewelry and Music Company The Hardware Store Osborne Electric Company Boger.s Garage M r. and Mrs. Lawrence West Ju ly 's C ountry Charm Deano's Bar-B-Q The Discoui^t House Davie Fish Camp C.S Barbeque Hinkle Mobile Home Park Ellis Used CarsF&F BarbequeDavie Discount DrugsCharles Ev-ans Hair Botique 1 & II Davie C ounty Farm Bureau Dillard & Foote Plumbing 4C - DAVIE COUNTY ENTHRI’ RISE RECORD. THURSDAY, MAY 5, 1483 S ta te Soybean A ssociation stamp Album | N e w Z ealan d D o m esticates The D eer H onors S p urg eon Foster Spurycon Foster, a Davie Couniy soybean grower, was honored recenlly by Ihe Norih Carolina Soybean Producers Association. He was recognized for two entries in Ihe slate contest which yielded, respectively, 48..')6 and 40.14 bushels per acre. Fo sler, who farm s near Mocksville, won Ihe honors wilh a RA 504 soybean variety, planled June 23 on 18-inch and 19-inch rows. The big yields were produced with a population of seven lo eight plants per foot of row on Georgeville soil. A major factor in top soybean yields is weed control. Fosler used a preemergence tank-mix of Du Pont “ Lorox” weed killer lo control broadleaves and Ciba-Geigy “ Dual” herbicide and paraquat for grasses.Among the 60 contcst winners who used a preemergcnce weed killer, 42 percent used “ Lorox” alone or in a tank-mix with a grass herbicide.’ Growers in the state contest used a number of production practices- including no-tillage, reduced tillage and conventional tillage. Double- cropping soybeans behind wheat is growing in popularity. The practice iwas more common Inishis season than Spurgeon Foster in pasl years. Officials monitoring the contest reported that 85 entries merited state recognition. Foster’s top soybean entry yielded almost twice the stale average of 25 bushels per acre; his second enlry was GO percent greater. 1SYOUR INSURANCE J^G&iT IOCKB> Ш О ONE œ M PAN Y? u T h e re a r e 2 w a y s f o b u y in s u r a n c e . V o u c a n b u y y o u r in s u r a n c e f r o m a o n e - ■' c o m p a n y a g e n t B u t t h e y ’r e lo c k e d In to o n ly th o s e p o lic ie s t h a t t h e ir : c o m p a n y s e lls . S o t h e ir h a n d s a r e tie d . O r y o u c a n b u y y o u r in s u r a n c e fr o m a n In d e p e n d e n t In s u ra n c e A g e n t J : . . Ih e m o r e - th a n - o n e - c o m p a n y a g e n t. Y o u s e e , a B ig In d e p e n d e n t 'A g e n t lik e u s d o e s n 't w o r k f o r o n e c o m p a n y . W e r e p r e s e n t s e v e r a l. S o w e ’r e ; f r e e t o g iv e y o u a n in d e p e n d e n t o p in io n a n d a d v is e y o u ¡ o n th e b e s t c o v e r a g e a t th e b e s t p ric e . A n d t h a t i g o e s f o r h o m e o w n e rs , a u to m o b ile , b u s in e s s , life a n d h e a lth in s u ra n c e . B e fo r e y o u re a c h a v e r d ic t a b o u t in s u ra n c e , s e e y o u r B ig “ / ’ ’ I n d e p e n d e n t In s u ra n c e A g e n t . .. th e m o r e - th a n - o n e - c o m p a n y a g e n t. D o it to d a y . Y O U R ^^ependent 1 , Insurance § ¡AGENT J S E R V E S Y O U F IH S T THE MORB-THAN-ONB-COMPANY INSURANCE AGENT. COME IN AND GET YOUR FREE “HOW TO CHOOSE THE RIGHT INSURANCE'^ BOOKLET. I t h e lp s m a k e c h o o s in g t h e r i g h t in s u r a n c e e a s ie r. L a r e w W o o d J o h n s o n , I n c . 135 South Salisbury S t. MocksviUe, N .C , Phone: 634-6281 The current flood of USA issues will have to lake a back scat to some of the news about stamps being released all over the world. Every now and Ihen we musl lake ourlidle "trip around the world.” 1 don’l know of a belter start lhat to bring you up lo dale on some of Ihe current Europa offerings. Guern­ sey released a set of four stamps in the Europa theme last March. They feature “ Great Works of Human Genius.” Each slamp depicts a scene from the town of SI. Peter Port, and showing Ihe additions lo Ihe harbor there which have made it a solid and safe place in the storm. Another slamp issuing authority which intrigues me is the Isle of Man. Their Europa issue features a total of six stamps. Two of them also explore the “ Masterpieces of Human Genius” topic and they show Ihe famous Laxey Wheel and its designer, Robert Casement. Four other Europa stamps com- memorale Ihe 150lh anniversary of the Founding of King William’s College. These issues will be cir­ culated on May 18. Belgium Europa issue will be released May 16 and it has two stamps showing fragments of paintings by P. Delvaux. The 11 B F stamps shows “ A Common Man” (no less than a chap standing and reading a newspaper) and Ihe 20 B F value features a railroad yard and is entitled “ Nighl Trains.” Iceland has also released Iwo stamps in the Europa series. They follow Ihe theme, “ Remarkable Projects” and the stamps feature deep oceanic drilling. This drilling involves the harnessing of thermal energy. This energy has been used in Iceland to heat homes, hospitals and lo provide waler to a municipal swimming pool. 72 percent of Ihe population now are served by some form of thermal heating on that northern island country. Another of the Europa stamp issuing nations is Denmark and on May 5 they released two stamps featuring “ Works of Art.” One slamp has a building on it and the other a bridge. In a recent stamp publication, a question was asked if there had been anything published on the bridges featured on stamps. It seems lhat recently Ihere have been quite a few bridges on stamps, all over Ihe world. By the way, these two Danish stamps were engraved by Czeslaw Slania, the engraver of our recent USA Swedish Amity Treaty Issue. Denmark also started a new series of ten stamps, along with five Nordic nations, which have tourism as their coinmon theme. I ’d rather have thal cruise lhan the much advertised Carribean cruise anyday. Slania was the engraver of Ihis issue. As I look through the press .releases from the various postal authorities, I see that Slania was also the engraver of the newly issued Greenland stamp featuring Queen Margrethe. A recent article in LINN’S STAMP NEWS told about Slania’s fanie as an engraver and how successfully he does half-tone engraving of people. The Greenland slamp appears to certify this claim of Slania's skill. It is too bad that the Federal Republic of Germany and the USA postal service did not get together on a joint first day cancellation and issuing of the new Concord stamp. Pvt. Barbara Alexander Completes Army Course P v l. Barbara J . Alexander, daughter of Cecil L . and Larondelle D. Branan of Route 3, Mocksville, N.C., has completed a supply course at the U.S. Army Training Center, Fort Jackbon, S.C.During the course, students received instruction in the main­tenance of stock records and the procedures necessary lo receive, store, issue and ship supplies and materiel.Her husband, Bruce, is the son of Bruce H. and Rebecca P. Alexander of Route 2, Mooresville, N.C.She is a 1980 graduate of Davie County High School, Mocksville. -A n d G ains A Business O U R M O N E Y M A R K E T IN V E S T M E N T A C C O U N T IS N ’T J U S T F O R T H E V E R Y R IC H . IT S ^ S O F O R T H E V E R Y S M A R T If you have at least S5.000 to invest, our Money M arket Investment Account will give you all the advantages of a money mark'et fund. Piiis.the advantage of work­ ing directly with your ¿CB banker. Frankly, we think that's a smart way to do business. And its al.so a smart way • to get richer. Because vour money will earn our highest market-related rate. Call for our bro­ chure. O r come in and , open a CCB Money larket Investment Ac- count. Soon. ( m W U help TOu find aW y. I f th e (iveni};e m on th ly hahw ce in y o u r a ccou n t falls b elow S5.Q00, in terest f o r th e w o n th w ill he creiU teilto your a ccou n t at oure.xistin}; N O W A c co u n t in terest rate. Name a domestic animal raised on 2,000 farms in the Southern hemisphere whose meat and soft hair are in great demand. Sheep? Llamas? Neither. The animals are red deer-the world’s newest domestic stock-and raising them is a booming business in New Zealand. The red deer, originally captured from high-country forests, are joining sheep in New Zealand pastures, according to this month's issue of International Wildlife, the bimonthly publication ot the National Wildlife Federation. A ll domestic anim als are descendants of wild species. But what’s different about New Zealand’s red deer is that the domestication has taken place in a few years, rather than millenia. The first red deer farm was started in only 1970. Today, the country has a herd of more than 180,000 animals. That growth is even more remarkable when one considers that the first deer arrived from Europe in 1851. Previously, plants and flightless birds had reigned unchallenged in New Zealand, and people had been the fh^t mammals to arrive in about 950 A.D., according to International WUdlire. In those New Zealand surroundings, the deer found abundant food year-round-and no competitors. Within a year, their brewing had adjusted to suit the’ new seasons of the Southern hemisphere; they survived winter easily, grew quickly, and heed early in life. As its population increased rapidly, however, the deer’s overgrazing denuded many slopes. After deer trampled out v^etation, soil slid into valleys, causing floods and cl^ging hydroelectric dam reservoirs with silt. , But what seemed like an ecological disaster was to become an economic boom as farmers realized the profit potential in domesticating deer. Since the first deer farm was started. New Zealand’s anim al scientists at the Inferm ay Animal Research Station have uncovered some interesting facts; -Deer produce over 40 percent more meat per acre than sheep or cattle. -Deer raised in captivity may achieve commercial body weight within 15 months, compared with 30 months in the wild. -Pasture that supports one dairy cow will support four deer. New Zealand deer farmers hope that .the venison industry will one day rival the country’s massive wool trade, according to International Wildlife. Venison is a highly prized meat, considered a luxury item In many restaurants. Venison is not the only product of New Zealand’s deer farms. “ Velvet,” the soft hair that covers a stag’s antlers and is shed every year, is another; One farmer claims that “ velvet” from one stag is worth as much as the wool from 24 sheep. In China, Korea and the Soviet Union, velvet is used in treatment of heart disorders and anem ia. Doctors there say it dilates blood vessels and stimulates production of red blood cells. Deer farming has also helped address New Zealand’s erosion problems, according to International W lldlire. Deer populations have diminished and domestic populations have increased, improving vegetation cover on eroded slopes. Some alpine forests are regaining their ori^nal splendor. Bird habitat has improved, and spring flowers are reappearing. Ken Miers, the director of the environmental division of the New Zealand Forest Service, says the deer are now “ absolutely under control. It’s the best thing that ever happened, as far as we’re concerned.” F o ite r> R a u c h D n iK i. 700 W U keaboro S t. ------- ‘ 7 H & N -2 N Î Solom on never knew M om ! Wise King Solomon may not have found )iis virtuous woman (“Who can find a virtuous woman?"). Bul we need only look lo Ihe Moms of our youth lo find ours. Who but Job could fathom Ihe patience Mom must have had to endure with us through diapers, knee britches, jeans, and slacks. Who but Florence Nightingale could understand Ihe agony Mom must have felt nursing us through various childhood diseases? Join with us to wish Moms everywhere a well-deserved HAPPY MOTHER’S DAY! Virtue is surely Mom's main attribute. ALTHY SAVINGS F o s te r-R a u c h D ru g s W e A p p r e c i a t e Y o u r B u s i n e s s The best deal in tow n on your kitchen wall. Or sitting on your nightstand. Or desk. Or wherever you have your phone. Because now you can buy the phone you already have in your home. And it will cost you much less than you d pay for any other phone like it. For just $14 for rotary dial phones or $22 for Touch Call models, you can buy any or all of the phones you lease from us (plus tax). And you can conveniently pay for your purchase on your monthly phone bill, In one lump sum or split over the next three bills —interest free. Afterwards, your telephone bill will go down because you will avoid monthly lease charges. So if you are looking for the best deal on phones in tow/n, you don't need to look past your front door. Just call or stop in at your Centel business ofTice and own your own phone. For less. CENTEL [— M itc h e ll C ollege S elects M a y C o u rt-n The 1983 May Courl at Mitchell Communily College has been selected by the student body and will be presented during May Day Ceremonies on Friday at 11 a.m. Nita Alexander has been selected as the May Queen to reign over (he 1983 activities and her maid of honor will be Minnie Ijames. Sophomore attendants are Scottie Stamper, Robin Kelly, Marcela Iriarte and Em ily Brown. Freshmen attendants are Tally Huie, Anya Smith, Becky O'Keefe and Jill Ray. Miss Alexander is the daughter of Mrs. Shirley C. Alexander of Park Drive and M r. E . James Alexander of East End Avenue. She is a 1981 graduate of Statesville High School. At Mitchell, Alexander is a pre­ liberal arts major. Her activities include: Student Government Association Treasurer, a member of Uie MCC Choir, a cheerleader, member of the Annual Slaff, Honor Council, Circle K and the MCC Theatrical Company. In addilion, she was a freshman attendant for Ihe 1982 May Court and sophomore attendant for Miss Valentine. She attends Front Street Baptist Church. Miss Minnie Ruth Ijames is a libera! arts major and a 1976 graduate of Davie County High School and a 1979 graduate of Davis Hospital School of Nursing. She is , the daughter of Rev. and Mrs. Ivan W illiam Ijam es of Route 1, Mocksville. Ijames is president of the MCC Student Government Association, a dean’s list sludenl and a member of the Franco-Hispanic Club. She was named as a Young Personality of America, and Outstanding Young Women of America, she is a member of Clement Grove Church of God and serves as church pianist and is also a member of Ihe Willing Workers in Davie County. Ijames has also served as a missionary to Jam aica. ; Miss Robin Lee Kelly is a 1981 graduate of Statesville High School aitd the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Soljert L . Kelly of Kenilworth Road. At Mitchell K e lly " is "a m em ber c?f the clio ir, Student Govern- m.ent Association, and College Republicans. She served as a candidate for Valentine’s and Christmas Queens. She is a liberal arts major. ^ Miss Scottie Jane Stamper is a pre-music m ajor and a 1981 graduate of South Iredell High School. She is the daughter of Mr. arid Mrs. James Stamper of Route 13, Statesville. At Mitchell, Stamper is:a member of the choir and was a representative for Valentine’s Queen. Miss Aria Marcela Iriarte is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Alvaro Iriarte of Route 3, Newton. She is a graduate of Newton-Conover High School. AC Mitchell, she is a member of the Franco-Hispanic Club. The May Court at AAitctiell Community College has been selected by the student body and will be presented Friday. Pictured from top left, are: Jill Ray; Becky O'Keefe; Anya Smith; Tally Huie. Center: Nita Alexander, Queen; top right: Emily Brown; Marcela Iriarte; Robin Kelly; Scottie Stamper. Not pictured is Minnie ijames, maid of honor.(Photo by Bernard Robertson) Miss Em ily Re; Ray of Route 1, Mooresviiie and a 1982 graduate of South Iredell High School. White in high school, she was the 1982 Miss South Iredell and Carrousel Princess, a member of the G irls Athletic Association, Student Council and Jr. Jaycees’ secretary, club sweetheart and varsity cheerleader. At Mitchell, Ray is a Student Government Association representative. Fresh­ men Class representative and was a contestant for Miss M erry Christmas and Valentine Queens.Miss Natalia Renee Huie is a Business Administration major and the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Wayne Huie of Route 11, Statesville. Huie is a 1982 graduate of West Iredell High - ■ ■ -...................................... I, she 1981 graduate of North Iredell High School and the daughter of Mrs. Carolyn R . Brown of Route 4, Statesville. At Mitchell, she is a member of Phi Beta Lambda and serves as secretary of that club. While in high school, she was a member of the NIH band and a member of FB LA . Brown is a General Office Technology major.Miss Jill Elaine Ray is Ihe daughter of Mr. and Mrs. George ¡etta Brown is a School. ^Vhile m high school.was a varsity cheerleader, Fresh­ men Class ’Treasurer, Sophomore Class President, Beta Club President, Vice-President of the Keywanettes, Vice-President of A FS, a member of Student Council for three years and was an E x ­change Club Youth of the Month. At Mitchell, Huie is Secretary of the MCC Choir. Miss Becky Elizabeth O’Keefe is a liberal arts major and the daughter of Mrs. Kathleen A. Cunningham of Route 7, Mooresviiie. She is a 1982 graduate of M ooresviiie High School. In high school, she was a mejnber of the Leo Club and cheerleader al South Iredell High School. At Mitchell O’Keefe is Freshmen Class Vice-President, a member of the Yearbook Staff and a Student G o v e rn m e n t A s s o c ia tio n representative. She was also a contestant in the Miss M erry Christm as and Valentine Sweetheart contests. She is also a condidate for NCCCCSGA State President.Miss Anya Romaine Smith is a Criminal Justice major and the daughter of Mrs. Jacquelyn S. Click of Western Avenue. She is a 1982 graduate of Statesville High School where she was a cheerleader. At Mitchell, Smith is a member of Ebony Kinship, Student Govern­ ment Association representative and was the winner of the 1983 talent show..She was also a contestant in the 1982 Miss Ebony Pageant.May Day activities will get un­derway Friday at 10:15 a.m. with entertainment on the Circle. Leave T h e C ritters In T h e W oods •'II looks as if spring is finally here, and along wilh it our wildlife species are doing their annual multiplication tables,” says Counly Exiension Agent, Dave Updike. And lhal, according to Updike, can lead lo some situations where well- meaning people try to help wildlife but wind up doing more harm lhan good.The problem occurs when people find young animals or birds and immedialely assume that they have become lost or been abandoned. They often pick up Ihe animal to lake il liome and try to care for it. There are several good reasons, Updike points oul, why Ihis course of action is unwise. First, mosl young animals found by humans are nol losl to abandoned by parents. The usual lactic, when danger approaches and undetected escape is impossible, is for the parent to hide (hb young and then leave, sometimes attempting to attract allenlion away from Ihe young. The young animals, such as fawn deer, Ihen wait quietly for danger to pass and for the parent lo return. Second, most people who attempt to rescue and raise wild animals in captivity do nol have the facilities or the knowledge to do this successfully. Third, if successful, the person often winds up with an animal which cannot care for itself in the wild and which may become dangerous. Added lo these reasons is Ihe requirement for eilher a state or federal permit before most wild animals can be kept in captivity. “ In view of these considerations,” Updike says, “ we recommend (hat Ihe best course of action in most cases is lo leave the critters in the woods or wherever you find them. Unless the animal is injured or in immediate danger from dogs, cats, or some other factor, do not pick it up or move it. Mother will probably be back as soon as you leave. If the animal needs medical attention, put it in a safe place and get in touch wilh a veterinarian for advice and possible treatment. The same goes for what to feed the young anim al.” “ The best advice,” Updike concludtii, “ is to let nature take care of its own.” Cornatzer Homemakers Hold April Meeting The Cornalzer Exiension Homemakers Club met at the home of Palsy Boger on Baltimore Road on April 26, 1983. Dorlhy Chaplin, president, presided over Ihe business session. Palsy Boger gave devotions. Aggie Caudle was program leader on “ Fitness is a Slale of Mind” - She gave each member a printed copy of information on food. The club made plans lo have the Birthday Party at the Fran-Ray Rest Home on May 17. Lucille Potts collecled pennies for Friendship - Dottie Potts read an article on Last Will and Testament of A Farm er. The club adjourned with Ihe club coiled and Ihe. hosless served delighlful refreshments.. D AVIi; COUNTY ENTKRPRISH RUCORD. THURSDAY. MAY 5. I‘)8.î - 5C Record Low Temperatures Raise Energy Costs This Spring By Christie Blanton The spring and fall months are probably the time of lowest energy consumption for you. So why might Ihis month’s bill for electrical service look as if it is more than last year’s at the same time? Usually in the Carolinas the spring and fall months require very little energy for heating or cooling. Thus, Ihey are often referred lo by the electrical company as base load months. This means your energy; consumption, or load, is mostly used for lighting, cooking, refrigeration, large and small appliances and water healing.Each month your total kilowatt- hour consumption is the sum of the base load and the weather responsive load. The weather responsive load is the electricity used for healing and cooling.Record low temperatures arrived Ihis month and prompted many of us lo turn on our heating systems. Thus, Ihe wealher responsive load has increased more than usual for Ihis time of year.Remember your heating and cooling syslem is the largest user of energy in your home. This month your heating system may have been on more lhan you realize due lo Ihe cold weather. Often this is the best time of year for a fire in the fireplace. A fire can help remove the chill from your home without using the heating sysiemThe energy consumption of your water heater may also be above normal for this time of year. Colder outdoor temperatures mean colder water to be heated. Thus, your waler heater is using more energy lo heat the water and maintain waler lemperalures for this lime of year.The rain and colder lemperalures have kept many of us inside more lhan usual for spring. Thus, fewer meals have been cooked outdoors. Mocksville Elementary School Holds Craft Day Wednesday, April 27 was Crafl , Day al M ocksville Elem enlary K-. , School. Seven local craftsmen spent ^ ^ Ihe day demonstrating Iheir skills lo Ihe sludenis. Mrs.’Bia'nch Rash. QUilting. George Hairston, woodcarving. r M rs. Debbie calligraphy. Furches, ■ I ■Friday, April 29, a demonstration and discussion of North Carolina Foods by Cynthia Higgins from the North Carolina Departm ent of A griculture in Raleigh. (H er column appears each week in the. Enterprise). Grady Beauchamp Joins Hereford Association Grady L . Beachamp, Route 1, Advance, N.C., has become a new adult member of the American Polled Hereford Association, ac­ cording to an announcement from Ihe beef breed association’s nalional headquarters in Kansas City, Mo. More lhan 2,(X)0 cattlemen have joined the Am erican Polled Hereford Association in the past year, bringing the total of woners and breeders of Polled Herefords in Ihe U.S. to over 250,000. The naturally hornless Polled Herefords are Ihe only major breed of liveslock tooriginate in the United Slates, starling with 11 head in 1901. Today Polled Herefords are Ihe fastest growing major breed in the world. Over four million Polled Herefords have been registered in the U.S. since 1901; almost one-half of the total in the past 10 years, illustrating the growth and universal acceptance of the breed. American Polled Herefords have been exported to all the beef produccing countries of the world. Concord Methodist Sponsor Bake Sale Concord United Methodist Church women will sponsor a bake sale, Friday, May 6, at Food Lion Store, North Main Street, Mocksville, beginning at 8:30 a.m. Proceeds will be used for the building fund. DEALER’S MERCHANDISE AUCTION Buyers and Sellers Welcome! 2 Big Sales Each Tuesday EVERY TUESDAY - llrOO A.M. UrJTIL 5:00 P.V. SECOr'.D SALE Or! TUESDAY - 6:30 P.M. UNTIL l_ o c a t e d In M o c k s v ille , N . C . o n W ilk e s b o r o S t r e e t In t h e b u il d in g w h i c h w a s f o r m e r l y P e n n in g t o n C h e v r o le t C o . A l l T y p e s o f N e w M e r c h a n d ls e - . H a r d w a r e . . . H o u s e h o ld G o o d s . . . T o y s . . . G r o c e r le s . . . T o o ls • C o s m e t ic s . . . C lo t h e s . . jn d M a n y M o r e M o n e : M a k in g I t e m s . I f y o u o w n o r m a n a g e a b u s in e s s o r w o r k t h e f le a m a r k e t , t h is Is t h e p la c e y o u v ia n t t o b e ! B u y y o u r m e r c h a n d is e h e r e b e lo w ' W h o le s a le P r ic e s ! E V E R Y O N E W E L C O M E ! P le a s e b r in g y o u r s a le s t a x n o . o r y o u w i l l b e r e q u ir e d t o p a y s a le s t a x o n m e r c h a n d is e . FOR M O R E Jl'JFO R M A TIO r^A LL; F r e d O . E llis 7 0 4 - 6 3 4 - 5 2 1 0 - 9 1 9 - 9 9 8 - 8 7 4 4 L ib G r u b b 7 0 4 - 2 8 4 - 2 5 6 6 A u c t io n T e le p h o n e N o . 7 0 4 - 6 3 4 - 5 0 7 7 ( S a le D a y O n l y ) Fred 0. Ellis Auctioneer N C.A.L. 343 Automobile Auction fir S tS a T e " " “ " " " " " " " “ I'lednesday, i ’arch 16,1983 Every Wednesday Night A t 7:30 P.M. I Located In Mocksville, N.C. In The Building [ Which Was Formerly Pennington Chevrolet E v e r y o n e W e lc o m e T o B u y O r S e ll O p e n T o D e a le r s A n d I n d iv id u a ls W e W II I S t a r t A c c e p t in g C a r s A t 3 : 0 0 P . M . o n S a le D a y S e lle r s M u s t H a v e G o o d T i t l e O n E a c h C a r . | W e W ill N o t S e ll T i t l e A t t a c h e d C a r s . C h e c k s W ill B e A c c e p t e d B y D e a le r s O n l y . I n d lv i( ju a ls M u s t P a y B y C a s h . Make Plans To Be With Us Each Wednesday] Niglit! Sell A Car— Buy A Car Enjoy The Evening And Make Money, Too! | We Pledge Fairness To Everyone! For More InformEtion, Contact: Fred O. Ellis (919)998-8744 (704)634-5210 Lib Grubb (704)2P4-2566 — ELLIS AUCTION C 0.~ F U R C H E S M O T O R S Brings It All Together... For You See one of our Sales Counselors below for the buy of Today! J.D. Furchess John Hendricks Richard Seeding Troy McDaniel FURCHES MOTOR COM PANY, INC. 225 Depot Street Mocksville, N.C. Phone 634-5948 6C - DAVII-COUNTY UNTERl’ IUSU RECOUP.THUUSDAY. MAY 5. 198.1 Roy W alker was not so lucky with his peach crop and although he managed to get by the first cold spell, he says the last one "w iped me out." (More Photos on Page 12C) ' W Plants Recover From Freeze The cold freezing temperatures of a little over a week ago have made it a rough season for the farmers, but some of them say it has not been a total loss as they had originally anticipated. M rs. Beulah Foster (I) has been busy meeting the dem and for plants since №e freeze. She and her husband have a greenhouse |ust north of M ocksville. The customers are M ary and Clyde Ireland. Although the season will begin laler, Scolt Angell says it looks as if he will have as good a strawberry crop this year as he had last year. He estimates a loss of about 20 to 30 percent. However, it cost him almost two million gallons of water to protect his crop... and Seott says Ihis “ was county water” he used. He kept his irrigation system going during Ihose freezing nights and he says ice insulates and creates warmth, which protected his straw berries. According to Angell and the Davie County Agriculture office, he was the only commercial strawberry grower in Ihe county who irrigated to save his crop. Angell plans to be open to the public by the end of next week. Roy Walker was not so lucky with his peach crop. He ran an irrigation syslem the first cold spell, but he says he ran out of water and the last cold spell “ wiped me out.” Walker has been growing peaches commercially for the past three seasons. He ways the first season, the trees were too young to produce a large quantity and last year, due to the late cold snap, he got a total of 12 peaches from his orchard. This year looks like a repeat of last year, but he plans to make some changes by next season. He estimates a small sprinkler system like he needs, to cost in the neighborhood of 10 to 12 thousand dollars. Larry Childs also lost his peach crop this year, but Walker says his apples will make it because Ihey were not in blossom when the cold wealher was so severe. Frank Brown of the local FCX Slore in Mocksville says the small farmers were not hurt so severely as the commercial growers in the counly. Many home gardeners were able to cover their plants and many have been later in planting this season. Brown says they have been pretty busy al the slore, however, Ihey have had some problems getting plants, but he doesn’t an­ ticipate this problem to last. Bob Foster and his wife, Beulah, have been busy during the past week meeting the demand for plants. The greenhouse which was once full, is now showing empty spaces. Mrs. Foster says that since the freeze, they have sold more than 300 trays of plants. She says during the severe weather,, they did keep heat in their greenhouse, therefore, Iheir plants were not damaged. ; In spite of Mother Nature’s trucks with the weather Ihis spring, all is not lost in Davie County. Story by Marlene Benson Photos by Jim Barringer ■ M '/ % Frank Brown of the local FC X store in M ocksville said there had been some problems getting plants, but they have been quite busy at the store the past week. growing cucumbers in hanging a Jtls a special type of "bush" plant which does not have such long runners before producing the cukes. ( Photo by Jim B arringer). M rs. Bob (Beulah) Foster of Mocksville .. ------------ _ baskets in their greenhouse. M rs. Foster says it is a special 1 t A u xiliary A ids D avie C ounty H o spital '!>' \ ■ Thp Davie Counly Hos MrSj Sarah Owings operates the new computerized Cash H w ilteî Suxlliai^f fiospital by the Officers of the Davle County Hospital Auxiliary for 19B3. Back Row; Louise Hammer, Ed Rosser, Annie Lois Grant, ■John Hendrix, June Young. Virginia Waters. (Front Row:) Debbie Furches, Linda Giles Lynda DulL Not pictured; Carroll Johnstone. Ninth annual car show. President's Choice Award. A 4932 Ford Roadster owned by Kenneth Joyce of Winston-Salem. Pictured here with Lynda Dull, Davie County Hospital Auxiliary President. SOLID CEDAR BEAUTY 1420 s a FT PRECUT LOG KIT »14,900.00 CEDARDALE H O M ES'IN C . B o x 1 5 3 - A B r o o k d a le D r . SEN,DCOU1>ON Advance, N.C. TODAY! 998-2687 □ Personal Home NAME-___ a Floor Plans $5.00 ADDRESS. Dealership Information PHONE . LOG HOME ExoellenoB in ♦Quality »Desiai •Service i ounly Hospital Auxiliary held ils regular monlhly Executive Meeting on April 28, 1983. Tiie meeting was called lo order by President, Lynda Dull. Discussion opened with Ihe reports of our Ninth Annual Car Show which was held on April 17th. All reports were ex­ cellent and showed that the Car Show was a big success. Proceeds will be used for Ihe Davie County Hospital. Special thanks are given lo all who participated in any way. Wilhout Ihe support and dedication of all our Auxiliary Members, this Event would nol be possible. The. Davie County Hospital Auxiliary has recenlly purchased a new machine for the Dietary Department. II is a cash register that records and itemizes every item purchased. Each purchase is printed out on a receipt and correct change is shown. These duties in the pasl have been done by Ihe Dietary Department and the Hospital Auxiliary Volunteers. Now with the accuracy and the speed of this machine, the busy Lunch Hour runs easier and more efficient.A Dietetic Cookbook was pur­chased for the Dietary Department by the Hospital Auxiliary and a copy was placed in tlie Davie County Library. Its title is. The American Dietetic Association Fam ily Cook­book. It was written by the Dietetic Association and the Diabetic Association and includes basic nutrition as well as delicious recipes.Volunteers are always welcomed and needed in the Dietary Depart­ment of our Hospital, especially during the Lunch Hour time of 11:00 a.m. unlil 1:00 p.m. If you are in­ terested in volunteering a few hours of your time to supporl Ihe Davie Counly Hospital, please contact Mrs. Annie Lois Grant at 634-5194 or M rs. Lynda Dull at 634-3764. Volunteers are needed in all areas in the Hospital and with your help we can meet the needs of the Davie County Hospital. ,^ A V IE COUNTY UNTl-Rl’ UISU RECORD, TllURSDA'i’. MAY 5. 1У83 D iO e c o m e s Northwest Financial Dial Financial Corporation and its parent company, Dial Corporation, have announced their new name, Norwest Financial. The name change is effective May 1, 1983, for Dial subsidiaries throughout the country.The name change lo Norwest Financial coincides with adoption of a new identity by the parent com­ pany, Norwest Corporation of Minneapolis, Minnesota. Formerly known as Northwest Ban- corporation (BAN CO ), Norwest Corporation consists of 86 com­ mercial banks, 5 trust companies, and several financial services subsidiaries. The common identity has been adopted to help com­ municate the combined strengtii, soundness, and security of the diverse companies. Norwest Financial holds assets of $1 billion and operates 456 offices in 38 states. Norwest Fin an cial’s business activities include con­ sumer and business loans, retail sales financing, equipment leasing, and accounts receivable financing for high quality furniture stores. Norwest Financial is also Ihe leading supplier of data services to the consumer finance industry. The Winston-Salem office of Norwest Financial is located at 956 Peter’s Creek Parkw ay and managed by Jack Drumheller. Special Program At Bethlehem A special program will be held at Bethlehem United Methodist Church, Advance, Rt. 1, Sunday, May 8, at 7:30 p.m.A slide presentation will be shown by Mr. and Mrs. W.V. Smith of their trip with Ihe building team to Jamaica.The public is invited to attend. Farm IM^rliet Summary (Farm Market Summary, Week of April 25, 1983, Federal-State Market News Service, Division of Marketing, NCDA.) A lolal of 9,169 feeder nigs were sold on II slale graded sales during week of April 25, according lo the Market News Service of the North Carolina Department of Agriculture. Prices were 50 cents to $1.50 higher per hundred on 40-80 pound 1-2 pigs. US 1-2 pigs weighing 40 50 pounds averaged $91.65 per hundred pounds with No. 3s $82.61; 50-60 pound l-2s averaged $83.91, No. 3s $73.98; 60-70 pound 1 -2s $74.35, No. 3s $66.21; 70-80 pound l-2s $66.77 per hundred pounds wilh No, 3s $63.55.Al Ihe few weekly liveslock auctions reported by the Market News Service for the week of April 25 , 6,650 cattle and 2,300 hogs were sold. Prices for slaughter cows were steady to 50 cents higher and feeder calves mostly $1 to $3 higher. Utility and Commercial slaughter cows brought $40 to $46.50 with Canner and Cutter at $35 to $44. Choice slaughter calves 350-550 pounds sold from $59 lo $63. Choice slaughter steers above 800 pounds broughl $62 to $65.75 at one market with Good al $56 lo $58. Slaughter Bulls yield grade I & 2 above 1000 pounds sold from $49.75 lo $57.50 per dwt. Medium Frame No. 1 thickness 400- 500 pound feeder steers broughl $64 to $79 with Small Frame No. Is at $57 to $67, same weight Medium Frame No. 1 heifers brought $50 lo $58.50 with Small Frame No. Is at $50 lo $56. Beef lype Feeder Cows carrying average flesh brought $40 to $48. Baby calves under three weeks of age brought $45 to $80 per head. Market hogs 200-240 pounds sold from $46.90 lo $48.20 with sows 450 pounds up al $40.90 to $43. The North Carolina fob dock quoted price on broilers for April 28 through May 4 increased three- fourths to 41.25 cents, with a preliminary weighted average of 41.67 cents fob dock or equivalent. The market is steady a;id the live supply is moderate for a moderate lo good demand.Heavy type hens were steady to one cent higher this past week. Supplies were adequate and demand moderate. Heavy type hen prices 17-18, mostly 18 cents per und al Ihe form with buyers loading.Corn prices were mostly 15 to 20 cents per bushel higher and soybeans were 12 to 22 cents higher Ihrough Thursday compared to the same period of the previous week. No. 2 yellow shelled corn ranged mostly $4.35 to $3.55 in the Eastern pari of the slale and $4.35 to $3.55 in the Piedmont. No. 1 yellow soybeans ranged mostly $6.27 to $6.54 in the East and $6.18 to $6.34 in Ihe Piedmont; No. 2 red winter wheal $3.26 to $3.36; No. 2 red oats $1.25 lo $1.45. Soybean meal fob the processing plant ranged $220.30 to $229.00 per ton for 44 percent. New crop prices quoted for harvest delivery corn $2.74 to $3.06, soybeans $6.29 to $6.71, wheat $3.06 to $3.43.Egg prices were higher on all sizes wilh Ihe greatest increase on smalls compared to those of the previous week. Supplies v/ere adequate with demand moderate to good. The North Carolina weighted avei age price quoted on April 28 for small lot sales of cartoned Grade A eggs delivered to stores was 72.04 cents per dozen for Large, Medium 67.60 and Smalls 60.33.Sweet potato prices were steady this week and supplies were adequate with demand moderate. Fifty pound cartons of cured US No. Is on April 28 were quoted at $3.75 lo $4.25 some $3.50 and $4.50. Jumbos mostly $1.75 to $2.00. Prices paid to growers for No. Is were $1.75 to $2.00, mostly $1.75 per bushel al the end of the grading bell. Market hogs at daily cash buying stations about the state sold 50 cents higher during the week of April 25, and ranged mostly $45.75 lo $47.50 per hundred pounds. Sows 500 pounds, up ranged $42.00 to $45.00. Drugs Keep products in their original containers. Many drugs are sen­ sitive to lemperature, moisture, oxygen or light. The original con­ tainer was designed lo proiect the drug's effectiveness. poilos Country Ham and Sausage Breal(fast MAY 7, 1983 5-11 A.M. William R. Davie V.F.D. Cany Out Ham Biscuits Introducing To The Mocksville Area: ailored lleaning lervices Quality Cleaning At Affordable Prices We Clean: Houses,Businesses, Offices, Garages, Windows, And Etc. We Can Come Weekly, Biweekly, Monthly, Or On A One Time Basis. Day & Night Work. For Free Estimates Call Lane Or Dianne Lovette At 704-634-3145 S E M I A N N U A L Bar-B-Oue Saturday May 7 — SERVING— Sandwiches-Plates Take Out Orders Also Available At The Fire Department StartingAtlOA.M. Jeru salem Fire D e p a rtm e n t intersection 801 and 601 Greasy Corner Kevin Smith of Advance was appointed by Lieutenant Governor Jimmy Green to serve as a Page in the North Carolina Senate during the week of April 25-29. Parents are Mr. and Mrs. Buford smith. The duties of North Carolina Senate Pages include working with the fifty Senators, and with the staff members of the General Assembly. Pages assist in the Senate Chamber during the Senate's daily Sessions. They are also assigned to the various Committee meetings during the day when the Senate Is not in session. CCB Announces Promotions (Central Carolina Bank announced the promotions of Carla T. Brown, David K . Cross, Ruth G. Foster, Sylvia Joyner Jones and Charles R. Lemons to the position of Assistant Treasurer. (3arla T. Brown, in addition to duties as Assistant Treasurer, also serves as Branch Operations Officer at CCB’s Asheboro Office. Brown isa member of the Mid-State AIB Study Group and is the Disaster Chairman of the Randolph County Chapter of the American Red Cross. Newly elected Assistant Treasurer David K . Cross, is also the Assistant Branch Manager of the bank's Battl^round Office in Greensboro, N.C. Cross officially joined CCB upon merger with the Burlington National Bank in January 1981. He is a graduate of Wake Forest University and holds a B.S. in Business Administration. ' As Assistant Treasurer and Assistant Manager of the Cooleemee Office of CCB, Ruth G. Foster also serves as a lending officer at that branch. Foster is a Director of the Davie County United Way and is active in the Dulin United Methodist Church. She and her family make their home in Mocksville, N.C. Joining CCB as a Commercial Note Teller in 1976, Sylvia Joyner Jones has been promoted to Assistant Treasurer and Loan Officer in the Stokesdale Office of the bank. The Joneses attend the Stokesburg Methodist Church in Walnut Cove. Recently they participated in the Exchange Student Program at the High School. The Joneses entertained a student from Paris while their daughter had the opportunity to live and study in France and Germany. Cliarles R . Lemons came to CCB in 1981 as a Loan Officer, and as Assistant Treasurer is assigned to CCB’s newest office in the Thruway Shopping Center of Winston-Salem. Lemons is a member of Sertoma- West and the Winston-Salem Jaycees. He completed bis education at Averett College majoring in Business Management. Comer Reunion Set For May 15th Comer Fam ily reunion will be held Sunday, May 15,1983, at 1 p.m. al William R . Davie Fire Depart­ ment.Fam ily and friends are invited to attend and to bring with them a picnic lunch. Plates, cups and, spoons will be provided.The fire department is located on Hwy. 601 North of Mocksville, N.C., seven miles out. Cooleemee School Menu, May 9-13 The menu for the Cooleemee School for the week of May 9-13 is as follows: MONDAY-Ham and cheese, lettuce, pickles, French fries, catsup, rolls, dessert.TU ESD A Y -C h icken p atties, creamed potaloes, green beans, rolls, dessert.W ED N ES D A Y -Fish , ta rta r sauce, boiled potatoes, slaw, rolls, Jello. THURSDAY-Hol dogs, chili, slaw, onions, potato chips, rolls, cookies. ■ FR ID A Y-Pizza, tossed salad, bullered corn, fruit, peanut butter and crackers. "You can tell the ideals of a nation by its advertise­ ments." Norman Douglas Buy a new Ford TW-10, TW-20 OP TW-30 and... GET A FORD RANGER (AT NO EXTRA ^ COST! • 'ж5 V Now you can pul big Fofd uacior power to work on your farm . arK) goi a lough new Ranger pickup al no extra cost Come in ao(j make your best deal on a now 110-PTO hp Ford TW-10 135-PTO hp TW-20 or 163-PTO hp TW-30 Buy and lake delivery of any one of ihese umjs before June 30.1983. and get — al NO EXTRA COST — a new Ford Ranger, the tough new Ford.ptckup youve been heanng aboul OR...MAKE NO PRINCIPAL OR INTEREST PAYMENTS UNTIL 19841 NONE! THEN GET 10^4% ANNUAL PERCENTAGE RATE FIXEO-RATE FINANCING FOR UP TO 48 MONTHS! Nearly 5 years of financing for tho price of 4' Thais right! Qualified b<jyers can get up lo 10 months waiver of finance charges. foi'ov.ed by 10*4»o ANNUAL PERCENTAGE RATE financing through Ford Molor Qfedil Com­ pany or olher pariicipaling financial institu­ tions New related implements are also eligible when purchased and financed with your new Ford tractor That moans finance charges wiH not begin lo accrue and youii make no additional pay- menis until January 2.1984 And the balance of your contract has a very attractive percent­ age rale A qualifying down payment or trade-in is required Certain restnciions apply Physical damage and ctedit htc insurance are nol included 0fl...6ET BIG CASH DISCOUNTS! Factory irx:on('ve aikiwances mean wo can now oiler subsfandai cash discounts m lieu ol the above offers Additional discounts are available lor from wheel drive opi<on Ask us how much you can save' ACT SOON! All offers expire June 30.1983! See us for all of the details and reslnctions Davie Tractor & Implement Co. Highway 601 South Mocksville, N.C. Piione: 634-5969 8C - DAVIE COUNTY I-NTURPRISE RECORD, THURSDAY. MAY S, 1983 District Court The following coses were disposed of during Ihc April 27 session of Davie Counly DislricI Courl wilh Ihe honorable Robert W. Johnson, presiding judge. Floyd Granville Shore, exceeding posled speed, cosls. Donald Raye Giles, going wrong way on a one-way slreel, cosls.Timolhy C. Benish, driving 05 mph in a 55 mph zone, no regislralion, $5 and cosls.Roberl John Brisley, driving 09 mph in a 55 mph zone, $10 and cosls.Peggy Brown, worlhless check, make reslilulion and pay courl cosls.Barry Keilh Carson, driving 05 mph in a 45 mph zone, $10and cosls.John Dominick Fiorili, driving 70 mph in a 55 mph zone, $10 and cosls. Terry Eugene Hulchins, driving lefi of cenler, cosls.Terry Lynn Kimmer, improper parking, cosls.Charles Ronald Lowe, exceeding safe speed, cosls.Lonnie Marlin, driving 70 mph in a 55 mph zone, $10 and cosls.W illiam Curlis Nichols, loud muffler, cosls.Kay Milcham Sherrill, driving 69 mph in a 55 mph zone, $10 and cosls. Gaye Pierce Thompson, driving 70 mph in a 55 mph zone, $10 and costs.Irv;n George Scherer, exceeding posted speed, cosls.Bruce Edward- Hall, Jr., DUI, voluntary dismissal.Nila Marie Reynolds, driving 66 nibh in a 55 mph zone, dismissed with leave.^Jammie Edward Truelt, driving 68 mph in a 55 mph zone, dismissed Wilh leave.Claude Sherman Donaway, dtiving 70 mph in a 55 mph zone, dismissed wilh leave."Charlie Craig Hanes, safe movement violation, voluntary dismissal. ■Billy Cave, trespass, voluntary dbmissal.^ m elia Frances Wilson, pcesession of ndn tax paid liquor, vbluntary dismissal. 'iAlton Lane, assault, voluntary dismissal.!;Robert M. Allen, Jr., worthless check, voluntary dismissal, i Elm er Warner Cromie, di-iving 69 mph in a 55 mph zone, $10 and costs. ; Elm er R . Hill, driving 80 mph in a 55 mph zone, $25 and cosls. "Michael Thomas Duane, driving 7p mph In a 55 mph zone, $10 and costs.■'Darlyn Lavern Holland, driving 6é mph in a 55 mph zone, $10 and cpsls.t^Ronnie Eugene Kelchie, driving 7p mph in a 55 mph zone, $10 and costs.iDonnie Gray Hardy, driving. 70 mph in a 55 mph zone, $10 and costs, ujohn Joseph Hummel, driving 70 mph in a 55 mph zone, $10 and costs. iiEdna K . Booth, driving 69 mph in ¿.'55 mph zone, $10 and costs.¿Don E . Giddens, driving 70 mph in a 55 mph zone, $10 and costs.S'Fredrick O’Neal Gaither, driving65 mph in a. 55 mph zone, $10 and costs.-"Wilbert Richard Caldwell, driving 7jP mph in a 55 mph zone, $10 and cosls.¿Altieri Bennett Gobble, exceeding ^sled speed, costs.S William Holm, driving 67 mph in a 55 mph zone, $10 and cosls.; Michele Elaine Bryant, driving 70 mph in a 55 mph zone, $10 and costs. David Edwin Voneannon, driving 66 mph in a 55 mph zone, $10 and costs.YClifton Agusta Schodt, Jr., driving 70 mph in a 55 mph zone, $10 and costs.i Dorothy W. Tuma driving 69 mph in a 55 mph zone, $10 and costs.■- Nochman Neff, driving 70 mph in a 55 mph zone, $10 and cosls.. Tina J . Morgan, driving 70 mph in a 55 mph zone, $10 and costs. James Harold Robinson, driving 70 mph in a 55 mph zone, $10 and costs.. Judiih Carol Whitmire, driving 70 ^ph in a 55 mph zone, $10 and costs. Patrick W. McCormack, driving. 69 mph in a 55 mph zone, $10 and costs.'B ry a n Stuart Yarborough, driving 68 mph in a 55 mph zone, $10 and costs.M arvin Daniel Yarborough, driving 69 mph in a 55 mph zone, $10 ^nd cosls.; Michael William Stone, driving 70 mph in a 55 mph zone, $10 and cosls.' Jackie Dale Robertson, driving 67 mph in a 55 mph zone, $10 and cosls.: Sleven Dewayne Smith, improper equipment, cosls.: Joseph Alvin Warnock, drivingJO 09 mph in a 55 mph zone, $10 and cosls.Fred Smilh, driving 69 mph In a 55 mph zone, $10 and cosls.Roger Keilh Lunsford, driving without license, and driving loo fast for conditions, $25 and costs.Craig Evan Jones, driving 69 mph in a 55 mph zone, $10 and cosls.Quincy Douglas Allen, driving 70mph in a 55 mph zone, $10 nnd costs. Tracy Jeni Easland, driving 68 mph in a 55 mph zone, $10 and costs. Bonnie Straight Davis, driving 70 mph in a 55 mph zone, $10 and costs. Mark William Kormroles, driving 70 mph in a 55 mph zone, $10 and cosls.Annie Maria Moore, exceeding posled speed, cosls. Edna R . Pitlenger, driving 70 mph in a 55 mph zone, $10 and costs. Anihony Ridick, driving 69 mph in a 55 mph zone, $10 and costs. Kevin Speight, driving 70 mph in a 55 mph zone, $10 and cosls.John Eugene Pitts, driving 68 mph in a 55 mph zone, $10 and cosls.Dennis Wayne Ram sue, ex­ ceeding safe speed, costs. Michael Lee Kennedy, driving 70 mph in a 55 mph zone, $10 and costs.Tim othy Lee Doby, safe movement violation, costs. Earnest Thomas Hodge, DUI and expired regislration, sentenced lo 6 months suspended for one year, $200 and cosls, altend DUI course at menial health. Alton Lane, resisting public of­ ficer, sentenced to • 60 days suspended for 2 years, pay $50 and cosls. remain of good general behavior.Franklin L . Stowe, driving wilh an expired license, $25 and cosls. Joe Franklin Tulbert, exceeding safe speed, cosls. Allen Grant Robertson, reckless driving after drinking, sentenced lo 6 months suspended for two years, pay $200 and costs, complele DUI course at mental health.Edward Hugh Ponder, exceeding safe speed, costs.Annette Leah Mullins, reckless driving after drinking, sentenced to 6 months suspended for 2 years pay $100 and costs, altend DUI course at mental health.Faye Hudson Cockerham, assault, not guilty.John L . Lyons, exceeding safe speed, reckless driving after drinking, sentenced to 6 months suspended for 2 years, pay $100 and cosls, attend DUI course at mental health.Patricia Ann Lewis, driving 70 mph in a 55 mph zone, no operator’s license, $35 and cosls.Meade Randolph Atkinson II, unsafe movement, costs. Mark Anthony Cope, reckless driving after drinking, sentenced to 6 months suspended for 2 years, pay $100 and cosls, complele DUI course al mental heallh. Early Vince Booe, Jr., exceeding safe speed. Joey Baker, disturbing the peace, $50 and cosls. Carl White Hoffman, exceeding safe speed, costs. Amelia Frances Wilson, possession of marijuana, $100 and costs, lurn drugs over to Police Departmenl to be destroyed. Ralph Kenneth Williams, driving wilh blood alcohol of .10 and driving while license suspended, sentenced lo 0 months suspended for 2 years, pay $200 and cosls, attend DUI session al menial health. G erry Paul Royal, reckless driving after drinking, sentenced lo 6 months suspended for 2 years, pay $100 and cosls, attend DUI course al mental health. Donald B . Roe, worthless check, sentenced lo 30 days. Ralph W illiam s, larceny, dismissed on costs. Frederick Hans Borgmann, trespass, prayer for judgment continued. Debbie Julin Fowler, assault, remit costs. Tammy Howell, assaull, remit cosls. Billy Edward Smoot, possession of marijuana, pay $100 and costs, lurn drugs over lo the Police Department lo be destroyed. Victor Arnold, breaking, enlering and larceny, sentenced to 60 days and make restitution of $50 to James Foster, report lo Tri-County Mental Health for counseling. Sleven Craig Stoltz, possession of a controlled substance, improper passing, DUI, sentenced to 6 months suspended for 3 years, pay $200 and cosls, complete DUI course at menial health. Son Thompson, Sr., sentenced to 6 montlis suspended for 5 years, pay $100 and cosls, placed on supervised probation for five years, complete DUI course at menial health. Kalhy Ann Gobble, DUI and exceeding safe speed, sentenced to 6 months suspended for 2 years, pay $100 and costs, attend DUI course at mental health. William Dennis Anderson, driving 100 mph in a 45 mph zone, failure lo slop for blue light and siren, DUI, driving in excess of 55 mph to elude arrest, sentenced to 2 years suspended for 3 years, pay $300 and costs, placed on supervised probation for three years, attend DUI course at mental health. No probable cause on DUI charge. r Sgt. John Keaton Serving In Germany Sgt. John A. Keaton, son of Lewis M. Keaton of Route 2, Advance, N.C., has arrived for duly in Boeblingen, West Germany, under Project Cohort. Keaton, an infantryman with the 1st Infantry D ivision, was previously assigned at Fort Riley, Kan. Project COHORT (cohesion, operational readiness and training) is'a test program designed to in­ crease the cohesion, stability and readiness ot a unity by allowing soldiers to-train together and continue together throughout their entire initial enlistment. He is a 1969 graduate of Davie High School, Mocksviile, N.C. AppUances Never immerse an appliance in water unless the manufacturer’s instructions say it is safe to do so. mph in a 55 mph zone, $10 and cosl Elliott Bernard Wilkes, improper passing, $10 and costs.Joseph Michael Sheridan, driving Andersoi) SUPER BRUSH BUSTER The thicker it is, the better the Stihl® FS-90 cuts It. And the better you’ll like the FS-90. Save on an optional accessory kit, Including a heavy-duty saw blade. It’s Stihl's way of help­ ing you overpower the under­ brush. Phone 634-5605 H lg h w a ^ S ^ o U t r^ocksvllle SAVE $25.00 O FF REGULAR PRICE S T IH L THE WORLD’S LAHOEST SELLING CHAIN SAW С D i Ф F a n n e rs' M utual F ire Insurance A ssociation Iredell, Alexander and Davie Coanty Branch 301 Harrill Street / StatesvUie, N. C. 28677 P. O. Box 507 / Phone 873-7461 (coUect) Homeowner, W e can provide a $30,000 AAAHO-2 for a cost as low as $114.70 a year. AAA Homeowners’ Policy 40.000—S146.60 50.000—$175.50 60.000—$204.40' 70.000—$233.30 80.000—$262.20 90,000—$291.10 $100,000—$320.00 AAA SUndard Fire Policy $ 40,000—$ 74.80 $ 5O,000r-$ 93.50 $ 60 ,0 0 0 -$ l 12.20 $ 70,000-$130.90 $ 80.000-$149.60 $ 90,000-$168.30 $100,000-5187.00 t C A L L C O L L E C T F O R A C O M P A R IS O N W E A L S O P R O V I D E H O M E O W N E R S 3 A N D P E R S O N A L P R O P E R T Y R E P L A C E M E N T C O V E R A G E . Я r J . ---------------------------------------------------------------- WQ^TH STO< — Southwestern Stock Show Feb. 1, 1983 over 200 head of cattle there. TNJ Enf High Voltage won Grand Champion; son RBF Hi Volt Sky Walker won Reserve Grand Champion. First time father and son won Grand and Reserve Grand at same show in Polled Hereford history. Owned by River Bend Farm of Cooleemee, N.C. RBF Hi Volt Supreme, Reserve Grand Champion Heifer at N.C. Polled Hereford Assoc, show and sale at Lenoir, N.C. was second highest selling animal /March 26, 1983. R ed Cross N eed s For D isaster V ic tim s H elp Only a few weeks ago, Sunday, April 3, as the waters of the Yadkin River rose to flood level, the American Red Cross prepared for the worst. Here in Davie County that meant activating a team of specially trained volunteers to assess the damage and prepare for evacuation and sheltering victims. Fortunately no one suffered severely. Louisiana and Mississippi residents were not so lucky. Due to repeated blows by large rainfall, high rivers and disasterous floods more than 12,000 families were left homeless. American Red Cross volunteers and staff quickly moved onto the scene to provide for the emergency food, shelter, clothing and medical needs of all those affected. Assistance in this hard hit region has left the American Red Cross national disaster assistance budget depleted and special reserve funds nearing exhaustion. F. William Hughey, Jr., Manager of our local Chapter expressed the concern this way, "With $3.5 million needed in the Mississippi-Louisiana area alone and spring snow melts, rains and tornado season just beginning, we must act now to get ready for what is certain to occur. Our funds are dangerously low. We need help!”The local Chapter, serving Davie, Forsyth and Yadkin Counties, has been assigned a goal of $13,230. As Hughey explained, "this is like an insurance policy. We pay, hoping we won’t need it, but knowing it’s available for the emergencies that do occur, b? it the Yadkin or the Alississippi.” Contributions, tax deductible, should be made to: American Red Cross, Disaster Fund Campaign, 690 Coliseum D rive, Winston-Salem, N.C. 27106. NCSU Plans For Alumni Weekend North Carolina Slate University w ill welcome alum ni back to campus and w ill honor NCSU faculty and alumni for outstanding accomplishments and contributions to the university during the annual Alum ni Weekend May 6-7 in Raleigh. The Alumni Weekend activities, sponsored by the NCSU Alumni Association, are scheduled to begin at 9 a.m. Friday, May 6, with registration at the Jane S. McKimmon Center on Western Boulevard. Campus tours originating at the M cKim mon Center w ill be conducted during the morning. Some 600 alumni, faculty and staff are expected to attend the Awards Luncheon to be held at noon on Friday at the McKimmon Center. The NCSU Alumni Association will present faculty extension, research and teaching awards, the student Alum ni Athletics Trophy and awards to alumni for outstanding volunteer service to the university. In addition the Schools of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Engineering, and Forejt Resources will present their distinguished alumni awards. From 3:30 to 5 in the afternoon, Chancellor and Mrs. Bruce R . Poulton w ill host a reception for alum ni at their residence on Hillsborough Street, and on Friday evening alumni will gather for class reunions and a dance at the McKimmon Center. Members of the Class of 1933, who w ill be celebrating the 50th anniversary of their graduation from NCSU, are honored guests of the Alum ni Association for the evening. The weekend will conclude with the Chancellor’s Breakfast at 8:30 a.m. on Saturday, May 7, at the McKimmon Center. T h e t e r m p c h o c , in r e f e r ­ e n c e t o t e a , r e fe r s o n ly t o t h e s iz e o f t e a le a f — n o t t o a v a r ie t y o r t y p e . JASON M. CRANDELL, M.D. Treatment for Emotional Problems 24 HOUR EMERGENCY SERVICE CALL 766-0681 Paid Pol. Adv. Russell Walker The JIM HUNT Record Jim Hunt Says: C a m p a i g n a s s i s t a n c e f r o m o u t - o f - s t a t e “ c r e a t e s o b l i g a t i o n s y o u o u g h t n o t t o h a v e . " ' ' For The Record: H u n t Р А С g o t B e r t L a n c e a n d A n d y Y o u n g t o h o s t a $ 6 5 , 0 0 0 f u n d r a i s e r i n A t l a n t a f o r J i m H u n t . ^ Did this create an ^out-of-state obligation’ for Jim Hunt? Y o u b e t i t d i d ! And, how did Bert Lance get his pay-off from Jim Hunt? F i r s t , B e r t L a n c e c a l l e d o n H u n t ' s p a r t y c h i e f t a i n , R u s s e l l W a l k e r , t o h o t f o o t i t t o C h i c a g o . 3 T h e n , H u n t ' s p a r t y c h i e f t a i n c a m p a i g n e d f o r B e r t L a n c e ' s c a n d i d a t e , H a r o l d W a s h i n g t o n , f o r M a y o r o f C h i c a g o . - ' I s t h i s h o w j i m H u n t b u i l t h i s P O L I T I C A L M A C H I N E ? Harold iVashlngton r Aihfvillf Citizen 10/6'в2 2. AiUnta Conititution 3/1)/в} 3 AiUnla Convlilulior) 3/22/6Ì 4 jnd Obvcrvi-r Ì/24/03 Dem ocrats for Jesse... A M an of Character Piid hr by HUM S for Senate, Mark Slephem, Treiiuref DAVIECOUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, THURSDAY, MAY 5, 1983 - 9C S u tto n W ins F u rn itu re "O s c a r" A now, two-year old furniture manufacturing company, Sutton Reproductions, Inc. has won the furniture industry’s most coveted and prestigious award, the Daphne. The 12 category winners in the 1983 competition, sponsored by the Hardwood Inslituie, ranged from authentic reproductions to modern design. CHarlcs Sutton and his partner, Kennelh Sales, were among the 246 manufacturers, designers, and retailers attending the black tie dinner held at the Top of the Mart in High Poinl during the recent Spring Market. Sutton’s “ Ladies Desk” , a reproduction copied from a piece in the Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arls, won the Daphne in (he reproductions category. The judges thought the petite writing desk represented the epitome of delicately proportioned grace and charm of 18th century craft­ smanship. Constructed of solid Honduras mahoganv, the desk interior has seven drawers, and eight pigeon holes. Under the droplid is a drawer for stationery, below which are two utility drawers. Sutton and Sales were over- • whelmed ■ that their entry was selected as the best at such an early stage in the growth of their com­ pany. Ken Sales, who had worked for 18 years as the plant manager of Baker Furniture in Mocksville, N.C., said, “ We are of course proud of Ihis honor. We make our furniture to be authentic and useful, but most important- to last. The best -:materials, highly skilled labor, and care that goes into each of our pieces in the line proves that American craftsmen can make the finest furniture in the world.” Charles Sutton said, “ We are committed, to making the best furniture reproductions possible and this Daphne reinforces our determination to do the finest.” Sutton’s line of important oc­casional furniture is distributed to the designer and retail trade only Ihrough regional showrooms in Washington, D .C ., Philadelphia, Dallas, Atlanta, and High Point. S e le c tin g W ood For Fences A nd D ecks Davie County homeowners who are thinking about building a fence or deck are urged to think twice about the type of wood they select. “ Choose the right wood and use it properly and you can enjoy your deck for 25 years or more. Make the ’ wrong choice and you’ll be repairing or replacing it in a year or two,” said Dave Updike, Davie County A gricultural Extension Agent.You have three ’ choices when selecting wood for outdoor use- Eressure treated southern pine, eartwood of naturally resistant species such as redwood, cedar, cypress, and black locust, or un-: treated pine that you treat,yourself. Pressure-treated southern pine is usually the most reliable and economical choice particularly for wood in ground contact. Creosote, pentachlorophenol, and copper- chrome-arsenate or salt treaty wdod are widely available. All will last at least 25 years when applied properly. Salt treated wood is the most popular for use around the home. The treatment leaves the wood a greenish-brown color but if you want, you can stain or paint the wood when it has dried. The wood is harder than un­ treated wood so use a carbide tipped saw blade to cut it. When pur­ chasing salt-treated lumber look for a quality mark stamped on each piece of wood. It gives the name of Ihe treater, the type of preser- /i PrnSBlRGH P A I N T S P R E -M E M O R IA L D fly Ю Р QUALITY PAINTS AT BIG, B I G S A V № K S ! NOW THRU MAY 31,1983 W A L L H ID E ' L a te x F la t W a ll P a in t U iln g th * p it tn itd M crollo P ro e tit'. Slams, spots ano norm al housertold dirt d e a n u p e a s iifr E icellerii covering power in m ost colors SAVE •4»o“ NOW *10’?. w rote, paslei 10вау’ mn»dcok»ioniy D trk tr colo«» iiighiiy ri.gne> P itts b u rg h ’ E x t e r io r L a te x F la t H o u s e P a in t Ideal lor new or re­paint w ork Resists cracking, peeling, -4 llakino R e tu liin g pain t m m is m ildew re tia ta n t fo r itt ow n pro te ctio n . Easy applicaiion Over 7S0 colors S u n -P ro o f A c r y lic L a te x S e m i-G lo s s H o u s e a T rim P a in t R esulting pain t film It m ildew re titta n l lo r It« ow n protec* lio n . W eather resistani Ones 10 a semi>gl05s sheen Fast drying, recoat in 4 hours Use on both sidm g and Inm SAVE •S 'S . NOW SAVE » T T S Oв Gal NOW L A T E X C E IL IN G W H IT E P A IN T -An economical Im- tsh lor ceilings only High hiding Dries to an aiiraciive nch w hile liai finish E iceiient resistance to yellowing Easy application, soap ano waiei clean-up SAVE t O O OA U « I NOW *12 ^ *14^ gal. w rtit* p«»tei itaO r- ir .iM c o lo ri only O i'*e r colori »lignti» n>gr>e> W '»ie p<»iei >««ar-m>*0 СОЮ'» OnlyO a 'à ti co*or% »iighii* riigne» SATISFACTION GUARANTEED OR YOUR MONEY BACK .SOth V.\WABER CO. 162 Sheek Street Mocksville, N.C. 27028 Phone 634-2167 A lcohol In fo R ep o rt By William Weant vatives, and whether the wood is treated for use in ground contact or above ground. For decking it is also preferable to purchase wood dried after treatment. You will pay a little more for dried, quality marked material, but you will be buying a guaranteed product. • ' N aturally resistant heartwood has a more variable lifespan than pressure treated wood and is usually more expensive to pur­chase. Black locust is the best of the naturally resistant woods for fen­cing. Cedar, chestnut, cypress, redwood and white oak heartwood posts normally last 7 to 15 years in the ground, although redwood in particular seems to be decreasing in quality. Pine, hickory, red oak, spruce, sweetgum and yellow poplar last from 2 to 7 years. The lighter colored sapwood of all these species will decay in a couple of years in the ground. RedwoocJ, cedar, and cypress heartwood are fine for use above ground where the decay and termite hazard is much lower. Just be sure to leave a gap belween the bottom of fence boards made with these species and the ground.If you have a supply of southern pine, it is possible for you to treat it yourself and obtain long service. The best treatment method for home use is to soak dry lumber or posts for several hours in a S per­cent pentachlorophenol solution in oil. Brushing or spraying pine with preservative will give virtually no protection to wood used in the ground, although it will prolong the fife of untrealeawood above ground. If you have untreated pine, fir,.o r spruce decking or fencing, par­ ticularly split rail, it would be a good idea to brush all above ground parts that hold water with a water repellent preservative every year or two if you want to avoid early replacement costs. With careful planning wood will give long, trouble free service. If you would like additional in­ formation on selecting pressure treated wood or treating fence posts yourself, contact the Davic County Extension office. (May is Menial Health Monlh, and Ihe prevention, recognition, and Irealmcnl of alcoholism is pari of Ihe program at Tri-County Menial Health)Does someone close to you drink loo much? Do you feel your slomach tighten jusi al Ihe Ihoughl of his or her drinking?. While the drinker Ihinks he or she is silling on lop of Ihe world, are you worrying aboul how lo pay Ihe family debts? While he or she may be laking reckless personal and social liberties, are you anticipating car accidents, lale night fights, and neighbors' gossip? Alcoholism is a family illness, ils deslrucliva effects cause problems in Ihe lives of everyone who loves and cares for ils victims. The illness may continue from generation to generalion since children of alcoholics have a greater change of becoming victims of this disease than do children whose parents are free of alcoholism. Many members of the family of Ihe alcoholic wail too long lo gel help and, without help, families often develop patterns of living which actually encourage Ihe progress of the illness. Each member of the family becomes increasingly lonely, isolated and frightened. When there is a practicing alcoholic in Ihe fam ily, other members of the family can begin to lose seft-esteem if they are blamed, by the alcoholic, for his or her drinking. Financial problems related to alcoholism can have a profound effect on the 1 ifestyle of the alcoholic’s family. Pear of what the alcoholic might or might not do when drinking can manifest itself in such psychosomatic illnesses in family members as headaches, in­digestion, nausea, or shakiness. Although caused by psycholigical fear, these are real illnesses which frequently require treatment.Nonalcoholic fam ily members may become involved in destructive behavior sim ilar to that of the alcoholic: denying and covering up Ihe misuse of alcohol, coaxing, extracting promises, hiding or destroying liquor, and making threats. The alcoholic has been involved in sim ilar natural reac­ tions: blaming family members, telling family members or em­ ployers or other relatives to get 6ff his or her back, hiding and prolecting the- alcohol supply, and making threats. Increasing isolation, anger, and depression can become a way of life both for the non-alcoholic family members as well as for the alcoholic. ' The children in the family do not receive the love and attention they need. The alcoholic may make, unreasonable' demands on these- children. Life becomes un­ predictable...will he or she show up al family celebrations? Will there be enough money for necessities after Ihe booze is purchased? The illness creates continual feelings of uneasiness and fear within the family. If you are concerned about someone in your family having a drinking problem, answering the following questions may help you Jn deciding to seek assistance. 1. Do you lose sleep biecause of someone’s drinking? 2. Do many of your thoughts revolve around the drinking situations and problems resulting because of that person's drinking?3. Do you tj7 to control the drinking by asking for promises to slop.drinking? 4. Do you make threats? 5. Do you have increasingly negative attitudes toward the person?6. Do you mark, hide, or empty bottles of liquor or medication? 7. Do you think lhal everything would be okay if the drinking situation changed? 8. Do you feel alone, rejected, fearful, angry, guilly, exhausted? 9. Are you feeling an increasing dislike of yourself? 10. Do you find your moods fluc­ tuating as a direct result of the drinking? 11. Do y Ihe drink 11. Do you try to deny or conceal rinking situation? N p : I PK. soil pH. secd.tfTigaiion equipment, plow points, chemicals, crop insuj-anre... it's the bnguage of iann- ing. And you’ve gol to speak it tosuccced Wc speak your lanauage. Wc tTiake short tcm^ loans for equipment purchases, operating expenses- you name «.whatever ^ou nrcd for your row crop operation. Wc're farmerortcnted and fanncrcontrolled. Wc know what you're up against. Call or come by today. FARMINGspoken here R O W C R O P S spoken here. FARM CREDIT SERVICE 3 9 0 S a l i s b u r y S t r e e t M o c k s v i l l e , N .C .' 6 3 4 - 2 1 5 9 ntVicichaen?. Morton, Assistant Vice-Presidentij John H. Ervin, Loan Officer_______ 12. Do you cover for and proiect Ihe person?13. Do you feel responsible and guilly for Ihe drinking behavior? 14. Are you beginning lo withdraw or have you withdrawn from friends and oulside aclivities? 15. Have you laken over respon­ sibilities lhal used lo be handled by the olher person? IG. Are financial problems in­ creasing bccause of Ihe drinking? 17. Do you find yourself trying to justify your feelings and behavior in reaclion lo Ihe drinking behavior? 18. Do you have any new physical sympi oms such as headaches, in­ digestion, nausea, shakiness? 19. Do you' feel defeated and hopeless? 20. Is your sexual relationship negatively affected by the drinking situation? 21. If Ihere are children in the home, are they showing any stress and behavior changes Ihat could be related to the drinking situation?. Three or more “yes” answers mean there may be a drinking problem and indicate that if you arc experiencing these problems you should seek help. Alcoholism is a family illness, and non-drinking family members need assistance if there is to be a suc­ cessful recovery program for them and Ihe alcoholic. The spousd,", parent, child, or friend should separate his or her problems from ' | Ihose of Ihe abusive drinker. This'^' separation does not necessarily'^ ' involve Ihe person.The Tri-Counly Menial Hcalllt,'^* Cenler is ipen Monday-Friday, B:.™ A.M. to 5:00 P.M. Appointments are neccssary and may be made by phoning 634-2195.!'” Fees are established on a sliding'-' scale based on gross family income' and lolal number of dependents. If alcohol abuse is present in your life or in the life of someone yoil '" love, remember thal life can b e "' different. A good time to slart on the road to recovery is now, during'' ' Mental Health Monlh. (This series is prepared by B ill Weant, alcoholism education consjltant wilh Ihe Tri-Counlyl'' Mental Health Complex, 622 North Main Street, Mocksville. Thes^'’' articles are designed to create understanding about drinking, ■' alcohol abuse, and alcoholism in our society. If you have a quesliofi “ concerning alcohol that you would like answered in a fulure column!"' phone 634-2195.) ’ Bath Oil I'’'- If your bath oil foams, it probably'’' contains a detergent. ' XI 9 6 2 Yadkinville MKhWay CAROLINA C A R O L I N A T I R E ALL SEASON RADIAL RETREAD • All Year-All Weather Tread Design' Radial PerforiTiance Fuel Economy NOW ONLY $ 2 6 . 8 8 Price plus F.E.T. and usable trade-in carcass for the following sizes; AR78-13, BR78-13, CR78-14, DR78-14, ER78-14, P155-13, P165-13, P175-13, P185-13, P175-14, P185-14, P195-14. Other sizes available at comparat^le savings. Phone 634-6115 C a r o l i n a R e t r e a d s ; Q u a l i t y Y o u C a n C o u n t O n l I Carolina Tire lia i ovir 30 yean eiparlenct retreading. • Tires are manulactuied using prectie. soplilsllcaled equlpmant I bull oil llie old tread, apply new rubber and m o lillh i tread pallern • Tire c a iirg i aie Inspected belorettiey ere bulled, alter bulling and alle' th> are remanuliclured Oui rigid quality control Inspection rejects al lead Iwo oul ol three lire casings. • Our eipetience. out modern retread plant, and out quality control ptogtam means you get Ihe bell product posslbl. .CARO LINA r HIGHWAY HAS PIY RETREAD $ 1 4 8 8 P r ic e s p lu s F .E .T . a n d u s a b le t r a d e - in c a r c a s s lo r t h e f o llo w in g s iz e s : A78-13, B7B-13, 078-14, 078-14, E 7 8 -1 4 . O t h e r s iz e s a v a ila b le a t c o m ­ p a r a b le s a v in g s . /1 A lgeOurCj|ditP|ai^ • InktMct airtourtiras • CorrMt «If pr»««ur# • S*t tront whMl cutar, cambar, toe to proP*r ailenn»nt • Inapact alaaring and auapanaion aystam«. M ÍK I u . a c a re . I m p o r li * l l h « d iu t u b l» » u w i i» ! ! : « . l i j c l u i « I fo n t 4 w « i d riv « . C M v a M n . lie w iru c N * a n d » r i r a q u irln « M a o P tm n o n - C0M»pn Expkai 4/30/83 С °« Ш тГт ш М1 COUPON — —LUBE, OIL ктлшн T 'W M O M R O P W ' tt» fF R E E 10p t.C w ln ^ lo n ¡ iMortt D m A M il toctiM « N tM И К и М tá. »П М .М М п.1М .1Ш 1.М .>»»4и>М ян» Coupon Expires 5/30/83 I И -'Г - •• I . . L PLEASE CALL FOR APPOINTMENT • 634-6115 Buy I .. the second for V P R IC E Coupon I / 2 S A L E Expires Monro-Matlc* 4/3o7s3 Shock Absorber T H E B U M P S T O P S H E R E T ire Riuty Cara^chael - Manager IOC - DAVIE COUNTY ENTERI’RISE REC Q R D /rilU R SD A Y, MAY 5, 1983 Model Moms: Doing What Comes Naturally Mother’s Day, May-ls n time for pnylnfi tribute to marvelous mothel's everywhere. ‘'Model Moms: Doing What Comes Nalurnlly” Is a lighthearted look al motherly love In the animal kingdom. The story has four black- and-white photographs, a vertlble menagerie of motherly mammals. Five r color slides are also available, showing a narhary maeaquc with Infant, a Calfornla sea lion and pup, a common zebra with young, a Masai giraffe with newborn and an atlas lioness with cub. (Incidentally, “ Be Kind To Animals Week” is the first week in May.)By Madeleine Jacobs Smithsonian News Service The time has come lo set the record straight: There is no such thing as a "bad mother.” ■ This of course, will come as no '•-surprise to millions of moms who i;have been telling their children that ■¡for years. On the other hand, there Is no such thing as a "good molher.” No, when it comes lo motherdom, al least in the wild, scientists say mothers merely do what comcs naturally.In fact, what appears in the eyes of the human beholder to be maternal ministering, or lack of il, is something lhal is largely "pre- ,, programmed” by mother Nature, Smithsonian News Service Photos by Jessie Cohen r-: 'm m National Zoological Park in „ I Washington, D.C. " For the vast majority of animals, Kleiman points oui, this program means doing absolutely nothing..J I Thousands and thousands of animal .'t.species never even see their ."¡mothers, much less get a goodnight hug. S till, throughout the . anim al kingdom there are creatures who ,1 know the “ true” burdens of ■; motherhood, those who put their ’ hearts, heads and even, on occasion, .. their stomachs, inlo mothering. To all these model moms, and wilh 'i special thanks to Smithsonian scientists who proposed their candidates for Molher of the Year, we dedicate this Mother’s Day salute. Not siirprisingly, animals oc- âcupying the lowest rungs of the Revolutionary ladder appear to have ;Athe least complex parenting plans. .v‘ ln most inverleorale species- t . anim als w ilhoul backbones-a • mother’s work is done when she lays ■ . her eggs. But there are somenotable exceptions. A female whip sco^ion carries her newly hatched babies in the brood chamber of her abdomen unlil the young go through several molls, ancl the wolf spider gives her one hundred youngsiers a free ride on her back during their , first week of life. Some insect mothers even tutor _ Iheir lots. In one species of cobweb '.: spider, the young remain in the V mother’s tangled web for aboul a w month after hatching, feeding on J /ants captured by mom. If they venture loo close lo a struggling ant, ".'mamma warns them off by r thrumming her forelegs on the web, . rather like a musician strumming • the strings of a violin. But as they ,. grow larger and can help wilh the capture, mom changes her tune, f.,summoning them with a different, V, sweeping motion of the forelegs., Still other invertebrates lake .. ,motherhood seriously. In at least one genus of snails, the female V broods her eggs in a special pouch in. ,:',her head; the young are released I through a slit in the neck. Other snails really put their hearts into reproduction; Females of these A menagerie of motherly mammals poses with offspring, from top left clockwise: common zebras, lion-tailed macaques, California sea lions and Nile hippopotamuses. species slore the male’s sperm in the pericardinal sac prior lo fer­ tilization. Malemal care is largely lacking in amphibians and reptiles, which lay eggs or even produce live young bul don’t have the guts lo stay around for midnight feedings. One am­ phibian thal does seem lo stomach motherhood is a recently discovered Australian frog. As a prosepeclive parent, the female has peculiar tastes; She actually swallows her eggs and they develop lo maturity inside her stomach. Propelled by a motherly hiccup, young adults omerge from mom’s mouth. No one can yet explain this miracle of motherhood but, needless lo say, scientists are anxious to learn how this unorthodox diet defies digestion.Moving on lo reptiles, the most advanced form of motherhood occurs, somewhat surprisingly. among the crocodiliahs. The mother lays her eggs in a specially conslrucled nest of dirl, leaves, slicks and debris and keeps a watchful eye-and fearsome leelh- trained for potential predators. Just before they hatch, the young emit high-pitched croaks thal bring mama croc, scurry ing lo her nest. She begins tearing material off the lop to free her young from the sun­ baked earth. Then, this 20-fool-long mom gingerly plucks up the liny eighl-inch-long babies with her powerful jaws and carries them singly or by pairs to the waler where whe will protect them from predators for a year or more.Birds are the most devoted parents and this includes fathers, who are conspiciously absent from parental provisioning in most of the animal kingdom. ’ But there are exceptions to this avian part­nership. The male bowerbird of Australia and New Guinea, for inslance, woos a wife by building an elaborate altar, on which he sings Toudly, dramatcially displaying his plumage. Alas, having fallen for this flight of fancy, the expectant mother finds herself left alone in a simple nest to brood over single parenthood. So much for romance. Even when whe has a helpmate, a fealhered female may go lo ex­ traordinary lengths, to protect her nest and young. If an intruder approaches the home of many ground-nesting mothers, such as kiildeers (in the plover fam ily), the molher will lead it away by feigning a broken wing. The ostensibly in­ jured mom drags her wing on the ground, flops around and tries to fly, all the while moving away from the Jiesl. A soon as the predator is well away from the nest, however, mom miraculously recovers and flies home.But if you’re looking for the true meaning of motherhood, your search must end wilh the maniríais, that eclectic class of animals lhal includes, among other creatures, the duck-bill platypus and the spiny anteater (the only two mammals Ihat lay eggs), as well as kangaroos, bats, giraffes, zebras, California sel lion, hippopotamuses, blue whales, ginat pandas, macaques, chim­panzees, and of course, humans. The National Zoo’s Keiman, who has studied parental behavior in a veritable menagerie of animals, explains lhal mamal mothers are, simply put; “ indispensable to their young.” “This is understandable,” she says, “ since the female mammal has internal gestation (with two ex­ ceptions) and nurses her developing ofspring with Ihe products of her own body. The mothcr-infanl relationship is the firsl and, in most cases, the longest-lasting relationship thal a mammal form- s.”Il’s a relationship that may be exceedingly close, as in the case of marsupials like the kanagroo and opossum; thir babies are nursod in built-in pouches and mom doesn’t leave home without them. Other mobile moms include some species of bats Ihat fly wilh their young attached until the babies are nearly as large as Ihe mothers.For sheer motherliness, it’s hard to beat most monkeys. A macaque mother, for instance, is in constant contact with her infant for its first three months. The baby is born wilh the ability to cling lo ils mother’s underbelly: immediately afler birth, iiwtherand child can be on Ihe go with the enlire troop. Kleiman’s personal favorite for supermom is the giant panda, one of the world’s rarest mammals and a creature she has studied both in ils native China and at the National Zoo. The female giant panda, despite her 250-pound heft, is a tender and skillful mother. She has to be: A newborn panda cub weighs a scant four ounces. It is a fragile, completely helpless, pink-skinned baby totally dependent on ils mother-who lavished il wilh non­ stop mothering. No matter lhal mom picks up her infant with her mouth to groom and to manipulate the baby for nursing-it works. In jusl a few weeks, baby is a miniature version of ils cuddly black-and-white molher. Yes, the measure of a “good” mother is not how much time she spends with her children, Kleiman insists. “ In order lo be ‘motherly,’ ” she says, “ some mothers literally have to ignore their young” -or risk exposing them lo deadly situations.. Thus, mothers who appear lo be malingerers turn oul to be model moms when closely examined. For instance, the mother Dorcas gazelle, a small North African antelope, is rarely seen with her calf during its first few weeks, but this sleek, swift creature only seems to be a bad mamma. In truth, shortly after birth, the calf crouches down into the grass, nearly disappearing. from yiew-and from , potential predators. Mom ’ returns periodically from her foraging to nurse the hidden infant. This behavior, by the way, is typical of many deer and gazelle.-! including the common while-tail deer. Although these no-nonsense relationships may not sound much like “ motherly love” to human ears, each is an'example of successful mothering. Whal, if not success, is motherhood all about? Or could Ihere be somelhing more?Says Kleiman, “Most mothers, including human mothers, do what they do because they’re genetically ‘pre-programmed’ to respond, specififically lo the sound, sight and smell of their own offspring. And there’s a real deep underlying, responsiveness of mothers to those particular qualities. These mothers develop a special bond wilh thier won. I don’t know if you call that motherly ‘love,’ bul il certainly is motherly. “ Of course,” she adds, “ in humans as in some animals, suc­cessful mothers are not necessarily born. There is a lot of fine-tuning involved in this relationship, in, learning lo be a ‘good’ mother.” And lhal, in the end, may be whal' motherhood is all aboul. Wm. R. Davie School Menu, May 9-13 ■ The menù for William R. Davie School for the week of May 9-13, J983, is as follows: i MONDAY; Spaghetti or beef-a- foni, salad, corn; fruit, cookie, roll ;i ; ahd milk. Breakfast: Cheese toast, \ apple pie, and milk. V ;; T U ES D A Y : Hamburger or combo, lettuce, pickles, French fries, catsup, bun, cake, and milk. Breakfast; Hash brown, sausage link, toast, jelly, juice, and milk. W EDNESDAY; Chicken pie or pork chop, creamed potatoes, peas, Jello, roll and milk. Breakfast; Waffle, butter, syrup, juice, and milk.THURSDAY; Taco or lasagna, salad, potato rounds, peach pie, and milk. Breakfast; Chicken nuggets, biscuit, fruit, and milk.F R ID A Y : Hot dog-chili or Hoagie, slaw, baked beans, cake and m ilk. Breadfast; Sausage, biscuit, applesauce, and milk. ••Q u a lity IsO ur B ésf S a lesm a n " Family Restaurant TuesdaySpeclal P e r c h & F l o u n d e r Thurs.-Fri.-Sat.-Sun. Always A Different Special (ÀIKYou Can Eat) WednesttâÿS Slirimp-Calabash Fried or Boiled (Hot or Cold) Hours 4:30-9 Tues.-Wed.-Thurs. Ffi.-Sat 4-9:30 Sui). 4:30-9 Closed Mon. Take Out,Orders 4 8 8 LCountry'Club Road , 765-0948 (CCTIiiMERCÏÂL) W h e n y o u ' r e r e a d y f o r a b 'g h p r o d u c t i o n m o w i n g m a c h i n e , y o u 'r e r e a d y f o r a Y a z o o . O u r c o m m e r c i a l r i d e r s a r e d e s ig n e d w i t h t h e b la d e h o u s i n g o u t f r o n t t o l e t y o u m o w u n d e r s h r u b s a n d f e n c e s . M o w a r o u n d u t i l i t y p o le s i n a s in g l e p a s s . A n d , m o w u p t o 2 4 a c r e s a d a y . ~ Y a z o o o r i g i n a l B i g W h e e l m o w e r s a r e t a i l o r - m a d e f o r t r i m m i n g ^ a n d t a l l g r a s s . T h e e n g i n e is o v e r t h e w h e e l s , s o y o u c a n t a k e o n t a l l g r a s s w i t h o u t s t a l l i n g . A n d , a ll c o m m e r c i a l Y a z o o s u t i b z e i n d i r e c t d r i v e t t o a b s o r b b la d e i m p a c t s h o c k , p r o t e c t i n g t h e t c r a n k s h a f t M d e n g i n e . T h e c o m m e r c i a l Y a z o o s . T h e y ’ r e ^ n o t j u s t m o w e r s , t h e y 'r e T i m e M a c h i n e s . THE HARDW ARE STORE 1113 Y a d k in v ü le R o a d • M o c k s v ille N C 2 7 0 2 8 • 7 0 4 -6 3 4 -3 3 2 2 DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, TIÍÜKSDAY, MAY 5. 11C David Scott (left) was nam ed State Champion in Lincoln Douglas debate during Tarheel Forensic League finals in Charlotte. Barbara Belcher placed second in original o r a t o r y , D avie N FL Finishes W in n ers For Ihe second year in a row David Scoll emerged from Ihe Tarheel Forensic League Slale Finals as Sla le Champion in Lincoln Douglas debale, and second in Boys Exiem p. Barbara Belcher placed second in Original Oratory out of 47 conteslanls. This contest, held al West Charlotte High School, April 15 and 16, ends the regular forensic season of competition which began last October. Miss Freddie Murphy, director of forensics, at Oavie summarizes the season; “ l,am extremely pleased with and proud of all the forensic my long nd par- sludents. They spend manj hours preparing for anc licipating in these weekend tour­ naments. I think the competition has been sharper this year than it., has for several years. Barbara Belcher has found her special event. I ’m extrem ely proud of her achievement this year. While placing second is heartbreaking, she can be proud of her ac­ complishments. David Scott cer­ tainly deserved the State Cham-' pionship for the second consecutive year. He is truly tlie best Lincoln Douglas debater in North Carolina. I certainly do not mean to slight the other parlicipanls-Brent Shoaf has worked diligently and industriously for Ihe leam in exiemp. He has done very well this year, and I ’m very pleased with his accomplishments. Tonya Turner, Laura Hildebrand, Traci Youngberg, and Laura Brock have also contributed greatly to the team. Other committments have prevented them from participating in all lournamenis. However, these girls will be the core of the leam for next year. I'm looking forward to another winning year.” Students Compete For Scholarship Awards In Second Zoo Poster Animal Contest Students in kindergarten through eighth grade will be invited lo compete for scholarship awards in (he second poster animal contest sponsored by the North Carolina Zoological Park and Pizza Hut restaurants statewide. The zoo is inviting schools in Davie County and throughout North Carolina to participate in the contest during May. The contest is designed to encourage the study of wildlife and promote the state zoo near Asheboro. • Mrs. John E . Myers and Mrs. Roger Mock, Sr. spent Sunday af­ ternoon with their sister, Mrs. Jessie Mullis of Lexington. • Mr. and Mrs. Johnny Brewer and daughters of Marion spent Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. Larry Mock and attended worship service here. : Mrs. Lizzie Coon of Winston- Salem spent last week with Mr. and Mrs. Tommy Brewbaker. Mr. and Mrs. Cecil Maas and Mrs. lone Evans of Denver, Col. attended worship service here Sunday. Mrs. David Miller and son and Mrs. Agnes Stencil spent Sunday with Mrs. Sherry Barnhart of Greensboro. , Jerry Carter returned to his home Monday from Forsyth Hospital. ' Alan Miller spent Saiurday night w ilh M r. and M rs. Rickey Hockaday. Mrs. James Carter spent Thur­ sday with her mother, Mrs. Lydia Allen of Courlney. M rs. Jam es Cardwell of Lexington visited her sister, Mrs. Roger Mock, S r., Friday evening. Pizza Hul is contributing a $2,000 scholarship award to the state winner in each of two age groups, and a $2,000 education grant to each stale winner’s school. The company will also donate $1,000 to the North CaroUna Zoological Society in the name of each stale winner. Sixteen regional winners will receive scholarship prizes of $500, $300 or $100. Winners at individual schools will get complimentary memberships to the Zoo Society. Contestants in kindergarten through fourth grade will be asked lo give names to seven of the eight poster animals. Students in grades five through eight will be asked lo answer questions about seven poster animals and names the eithlh. The poster animals include a chimpanzee, lion, rhinoceros, African crowned crane, lilac- breasted roller, ostrich, giraffe and a trio of elephants. Pizza Hul is also making the posters available lo colleges, libraries and hospitals across the stale. Jonathan Davis, a sixth grader Explorer Scouts fo Meet Monday The Davie Couniy High Ad­ venture Explorer Post 518 will meet al the Mocksville National Guard Armory Monday, May 9, al 7 p.m. After recreation at 7;00, there will be a program by the Animal Cruelty Investigator for Davie County. Plans will be finalized for the first Annual- Davie ■ County Explorers River Raft Race to be held in July. •U S á r W E E K E N D SALE Come join us for our Mother's Day Sale at: ^ i g Days ^— T h u r s d a y , F r i d a y a n d S a t u r d a y , M a y 5 , 6 a n d 7 t h , p le n t y 1 t - S W r t i D a v i e D e s i g n s from Candler, N.C., won last year’s $3,000 state scholarship award for naming three poster animals. His school, Pisgah Elem entary, received a matching grant. More than 650 schools entered the con­ test.In announcing the new contest. Governor Jim Hunt thanked par- ticipanting Pizza Hut restaurants for their continued interest and increased support. “ When this public-spirited corporate sponsor came back and proposed a much more ambitious program, the company was saying it’s good business lo support the zoo. “ And we th i.* it is great bccause . we need ihis kind of private-public partnership to tell our citizens what an outstanding educational and recreational facility our state zoo really is,” Hunt said. Animal Protection Group To IMeet The Davie County Animal Protection Society will hold its regular monthly meeting at the Davie County Courthouse at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, May' 10.Agenda items include finalization of plans for the Third Annual Davie County Animal Protection Society Horse Show to be held in October, 1983. Inquiries about the show may be directed lo Beth Tester, show chairman or Tom Hardwick, vice chairman, c-o The Davie Couniy Animal Protection Society, P.O. Box 302, Mocksville, N.C. 27028.A special invitation lo the May meeting is extended to all former APS members who wish lo renew their membership.Anyone who wishes to learn more about this worthy non-profit organization is encouraged to at­ tend Ihe May meeling. 4-H'ers P lin Weekend At Camp Sertoma Uavie County 4-H’ers will get the opportunity lo spend a fun-filled week al Camp Sertoma, in Stokes Couniy from June 26 - July 1 this summer. Areas of activities will be outdoor living such as camping outdoors, tracking, and fishing, lo dramatic arts, such as theatre and dance. Cost of the camp is $70 which includes transportation lo and from the camp. If you would like to learn more about this 4-H camping ex­ perience, call the County Extension Office at 634-6297. Deadline is May 9 ;_____________________________________ THE FASHION_STATION w ill h a v e C a lv in K lle n a n d 'T o r d a c h e J E A N S a t 1 5 % O F F Two Rabies Clinics In Davie This Saturday Two Rabies Clinics will be held in Davie County on May 7. They will be held rain or shine at the following locations and times. 12:00 - 12:.30 p.m. - Davie Academy, Fork Fire Depl., and Advance Fire Dept. 1:00 - 1:30 p.m. - Brock Building, William R. Davie School, and Old Farmington School.North Carolina law requires all dogs over four (4) months of age to be vaccinated for rabies. Dogs vaccinated for the first time in 1982 should be revaccinaled this year. All olher dogs not vaccinated in 1980 should be vaccinated in 1983, As in the past, North Carolina approved vaccines will be used in these clinics. All vaccines will be ad­ m inislered by a qualified veterinarian. Cats should be vac­ cinated. There will be a charge of $5.00 for each animal vaccinated at these clinics. For more informalion call Buck Hall al the Davie County Health Dept, or your local veterinarian. M rs. Billie V arn er, w ife of State Representative John V arner of Lexington, read from her poetry boolcs Monday; afternoon a t M ocksville Elem entary School. M rs. V arn er te® poetry, “ Come Share M yW orld"and"W oodland Footpaths". H er visit to Moclcsvilie Elem entary was p art of the school's program for North Carolina H eritage W eek. U N C -C h ap el H ill To O ffe r 7 5 0 U n iq u e C ourses In S u m m e r Session i You can take a class that’s not available elsewhere, one that’s difficull to get into during the fall or spring, or one lhat you need to complete your course requirements. You can lake lhat class with a top quality faculty member, and you can lake it in air conditioned comfort in the summer session at the University of North Carolina al Chapel Hill.The University will offer nearly 750 courses during ils 1983 summer session, everything from Japanese lo swimming. Some 500 faculty members, including 40 visiting educators, w ill represent 39 disciplines, not counting the Division of Heallh Affairs. Terms are scheduled for May 23- June 28 and July 5-Aug. 9. (May 30 and July 4 will be holidays.) More than 12,000 students are expected to attend, said D r. Donald Tarbel, direclor of the summer session. Last year 6,632 altended the first term and 5,597 the second, for a total of 12,229. “ Our strong points are our wide course offerings and our faculty,” Tarbel said. “ We offer the broadest program in the stale and have an e:{cellent faculty.” Students from other schools, who make up about 20 percent of the summer session enrollment, can come to UNC-CH lo take courses lhat are not offered at their schools. High school students may take courses before they enter college and transfer the credits earned to Iheir high schools, or, in the future, their colleges for credit.UNC-CH students may go to summer school to complete their course work, get classes not offered in the fall or spring semesters, work ' in smaller classes, take a lighter load or even just spend the summer in Chapel Hill.“There’s the opportunity for more of a concentrated study during a summer session,” Tarbet said. “ Students can concentrate on two courses, where, in the fall, they may have to concentrate on five.” He said students could earn a full semester’s credit by attending bolh terms of summer school and taking a full load each term. Recreational activities abound for spectators and participants, in­ cluding swimming, volleyball, golf, tennis, softball, intramural sports, concerts and free movies. Registration for the summer session w ill be held May 23 for the first term and July 5 for the second. Late registration will be on the firsl two days of classes in each term ; a late fee w ill be charged. Visiting students may pre­ register by m ail, bul the approved forms must be received by May 9 for the first and June 21 for the second. Tuition and fees are calculated by the number of hours a student takes. In addition lo regular summer session classes, several' special short courses are offered on such topics as organizing guidance service, special education, ad­ vanced writing for broadcast and film, and the two-year college. Short courses will be held May 23-June 9, June 14-30, July 5-21 and July 19- Aug. 11. Clinics, institutes, seminars and workshops also will be held during the summer at UNC-CH. The In­ stitute of M arine Sciences in Morehead City w ill sponsor a summer program , and biology studies will be conducted at the Highlands Biological Station. Other programs include trips to the South­ west to study geology, a practicum in state government and a seminar with a professional laboratory theater of (he Lost Colony in Manteo. On campus, a piano workshop for teachers and students will be held, as well a Cato Havas siring class, the Chapel Hill Choral, Seminar and the 33ra annual N. CJ High School Radio-TV Institute, r The Study-Travel Abroad program, coordinated through the Division of Extension and Con* tinuing Educalion, will offer ■ £(' chance lo see olher parls of the world .while earning college credit. Seventeen courses will be offered in Ihe United Stales and Europe ori history, literature and drama, and foreign languages and cultures. ■ Costs vary for the seminars, inj slilutes and summer study abroad courses. ;For more information about all summer session activities, contact the summer session office, 102 Peabody H all 037A, UNC-CH, Chapel Hill, NC 27514; telephone (919) 966-4364. Carpets Come In Dazzling Colots Alvin Whitaker, - left, receiving an award for ' Today’s carpets come in an array of colors that dazzle the eye. “ Carpets can be constructed with lower face weighls-the weight ot the material per square foot of the part above the backing-which look and feel like the heavier weight carpels. But they will not wear as well,” says Wilma Hammett, ex­ tension furnishings specialist. North Carolina Slale University. To compare sim ilar carpets, ask about denier, ply, stitch and gauge, says the specialist. The higher each figure is, the better the carpet. A high density carpel, which has fibers closer together, is considered to be a better carpet because il will last longer. Denier relates the yam .size and weight, in grams per 9,000 'meters. For example, a nylon yarn 9,000,meters long that weighs 1,400 grams is called 1,400 denier, Mrs. Hammett says. The denier of a bonded carpet can Annual Eanes Family Reunion is May 15 The annual Eanes Fam ily Reunion will be held Sunday, May 15, al 1 p.m. at Oak Grove United Meihodist Church fellowship hall.Fam ily and friends are invited lo allend and bring with them a picnic lunch. be half that of a tutted carpet. The number of single • yarns twisted logether to form one yarn is I the ply. For example, a carpet with ! two yarns twisted together in each ■ tuft is a two-ply carpet. Stitch and gauge together give the I number of tufts per square inch. The more tufts per square inch, the : better the carpel. The sales person can give the denier, ply, stitch and gauge or carpels, says the extension specialists. is shown- “ Salesman! of the Year” for 1982 for Plcasantsj Hardware, Inc. of Winston-Salem.^ This is the second consecutive year; that he has held this honor. He has been a sales representative for. twelve years. His .terrJroty in­ cludes: Greensboro, Kernersville,’ High Point and Thomasville^ Pleasants Hardware has served the hardware industry since 1913 with twelve sales territories in North Carolina, Virginia, West Virginia and South Carolina. He and his wife, Carol and their two sons. David and Stacy reside at Milling Road in Mocksvillc, N.C. lorner o n HiBhway 801 and Yadkin Valley Church Ri' Between 1-40 and Farmington FOR SALE Shop For Mother’s Day' Friday Noon U n t il- - - Saturday 10:00 A.M.-Until At The Location Of Scotty’s Berries On Sanford Road V4 Mile Off 601 N. A L S O Y A R D S A L E With Household And Baby Items rrs. Sallie James Y o u a r e t h e o n e . b e y o n d c o m p a r e T h e d e a r e s t M o t h e r A n y w h e r e L o v e y o u , C a m I Paid For By C iim i Jamet M O T H E R ’ S D A Y Beautiful 7-Diam ond Cluster 'A. are gifts sure to please this M other’s D ay A .’99»* B.’149* C.»275“ S downtown Mocksville “For a Day sure to remember' 12C - DAVIU COUNTY ENTERI’ RISE RECORD, THURSDAY. MAY S. 1983 Angeli's berries survived the freezing temperatures with the aid oi his irrigation syslem. rid of the weeds and grass before picking tim e. I t ’s s a i d t h e i r n u m b e r s o n c e d a r k e n e d t h e s u n . O nce Ihey ivere said to be couniless. Today it t.ikos special care to ensure waterfowling's survival. It takes your help. Ducks Unlimited is an organization that provides our Continent's waterfowl wilh Ihe habitat they need to breed and survive. DU works to protect and restore the marshlands of Canada, where United States Federal funds do not reach . . . and where 70% of our waterfowl are hatched. DU has preserved 2.7 million acres of habitat — more than any other private wildlife organization. But as civilization presses in upon natural waterfowl habitats, DU's work becom es even m ore important. And so do your dollars. W e're asking you to give to a non-profit organization that has shown how private donations can help. VVe may not be able to make waterfowl numbers grow to darken the sun again. But we can keep them flying. And will, with your help. MIUS' OOTin 1-40 At The Clemmons Exit 2 4 1 9 Lew isvi lie - C lem m ons Roac* C lem m ons, N.C. IS1& Salesman Samples Values S | To ‘32“ 1»V P articipants in the Special Olympics were grouped according to their ages and abilities. P ic tu re d above is the ET group giving a big hooray for all of the fun they're h a v in g . Debbie Bovender gives tl^e running long jump her all in the Special Olympics at Davie High School, April 27. S p e d a i O l y m p i c s B r i n g V i c t o r y T o A t h l e t e s Hot sunny skies provided the perfect atmosphere for D a v ie County’s annual Special O lym pics Wednesday, April 27. fh e M ocksville R e cre a tio n Department sponsored the gam es with; the Davie County Association for Retarded Citizens, ( A K C ), funding the event. fhe games began with all athletes marching around the track. T h e y ' proudly displayed their sch o o l banners and shining faces w ild ly anticipating the coming events. Participants in the games ranged l-’rcg ram . The group nina tic tackled all events with from kindergarten to middle ag e. A ir of the athletes were m entally handicapped and were assigned to groups according to their ages and abilities. The athletes were fro m area, schools and the A D A P T broad jump and the 50 meter dash. Ribbons were presented to first through fourth places in each group of athletes. M ik e G a rn e r, Recreational D irecto r for the Town of Mocksville, stated, “ We had the largest turnout of p a rticip a n ts ever with an estim ated 65 athletes competing in the event.” He added that this may be due lo changing the event from a Saturday to a week day. This year’s evenl attracted huge support from volunteer workers. Approximately 100 volunteers w ere on , hand throughout the day to assist in competition. Junior Civitans from South Davie and Davie High, Davie High P .E . classes and adult volunteers assisted all day. Following the luncheon, served by the ARC on the grounds, medals and certificates were presented to all athletes. Six athletes have been named to attend the state finals May 20-22 at A & T' University in Greensboro. They are Donna and David Packet!, South D a vie ; Am y Yates, M ocksville M iddle; Chad Southerland, Pinebrook; and Danny Chunn and Patricia Hersey, ADAPT Program. Garner concluded, “ I would like to thank the many people who made , the Special Olympics possible and such a big success.” D A V I E C O Ü N T Y F e a t u r e I D M a y 5 , 1 9 8 3 P h o t o s a n d S t o r y b y D e r e e E a t o n The participants ioved attention and latched on to the volunteers without any encourage - - - • High Jr. C Member. encouragement. Pictured above are (l-r) Chris Atwood, Randy Ferguson- Davie High Jr. Civitan vice-president, Chris Collins, and Beth Parker-Davie Jr. Civitan Kenny Housch, a student In th e T M H class at Davie High, prepares for the softball th ro w . - ijC V tk , Connie Yokley winds up in the softball throw.Donna Packett prepares to let the ball fly in the softball throw. I 2D - DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD. THURSDAY. MAY S, 198’ A dvance N ew s Mr. and Mrs. Tom Talbert spent Sunday in Charlotte where they attended the Christening of their 6 month old grandson Andrew Leach. Andrew is Ihe son of Denise and Neal Lcneh, and he has a brother Marshall. The 1937 Class of Shady Grove High School held its fourth annual reunion Salurday night at the Community Building with 32 present (class members and spouses) and three teachers. The leachers were Mrs. Virginia Poe Shutt, Mrs. Lucille Martin Donnely and husband Paul of Mocksville, Mrs. Elizabeth Guy Calhoun and husband Harold of Harmony. Out of 20 original class members two have died. Only one member was missing from the reunion, Jerome Shermer. He has attended Ihe past reunions but was unable lo come this year, due to his wife's serious illness. The Senior Methodist Youth prepared and served dinner, for the class reunion. Mrs. Beryl Miliner of Chester, England was a visitor at Methodist Church Sunday for both worship and Sunday School. Mrs. Mlllner and husband Joe are guests of Mr. and Mrs. G. A. (Gus) Street for the week. They are in this country on a combination business and pleasure trip. They spent last week in Orlando, Florida, Disney World and the Epcot Center. Mr. and Mrs. Bill Zimmerman spent Thursday, April 2Д in South Carolina with their children and grandchildren, Mr. and Mrs. Jerry Hendrix, Andrea, Melissa, Amanda and Meredith. The occasion was in celebration of Andrea’s 9th bir­ thday. After a birthday supper the up attended a softball game in khart in which Andrea played. Mr. and Mrs. “ Jack" Carter and- Miss Belinda Potts spent the weekend in Cuilowhee where they visited Mr. and Mrs. Carter's daughter Jill, a student at WCU. On Sunday afternoon they enjoyed a drive lo Glenville Lakes. The Senior Methodist Youth entertained Ihe Senior Citizens with a Banquet Sunday night at the Community Building. Ap­ proximately 75 people attended and enjoyed the delicious meal prepared and served by the Youth. The Senior Citizens appreciate this meal, and wanl lo say many thanks! Mr. and Mrs. Lynn Hunt of Pleasant Garden were Sunday afternoon visitors of Mrs. Minnie Bryson and Mrs. Rebekah Talbert. Mrs. Recie Sheets spent the weekend in Courtney visiting cousins Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Baity. Saturday they atlended the Yadkin Valley Telephone Mem-' bership meeting held In the YadkinvUle School Building. Mrs. Slieets was a winner of one of the prizes given during the meeling. She won a metal folding picnic table.Mr. and'Mrs. M. C. Deadmon of Mocksville were Sunday afternoon visitors of the Bill Zimmerman’s. Paul Barney suffered a heart attack late Sunday afternoon and,is in serious condition at Forsylh Memorial Hospital. Get well wishes go out to him. Mr. Barney had eye (cataract) surgery last week, but was recovering satisfactorily from lhat. Mrs. Lucy Fulk, our pastor’s wife, was able lo-fitlend church services Sunday. She has been confined for the past few weeks, recovering from surgery. WIC Nutrition Program Offered By Health Dept. WIC, the special supplemental nutrition program for women, in­ fants, and children is available at Ihe Oavie County Health Depart­ ment. In Ihc past, the WIC program has provided supplemental foods and nutrition educalion to pregnant and. breastfeeding women, and to infants and children up lo their fifth birthday. Beginning May 2, 1983, due to increased program funding, WIC now offers its services to women up to 6 months post partum. There are certain criteria WIC applicants must meet to qualify for WIC in Davie County. The applicant must be: ]. A pregnant, breastfeeding or post-partum woman, or an infant or child under five years of age. 2. Reside in Davie County. 3. Meet the financial eligibility guidelines of the Davie County WIC program. 4. Found to be al nutritional risk. If you think you are eligible for Ihe WIC program, contact the Davie County Health Department on Hospital SIreet or call (>34-5985. The office hours are 8:30-12:00 noon and 1:00 ■ S:00 p.m. Standards for participation in the WIC program are the same for everyone regar-' diess of race, color, creed, national origin, political beliefs, sex, or handicap. G reen M e ad o w s IU! My name is Amanda Sue Work­ man. 1 was Iwo years old Thursday, April 28, and 1 had three parties, cclcbrallngwith family and friends. Birthdays arc so much fun, and I wanl to thank everybody for my gifts. My parents are Mr. and Mrs. Phillip Workman of Lexington, N.C. My grandparents arc Mr. and Mrs. Roland Jones, Salisbury Street, Mocksvillc, N.C. and Mr. and Mrs. 1,.A. Workman ot Welcome, N.C. My great grandmothers arc Mrs. Zclpha Ingram of High P o in t, N.C.; and Mrs. Lillian Smith ot Mocksville. A group from Ihe Green Meadows Church attended the annual W.M.U. meeting of the Yadkin Baptist Associalion on Monday night held al Ihe Sandy Springs Church. Rev. and Mrs. Hubert Middleton were guest speakers. They have recenlly retired afler many years service in Chili. Rev. Middleton was interim pastor for several months during a furlough once for the Green Meadows Church.The Green Meadows Bible study group will have Iheir regular May meeting at the church fellowship center on Wednesday al 10 a.m. All members lake note the day has been changed from Tuesday to Wed­ nesday. The Joe Langstons attended funeral services in Salisbury on Sunday for a brother-in-law, William Brandon. The services were conducted by an aim y chaplin and burial in the Veterans section of a cemetery there. Mr. Brandon was a purple heart veteran of World War II. Survivors include his wife, the former Madge Langston and two sislers. Lawrence Riddle entered the hospital on Monday where he ex- for apecis to undergo surgery glandular disorder. Dan Tatum gospel singer and recording artist will present a concert on Sunday nighl. May 15 al 7:30at Ihe Green Meadows Church. Mrs. Mildred Johnson was able to be in churcli on Sunday following recent eye surgery. Mrs. Ray Wright was an af­ ternoon visitor on Sunday of Ihe Joe Langstons.All the Matthews clan will gather al the home of Gray Matthews on Salurday, May 14 for a big yard sa e 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. There will be people from 6 differenl counties par­ticipating. The location is in Ihe Redland Communily on Hwy. 158 near Ihe Baltimore Road.Don’t forget the Willing Workers Class of Green Meadows auction this Saturday, May 8 10 a.m. at the Smilh Grove Communily Bidg. Many good items have been promised for Ihis sale. There are new items as well as some antiques and craft items, and also all auc­ tions have some just junk. \i4 W S T h e f i l m Q u o V a d is u s e d 3 0 , 0 0 0 e x tr a s a n d 6 3 lio n s ! C o n f id e n c e in G o d is o u r r e fu g e a n d s t r e n g t h . A U C TIO N SALE Saturday, May 7th, 10:00 till- Smith Grove Community Gym Highway 158 -3 Miles West Of 801 * M a n y /A s s o r te d & A n t iq u e I t e m s » H o m e C o o k e d - G o o d le s * R e f r e s h m e n t s A v a ila b le sponsoreri by Willing V^forkers Class Green Meadows Baptist church A S S E M B L Y O F G O D n e W b e t h e l a s s e m b l y o f g o o 109 N . M a in S trM t M o c k tv llle , N.C . R ev. M ik e B ra k e S unday School 10:00 a .m . M o rn in g W o rs h ip U :00 a.m . E ve n in g W o rsh io 7:00 p.m . B A P T I S TA D V A N C E B A P T IS T C H U R C H M lohw ay «01 S undayS cho ol 9:45 a .m . M o rn in g W o rsh ip 11:00 a .m . W ednesday E ve n in g _ 7:00 p.m . B E A R C R E E K B A P flS T C H U R C H B ear C raek C h u rch R d. B L A IS E B A P T IS T C H U R C H H ig h w a y 601 N o rth a t 1-40 R ev. D a v id H y d t . P a s to r S undayS cho ol 9 :4 5 a .m . W orship 1 1:00a.m . E vening 7 :0 0 p .m . W ednesday 7:30 p .m . .C A L A H A L N F R IE N D S H IP B A P T IS T ’ ’c h u r c h C ala h a in Road 'R e v . G ra h a m W ooten, P a sto r S undayS cho ol 1 0 :00a.m . W torship , U :0 0 a .m n S unday N ig h t W o rs h ip . 7:0 C p .m . W ad B lb ia ltu d y A ^ a y e r Ser 7:00 p .m / c a l v a r V b a ^ i s t c h u r c h H ig h w a y «01 South R oute 7, B ox W , M o ctavJH e, N .C . . J im G ry d e r, P a sto r Sunday School 10:00 a.m . W orsh ip 11:00 a .m . E v e n in g 7:00 p .m . P hone: «4.57B7 C E D A R C R E E K B A P T IS T C edar C re e k C h u rc h R oad X H tN Q U A P IN G R O V E B A P T IS T C H U R C H C O M M 'U N IT Y B A P T IS T C H U R C H G ladstone Rd. S undayS cho ol 10:00a.m . W orsh ip 1 1:00a.m . C O R N A T Z E R B A P T IS T C H U R C H A d va n ce , N.C. D A V IE B A P T IS T T A B E R N A C L E F o rk , N .C . S undayS cho ol 10:00 a.m . W o rsh ip 11:00 a .m . E ve n in g 7:00 p .m . W ednesday 7:30 p .m . CAUDËLL LUMBER CO. 1 2 3 8 B in g h a m S t r e e t M o c f c t v lile , N . C . Phone 634-2167 COBLE LIME & FERTILIZER SERVICE H ig h w a y B O I C o o le a m M , f Phone Business 284-4354 Home 284-2782 DAVIE TRACTOR & IMPLEMENT CO. F o r d F a r m in g S i l u a n d S e r v ic e Nevir H o lla n d E q u ip m e n t H ig h w a y 6 0 t 'S o u t h M o c k i v ill « , N . C . Phone 634-5969 EATON FUNERAL HOME 3 2 8 N o r t h M a in S t r e e t № ) c k t v ll la , N . C . PhônT6T4-2148 G O D ' S F I V E A A IN U T E S " ^ a time for everytldng ... " - Ecciesiastes 3M, llie Living BiWe; D U T C H M A N C R E E K B A P T IS T C H U R C H H ig h w a y 601 o tf 64 E A T O N 'S B A P T IS T C H U R C H E a to n 's C hurch Rd.S undayS cho ol 10:00 a .m . W o rsh ip 1 1:00a.m . .E D G E W O O D B A P T IS T C H U R C H H ig h w a y 801 W est c o o le e m e e N .C . F A R M IN G T O N B A P T IS T C H U R C H F a rm in g to n Road S undayS cho ol 1 0 :0 0 a .m ., W orship 1 1:00a.m . Y o u th T ra in in g U nton 7:00 p.m . F IR S T B A P T IS T C H U R C H 390 N . M a in S treet A Aocksvllle, N .C . S undayS cho ol 9:45a.m . W o rsh ip 1 1:00a.m . E ve n in g 6:30 p .m .-O c t. th ru AAay F IR S T B A P T IS T C H U R C H Cooleem ee. N .C . ^ R ev. Lee W h itlo c k S urtf a y School W orship E vening •W ednesday 7:30 & 9:30 a .m . 11:00 a .m . 7:30 p .m . 7:30 p .m . F O R K B A P T IS T C H U R C H 6 M ile s E a st on H w y. 64 S unday School 9:45 a .m . w o rs h ip 11:00 a .m . E ve n in g 7:20 p .m . G O S P E L B A P T IS T C H U R C H R t. 6, M o ck s v lK e . N.C . S undayS cho ol 10:00 a .m . W orsh ip 1 1 :00a.m . E vening 7:00 p .m . W ednesday 7:00 p .m . G R A C E M IS S IO N A R Y B A P T IS T C H U R C H R d in b o w R oad, M o c k s v ille , N .C . R ev. H a ro ld T u ttle S undayS chool 10:00 a .m . W orship 1 1:00a.m . E ve n in g 7:00 p .m . W ed. P ra y e rM e e tin g 7 :0 0 p .m .- G R E E N H IL L B A P T IS T C H U R C H G reen H ill Road R ev. S teve H edgecopk. P a sto r S undayS chool 9:30 a .m . W orship 10:45 a .m . E ve n in g 7 :0 0 p .m . W ednesday 7:00 p .m . \ MOMENTS FOR M EDITATIO N When you find the preaching in your church is not fru itfu l, you should remember: it is not because what is being said is not true. It may be because so many influences in your life are preaching against what is being preached. There is great strength to be gained from the allying of your soul w ith the truth which is being sincereiy proclaimed. Thus it was that John Westey had his "heart strangely warm ed," and went out to found the great M ethodist movement in the world. Christians were told by the Master to be "lig h t," not lightening! J -Щ ATTEN D CHURCH THIS WEEK 'G R E E N M E A D O W S B A P T IS T H ig h w a y 8 0 1 'F a rm ln g to n R ev. D a vid E . R oberts S undayS cho ol 1 0 :00a.m . W orsh ip n .-o o a .m . E vening 7:30 p .m . W ednesday 7 :3 0 p .m . H O P E B A P T IS T T A B E R N A C L E H ig h w a y 158 E a st N o rm a n S. F ry e , P a sto r S undayS chool 9:45 a .m . W orsh ip 1 0 :45a.m . E v a n g e lis tic 7:30 p .m . W ednesday 7:00 p .m . IJ A M E S C R O S S R O A D S B A P T IS T C H U R C H K ennem H yd e , P a s to r S unday School (W orship E vening W ednesday J E R U S A L E M B A P T IS T H ig h w a y 601 South Sunday School W orship E vening W ednesday Thi* folumn belon^i lo eur m dcri. Wf »ill âffept prifttiblf iirm i and ц у WOO fpr e»rh item publi»h«l In chf ritf of quoution*. thr f\amp of ihr auihor and thr tul» and publiihrr of ihr hook mu«i br pvrn. Addrrii itrmt to 'Cod'» Fivr Mlnulr». ' P.O Bni IB0I2. Aihrvillr. N С 2МП4 О Community Advartíiing A D V A N C E U N IT E D M E T H O D IS T C H U R C H A dvance. N.C . B A IL E Y 'S C H A P E L U N IT E D M E T H O D IS T B a ile y 's C hapel R d. B E T H E L U N IT E D M E T H O D IS T B ethel C hurch R d. B E T H L E H E M U N IT E D M E T H O D IS T C H U R C H R edland R d. o ff 158 E a st C E N T E R U N IT E D M E T H O D IS TC H U R C H H ig h w a y 64 W est C H E S T N U T G R O V E M E T H O D IS T 2nd & 4th S unday S u n d a y S ch o o l 10 :0 0 a .m . W o rsh ip 11:00 a .m . C O N C O R D U N IT E D M E T H O D IS T C h e rry HIJI Rd. C O O L E E M E E U N IT E D M E T H O D IS T C H U R C H R ev. A lto n F itz g e ra ld , P a sto r C O R N A T Z E R U N IT E D M E T H O D IS T C H U R C H C o rn a tze r R d. D U L tN M E T H O D IS T C H U R C H A dvance, N .C . E L B A V IL L E U N IT E D M E T H O D IS T C H U R C H H w y. BO I-A dvance, N .C . F A R M IN G T O N M E T H O D IS T C H U R C H S undayS cho ol (Is tS u n d a y ) 11:O 0a.m . (2nd, 3 rd , 4fh S un.) W orsh ip (1st Sun.) (3rd Sun.) U N IT E D 10 :0 0 a .m . 1 0 :0 0 a .m . 1 1 :0 0 a .m . M E T H O D IS T T R IN IT Y B A P T IS T C H U R C H R oute 4. M o c k s v ille , N .C . G ene B la c k b u rn , P a sto r S unday School ¡W orship E vening W edensday N O R T H M A IN ST C H U R C H O F C H R IS T R o b e rt D a rn a ll, M .«ister 1 0 :0 0 a .m . S undayS cho ol 1 0:00a.m . 1 1 :0 0 a .m . W o rsh ip 1 1:00a.m . 7:00 p .m . E vening 7:00 p .m . 7:00 p .m . W edensday 7:30 p .m . F IR S T C H U R C H N o rth AAaln St. AAocksvllle^ N .C . R ev. G eo rge A u m a n , P a sto r S undayS cho ol 10 :0 0 a .m . W o rsh ip 11 :0 0 a .m . F U L T O N U N IT E D M E T H O D IS T H w y. 801 a t F o rk H A R D IS O N U N IT E D M E T H O D IS T J e ric h o C h u rch R d. H U N T S V IL L E M E T H O D IS T W orship (2 n d S un.) 1 0 :0 0 a .r(4th Sun.) 1 1 :0 0 a .r L IB E R T Y U N IT E D M E T H O D IS T C H U R C H G ladstone Rd. M O C K S U N IT E D M E T H O D IS T C H U R C H A dvance. N .C . M T . O L IV E M E fH O D lS T C H U R C H R t. 5, A A ocksvllle W o rsh ip (2nd Sun.) (4th Sun.) S unday School (4 th Sun.) (1st.2fKl.3rd S un.) 1 1 :0 0 a .m . 10:0 0 a .m . 11:00 a .m . t0 :0 0 a .m . 9:45 a .m . 11:00 a .m . 6 :0 0 p .m . 7:30 p .m . 10:00 a .m .. 11:0 0 a .m . 7:30 p .m . 7:30 p .m . N O C R E E K P R IM IT iV E B A P T IS T C H U R C H NO C reek Rd. o ff 64 S M IT H G R O V E B A P T IS T C H U R C H H ig h w a y 156 E a st T U R R E N T IN E B A P T IS T C H U R C H .R t. 7, M o c k s v ille R ev. Ju d g e Johnson S unday School 9:45 a .m . W orsh ip 11:00a.m . E vening 6:30 p.m .' W ed. P ra y e rM e e tin g 7 :0 0 p .m . Y A D K IN V A L L E Y B A P T IS T C H U R C H Y a d k in V a lle y R oad C A T H O L I C ST. F R A N C IS O F A S S IS I C H U R C H H ig h w a y 601 N o rth Sat. E v e n in g AAass 5:00 p .m . Sunday 10:00 a .m . C H U R C H O F C H R IS T C O R IN T H C H U R C H O F C H R IS T M in is te r: C h a rlie H a rris o n . J r. W o rs h ip : Sun. 11:00a.m . E ve n in g 7:00 p.m . C H U R C H O F G O D C H U R C H OP G O D C ooleem ee. N .C . C L E M E N T G R O V E C H U R C H O F G O D H ig h w a y 64 W est I.W . n a m e s . P a sto r S undayS cho ol 1 0 :00a.m . W o rsh ip 1:00 p.m . E ve n in g 8 :0 0 p .m .W ednesday 8 :0 0 p .m . M O C K S V IL L E . C H U R C H O F G O D H w y. 64 E . & D epot SI. Sunday School 1 0:00a.m . W o rsh ip 11:00 a .m . E vening 7:00 p .m . " • “ ' " “ " ' 'e p i s c o p a l C O O L E E M E E E P IS C O P A L C H U R C H O F T H E G O O D S H E P H E R D R ev. W illis M . R o senthal. P rie s t S erm on 9 :3 0 a .m . S undayS cho ol 10:50a.m . F O R K E P IS C O P A L C H U R C H C anon C. N ic h o ls , P a sto r A scension 10 :o o a .m . 1 1 :0 0 a .m . N E W U N IO N U N IT E D M E T H O D IS T W ednesday 7:45 p .m . R ev. K e rm it S hoaf, P a s to r S undayS cho ol 10:00 a .m . I N T E R D E N O M I N A T I O N A L .'o a k g r o v eT u n i t e d m e t h o d i sT A A O C K S V ILLE -H ig h w a y 158 E a s t 'p«fiî.ReI!°UfîdMy W^ D«We^cademy°Ro!'^^”°°'*^S undayS cho ol 9 :4 5 a .m .f ^AAornIng w o rs h ip ^ i.o o a .m . S'W*’ ’» G R O V E U N IT E D M E T H O D IS T R adio P ro g ra m (W D S L ) 1 :0 0 p .m . H w y. 158 E a s t .A A ocksvllle Y o u th S e rvice 6:30 p .m . J.C . Lan e , P a sto r M id-W eek B ib le S tudy b y : AAra. K nox W o rs h ip d s t i.3 r d ) J ohnsto n 7.00 p .m . S un.) S unday School (1st a n d 3rd ) (2nd, 4th, & 5th) B ib le S tudy W ed.L U T H E R N H O L Y CROSS L U T H E R A N C H U R C H 1 0 :0 0 a .m . 11:00 a .m . 11:00 a .m . 10:00 a .m . 7:30 p .m . H w y. 601 A A ocksvllle, N .C . Sunday ^ h o o l W orsh ip 9 :4 5 a .m . 11:00a.m . R ev. John F o w le r 1 st.,p rd . & 5th S unday School W orship 10:00 p .m . 11 :0 0 a .m . M E T H O D I S T A .M .E . Z IO N M E T H O D IS T C H U R C H (2nd, 3rd , 4 lh S un.) W Ë S L E Y C H A P E L M E T H O D IS T A dvance, N .C . W o rsh ip (1st S un.) 10 :0 0 a .m . O rd S u n .) 1 1:00a.m . S undayS cho ol ( 3 rd S un.) 1 1:00a.m . 1 0:00a.m . SUPPORT YOUR MERCHANTS WHO BRING YOU THIS INFORMATION - ATTEND THE CHURCH OF YOUR CHOICE FARM & GARDEN SERVICE, INC. 9 6 1 Y a d k l n v lll a R o a d M 'o c k t v ll la , N . C . Phone 634-2017 or 634-5964 FOSTER-RAUCH DRUG CO. W ilk e s b o r o S t r e e t M o c k s v ille , N . С . Phone 634-2141 J.P. GREEN Milling Co., Inc. M a k e r s o f D A I S Y F L O U R W e C u s t o m B le n d D e p o t S t r e e t . M o c k s v ille , N . C . Phone 634-2126 JEFFCO CO., INC. I n t h e H ills d a le C o m m u n i t y R o u t e J A d v a n c e , N X : . Phone 998-8192 M O R A V I A N A A A C E D O N IA M O R A V IA N C H U R C H R ev. E . H a m p to n AAorgan, J r., P a sto r H w y. 801 & F a rm in g to n Sunday School 10:00 a .m . w o rs h ip 11:0 0 a .m . E ve n in g 7:30 p .m . S E V E N T H D A Y A D V E N T I S T S E V E N T H D A Y A D V E N T IS T M illin g R oad A i M a za t, P a rtrr S abbath S chool 9:30 a.rn. W o rsh ip 11:30 a .m . P E N T E C O S T A L H O L I N E S S C L A R K S V IL L E P E N T E C O S T A L L ib e rty C h. Rd. R ev. A lb e rt G e n tle • S undayS cho ol 10:00 a .m . W o rs h ip ' 11:00 a .m . • M O C K S V IL L E P E N T E C O S T A L H O L IN E S S M illin g R oad R ev. C u rtis w o o d S undayS cho ol 10 :0 0 a .m . W orsh ip 1 1 :0 0 a .m . S unday n ig h t S e rvice s 6:00 p .m . E var> geiistic 7:00 p .m W ednesday 7:30 p.m . R E D L A N D P E N T E C O S T A L H O LIN E S S R ev. P a u l C. L e d b e tte r S unday S ctM ol 10:00 a .m . •W o rship 11 :0 0 a .m . L ife lln e rs 6:00 p .m . E y a rrg e tls tlc 7:00 p.m . W ednesday 7:00 p .m . P R f e S B Y T E R I A N B IX B Y P R E S B Y T E R IA N C H U R C H S undayS cho ol I0 :0 0 a .m . W o rsh ip 11 :0 0 a .m . E vening 7:00 p .m . W E S L E Y A N L IB E R T Y W E S L E Y A N C H U R C H J e ff C o llin s. P a s to r M O C K S V IL L E W E S L E Y A N C H U R C H H o s p ita l S tre e t A A ocksvllle, N .C . R ev. D oug S m ith , S undayS cho ol 9:45 a .m . W o rsh ip S. E ve n in g 6:00 p.m . W ednesday 7:00 p.m . MARTIN Hardware & General Mdse. F e e d s , D r y G o o d s , G r o c e r ie s a n d F e r t i liz e r D e p o t S t r e e t M o c k s v ille , N . C . Phone 634-2128 C.A. SEAFORD LUMBER CO. J e r ic h o R o a d M o c k s v ille , N . C . Phone 634-S148 SHEFFIELD LUMBER & PALLET CO. R o u t e s , B o x 1 5 3 M o c k s v ille , N . C . Phone 492-5565 Ed Fisher PLUMBING SERVICE C o o le e m e e N X . P h o n e 2 8 4 . 2 7 2 1 O r 2 8 4 - 2 2 3 2 Expert R e p a irs* New Installalion fie e Estimates & Emergency Service DAVIECOUNTY ENTERPRISE RUCORD, THUKSIMV, MAY 5, l ‘)83 - 3D Area Obituaries Л1?/. L E E О. SHEPHERD Lee Olen Shepherd, 64, of N. Cooleemee, died late Saturday afternoon al the VA Medical Cenler in Durham. The funeral was conducted al 11 a.m. Tuesday at Eaton's Funeral Chapel in Mocksville by the Rev. Lee Whitlock, paslor'of Cooleemee Firsl Baptist Church where Mr. Shepherd was a member. Burial was in Legion Memorial Park. The family requests that all memorials be made to either Ihe Cancer Fund or to F irsl Baptist Church of Cooleemee. Mr. Shepherd was born May 21,. 1918, in Fayelle, Ala., to Ihe/lale Roscoe and Viola W allace Shepherd. He was a relired employee ol Ingersol-Rand Corporation of 'Mocksville. He was a veteran of World War II, having served in the U.S. Army. Surviving are his wife, Mrs. Margaret Jordan Shepherd of the home; two daughlers, Mrs. Jim (Kalhie) Brown of Cooleemee and Mrs. Larry (Gail) Spencer of R I. 1, -M ocksville; one son, Lee J . Shepherd of Cooleemee; one sister, Mrs. Pauline Rolette of La Fayelle, G a.; two brothers, Lloyd Shepherd of Rockingham and Luird Shepherd of Kodak, Tenn.; five grand- ' children. B U R L E Y A. BOGER Burlev Alvin Boger, 84, Rt. 6, •Mocksville, died al Davie Couniy 'Hospital early Friday morning. • The funeral was held Sunday at : Union Chap« Uniled Methodist 'Church by the Rev. John Fowler. B urial followed in the church . cemelery.■ Mr. ■ Boger was born in Davie County to Ihe la fe James Waller and ' Jane Stonestreet Boger and was a : relired farmer. He was a member of Union Chapel United Methodist Church.'His wife, Mrs. Louise Polls Boger • preceded him in death in 1976. Surviving are two daughlers,: Mrs. Vada Beck, Rt. 6, Mocksville . and Mrs. Libby Leonard, Rt. 13, ■ Lexington; two sons, Edwin and ■ Ray G. Boger, both of Rt. 6, : Mocksville; eight grandchildren;■ five great-grandchildren and one ! sister, Mrs. Mae McClamrock, Rt. ; 2, Mocksville. R O BER T R , EATON Robert Roosevelt Eaton, 1411 N. : Cherry Street, Winston-Salem, died April 26th at Forsyth Memorial Hoepital. He was a native of Davie County but had lived in Winston-Salem meet cf his life. Surviving are two sisters, Mrs. Rosalie M iller and Mrs. Ruby Brown and two brothers, Mr. Henry Eaton and Mr. William Eaton, all of Winstcm-Salem; one brother-in-law, Harvey L . MiUer and two sisters-in- law, Mrs. Helen Eaton and Mrs. Nellie Eaton, all of Winston-Salem and a host of nieces, nephews, other relatives and friends and a devoted friend, Ms. Thelma Hairston. The funeral was held Friday at Forsyth Funeral Home Chapel by Dr, W. E . Brannon. Burial was in Evergreen Cemetery. MRS. CLAUDIA NORTON Mrs. Claudia Viola E llis Norton, 80, 122 Bell Street, Spruce Pines, died at Forsylh Memorial Hospital Wednesday morning. She was born Jan. 15, 1903, in Mitchell County to Robert N. and Augusta Willis Ellis. She spent most of her life in Spruce Pines a4d retired from Elm er Cline Hosiery Mill. Surviving are two daughters, M rs. M ary Norton H ollifield, Lincolnton and M rs. Frances Norton Painter, Voglers Street; two sons, John N. Norton, Mocksville and Jack N. Norton, Americus, Georgia; two sisters, Mrs. Gladys Allison and Mrs. Kale Mae Bird, both of Marion; 18 grandchildren and 18 great-grandchildren. A graveside service was held Thursday at Oak Grove Cemetery near Marion. MRS. EV A W. C A RTER Mrs. Eva Whitaker Carter, 69, Rt. 2, M ocksville, died Thursday afternoon at Davie County Hospital after one day of serious illness. She was born August 26, 1913 in Davidson County to Marvin and Mary Smilh Whitaker. She was married to Zackey Carter, who died In 1976. Surviving are four daughlers, M rs. Shirley Cody, Lexington and M rs. Peggy Henderson, Mrs. Betty Poole and Mrs. Judy Ashley, all of Mocksville; one son, Roy (M unk) Carter, M ocksville:' six grandchildren; three great-grandchildren and one sister. Miss Ethel Whitaker and two brothers, Jim and Tom Whitaker, all of Mocksville, The funeral was held Saiurday at Eaton’s funeral Chapel. Burial was in Dulin United Methodist Church Cemetery by the Rev. J. C. Lane and the Rev. Eugene Goodman. MRS. ETTA SH ERM ER STA LEY Mrs. Etta Shermcr Staley, 80, W inslon-Salem Convalescent , Cenler, widow of Dewey William Slaley, died early Monday morning after two months of declining health. She was born Dec. 4, 1902 in Davie Couniy lo Boyd and Della Markland Shermer. She lived all of her adult life in Winston-Salem and was a mcmlier of Northwest Baptist Church. Mrs. Slaley was employed by R .J. Reynolds Tobacco Company for approximalely 25 years, retiring in 19G5. Mr. Slaley died in 1943.Surviving are Iwo daughlers, Mrs. I.F . (Joann) Brown, 4240 Thomasville Road and Mrs. D.O. (Belly) Matlock, 6970 Kenbridge Drive, Clemmons: seven grand­ children; five greal-grandchildren: three sisters, Miss Luci'le Shermer ■ and Mrs. Claude (Nancy Sue) Holcomb, bolh of Winston-Salcm and Mrs. Robie (Frances) Jarvis, Mocksville and Iwo brothers, W.T. (Jerry) Shermer, Winston-Salem and W.H. (Hob) Shermcr, Orlando, Florida. Graveside services were held Wednesday at Oaklawn Memorial Gardens by Ihe Rev. Russell L . Wimmer. L E S T E R H. CRAVEN Funeral services for Lester H. Craven, 6i; of Charlotte were held Tuesday a t'2 p.m. Burial was in Sharron Memorial Park in Charlotte. Mr. Craven died Saturday in Charlolte Memorial Hospital.Survivors include one son, David, of Salisbury, N .C.; a daughter, Mrs. Linda Krelic of Phoenix, Arizona; Iwo sisters, Mrs. Frank (Martha) Short of M ocksville and M rs. Carolyn Thompson of Palmdale, Calif.; five brothers, G.C. Craven of Camden, S.C., W.G. and F .E . Craven of Salisbury and C.C. and C .E. Craven of Mocksville. Joseph Walter Hege Joseph Walter “ Joe” Hege, 72, of Route 1, U.S. 601, died. Monday after- I noon at Rowan Memorial Hospital I following an illness I of three weeks. The funeral will I be 2 p.m. Thursday I in the Summersett I Memorial Chapel |hy Dr. Daniel N. -- Sansbury, pastor of fS^'iFranklin Presby- TO fterlan Church. Burial WiU be in H EG E Rowan Memorial Park. The family will be at the funeral home on Wednesday night from 7 to 9. Born March 20, 1911, in Davie County, he was a son ofthe late Jake B. and Annie Robertson Hege. He was educated in the Davje County schools, was employed by luthern Railway ! for a number of years and later self- employed as a carpenter, and was a member of Franklin Presbyterian Church. Survivors include.his wife, Emma I Beauchamp Hege, whom he married 'in November of 1938; a son. Grant Hege of Route 1; a daughter, Jackie Thomason of Richmond, Va.;' two ' brothers, John Hege of Charlotte and Morgan Hege of Florida; Three sisters, Sally Foster of M ocksville, Grace Peacock of Winston-Salem and Nomie Hendrix of Advance ;_and three grandchildren. Revival Services At Center Methodist Special Revival Services will be held al the Center United Melhodisl Church May 12-15, wilh the Reverend Roberl L . (barter, Jr. of Salisbury as the visiting minister. There will be preaching on Thur­ sday, Friday and Saiurday evening al 7:30 p.m. and ot; Sunday morning at 11:00 a.m. The Reverend Mr. Carler has served United Methodist churches in Shelby, Glen Alpine and Charlotte. A l present he is Superinlendent of the Salisbury District. At the Sunday morning service. May 15, the Salem congregalion will worship wilh Center under the Arbor. The pastor, Ihe Reverend M. Wilson Nesbitt, and the congregation cordially invite the public lo attend. On Sunday evening. May 15, Ihere will be a Davie Couniy United Methodist Rally sponsored by the County Council on Ministries. ARC To Hold Dinner ■ Tha Davie County Association for Retarded Cilizens will hold a dinner meeling al 6:30 p.m. May 17 al the B.C. Brock cafeteria. The meal will be supplied by the ARC wilh each family urged lo bring a dessert. All members are urged lo attend. The business session of the meeling will finalize delails of the annual ARC summer camp. Mike Garner, M ocksville Recreation-' director who assists in the effort, will be guest speaker. C arroll F. A rn d t afternoon at Ihe F irsl United Melhodisl Church of Newton. The Uev. Kenneth Johnson, pastor, and Ihe Hev. George Auman, paslor of Ihe First United Melhodisl Church of Mocksvillc officiated. Burial was in the family plot in the cemetery of Ihe Ml. View United Methodist Church of Catawba, N.C.Al Ihe lime of death, Mr, Arndt was chairman of Ihe board and vice- president of Midstale Mills, Inc. of Newton. He was a member of Ihe board of directors of Ihe Firsl Union National Bank, Hickory Division, and was a member of the board of Ihc Firsl National Bank of Catawba Couniy prior lo its merger with Ihe Firsl Union National Bank.A member of F irsl United Methodist Church of Newton, he had served on Ihc administrative board, as annual conference lay delegate and numerous other committees. _____________________________________Survivors include his wife, Mrs. Carroll F . Arndt of Newton died Vera Drum Arndt of Newton; two unexpectedly Fridav al the Baptist sons, Brevard Arndl of Newton and Hospital in Winston-Salem following Sleven Arndl of Conover; four bypass surgery. grandchildren; Iwo brothers and The funeral was held Sunday one sister. It was the year 1943. The second full year of World War II. The year that Carroll F . Arndt, his wife Vera, and son Brevard, became a part of Mocksville and Davle County. In December of 1941 the old Hom-Johns'tone Flour M ill, located near the depot in Mocksville, was purchased by M. H. Murray and G. D. Drum of Maiden. Murray became the general manager and also took to the road as salesman. However, back to the year of 1943. This was the year Carroll F . Amdtjoined his father-in-law (G. D. Drum) and uncle (M. H. Murray) in the new business venture lhat by then had become Incorporated as the Mocksville Flour Mills, Inc. This was also the year that the mill was rebuilt and enlarged. Also, 1943 was the year the firm went over “ the hump” receiving a federal government contract for the grinding of feed, wheat and milling of flour— resulting in a further expansion of production. Two years later, in 1945, a modern feed plant was added and the business, shifting from flour to feed, became the Mocksville Feed Mills, Inc. The end of World War II marked the return of servicemen to their home towns— and Mocksville was no exception. The end of the war ■years reunited “ old buddies" and the formation of semi-pro athletic teams, especially in basketball and baseball. ' Here in Mocksville “ old buddies" and former "team-mates" got together and on their own formed a basketball team lhat created quite a reputation as they won game after game, tourney after tourney, that first year. This was also true with the change of seasons— to baseball. I am proud to say I was a member of these teams, Two of the most enthusiastic fans and supporters of these teams were Carroll F . Arndt and M. H. Murray. After this first year these two sportsmen stepped forward in an offer to financially support these teams. I was offered la job to join the Mocksville Flour and Feed Mills, Inc., and along with other düües, oversee the sports program. This team, “ The Mocksville Millers” , became a statewide name during the next few years in the sports world. Carroll P . Arndt was not only a member of that team, but he and I wwked closely together to keep the program going as-well as discharging duties required by the corporation of which we were a part. , Without reservation, I can say I have never known a finer man than Carroll F , Arndt. I could use all available adjectives in describing this man, and still not do him justice. In Mocksville he was active in civic affairs. He held various offices and was most active in the Mocksville Methodist Church. He was most active in tbe Jaycees, holding various offices. He served as chairman of the Davie District of the Uwarrie Council of Boy Scouts. He was a charter member of the Mocksville Lions Club. And from 1957, until he moved away in 1%2, personified trustworthiness and devotion to duty as a member of the governing body of the Town of Mocksville. In March of 1962, the Mocksville Feed Mills, Inci merged Into the Holly Farm s poultry enterprise. In April, 1962, Carroll Arndt resigned his position as a member of the Mocksville Town Board and he and his family left Mocksville to return to their native Catawba County where he purchased an interest in the Midslate Mills of Newton. By this time his family had added another son, Steven. In Newton, Carroll began his new career with the Midstate Mills as office manager in charge of feed mill production. There also he soon rose to the top in business and as a community leader. Several years ago he was featured in an article in the Newton newspaper. In this article was this observation: “ Willingness to give 100-percent in whatever he undertakes have made Carroll Arndt a highly successful business executive and community leader in Newton and Catawba <i)unty. The respect he has gained has not been based solely on his abilities as a businessman. Much of the esteem in which he is held by his fellow businessmen and employees Is directly attributable to his high regard for his fellowman. He is a strong believer in the Golden Rule." As to his theory of organizational relationship he was quoted in the article as saying: “ I feel every employee Is equal to me. No matter how small a man’s position, if he is doing his job well, he Is just as important as the president of the company. Treat every man as you would like him to treat you— fairly and squarely.” Looking back over the years, I realize how much I lost In not being closely associated with Carroll Arndt for the last 21 years, I recall a quote from John Burroughs: “ New times always! Old times we cannot keep. Time does not become sacred to us until we have lived it, until it has passed over us and taken with it a part of ourselves." This I personally relate to the passing of Carroll F . Arndt. And, the word “ time" certainly relates to Carroll Arndt. As a great philosopher once observed: “ A man’s lime, when it is well husbanded, is like a cultivated field of which a few acres produce more of what is useful to life than the most extensive of provinces, even of the richest of soil, if overrun with weeds and brambles." Thus was the life of Carroll Arndt. Wherever he spent any time he contributed and left behind a legacy that even later, those who did not personally know him, can be thankful and grateful. ' Although in the past 20 years 1 was not associated closely with Carroll Arndt, I know that he continued to live and died, as he was those years as my close friend In Mocksville, with the belief: “ Spend your time in nothing which you know must be repented of; In nothing on which you ought not pray for the blessing of God; in nothing which you could not remember with a quietconscience on a dying bed; in nothing in which you might not safely and properly be found doing if death should surprise you in the act." And that was Carroll F . Amdt, — Gordon Tomlinson Governor Proclaims Nurse Recognition Weelt, IVlay 1-7 The week of May 1-7 has been proclaimed by Governor James B. Hunl as a week of recognition for nurses. May 6 has been selected as Nurse’s Day. North Carolina has the distinction of being Ihe first state lo provide for registration of nurses. On May 3, 1903 Ihe Governor, Charles B. Aycock, signed Ihe bill. The 1903 statute provided for a Board of Examiners of nurses composed of five members, Uiree regislered nurses elected by the Slate Nurses Association and two physicians elected by Ihe State Medical Society. Board members al thal lime were compensated four dollars a day and aclual traveling and hotel expense when engaged in Ihe work of Ihe Board. The most recenl revision and amendment of Ihe statute became effective July I, 1981. This revision changed Ihe composition of the Board of Nursing and Ihe manner in which members were selected. Presently the Board of Nursing consisis of 15 members who are elected by w rillen ballot. Registered nurses nominate and elect Registered Nurses and Licensed Practical Nurses nominate and elect Ihe L.P.N . members. The Board of Nursing consists of nine registered nurses, four L.P.N .’s and two represen- lalivcs of Ihe public. Physicians arc no longer members of the Board. Mrs. Nancy Cook, LPN ., a Davie Couniy Hospital Em ergency Department Nurse, currently serves as Vice-C hairman. Nursing has also changed in the last several decades in Ihe roles thal are performed and the locations in which they serve. In Ihe early 1900’s nurses took care of patients mainly in the home selling and under the supervision of the patient’s private physician who periodically visiled Ihe home during the patient’s illness. With the growth of hospitals throughout the United Slates, nurses began to work in the hospital, facing a change from one person acting as their supervisor lo a situation, in which they were directly responsible to the physician and lo Ihe hospital administrator.Physicians also faced a big change in their method of practice at this point when they were in need of collaborating w ilh other physicians, hospital administrators and nurses lo determine patient needs regarding decisions aboul equipment to be used, (he more commonly ordered drugs which needed lo be slocked in the hospital, as well as numbers of nurses it would lake lo care for Iheir patients in Ihis new setting. “ Nursing throughout the years' has continued in educational growth to the point thal nursing is recognized as an independent profession, requiring specialized knowledge and long and intensive academic preparation," said Ann Stiller, Nursing Director at Davie Woman’s JMissionaries Union To Meet The Woman’s Missionary Uhion AnnualMeeling of the South Yadkin Baptist Association will be held at Firsl Baptist Church, Statesville, Tuesday, May 10.A covered-dish supper will be served at 6 p.m. wilh the program beginning at 7:15 p.m. Guest speaker will be Mrs. Barbara Joiner from Columbiana, Alabama. She is a popular speaker and has written extensively in W.M.U. publications.Everyone is welcome to attend, especially those in W.M.U. organizations in Baptist churches in Davie County. Couniy Hospilal. Nurses may now choose lo prepare Ihemselves for many differenl levels ot performance. The L.P.N , is prepared with one year of cducalion following which a licensing exam must be passed. Associate degree nursing refers lo Ihe registered nurse who has completed Iwo years of academic preparation and has passed the licensing exam for R.N .’s. The diploma graduate has completed Ihree years of academic preparation in a nursing school usually associated with a hospital. This person becomes an R.N. upon passing Ihe licensing exam. TheB.S.N. refers lo nurses who have received Iheir education in a University selling and hold a Bachelor’s of Science degree in Nursing. II is cxpecled thal the term professional nurse in Ihe future will refer lo Ihe Bachelor’s degree or higher, those prepared al the Master’s of Science and Doctorate level. Davie County Hospital’s staff of nurses represent a group at­tempting lo offer their public the very besl in up-to-date knowledge. Presently Ihere are Ihree L.P .N .’s who are upgrading their educalion from the L.P.N . lo Ihe Associate degree level and 15 registered nurses from Ihc Associate Degree or Diploma level advancing lo the Bachelor’s of Science level. Many of our present Registered Nurse staff have upgraded from the L.P.N . level lo Ihe R.N. and many of the L.P.N .’s began Iheir careers as a nursing assistant. “ Nursing offers much personal satisfaction giving the nurse the feeling thal she has had the op­ porlunily lo help others.” she said. Ask any nurse whal nursing is like- and he or she will probably reply lhat it makes your feel hurl, back hurl and even your head hurt; but it is truly so satisfying it’s like having a lillle bit of heaven on earth." Special Holy Day Service At Church Of Good Shepherd A special Holy Day service in observance of the Ascension of Christ will be held Wednesday, May11, at 7 p.m. at Ihe Episcopal Church of Ihe Good Shepherd, Cooleemee, N.C. TlieRev. Willis Rosenthal,pas- lor, will be celebrant at Ihe Eucharist service. •Ascension Day, sometimes called “ Holy Thursday", comcs forty days after Easier day and marks the end of the lime of appearances of the Risen Christ lo his disciples as recorded in the New Testament.The public is welcome to attend. _________ Hi, My name is Amanda .Ann Packett. I was 2 years old the 27(h of April. I had a party Sunday April 24. I had aunts, unclcs and cousins from High Point and friends and neigh­ bors. My parents are Henry and Linda Packett and my brother and sistcr are David and Donna. S m a ll B u s in e s s W e e k M a y 8 -1 4 1982 Unpaid County Taxes N O R T H C A R O L IN A D A V IE C O U N T Y U n d e r a nd b v v irtu e o f the a u th o rity vested In m e b y S ection 105-369 of th e G e n e ra l S tatute» of N o rlh C a ro lin a and p u rs u a n t to an o rd e r of Ihe B o a rd o f C o m m lu lo n e rs . D a v ie C o unty. I w ill o lfe r fo r ta le and w lli s e ll a l p u b lic a u c tio n fo r cash to the h ig h e st b id d e r a t Ih e co u rth o u se door in M o c k s v ille . N o rth C a ro lin a , a t 12 o 'c lo c k noon on June 6. 1903 lien» upon Ihe re a l estate d e s crib e d b eio w fo r the n o n -p a ym e n t o f taxes o w in g (o r th e y e a r ]9S3. T h e d m o u n t a d v e rtise d w ill be Incre a se d by In te re s t a nd costs and o m issio n o f in te re s t and cost fro m the am o u n t a d v e rtise d w ill n o t c o n s tih ite a w a iv e r o f the ta x in g u n it'» c la im fo r these Ite m s. P a u lin e H . W a gner D a v ie C ounty T a x C o lle cto r 4D - DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPUISE A h is tro m , C la re n ce W . a nd M a ry S. .)L - B a l. $89.02 A lb e rty» R a y m o n d D . a n d M a ry D . • ,99A • B a l. M .54 A lb e rty , R a y m o n d P. >.99A • B a l. $1.01 A le x a n d e r. S y lvia L . • IL - S96.t3 A lle n . A lfre d and A th a • IL -$156.93 A lie n .C h a rlie H e irs a nd V. A lle n -S.SOA -$5.00 A lle n , G eo rge W . H e irs •S.13A $42.94 A lie n . G ra d y W . a nd P a tric ia -1.88A -$1M.44 A lie n , Jot)nny R a y -250 A- $1,296.52 A lie n , K a th y В -lL-$t09.95 A lle n . Rosa H e irs -IA -$12.50 A lle n , R oy G . S r. and M a rg ie W . - IL -$127.94 A lle n . V rola . t.90A - $11.40 A lle n , W Iiiia m F re d a nd C a ro l -1.S0A -$198.28 A lie n , W llila m J r. and M a rg a re t K . -IA -$86.52 A llis o n , C h ris tin e C. -2A -$181.07 A liis o n . E d w a rd a nd S arah • .90A -$109.57 A llre d . Joseph 0 . .1.30A $70.S2 A ls p a u g h . R o b e rt w . J r. and K a th y -IL - $120.86 A n d e rso n , A rn o ld G ra y and A nna 'H . -IL $164.16 A n d e rso n , C u rtis D ean a n d P e rrl p . -.38A • $40.15A n d e rso n . АЛагу E lla -2.10A -B a i. $7.78 A n d re w 's. Sam D . H a irs .1L.$9.79 A rn o ld . C harles S. & J u d y L . 48.42A >Bal. $10.13 A rn o ld , W illia m P e rry H e irs ■ 3.40A- $33.75 A rrin g to n , D a v id A n th o n y -11.15 A . .B a l. $7.30 A s h le y , R obert M . a n d V irg in ia - IL -$132.64 A v ila , A llla n d ro A . and M a rily n W . - iL -$65.25 B a ile y . C re o le V a s h tl -.30A $34.45 B a k e r, D a lla s a n d B onnie - IL -$72.71 B a k e r. R o b e rt N . a n d B e tty Jean -4.20A *$68.00 B a rb e r. C lyde M . and P a ts y O L -$172.11 B a rk e r, P e lm a C. a nd A lic e H . - I L -$39.77 B a rk e r. P in k ie M rs . - IL -B a i. $47.53 B a rk e r. R o b e rt L . and B re n d a S. -2A $160.05 B a rnes. B obby J . a n d L y n d a S. • 2A $25.15 B a rn e y . D ouglas and F a y e -1.38A -$304 J 6 B a rn e y . N oel a nd W a n d a - IL $205.57 B eal, Lo u ie a nd M a ry R . -1L $1.65 B eal, Lo u ie J r. a nd J u n e I L -$128.73 B e a m . L e s te r C. a n d B e cky -IL -$11.25 B ean, B e rth a M rs . -IL -$25.32 B e aucham p, J.C . H e irs • 7.20A - $37.80. B e a u ch a m p , J u n ie N oah H e irs a n d Iv e y -34A • »171.84 B e a u ch a m p . L e s te r W . a n d M a rc ia • IS A • $368.77 B e a u ch a m p , P h illip A . a n d H ild a -3.47A • »190.96 B eck, N a than C. J r. and Jo y n c e P. - IL -B a i. $1.67 B e ck, R ic h a rd A . and B illie Jean - 7.46A • $674.56 B e c k / R ic h a rd A . a n d B lille Jean -1.40A -$6.13 B e ck, R ic h a rd A . and R .R . F o s te r • 5.17A • $24.85 B e ck, W ade C a rlto n a n d R u th -26.71A -B a l. $229.69 B e ck. W a rre n K e ith and M a lin d a p . -.90A - _____ ЁеИ. D onna L y n n H o w a rd and C h a rle s ^ A - »5.09 B e n fie ld , H a ro ld E ug e n e a n d M ild re d -SI.^OA- »245.64 B e n n e tt. Joseph P . J r. a nd V e ra -3 8 A -$81.10 B e n n e tt. R .D .H e irs a n d M a ry S. -.BOA -$89.24 B e n n e tt, R .D . H e irs a n d M a ry S. -1L -$6.50 B e n n e tt R .D . H e irs a nd M a ry S. - 37.25A -$72.12 Benson, A n n ie H . -.25A -$17.92 B enson, L e ro y - IL -$126.46 B e rn a rd . W illia m R . a n d N a n cy - IL -$234.88 B e rry . G eo rge R . a n d V e m le e - IL .1238.45 B e rry . R u b y M a e -3.20A .B a l. $20.10 B la c k b u rn , G ene M . 11 and D e b ra L . - IL - $130.79 . B ia c k b u rn , R ebecca V e s ta l -$1.50A .$224.99 B la c k w e ld e r. N e ll C. -I.IS A -$193.84 .B '4C kw e li, N o rm a J e a n M o u ltry O L -$24.42 . B la c k w e ll; W ilb u r C la y a n d P h y llis -IA -$115.65 B la k e . H u b e rt A . and P a u lin e -.52A -$30.07 B o g e r, B enny D ean a n d P aW -4.V A -1559.39 B o g e r, B e n n y D ean a n d P a tti -3.50A -$8.75 B o g e r. C laude ЛЛ. a nd O ne ta S. - IL .$77.45 '■ B o g e r. G ilb e rt L ee a n d M a xin e .18A .$288.89 ■ B o g e r, J a m e s L a rry and S haron -L -$46.34 : B o g e r,J a m e s M .a n d P a n d o ra B .0 .4 0 A .$96.28 , B o g e r, Ja m e s W . -132.97A -$925.12 - B o g e r, J o h n n y . IL -$10.24 B o g e r. R o g e r G ra y a n d R u b y K . -1.01A -$61.15 B o g e r. R on a ld L ee a n d R obin D -$!.36A -$1(4.47 ' B o lln . L o n n ie G ra y -.84A -$60.55 B o lt P ro p e rtie s |г к . - IL -$15.00 B o lt P ro p e rtie s in c . - IL -$15.00 B o lt P ro p e rtie s in c . - IL -$15.00 . B o lt P ro p e rtie s in c . - IL -$15.00 B o lt P ro p e rtie s In c. - IL $15.00 ' B o lt P ro p e rtie s in c . - IL -$15.00 B o lt P ro p e rtie s in c . - IL -$15.00 B o lt P ro p e rtie s In c. - IL >$15.00 Booe. E a rly V . a nd N e llie - IL -$44.98 Booe, S a llie R . O L -B a l. $54.61 B ow les. V e ln a M rs . -2.S0A -$81.85 B oxw ood R eal E s ta te in c . O L -$ Ш Л З B ra ln a rd . R o b e rt J . and C a ro ly n -3.35A -$132.77 B re c h t, C a rl M . -21.25A -$38.00 B re w e r. H a ro ld D . a nd S andra - f 8.07 A -$61.18 B rin d le , C h a rlie E . J r. and M a g g ie G . O L - %ЫА4 B ro a d w a y . J u d y C. -8.49A -$212.91 B ro c k , A m b ro s e Lee and P e a rlie -12.25A - $100.31 B ro c k , A m b ro s e L ee a n d P e a rlie -2A -$36.25 B ro c k , A m b ro s e Lee a nd P e a rlie -1A $4.00 B ro c k , B u rr C. J r. a nd R u th -8.83A -$226.34 B ro c k . B u rr C. J r. a nd R u th -5.24A -$26.20 B ro c k . G eo rge A m b ro s e a n d R achel -.62A - $37J3 B ro c k . W illia m K ennen a nd A n n ie -12. 12A • $106.40 B ro o ks. J e rry -1.33A -$49.62 B ro o ks, R oole Jackso n -11.29A -$100.49 B ro w n , D ale a nd G lenda B. -1.47A .$285.84 B ro w n . D a vlu C . a nd K im b e rly C. -IL $1.15 B ro w n . H axel M rs . -50.13A -$127.73 B ro w n , J .H . H e irs - 102.00A .$256.40 B ro w n , John H . H e irs - 280A - $492.93 B ro w n , K ris ty P o tts .IL -S25.59 B ro w n . L a rry a n d B e tty -.93A $150.94 B ro w n . M e ry H e irs A lle n O L $4.47 B ro w n , P aul J r. and N o ra -1.38A -$124.43 B ro w n . P aul J r. and N o ra -1.83A -$18.53 B ro w n , W anda H . -.93A -$182.03 B u m g a rn e r, F re d A . J r. a n d J o h n n y ^ : -IA - $88.74 B u n d y , E noch E d w a rd -4.09A -$32.44 B u rgess, B .N . e n d P h y llis -14.80A -$124.40 B u rgess. Jesse a nd B e tty -4.51A $32.79 B u rk e , D a is y B Ilie E s ta te - IL -$44.45 B u rk h a rt. E d w a rd D . and M a rth a -1L -$144.52 B u rto n , Ja m e s E . a n d J u lia -4.45A -$30.20 4 B u rto n . S adie a n d D on -1L -$210.09 B u rto n . S adie a n d D on O L -$11.12 B u rto n , W Iiiia m C . a nd P a u le tte -1.44A -$182.52 B y e rs , S adie U am es -10A -B a i. $1.49 C able. S am uel T u rn e r and P eggy - 24.58A - $144.37 C ain, C.C. -33.49A -$40.48 C a ^ , C.C. -2A .$4.00 C ain. Sam and T h e lm a - IL $23.75 C a llo w a y , Lo u ise S. - IL -$55.37 C a m p b e ll. C a rl j . J r. H e irs a nd E va -.40A - $3.00 C a m p b e ll, C u rtis and M a m ie A . -1L -$41.84 C a m p b e ll, E va M a e -IL $44.51 C a m p b e ll, H a rv e y L ee and C reola -42.40A • $299.49 C a m p b e ll, H a rv e y Lee and C reola -IL -$10.00 C a m p b e ll. J .D . O L $157.39 C a m p b e ll. Ja m e s H . a nd L o re H a АЛс -18.30A • $104J9 C a m p b e ll. Ja m e s R o b e rt a n d S a ra h H -IL - $591.05 C a m p b e ll, Ja m e s R o b e rt s S arah H .O L - $12.50 C a m p b e ll, K a th y D . - 1L • $140.17 ' C a m p b e ll, M a e E . - IL -$80.08 C a m p b e ll, P e n n y D - IL $12.50 C a m p b e ll, R o b e rt J. a nd A n n B. -1L -$140.17 C a m p b e ll, R o g e r and L a u ra -4.10A -$126.88 C a m p b e ll. W lilla m L and C onnie -1.60A -$47.41 Cepe», E rn e s t 5. O L - » . 4 0 ______ C a rro ll. L a w re n c e W . -10.25A $24.49 C arson, C ra y to n a od L o rln e -1.08A -$75.45 C arson. J o h n n ie A . -4.44A $28.27 C arson, АЛагу С . -2.Э0А $79.38 C arson, R ic h a rd A a n d E z e ll -.45A -$270-80 C a rte r, C a iiie C. -9A -$41.23 C a rte r, C a llle C . - IL $74.71 C a rte r, C a iiie C . -22.89A $43.49 C a rte r. D o n n ie E v e re tte a n d M e ta -27A -$4в.&5 C a rte r, F re d d ie E ugene a nd A n ita W . -.45A - $98.77 C a rte r. L e w is C . and C a ro le R . .6SA $113.58 C a rte r. L e w is D ean a n d G a ll D . .92A $147.29 C a rte r. M . G ra y and R u b y N e ll -S7A $454.29 C a rte r. M . G ra y a n d R u b y N e ll -14.80A -$91.41 C a rte r. R ic h a rd a nd F a y e C ain -10A -$52.05 C a rte r, S helia M . -IL -B a l. $48.75 C a rte r, V a rn e r S. -1L -$8.50 C a rte r. W illia m B. and H o b e rt -7.13A -$24.74 C a rte r, w m ic G ray O L -B a l. $32.58 C a rte r, W m . n e rt and H o b e rt L ee -14.75A • $317.29 C a u d ill, W illia m and A n ita J . -2.49A -$28.68 C audle J r. Joe E d w a rd a nd R u th O . - IL -$148.85 C h a ffin , Joe T. a nd M a ry B. -IA -$88.50 C h a m is, Cus W . -15.45A -$43.40 C heeks, A A arvIn E . and B ebora P. -IL -$158.28 C hunn, B eaulah -IA -$82.95 C hunn, B eaulah 2.50A -$)5.43 C hunn, C harie» E d w in and Y v o n n e -21.82A • $94.37 C hunn, C h a rle s E d w in ahd Y v o n n e -15.40A - 168.40 C hunn, C h a rle s E d w in a n d Y v o n n e - IL -$108.78 C hunn, R o b e rt and G la d ys - IL -$40.35 C hunn, R o b e rt and G la d ys - IL $5.00 C hunn. R o b e rt and G la d ys -.44A $4.03 C la rk . H e rb e rf-O ie n e r C la rk -J0.40A 475.40 C le a ry , K irk and M a ry F ra n c e s -8A -$177.48 C le a ry , T o m m y E u g e n e -4.05A -$21.15 C le m e n t, B e a tric e A rn o ld - IL -$25.31 C le m e n t, B e a tric e and W illia m E . -5.47A . $148.13 C le m e n t. D e lla B la c k w e ll -IL -B a l. $5.59 C le m e n t, G eorge -3.47A 4143.83 C le m e n t, J a m t^ O d e ll a nd O c ta v la W . -IL - S39.42 C le m e n t. John - IL -$4.oo C le m e n t. A A argaret F. O L -$7.88 C le m e n t, M ille r a nd M a rg a re t F . - IL -181.49 С le m e rt. R achel H e irs -1K -$2.48 C le m e n t. W illia m E . and B e a tric e -5.07A - $48.18 C le m e n t, W illie G ra y a nd B e tty K . IL -$124.43 C le m e n t. W lllle G ra y a n d B e tty K . -IL -$9.00 C le ve la n d , H e n ry J u n io r -IL -$49.53 C lin e , B re n d a P. -IA -$5.00 C lin e , Ja m e s W . J r. and G a ll S. -IL 4159.97 C lo n tz. A lie n and D e lo ris -1.22 A -$74.42 C o c k e rh a m . A lic e F a y e -IL -$3.40 C ody. S am uel J . - IL B a l. $100.47 C oley. M a ry Lou S. -1.18A -$124.94 C o llin s , E th e l -1.59A -$148.44 C ook. B obby G. a n d P a tric ia -7.25A -$230.07 C ook. O s c a r B. a n d M y rtle -4.68A 4114.42 C ook, O s c a r B. a n d M y rtle -3.40A -$22Л C ope. S a m u e l J. a n d R u b y -5.84A 4134.94 C ope. S a m u e l J . a nd R u b y -.50A -$29.42 C ope. T o m m y E . and S a n d ra -5A -$105.40 C o rn a tz e r, C a rrie -19.44A -$55.44 C o rn a tz e r, C ic e ro W . j r . a n d G lenda - IL - $209.93C o rn a tz e r. C onnie G ra y -1.35A -$104.54 C o rn a tz e r D o n a ld G ra y and Jean - IL -$S7.41 C o rn a tz e r, E v e ly n -5.10A -B a l. $3.83 C o rn a tz e r, J e ffe ry S. a nd L in d a -2A -B a l. $143.31 C o rn a tz e r, AAadge C. -4A -$34.85 C o rre ll, D a n ie l F re d e ric k and M a rie -11.94A - $147.17 c o rre ll, H o w a rd J r. and T eresa - IL -$254.49 C o rre ll, P a u l D a v id a n d AAarge . IL 4213.49 C o rre ll, P a u l D a v id a n d AAarge .1.59A -$11.93 C o v e r, D a v id A lie n a nd J o yce - IL -$1.15.39 C o vin g to n , Joseph A . a nd M a rth a - IL -B a l. $1437 C ra te r, B renda Seats -4.47A .$27.35 C ra te r, B re n d a Seats -1.02A -$8.93 C ric k m o re . G eo rge C. J r. a nd M a rth a -.70A - $5.25 C ro tts . B illy A n g e ll -7.37A -$27.86 C ro tts . R ic h a rd H . and D e b ra S. -2.75A .$229.49 C ro tts , R onald Jo e - IL -$45.13 C ro tts . R o n a ld Jo e -ЗА -$15.75 C ro tts . T o m m y S teven. IL -$43.44 C ro tts . T o m m y S teven, ЗА -$15.75 C u n n in g h a m , D e v o rla S. -3.04A -$8.47 C u th re ll. C .F . -.84A -$7.35 C u th re ll. L .A . - IL $4.00 C u th re ll. W ilm a H . - I L $191.74 D a li, R o b e rt A . and AAary T . - IL -B a l. $9.03 D a lto n . C h a rle s N . a n d H e le n M . -1L -$84.21 D o lto n . C h a rle s N . a n d H elen M . -4.10A 425.43 D a llo n . E lla H . - IL $87.72 D a lto n . H .M . a nd Jose p h in e -7.21.A -$34.05 D a lto n , H u b e rt M . a n d Jose p h in e C . -4 .4 0 A - $244.04 D a lto n . H u b e rt M . a nd Jose p h in e C. -2.46A • $6932 D a lto n , M y rtle Lo u ise -.50A -B a l. $46.41 D a lto n , N e w m a n a n d E liz a b e th -4.90A -$123.59 D a lto n . O d e ll -5.40A $44.93 D a n ie l. J a c k B. a n d A ld in e -1.50A -B a l. $45.91 D a v id s o n . F re d H . 0 .5 0 A 4132.49 D a v ie B u ild e rs O L -$48.91 D a v ie T ru c k & A u to S ales In c . - IL .$10.00 D a v ie T ru c k 8i A u to S ales In c . - IL $9.00 D a v ie T ru c k fr A u to S ales In c. - IL 417.50 D a v ie T ru c k 8. A u to S ales In c. - IL 415.00 D a v ie T ru c k & A u to S ales in c . - IL 415.00 D a v ie T ru c k & A u to S ales in c . -IL $15.m D a v ie T ru c k 8. A u to S ales In c . . IL 415.00 D a v ie T ru c k 8, A u to S ales in c . - IL $730 D a v ie T ru c k Bi A u to S ales in c . - IL -$15.00 D a v ie T ru c k & A u to S ales in c . - IL -$15.00 D a v ie T ru c k 8. A u to S ales in c . - IL 415.00 D a v ie T ru c k 8. A u to S ales In c . -З.ВОА 423.75 D a v is , B e tty H e irs -4.50A -$14.88 D a v is , B illy R a y a nd V ic k ie -IL -$5.00 D a v is . G la d y s D . a nd R oy G a ttis - IL -$52.45 ^ a v ls . R oy O L .$4.50 D a y . B obby E . a n d S y lv ia -.70A -$229.75 D illa rd . C la re n c e C . a n d Lo u ise -3.21 A -$111.48 D illa rd . C la re n c e S. a n d N o la - IL 437.41 D illa rd . Ja m e s D . - IL 412.50 D llla ra . Joe W ayne -1L -119.38 D illa rd . T e rry W . and C a ro ly n W . - IL 4127.49 D illa rd . T im o th y G . - IL 412.50 D ix o n . Zeno H . a nd A n n L . -33A -$138.38 D obson. Ja m e s F ra n k -IL -»145.42 D oby. B illy L . a nd B a rb a ra -IA -$47.79 D oby. D onald B. and R ebecca -5A -$121.98 D oby. E a rl and G le n d a -.90A -$48.33 D oby, E a rl and G le n d a - IL -$4.00 Doby, E a rl and G lenda -1.23A -$10.77 D o o le y. H e rb e rt E . a nd J e tty -123.48A -$493.11 D o u b . N a n c y S. - IL -S35.22 D o u lln . J o h n C h a rie s a n d L illia n D . 0 .8 7 A - $134.49 D o w n in g . J a n e P h y llis - IL -$42.89 D ra u g h n , P a u l R an d o lp h J r. and D e b ra -1L • $134.44 D ra u g h n , R a y a nd D o ro th y - I L • $100.25 D ra u g h n , W a y n e M . S r. -.80A .$145.07 D riv e r. L e ro y a n d E le a n o r -IA -$19.40 D ru m . S helba S. -10.55A -$74.45 D u lln , C h a rlie J r. a n d E lla M a e O L -$9.00 D u lin , G eo rge W . a nd J u lia - IL -$40.99 D u lin , H e n ry W . a nd J e w e ll -11.70A -$273.40 D u lln , H e n ry W . a nd J e w e ll -5.35A -$32.10 D u lin , J a s p e r H . and Z e lm a -20A -$150.88 D u lin . John W esley and A n n ie C . - IL -S29.12 D u lin , L a r ry D o n n ie - IL -$151.87 D u lin , L e ro y - IL 428.11 D u lln , R o b e rt H e irs -7.72A .$23.14 D u ll, G a ry W a y n e and D eborah E . 0 .5 8 A .B a l. $3.47 D u n n , S herm an L a nd L in d a -4.55A -$42.88 D u rh a m , L o u ise C. -1.49A -$26.13 D u rh a m , M a n u e l W . a nd Ire n e -2.75A -$73.07 . D w ig g in s , M ic h a e l Lee O L 4109.14 D yson, Leon and L e n o ra -2.76A -$49.17 D yson, M a rty A . a nd C a th y D . - IL -B a i. $5.84 D yson, V lC k l L . -1.44A -$81.57 E a rn h a rd t, F ra n k D . and Sue -2.28A -$413.24 E a rn h a rd t. F ra n k D . and Sue - IL -$43.48 E a rn h a rd t, F ra n k D . and Sue - IL -$28.91 E a rn h a rd t. F ra n k D . a nd Sue -24.20A -$84.32 E a rn h a rd t, F ra n k D . and Sue - IL -$31.54 E a rn h a rd t. F ra n k D . and Sue -1.33A 414.43 E a rn h a rd t. F ra n k D . and Sue -2A $17.50 E a rn h a rd t. F ra n k D . and Sue - IL -$22.27 E a rn h a rd t, F ra n k D .,a n d Sue -7.77A -$58.28 E a rn h a rd t. F ra n k 0 . and Sue - IL -$29.31 E a rn h a rd t. F ra n k D. and Sue -1.37A $17.13 E a rn h a rd t, F ra n k D . and Sue - IL -$97.40 E a rn h a rd t, F ra n k D . and Sue - IL -$27.12 E a to n , A lta .21.40A -$44.74 E a to n , E v e re tte -45.44A -$182.34 E a to n , E v e re tte -2.13A -$4.39 E a to n , E v e re tte <4.30A -$12.90 E a to n , H e n ry R a y m o n d -8 A -$28.00 E a to n , O de ll a nd H e n ry -31A -$90.79 E b rlg h t. M ic h a e l L. and D ia n n a - IL -$114.71 E b rlg h t. M ic h a e l L y n n .IL 415.75 E ccle s, E th e l ..48A -$189.78 E ccle s, E th e l - IL -$44.04 E d w a rd s , Ik e A . -J 2 A $18.54 E d w a rd s , R a n d y a nd E la in e H . • 1.40A - B al. $2.42 E llis , A usbon a n d D o ro th y -43.43A $522.01 E llis , F ra n c is R eid &. D o ro th y • 43.43A-$522.01 E lils . F re d O . a n d AAarie C. -IL -$217.04 E iils , F re d 0 . a nd A ^ rie C. 0 .1 4 A $60.62 E llis . F^ed O . a n d A ^ rie C. -IL $41.02 E llis , W .A . J r. and F re d O . -2.10A -$41.93 E llis W .A . J r. and F red O. .)L -1498.23 E llis W .A . J r. -50.60A .$518.14 E ills , W .A . J r. .IL 41.47 E tc h is o n , B illy G a rla n d - IL $7.50 E v a n s , Joe H e n ry -5.32A $40.84 F a m ily F a rm e rs F o und of A m e ric a -49.37A - $597.99 F e a s te r, ~ E d ith - .45A $35.42 P e n w ic k , E iiia b e th L . -25.34A -B a l. $4.11 F itz g e ra ld , Ja m e s A . and L a u rie -5.43A $4).90 F le m in g . E v e re tte A . -1L -$3.75 F le m in g , E v e re tte A . -IL -S3.98 F le m in g . Ja m e s B a x te r a n d J a n e t W . O L . $114.6^ F le m in g . Ja m e s B a x te r a n d J a n e t W . -IL . $10.13 F llp p in . W anda B. M rs . O L -$120.99 F oote, c a rle l - IL 410.89 F oofe. C arlel .)L 41.11 F o o te ,'C a rle l a n d G eneva F . .IL -$1S4.90 F oote, C a rle l a n d G eneva F . 0 .4 3 A -18.58 F oote. C a rle l a n d G eneva F . - IL $34.28 F o rre s t, C la re n c e a nd S adie E . -74.69A ;$]81.30 F o rtu n e , B a rry D aie - iL -$7iS0 RECORD, THURSDAY, MAY 5, 1983 F o s te r, E u la H e irs .IL -$37.43 ^ F o s te r, F re d and P a u lin e -IL -$27.69 F o s te r. O ie n n M . e nd D o ris -1.04A -$3.45 F o s te r, G le n n M . a nd D o ris -3.04A $19.71 F o s te r, O ie n n M . a nd D o ris .25.10A -$73.94 F o s te r, G le n n M . a nd D o ris -1.07A -$199.22 F o s te r. G le n n M . a nd D o ris -IL -$5.57 F o s te r, O ienn M . a nd D o ris -IL -$41.80 F o s te r, H .L . and B e tty -12.49A -$73.14 F o s te r. H a ro ld F ra n k lin a nd M a ry - IL -$48.82 F o s te r, J.G . H e irs -8.40A -$29.40 F o s te r, Ja m e s M itc h e ll and K e n n e th 00.19A - $30.38 F o s te r, John H e n ry J r. and N e llie T . -1.30A - $45.95 F o s te r. J u lia E. H e irs O L -$3.00 F o s te r. M a ry W . M rs . -IL -$76.28 F o s te r, R ic h a rd R . a nd C a ro ly n -.93A -$212.30 F o s te r, R o n a ld E ugene a nd W a n d a - IL -$205.15 F o s te r. T h o m a s G . J r. and H elen - IL -$162.99 F o s te r, T h o m a s G . J r. and H elen - IL -$27.94 F o s te r. T h o m a s G . J r. a n d H elen - IL -$23.73 F o s te r. T h o m a s G . J r. a n d H elen - IL -$27.74 F o w le r, D ew ey - IL -17.97 F o w le r, E liz a -IL $17.04 F o w le r, G eorge C a lv in and D ia n e - IL -$80.35 F o w le r. Ja m e s a n d V ic to ria В *1L -$58.71 F o w le r. Ja m e s O tis and C la ra - IL -B a l. $50.92 F o w le r. R o la n d R . H e irs -IL -$30.31 F o w le r. S am uel O tis and W lllle M a e - IL -$83.97 F o w le r. T hom as E . E ta l -IL -$3.37 F ra n k E a rl M . and E lle n M . - IL .B a i. $40.23 F re e m a n , D e b b ie D . - IL -$184.48 F re e m a n . O pa l W . -IL -$24.42 F u n d e r A m e ric a In c. O A -$381.11 F u n d e r A m e ric a In c. -25.74A -$4,980.90 F u rc h e s . P a m e la D ee -IL -$23.34 G ad dy L .G . and A n n a Jean -2.20A 4170.14 G a ith e r. C la y -8.50 A -B a l. $44.37 G a ith e r. P ra n ce s H . H e irs -1L -$3.70 G a ith e r. F ra n c e s H . H e irs - IL -$4.48 G a ith e r, G o rd a n a n d C oleen -2.97A -$80.84 G a ith e r. H ugh C. a nd L in d a F. -,73A -$213.41 G a ith e r, Jesse - IL -$19.91 G a ith e r. John R . a n d A A ariiyn J . -5.44A -$34.44 G a ith e r, John R edm on -IL -$45.89 G a ith e r, John R edm on -IL -$5.00 , G a ith e r, J u lle H e irs -2.25A -$9.45 G a rn e r. R o b e rt W . and L u c ille O L -B a l. $4.84 G e te r. J .W . a nd B re n d a G a ll ..34A 4157.54 G ibson, Joh n sie D a v is .)L -$90.42 G ibson, L o u is R . a nd Joh n sie В - IL -$19.25 G lddens, J o h n С - IL -$25.00 G lddens, J o h n C. - IL -$25.00 ' G in th e r. K a y M . a nd R o b e rt -53.50A $259.13 G in th e r, K a y M . and R o b e rt -IL -$41.84 G in th e r. K a y M . and R o b e rt -9.29A -$58.07 G lass. B obby G ene and B e tty -4.34A -$2.78.83 G leiiS, B obby G ene a nd B e tty -1.60A -$20.00 G od bey. A lic e N . a n d C u rtís -IL .»72.87 G od bey, A lic e N . a n d C u rtis .IL -$12.80 G od bey. D ean a nd S helia -2A -$93.00 G o fo rth . G .H . J r. a n d L u c y -2.30A 4154.01 G o fo rth . G ra c e S. -3.04A -$16.84 G o fo rth , W illia m J . a n d M a rq u le tta - IL - $121.08 G olden, N e w m a n H e irs - IL 410.00 G oo dlet, A n n ie R u th -1.20A -$133.33 G o rd o n . R oger L . a nd Susan -5 .0 IA 4141.41 G ra n t, F re d ric k . S ta n le y a n d A n n ie -1.40A -- $32.95 G ra n t, F re d ric k S ta n le y and A n n ie - IL -$39.59 G ra n t, F re d ric k , S ta n le y a nd A n n ie O L 414.34 G ra n t. M o ze lla H e irs -IA .$51.91 G ra v e s . W illia m L e e a n d M a rg a re t - IL .$93.07 G re g o ry . J a n e C. 1.22A -$50.38 G re g o ry . P a u l M e lv in -IA -1274.»G re g o ry , R e g in a ld S. a n d Joann-1L-$115.39 G riffin , J o h n D . a n d T a m e la c . -.81A -$87.28 G rin d e . L e w is A . and F re d a P. - iL -»77.40 G ru b b . G a ry R a n d a ll a n d K a th y -.80A -»199.11 G ru b b , J a m e s C. a n d J u a n ita K . -.75A -$8.44 G ru b b , R o b e rt C la y a n d M ic k e y -1L -$23.04 G ru b b . W ade D e n n is a nd J u d y -4.24A -$252.74 G ru b b . W ade D . E t A l -IA -122.24 G u n te r. C h a rie s a n d L u la M a e -28.48A -$332.40 G u n te r. C h a rle s a n d L u la M a e -.50A -$29.03 H a g e r. J e rry L . a n d P h y liu - IL -$9.00 H a g e r. J e rry L a n d P h y lls s .IL -$10.00 H a irs to n . A lb e rt a n d C a th e rin e -.40A -$74.15 H a irs to n . C la ra E s ta te -5.40A -$18.90 H a irs to n , F ra n k H e irs -2A -$11.75 H a ll, E lb e rt M . a n d N a n cy C. - IL -$11.25 H a ll, L o c k s le y S. a nd M a rie .70A 4147.43 H a ll, S ava n n a h . M r s ..IL .$3.03 H anes, C h a rlie F ra n k lin .5.S8A .$54.73 H anes. R a lp h M a rtin a n d D ia n n e .1.44A - $128.08 H anes. R a lp h M a rtin a nd D ia n n e -4 3 4 A -$18.14 H a rd le B e v e rly Y . - IL $97.44 H a rd in , D onald M . a nd V irg in ia -1.42A -$119.34 H a rd in g . G a ry L a n d E rn e s tin e - IL -$54.30, H a rd in g , S .A . a n d C ly d e Y oung - IL -$344.54 H a rd y W a y m o u n t and D a is y M . - IL -$1430 H a rris . B obby J . a nd B e tty - IL -$15.38 H a rris , H e n ry P. and F a ith - IL 4108.70 H a rris , H o y le B. J r. a nd AAary J o - IL -$187.09 H a rt, D a v id J r. a n d M ira n d a A n n -3.11 A - $98.45 H a rtm a n , H azel S. -25.04A -$204.81 H ayes, Ja m e s E.^ J r. a nd P a u la D . O L -$170.29 H ead. B o b b y Lee a nd C a ro l C. - IL $14735 H ead. B re n d a F . - IL 4118.41 H ead. W illia m ? , a nd AAartha F . - IL -$131.49 H e a ly . L o u is J. J r. and J a n e ll - IL .$521.31 H e a iy . L o u is J. J r. a nd J e n e ll . IL $75.00 H e lla rd L e o n a rd -.80A -$70.42 H e lm s . J a c k C. and D e g n e y A - IL $54.25 H enderson, P e g g y C. a n d K e nneth -.48A - $131.25 H e n d rix , C la re n c e L .-2 0 A -$55.00 H e n d rix . T h o m a s Spencer. H e irs -IL -$9J4 H e n d rix T h o m a s S pencer H e irs .IL -$4.42 H e p ie r B ro ttie rs D a iry -144.S0A -$952.57 H e p ie r B ro ttie rs D a iry In c. 15A 4130.75 ^ H e p ie r. Ja m e s M . a n d T e re sa A n n .IL .$337.84 H ic k o ry H ill D ev. C o rp . IL .$24.00 H ic k o ry H ill D ev. C orp. - IL .$40.00 H ic k o ry H ill D ev. C orp. - IL -$30.00 H ic k o ry H ill D e v. C orp. - IL -$30.00 H icko ry H III D e v. C orp. - IL -»30.00 H ic k o ry H ill D e v. C orp. - IL .$30.00 H ic k o ry H lii D e v. C urp. - IL -$32.50 H ic k o ry H KI D e v. C orp. - IL -$32.50 H ic k o ry H ill D e v. C orp. -IL -$32.50 H ic k o ry H ill D e v. C orp. - IL -$35.00 H ic k o ry H ill D e v. C orp. - IL -$35.00 H ic k o ry H ill D ev. С о ф . - IL .$35.00 H ic k o ry H lii D e v. C orp. - IL -$35.00 H icko ry H ltl Dev. Corp. -IL .$32.50.H ic k o ry HiiJ D e v. C orp. -IL - $32.50 H ic k o ry H ill D ev. C orp.-1L -$32.50 H ic k o ry H ill D ev. C o rp . - IL -$40.00 H ic k o ry H lii D ev. C orp. O L $19.50 ■ H ic k o ry H ill D e v. C o rp . .1L $19.50 H ic k o ry H lii D ev. С о ф . - IL .$30.00 H ic k o ry H lii D ev. C orp. - IL -$30.00 H ic k o ry H ill D ev. С о ф . - IL -$30.00 H ic k o ry H ill D e v. С о ф . - IL *40.00 H ic k o ry H ill D e v. С о ф . O L -$40.00 H ic k o ry H lii D e v. C o rp . - IL -$40.00 H ic k o ry H ill D e v. С о ф . -IL $40.00 H ic k o ry H ill D ev. C o rp . - IL -$40.00 H ic k o ry H ill D ev. C orp. - IL -$30.00 H ic k o ry H ill D ev. С о ф ..- IL -$24.00 H ic k o ry H ill D ev. С о ф . -IL -$24.00 H ic k o ry H ill D ev. C orp. - IL -$24.00 H ic k o ry H III D e v. С о ф . - IL -$24.00 H ic k o ry H ill D ev. C orp. -IL -$24.00 H ic k o ry H ill D ev. C orp. - IL -$24.00 H ic k o ry H lii D e v. C o rp . -L -$24.00 H ic k o ry H ill D e v. C orp. - IL -$24.00 H ill, D o n a ld and C a rrie B. -1L $43.58 H ines. W ils o n H a rris a nd V e ro n th a -2.Э7А - $81.80 H in so n . J im m y D a rre ll S r. a nd M a rg a re t - IL - B a l. $1031 H o lc o m b , M ic h a e l R . a nd P a m e la - IL -B a i. $174.68 H o lla n d . Ja m e s E . -1.03A -$79.28 H o ilifle id G u y E . -IL 412.50 - H o llo w a y M ic h a e l T . a nd R honda O L 4152.24 H o lm a n . C le m e n tin e H e irs -1L -$2.42 H o lm a n , H e n rie tta J. - IL -$79.77 H o lm a n , T h o m a s S. and P ecolla E . - IL -$73.15 H o lm a n , T h o m a s S. a n d P e c o iia E .-1 L - $20.82 H o lm a n , T h o m a s S. a nd P e co iia E . - IL 420.41 H ope B ro th e rs B u ild in g In c. -IL -$9.00 H ope B ro th e rs B u ild in g In c. -IL -$3.40 H ope B ro th e rs B u ild in g In c. -IL -$3.40 H ope B ro th e rs B u ild in g In c. - IL -$3.40 H ope B ro th e rs B u ild in g in c . -1L -$5.40 H ope B ro th e rs B u ild in g In c. - IL -$5.40 H ope B ro th e rs B u ild in g in c . -1L -$5.40 Hope B ro th e rs B u ild in g In c. .IL -$5.40 H ope B ro th e rs B u ild in g in c . -i l -$4.50 Hope B ro th e rs B u ild in g in c . -IL -$430 H ope B ro th e rs B u ild in g In c. -IL -$4.90 H ope B ro th e rs B u ild in g In c. - IL -$4.30 H ope B ro th e rs B u ild in g in c . -i l -$4.30 H ope B ro th e rs B u ild in g in c . -IL -$4.00 H ope B ro th e rs B u ild in g In c . -34.54A -$179.05 H ope B ro th e rs B u ild e rs in c . -IL -$10.00 H ope B ro ttie rs B u ild e rs In c. -1L -$10.00 H ope B ro ttie rs B u ild e rs in c . -IL -$12.00 Hope B ro ttie rs B u ild e rs in c . O L -$11.00 H ope B ro th e rs B u ild e rs in c . -IL -$9.90. H ope B ro ttie rs B u ild e rs in c . .IL -$12.50 H o rn C a iiie -2.79A 413.14 H o rn e Ja m e s a n d E lla -IA $52.31 H o rto n . B illie A . -5 .7 0 A -$335.44 H o w a rd , C h a rlie W h itlo c k -1L $34.38 H o w a rd , C liffo rd W . a nd K e nneth -11.48A . $55.23 H o w a rd , D o ro th y .IL 4181.42 H o w a rd , D o ro th y -IL 413.74 H o w a rd , K e n n e th and C llftorc! W .IA .$49.70 H o w a rd , K e nneth W eldon -IA -$182.84 H o w a rd ,K e n n e th W e ld o n -1.50A -$4.50 H o w a rd , V e ld a inex - IL 414.35 H o w a rd , W ayne - IL $99.94 H o w e ll, E th e l M rs . -17.60A -$53.77 H o w e ll, M a tie H e irs -2A $11.75 H o w e ll, O tis Lee -2A 411.7S H o w e ll, R onald L e e -.77A $209.40 H o w e ll. R o n a ld L ee and S heila -1.40A -$17.50 H o w e ll. R o n a ld L ee and S heila -1.40A -$41.33 H o w e ll. R o n a ld L ee a n d S helia O L 417.01 H o w e ll, R o n a ld L ee a n d S heila -1.38A 417.25 H o w e il. R u tti -2A 417.50 H o w e ll, T u rn e r O la n d o a n d AAarsha L -IL - $34.45 H udson, AAanuei - IL 414.44 H udson, T o m H e irs - IL 434.67 H u e ttn e r. P e te r K . - IL $94.39 H ughes, R ic h a rd C . a n d P a m e la C . - IL -$483.91 H ughes, R ic h a rd K e n n e th a nd D e b o ra h D -.75A -$75.42H u m b le , Joan H elen and G a ll O . - IL $125.14 H u rt, R o y E d w a rd and L u la R . -3.40A -$99.50 H u tc h in s . G e o rg e E . -20.32A -$43.95 H u tc h in s , T o n y R . a nd B re n d a - IL . -$104.29 lla m e s , J a m e s E . and Jo se p h in e H . - IL -$154.39 lla m e s , J a m e s E . a nd J o se p h in e H . - IL -$.86 M am es, J a m e s L . a nd O dessa -1L $91.12 n a m e s , J a s p e r P. - IL -$49.38 n a m e s , J a s p e r P. - IL $1.70 M am es, J o h n C a lv in a n d A A argaret -1.23A • $38.39 n a m e s , J o h n L . a n d L iz z ie R . -5.25A -$109.20 n a m e s . S m ith H e irs 04.20A -$43.15 M am es T .R . a n d Q ueen O L -$39.32 Ire la n d , C ly d e and AAary -20A -B a i. $82.58 is s a a c , M u rie l -1A -$95.32 J a m e s , J im m y R o g e rs a nd B e tty T . -10.20A • $259.15 J a m e s , S teven G ra y a n d S h a ro n T . -5.70A • $245.71Johnson, C h ris tin e A . a nd P a u l B . O L -154.94 Johnson, D a v id A lb e rt a n d E d ith -.84A -B al. $90.30 J ohnson, D o n a ld L ee S a ra h R . and D Lee- 1.33A -$7.98 J ohnson, G e o rg e -7.50A .$42.48 Jones, A lto n a n d AA adeilne W . 0 4 A 4117.99 Jones. C o rn e ll a n d S adie B. - IL 4103.03 Jon e s, C o rn e ll a nd S adie B. - IL .$1.94 Jones. E ug e n e J r. a nd D e lia .11.50A 4144.87 Jones. Ire n e C . a nd J o h n R . .47A -$5.88 Jones, J a m e s w . J r. a n d M ild re d -79A -$772.37 Jones. J a m e s W . J r. a n d M ild re d -33A -$131.78 Jones, M a m ie P . H e irs -IL .$38.23 Jones, M e lv in 49.50A .$312.44 Jones, M e lv in O L -B a i. $101.93 Jones. N a n c y R . a nd R oscoe J r. -2.13A -$202.21 Jon e s, N a n c y R . a nd R oscoe J r. ..7«a $9.50 Jones, S adie D u lln -IL -$24.91 J o rd a n . T ro n ia B. - IL -B a l. $1.51 K e a to n . C h a rle s A n th o n y a n d S h e rry -.84A - $25.47 K e a to n . P lo y L o u ise - IL -$15.05 K e a to n . P a m e la W a rn e r -.04A -B a i. $25J0 K e lle r. G e rtru d e H e irs - IL -$40.00 K e lle r. R a y m o n d A . S r. and J a n ie F . O L • $193.50 K e lle r. R a y m o n d A . S r. a nd J a n ie F. - iL -$14.07 K e s le r. C .C . a n d E liz a b e th H e irs -2.80A -$8.40 K e s le r. C .C . a n d E liz a b e th H e irs O L -$4.44 K lb lln g e r E d w a rd L ee - IL -$38.42 K ig e r. G la d y s S eats - IL -$7.25 K ig e r. G la d y s , S eats - IL $4.25 K lu ttz , R a y B. a nd J o y c e H . - IL -$76.80 K n ig h t, B ill and W lllle P. -.BOA .$38.35 K n ig h t, L a r ry D ean an d A A a rla A n n - IL -$129.70 K n ig h t, W .L . .IL .$49.77 K o o n tz . M a ry L o u a n d W ilb o rn B . -49A -$195.87 K o o n tz . W ilb o rn B a ity a nd J a c k ie - IA -$95.43 L a g le , H e n ry H . a n d A n n ie O . -4.70A -$41.88 L a g le , H o m e r a nd T a m s le S. - IL -$41.35 L a g ie , H o m e r E . a n d T a m s le S. -.42A -$5.25 L a g le H o m e r E . a n d T a m s le - IL -$54.00 L a m b , E m m a F ry e -3A .$51.05 L a m b . Jo e C . IK a n d W a n d a H . 4 .8 5 A -$111.43 L a m b , J o h n T h o m a s - IL -$12.42 L a m b le , J a m e s T . a nd D e b o ra h T . .i l .$287.04 L a n ie r. S a ra h G . a n d D o n a ld -9.54 A -$209.28 L a n k fo rd . D o u g la s M ic h a e l -8.74A -$42.71 L a n k fo rd . M .G . J r. - IL -$34.43 L a n n in g . H a ro ld D a v id a n d S h irle y -.75A - $89.41 L a n n in g . H a ro ld D a v id a n d S h irle y -1.30A - $3.90 L a n n in g . L a v a d a C ro tts -14.11A -B a i. $34.10 L a n n o n . S tephen E . - IL -$32.50 L a n n o n , S tephen E . - IL -$40.00 L a q u ln ta C o rp . - IL 410.00 L a u e r. H a rry G e o rg e -5A -$102.43 L a w re n c e . .D a n ie l C a rl and P a tty -24.39A - $134.54 L a w s . T o m m y R a y .4A .$15.75 L a w s o n , W m . H .C . J r. and S heila -5.87A -11.74 L a z a rls . G e o rg e and P .G . C hrysson - IL $177.74 L e o n a rd . H a rry L . a nd L o is -3.29A 4138.97 L e o n a rd , H e rb e rt L . a n d N a n c y Y . - IL -$9.00 L e o n a rd , H e rb e rt L . a n d N a n c y Y . - IL -$10.00 L e o n a rd , H e rb e rt L . a n d N a n c y Y . - IL -$9.00 L e o n a rd , N e llie J u n e -5.87A -$12.58 L e o n a rd , R a lp h H . a n d H ope -2.44A -$44.38 L e o n a rd , R a lp h H . a n d H ope *.44A 48.00 L e v is , J o h n W illia m and K a re n .1L .$197.27 L e w is . C a rs o n a n d A A argaret D . . i l -$57 74 L e w is . H a y w a rd 8. D o ris • 5A - $11.00 L e w is . H a y w a rd V . a n d 'D o ris M . -1L 417.50 L e w is , J a m e s M ic h a e l . 1L .B a l. $54.32 L e w is . M a g g ie H . .2.40A .$40.09 L e w is . M e lv in G . a n d C h a rle n e C . O L .$112.81 L in d s a y , H a rv e y , b o y d a n d J e ttie -2A -B a i. »54.88 L in k , C la re n c e w . a n d C a ro ly n -1.13A 4114.84 L in k . E u g e n e . I L 47.28 'CòriTn. B à ri> à ra -1.83A 4104.81 L o flln . B a rb a ra -«A $34.00 L o flln , B a rb a ra .12.81A .$57.45 L o flln , J .H . a n d M in n ie - IL .$4.00 L o flln . J oseph H . J r. a n d A A erilne >1L .$47.93 L o n g . B re n d a .1L .B a i. $1.25 Lon g , C h a rle s , L in d s e y a n d C a ro l -3.98A - $198.14 Lon g , C h a rle s L in d s e y a n d C a ro l .15.05A . M 1.77 L o w d e r. J e r ry C . a nd E v a ' H . >1L - $199.34. L a /e. D a v id A . and E lla - IL -$45.00 L u c k y 's G a ra g e and S peed Shop -1L -$140.37 L u d w ic k , W illia m R . and G le n d a P . .1L -$137.21 L u H m a n . R o b y L a nd S y lv ia M . - IL 415.00 L y le s . R o b e rt L . and F ern R. -;59A -»48.77 L y o n s . M a rg a re t S. -.95A -8280.51 L y o n s . N e llie C . -4A 418.88 L y o n s , R . G re e n E s t. and AAary H a irs to n - IL - $5.17 M a c k , R ic h a rd D . H e irs a n d F lo ra - IL -$19.33 A A arlon. C h ris tin e C . - IL -$104.78 M a rk la n d , AAary H . O L -$99.45 M a rk la n d . R ic h a rd J . a n d C a ro ly n -2.14A - $205.95 A A arkland. R ic h a rd J . a n d C a ro ly n -.80A -85.00 M a rtin , A lic e F o w le r E s ta te O L .$27.81 A A artin. M a rv in C oy . IL -$128.12 A A artin. M ic h a e l a n d S a ra h - IL -$548.71 AAason, B la n c h L u c ille -10.40A .$43.02 M a so n , Jose p h a n d M in n ie Lee .8.20A -$198.28 M a so n . P a u l H . and A u b u rn L -4.07A -B a i. $8.44 M a so n P a u l H . J r. H e irs a n d D o ro th y S m ith - 1191A 4143.47 AAason P a u l H a rris o n II O L -$58.74 M a s u ra . D o n a ld W illia m a n d S a n d ra - IL . $474.68 M a tth e w s B u ild e rs o f W in s to n -S a le m - IL -$6.00 M a tth e w s B u ild e rs o f W in s to n -S a le m - 1L • $120.« AAatttiev,« L illia n .1.75A -$24.67 M a y b e rry . B u rle y R o b e rt - IL -$9.14 M a y fie ld , J a m e s A lb e rt a n d B e rn ic e - IL -S a l. $54.16 M a y n a rd . M a rk D a v id a n d B e rlta G a le -.85A - $44.44 M c B rid e , D o n a ld W . a n d N in a S -12.49A -$74.29 M c B rid e , R a y m o n d R a n d R u b y ..50A .$8.05 M c C a rty , D o n a ld J . a n d J u n e - IL -B a i. $104.27 M c C la m ro c k , .A rttiu r T h o m a s J r. -5A -$31.57 M c C la m ro c k , P h y llis 0 .1 3 A -$58.94 M c C la n n o n , B illy W a y n e -10.30A .$47.48 M c C la n n o n , E u g e n e .11.20A $31.30 M c C la n n o n , P e g g y S. O L $113.01 AAcCoy. D o n a ld R a y a n d C oiene W . - IL $84.48 M c C o y . D o n a ld R a y a n d C olene W . - IL -$14.50 M c C ra ry , B ru c e C. a n d C a ro ly n -1L -$34.52 A A cC rary. B ru c e C. a n d C a ro ly n -4.83A -$99.83 M c C u llo h . J o h n W a lte r a n d K a th y T . .IL - $85.47 M c C u llo u g h . J .W . - IL -$7.50 M c C u llo u g h , L a r ry a n d A n n -37.19A -$223.05 M c D a n ie l. B o b b y a nd K a th ry n - IL $31.03 M c D a n ie l. B o b b y a n d K a th ry n -1L -$12.75 M c D a n ie l. H o w a rd C. and A A argie - IL $239.83 M c D a n ie l, H o w a rd C. and M a rg ie - IL -U .39___ M c D a n ie l. T o n y R . a n d B a rb a ra -.94A -'$57.05 M c D a n ie l. W a ite r F lo y d and A A argie -3.71A - B a i. $1P4,W .A A cM ahan. A n ita -5.10A $25.50 M c M a h a n , H u g h G le n n -5.44A -$27.20 M c M a h a n , L illia n -4.45A $23.25 M c M a h a n . AAam ie -3.50A $12.50 M c M a h a n . M a n d y Lo u ise -5A $28.00 M c M illa n , M ic h a e l C. S r. a n d A n n - IL -$397.85 M c N e il. T h o m a s L e e a n d D onna - IL $255.58 AAelton, M a rg a re t -.48A $44.75 M e lto n , T h o m a s M . -4.32A $43.07 M e ro n e y . J o h n S ta n le y -3.54A -$384.85 M e u ic k , C h a rlie W . a n d H e le n C. - IL $214.34 AA essick.G ienn A ld e n a n d W liile M a e - IL $44.40 M ic h a e l P a u l E . a n d P h y llis O L -$H 7.43 M ille r, H ild a C a in -.31A -»39.57 M ille r, J a m e s L o o n a rd a n d R ebecca - IL $5.25 M ille r. J a m e s P . and P a tric ia D . -2A -$44.37 M ille r, M ic h a e l L in n a n d D ix ie T . - IL .$140.04 M ille r. N elson - IA $45.82 M ille r. R a n d y E . a n d R e g in a H . -30.48A . $229.43 M in o r. G ra d y a n d P a tric ia .1.20A -$82.78 M itc h e ll, P a u l B. J r. a nd G e ra ld in e .1.44A - $51.27 M o nse es, H a rry A . a n d B e tty - IL -$184.49 M o n tg o m e ry . R a lp h a n d Jo sle B. - IL $58.83 M o o d y , W ade D . a n d D e lo re s -S8.20A $533.78 AAcody, W ade D . a n d D elo re s - IL 411.40 M o on. L u th e r D . a n d Inez B . -1L $79.30 M o o re , H o w a rd and A n g e la O L $40.00 .M oore, R a c k a rd L . a n d B re n d a W . -5.49A -B a l. $141.42 M o rg a n , H a rris o n B. J r. and L a u lle C. -1L • $20.00 M o sn y , W illia m J . a nd G lenda K . -1.75A -$10.50 M o sn y , W llila m J. a nd G lenda K . - IL -$8.75 M o sn y , W lilla m J . a n d G lenda K . -4.04A -$30.30 M y e rs , C a rl K . and P h y llis -7A -$158.42 M y e rs , C a rl L a n d J e a n -IA $147.17 M y e rs , G a rla n d L . and M a rg a re t B. -11A • $103.42 M y e rs , G a rla n d L . a nd M a rg a re t B. -8.75A - $25.09 M y e rs . J im m y Lee a nd P a u lin e -3 1 A -153.71 M y e rs . W illia m A lto n and G ra c e D L -IL -143.81 N a n ce . G eneva H . -34A 474.77 N a n ce . G e n e va H . -23A .$45.73 N a v lo r. D o n a ld Lee a nd Zelda -IL -S135.7t N a y lo r. E liz a b e th - IL -$47.48 N a y lo r, R u d o lp h a nd B e tty P -.44A -$59.73 N e e ly . G lenda F a y a nd G enesta -IL $34.14 N e e ly , J .P . a nd E liz a b e th - IL -$10.44 N e e ly . M ic h a e l A u s tin and K a th - IL -$109.44 N elson, C h a rle s J a s p e r a nd O p h e lia -.90A .B a l. $4.28 N ew so m e. S te d m a n L and L o a l -IL $114.44 N ic h o ls , L a r ry T hom as H e irs -84A -$195.34 N ic h o ls , R oble J r. and D o re th a S. -IL -$26.58 N o b le , A le x H e irs - IL 410.35 N o k o v lch , M ilto n C. and M e lle ra -78A -$222.93 O 'M a ra T h u rm a n E ugene -21.80A 4375.26 O rre ll, K e n n e th H . a nd M a ro u lta .IL .$196.04 O w in g s . D a v id Lee -5A .$245.48 O w in g s. J .R . T eague a nd P a rk e r - IL $157.95 O w in g s, W ils o n H e irs and S arah G . -Э02.89А - $831.27 O w in g s , W ils o n H e irs a nd S arah G . - IL -$33.28 P -H A g rl-E n te rp rls e s In c. -IA $55.79 P age S heron -.29A $51.78 P atge, J a c k D a n d J u d y D . -8A -B a l. $108.10 P a lm e r. S y lv e s te rM L $5.49 P a rk e r, G alena -4A 4120.93 P a rk e r. H e nderson H e irs -IL -$3.75 P a rk s . D e w e y (sh op) IL -$1.55 P a rk s . D ew ey (sh op) IL $17.50 P a rk s , D e w e y (sh op) IL -$154.34 P a rk s , D e w e y ( shop) IL -$2.42 P a rk s , D e w e y (sh o p ) I L *$1 55 P a rk s . D e w e y (sh op) I L 4 12235 P a rk s , D e w e y S r. -19.11A $281.59 P a rk s , Dewey S r. -2A -$8.00 P a rk s . D e w e y S r. -3.90A -$122.27 P a rk s , D e w e y H . a n d J u a n ita - IL 414.19 P a rk s . E m o g e n e M . O L $41.38 P a rk s , S a ra h T -IL 4158.83 P a rk s , T o u lo u p Y v o n n e . IL -$136.38 P a rris . B u m lc e L e ro y a nd J u n e -1.49A .$352.54 P a te lla N ic h o la s P. and V irg in ia O L -B a l. $1.73 P a y n e . J a m e s L e o n a nd S y lvia O L $43.39 P a y n e . J a m e s Leon a nd S y lv ia O L -$4.43 P eacock, D onna A . - IL 4130.74 P eebles, C h a rlo tte .S.20A 418.20 P eebles, C llfh m -3.20A .B a l. $8.34 P eebles, E rn e s t G . -2.50A -$88.38 P eebles. F ra n k M a d is o n a n d N a n cy -.50A - $42.91 P eebles. F ra n k M . a nd N a n cy -4A -$43.75 P eebles. J a m e s E . - IL »44.25 P eebles, Ja m e s E . J r. and C ora -10A -$35.50 P e n n in g e r, L e o n P . and J a n ic e M . -1.81A - »251.43 P e n ry , J o h n F . and N a n cy M . -5.81A .$42.14 P eoples, F io y d H e rm a n - IL -$.50 P eoples, L illia n C . -4.20A -$21.00 P eoples. W ilb u rd a nd AAary P . -.32A -$2.00 P eoples. W ilb u rd a nd R ixlger D . -9.90A -$144.55 P eques. B essie - IL $4.27 P e rry . R a y m o n d T . a nd Ire n e - IL -$210.10 P fa ff. R .K . -7.30A -B a l. $44.35 P ilc h e r, G e ra ld in e H o w a rd -.81A -»122.08 P lo tt. A r tis t Lee a n d O liv ia -1.48A -»203.81 P lo w m a n . B illy G . and W an d a -IA -»39.87 P lu m m e r, F ra n k lin L . a n d B e tty S. -1.50A - »ЗВЗ.Л P lu m m e r. F ra n k lin L . J r. a nd Susan O L - »105.41 P o in d e x te r, Jo e F . -70A 4129.77 P o in d e x te r. W .D . .22.74A .»128.48 P oole. J .L . a n d K a th le e n - IL -»31.50 P oole. V e rn o n G . a n d K a th ry n F - IL -B a i, $7.97 P o p lin , T h o m a s C. a nd P a m e la C . -4.17A - $29.40 P o rte r, F a y e A n n - IL .$21.95 P o rte r. R o b e rt L . a n d B e cky - IL $730 P o tts , B illy Jo e -1.48A -$23.18 P o tts , D e n n is L e e -2A -$52.99 P o tts , G a ry R a y -7.80A 4101.27 P o tts , G ra y A . a n d R o y L . -41.59A .»124.77 P o tts . P a u l A . and M a ry M . -5.40A .$42.00. P o tts . V e s ta l W . -3.44A -$35.75 P o tts .-W lie y F ra n k a nd E liz a b e th R . .1.30A - $233.49 P o tts . W ile y . F ra n k a n d E liz a b e th R . 4174.17A .$522.45 P o tts , W ile y F ra n k a nd M a ry -88.30A .$252.43 P o w e il, B o b b y J . a n d S andra P -4.15A -ti0 9.24 P o w e ll, H a rre ll J r. o L 4441.49 P ra te r, J e rry L e e a n d S a ra h -2.93A -$32.39 P ric e , M a ry 0 .1 4 A .$14.01 P ric e , S a n d ra В -IA -$155.94 P ru itt. L .V . O L $191.08 P ru itt, L.V .-2 1 .2 5 A $78.73 , P ru itt. L .V . -29.24A -$111.02 P ru itt. L e v a n d e r L e v i -.M A »9.00 P ru itt. L iv in g s to n e a nd E th e l ..52A -$57.44 P fu (tt, L o n e ll -.80A -$9.03 P u llia m , H a rv e y L e t a n d L illia n C. - IL -$12|.93 P u llia m L ila AAae a nd T a im a d g e T . -1A 4130.89 P u rk e y , R o b e rt G .’a n d L a rra in e C. - IL -$11.25 R a ln tre e A sso cia te s .IL .B a l. 9.07 R a m s e y . C h a rle s F . a n d F re d a .4A .$239.49 R a tle d g e , J e r ry L . and P a ts y - IL -$90.53 R a tte d g e . AAaude W . -4.08A $38.29 R e a v is . A n d re w W . J r. a n d M a ry 4 A 4137.17 R e a v is . A n d re w W . j r . a n d M a ry .ЗА .$4.75 R e a v is . T h o m a s H o w a rd -4.71A .$11.19 R e d la n d C h u rch o f C h ris t O L .$92.93 R e d m o n , M a ry -1L $90.40 R e d m o n , R a lp h a nd AAary -5.44 A -$57.90 R ed m o n . R a lp h and AAary - IL -$3434 R e id , N a o m e -2.70A -$48.41 R e ve ls. W iilla m J r. -2.34A .$44.90 R e ve ls, W Iiiia m J r. 4 .4 4 A 4129.80 R h y n e h a rd t E a rle n e -.48A -$9.45 R ic h a rd s o n , T h o m a s A la n a n d A n n lc e «12.60А - $268.82 R ic h ie . C h a rlie D . 2.50 A 4158.21 R Ig g a n . C o lu m b u s F . J r. a nd B onnie C. -5.12A • $254.41 R Ip p y S te lla R . O L -B a i. $106.76 R iv e rs , P a u l E . and K a lh y S. -2.40 A -$103.30 R oad R a m s in c . -1.13A $37.31 R o b b in s D o n n ie G ene a n d J a n ic e S. -.91A • $51.48 R obbins, J a m e s D . a nd F rie d a M . O L 4111.81 R o b b in s, John E d w a rd a n d J u d y - IL -$ ioi.43 R o b e rts o n . P ress S. a nd N o rm a S. .1.22 A - »184.06 R o b e rts o n . T e d Johnson .2.Э0А .»119.20 R o b e rts o n . T ed Johnson >3.45 A -»18.38 R o b e rtso n , T ed Johnson -22.24A 478.77 R o b e rtso n . T e d Johnson - IL $84.15 R o b e rts o n , T e d J . -7.97A -$39.85 R o b e rtso n , T lm o ttiy AAark -2A -»19.70 R ogers, G eo rge a nd M a ry -IL -$8.44 R ogers. G eo rge W a rd -IL -$35.75 R o llin s . H a ro ld and S h irle y -10.32A -$221.93 R oop, J o h n n y D . a nd B a rb a ra - IL -$13.50 R o p e r. K e n n e th R . a n d E t A ls .98.60 -$85.12 R ose, G la d y s E -3.17A $193,61 R ose. A A artin L and AAary G .50A -$49.42 R ouse. J o h n F . and B e tty -1.01A 4178.44 R o y a ll. R o n n ie and AAarie 00.27A -$45.33 R unge. S am S. a nd L in d a - IL -B a l. $17.29 R y c ro tt. B obby G . a nd AAarie C . O L 4113.21 S an ra ve s, H . R eed a nd D o ro th y -19.34A -$140.14 S ain, W Iiiia m L e s te r a nd L u c ille P. -35.19A - $203.54 S a n d e rs, H arold - IL 4138.45 S a n fo rd , G a ith e r A Aarshall E t A ls - IL -$12.43 S a n fo rd . J o h n S. J r. a nd D a re W -5.01A -$221.49 S a n fo rd , L .G . a n d R .B . J r. H tlr s - IL -$7.80 S a n fo rd . L .G . a nd R .B . J r.H e irs -IL $7.80 S anfcrd L .G . and R .B . J r. H e irs - IL 423.80 S a n fo rd . L .F .M .C . and R .B . J r. H e irs -107.10A . $324.04 S a n fo rd M o to r Co. - IL $8.03 Sanford, R .B. H e in -1.90A 411.99 S a n fo rd . R .B . H e irs - IL $14.20 S cott. A r ttiu r a nd B eulah W . -2A .$34.99 S cott, C lyde E . and D ew ey P a rk s .2.20A -$18.24 S cott, D w ig h t a n d H ild a -8A .$40.00 S cott. L e s te r C . S r. a n d M a ry -9.40A -$127.71 S cott. R o b e rt L .a n d M y rn a L . . i l $87.83 S eam on, C u rtis D ou g la s - IL *$91.04 S eats. M ln to ra W . -14.54A $87.00 S eats, W illia m H . a n d d a M a e -4.27A -$40.70 S eats. W illia m H . a nd O la AAae -130A .$5.25 S e a v ^ lg h t, P e rry a nd B a rb a ra P. . i. l iA . $222.21 • Sensel M a ry -1.52A 4114.58 S exton. L illa r d R o b e rt and N o rm a J . -1.43A - $103.04 S exton. L illa r d R o b e rt a nd N o rm a J . O L . $10.70 S exton, L illa rd R obert and N orm a J. -75.40A - $138.92 S h a ffe r, G ale V . a nd Jean R -8A .191.48 S hanks, G a ry . IL $75.83 S hanks, W llila m J r. and V io la -IA -$97.20 S hannon, L y m u s E s ta te -IL -$19.30 S harpe, W .B . J r. - IL $214.54 S h a ve r, R o n a ld W . a nd R honda S. -1L -B ai. $72.85 S heets, K e lfh V . a n d D arien« -IL <174.23 S helton, J o h n H ugh .72.02A $201.20 S helton, S adie M rs . 0 1 A -$104.49 S h e rrill, P ric e E . J r. *1L $31.19 S h ie ld s, Jo e R . -4 5 A -$92.92 ^ h o a f , H e n ry AAonroe and E dna -4.81A -B a l. S h o tfn e r, A A argaret j . -13.40A $49.18 S hore, C la re n c e C. -1A $44.98 S hore, G la d y s C. -18.99A -$38.73 S hore, Ja m e s O d e ll a n d G la d y s C. -2.70A - S hore, M ic h a e l W . a nd K e re th a C. -34.9IA . $349.77 S hore, T h o m a s R ay a nd B u rlle -3.14A -$41.95 Shouse, S h irle y D . O L -$202.72 Shue, G e ra ld in e -IL -$41.87 S im m o n s, T e rry L . a nd C a ro l - IL -$12.50 > S im pson. J e rry and K a th e rin e B. - IL -$190.43 S izem ore, J a m e s S a n fo rd -2.11A 4123.99 . S la te r. T e rry G . O L 417.20 S m ile y , M ic h a e l D . -IL -Ш .3 2 S m ltti, B ob L . a nd A d a -9.Э2А -B a l. $133.13 . S m ith , B ob L a n d A d a - IL -$21.30 S m ith , C h a rle s L . a n d L a u ra 01.90A -$39.95 S m ith . E liz a b e th . M c C le lla n d O A -$23.83 S m ith . F ra n c e s -1.85A -B a l. $101.05 S m ith , -G eorge M . a nd S h e rre e -2.54A -$40.90 s m ith , H e n ry C ar and A n n e tte M . -1.40A - $149.93 S m ith . L a rry C a rl a n d A nne L 0 .1 7 A -$93.00 S m ith . L illie AAae .88A 41.00 S m ith . M a rth a M . -20.50A -$245.40 S m ith , M ic h a e l K . a n d A n n N . - IL -B a l. $22.40 S m ith , N a ttia n F ra n k lin a n d M a ry G . -44.71A - B a i. $138.23 S m ith . N o ra C .D . a n d A .R . W illia m s -54.94A . $194.58 S m ltti, P e a rl M rs . -1.74A -$3.22 S m itti. R o b e rt H e n ry a n d B re n d a 0 .1 5 A - $1M .14 S m ith , R o b e rt and B renda -.25A -$38.48 S m ith , R osa J. M rs . H e irs 03.14A .B a i. $84.94 S m ith , S a ndra G . 1.94A 4178.&3 S m ith , S ta n le y Leon a nd C a rrie - IL -$228.45 S m ith , S tanley Leon a nd C a rrie O L -$2230 S m ltti, S ta n le y Leon a nd C a rrie .IL .$24.00 S m ith . S ta n le y Leon and C a rrie - IL -$18.45 S m ith . S ta n le y Leon and C a rrie -2A -$95.02 S m ith . S teve W illia m and G e o rg ia -IL .$135.48 S m ith , S teve W illia m a n d G e o rg ia -1.25A - $18.75 S m ith , T h o m a s E. and M a ry -1L -$35.00 S m ltti, W e n d e ll a nd G o ld ie .2.04A -$30.00 S m ith . W illia m B. a n d B a rb a ra D -122A -B ai. $259.75 S m ith . W illia m B. a n d B a rb a ra D . -40A -$75.04 S m ltti, W m . D o u g la s a n d P eggy P. 00.99A $44.62 S m oot, C o n ra d a nd W lllle AAae - IL -$82.20 S m oot, M y rtle J a c q u e lin e ..45A -$74.24 S m oot. R ow an H e lrs M lA 433.13 S m oot, w a d e V . a n d H a rv e y L -1.88A .$9.40 S n id e r, R o b e rt W a y n e a n d J u d y -2.04A >$185.47 Snyder, Joan S. - IL »39.85 S p a rk s . B o b b y G en e a nd N a n n ie L o u - IL - $155.05 S p a rk s , B o b b y G ene and N a n n ie P . -4.87A - $111.33 S p a rks, T h o m a s J . a n d AAary S. -4.80A -$48.50 S paugh. J a m e s H . a n d V irg in ia -.99A -$24.15 S paugh. A A arvin E ugene a nd Jo - IL -$39.91 S paugh. R o b e rt a nd L in d a F . -1.33A 4101.74 S p fllm a n , H e rm a n E . a n d A^ary -115.92A - $539.53 S p illm a n , J o h n A O L -7.13 S p illm a n , J o h n A O L -$39.37 S p illm a n . J o h n A - IL -$94.43 S p illm a n , J o h n A - IL -$108.40 S p illm a n . J o h n A - IL 4123.25 S p illm a n , J o h n A O L $134.53 S p illm a n , J o h n A - IL -$42.87 S p illm a n , John A - IL 41.50 S p illm a n , J o h n A O L $9.88 S p illm a n . J o h n A - IL $9.34 S p illm a n , John A O L .$4.00 S p illm a n , J o h n A O L -$12.11 S p illm a n . J o h n A - IL -$4.24 S p illm a n . J o h n A O L -$4.24 S p illm a n . J o h n A O L -$4.12 S p illm a n . J o h n A - IL $4.12 S p illm a n . J o h n A . - IL -$4.00 S p illm a n . J o h n A - IL -$4.00 S p illm a n , J o h n A . - IL -$4.00 S p illm a n , J o h n A - IL .$4.12 S p illm a n . J o h n A >1L .$4.13 S p illm a n . J o h n A . - IL $4.12 S p illm a n . J o h n A - IL $4.24 S p illm a n . J o h n A • I L -$8.44 S p illm a n . J o h n A O L -4.24 S p illm a n . J o h n A -11.41A -$52.25 S p illm a n , J o h n A O L $4.04 S p illm a n , J o h n A - IL 44.04 S p illm a n , Joseph A S r. a n d B a rb a ra - IL -$74.78 S p illm a n , Joseph A S r. and B a rb a ra - IL -824.29 S p illm a n , N ic k -2A -$20.00 . S p illm a n , R a y and E m m a L -15.80A -$79.00- S p ry , D a n n y a n d S h a ro n S. -3.01A .»94.47 ' S p ry , J u d ith H . O L »143.31 S p ry . J u d ith H O L -$12.50 S p ry . J u d ith H . -2.30A .$14.38 ‘ . : S ta ffo rd . Joe L . a n d B a rb a ra ..93A -$201.34 S ta le y D ean A . and L in d a ..41A .$40.55 S ta le y , D ean A . a n d L in d a - IL .$29.23 S ta n le y C a lv in C o olldge -40.30A -B a l. $253.00. S ta n le y C a lv in C oo lld g e -24.50A -$40.73 S ta n le y C a lv in C oo lld g e .40.83A -884.41 S ta n le y, K e n n e th L e ro y a n d D ia n n e M , -1 .0 9 À . $115.72 S ta n le y , S tephen C . a n d G a y - I L .$141.12 S teele, D a v id L e w is .IL .$77.74 S teele, J o h n Q ., J r. a n d J o yce - IL 4124.12 S teele. M a rs h a ll A . a n d P a tric ia ..77A -$107.03 S teele, R ic k e y L .'a n d A n n e tte - IL -$97.42 S te e lm a n , D a v id L ee a n d D onna R . ЛЛ0А • $103.45 S te e lm a n , W a sh in g to n H . and M a ry R . -1L! - $251.14 S te e lm a n , W a sh in g to n H . a n d M a ry R . -IL - $27.50 S tephenson, J a m e s a n d S a n d ra -2.32A .$43.05 S tevenson, A tla s D . a n d E m m a L . - IL .$130.08 S tevenson, M oaes D a v id and E m m a L . .1 L -. $24.23 S teve's A u to m o tiv e - IL .$4.27 S to ckto n , H o w a rd J . a n d A z a lle -.85A -$239.88 . S tokes, A . C. a n d J e w e l S. -3.03A $213.42 . S tra in , E ls ie C leo - IL -$21.40 S trid e r, v ir g ll D . a n d E la in e S. - IL -B a l. $10.54 S tro u d . A . R . M rs . O L .$99.44 S tro u d , R o b e rt D ou g la s E s ta te -11.71A .$84.71 S tro u d . R o b e rt D ouglas E s ta te .3.25A 413.00 S tu d e v a n t. M a rg a re t -28.25A -$85.82 S tu d e ve n t, P e rry E t A i -1L -89.30 S tu d e ve n t, P e rry J. and M axllene S. - IL $182.53 S upple, J e re m ia h M . a n d B e v e rly A . - IL • 8108.01 . T a tu m , D a n ie l W . a nd T o n i D . - IL 4115.89 T a y lo r, D a v id P a u l a nd P a tric ia F . - IL .$201.17 T a y lo r. D o n a ld H . a n d J a n ie C. - IL -$79.95 ' T a y lo r. D o n a ld H . a n d J a n ie C. - IL -$10.70 T eague, S id n e y C. a n d K . S. P a rk e r - IL -$74.43 T e e te r, C 6. 0I L . - IL -$412.31 T e m p le E q u ip m e n t Co.. in c . -9 3 7 A -$2.503.33 T e n o r. P e rc y R . a n d AAary A . -.94A -B a i. $10.92 T e rm o tto , A n th o n y E . and N a n c y .IL .$541.43 T h ie s, L a r ry a n d B e tty R . -.44A -$83.90 T h o m a s. B a rb a ra W . a n d R uben - IL -813.09' T h o m p so n , J im m ie L . and R o se tta .IL .$87.05 T h o m p so n , M ilto n T . a nd M a ry S. ..47A .$5.88 T h o m p so n , R o g e r L e e - IL -$48.13 T h o rn e . G erald 6 . a n d S haron D . -?A -8143.22 T In c h e r. R o g e r L . a n d M a ry C. O L -$143.42 T ittle . C h a rle s W . - IL 4124.14 T ittle , C h a rle s W . - IL -$9.51 T o lb e rt, J a c k and J o y c e -IL -$129.42 T o m lin s o n . R o y E ., J r. a nd C h e ry l - IL -$27.73 T o m s . E m m e t W ils o n -L e a sed L a n d -$477.29 T riv e tte . D a v id G ra d y a n d L in d a - IL .$113.33 T riv e tte . E d g a r L . a nd F ra n c e s E . -4A -$307.82 T riv e tte . J u d a P ears -2.73A -$41.55 T riv e tte . R ic h a rd G ra y a n d J e rry L . -2.2&A - $40.93 ' T ro u tm a n . E d g a r C . a n d S heron -30.70A -B a l. $4.09 T u c k e r, C o n ra d W o rm a n d E ilz a b e tti - IL .$4.30 T u c k e r, C o n ra d W o rth and E liz a b e th - IL - $10.00 T u c k e r, C o nrad W o rth a n d E liz a b e th - IL .$9.00 T u c k e r, C o n ra d W o rth a n d E ilz a b e tti - IL - $10.00 T u c k e r, C o n ra d W o rttt a n d E ilz a b e tti .IL -$9.00 T u c k e r, C o n ra d W o rth a n d E liz a b e th «1L .$4.M T u c k e r, C o n ra d W o rth a n d E ilz a b e tti O L $4.30 T u c k e r, C o n ra d W o rtti a n d E ilz a b e tti *1L -$ 4 .X T u c k e r, C onrad V /o rth and E ilz a b e tti -1.90A - $49.21T u c k e r, C o n ra d W o rth and E liz a b e th -11.2JA - $494.87 T u c k e r. C o n ra d W o rtti and E ilz a b e tti - IL -$5.00 T u g g le . T h o m a s -<45A -$194.30 T u rk , C lyde P . a n d D ale 8 . -77.59A -$188.44 T u rn e r, D a n ie l -.50A $4.38 T u rn e r, M a ry A n n H e irs -IL 410.35 T u tte ro w , A lfre d a n d T h e lm a -4.24A -$33.34 T u tte ro w , B o b b y ‘ R a y a n d P eggy -1.40A - $108.28 T u tte ro w , 0 . B . H e irs -1.23A 4109.82 T u tte ro w . D a v id E u g e n e o r J u d y R . ..85A - $228.22 T u tte ro w . L a r ry G ene a nd L in d a -4.25A -848.78 T w in C edars G o lf C ourse -178.22A $1.744.70 T w in C ity P a c k in g C o m p a n y -242.90A -$308.81 T w in L a ke s A v ia tio n . In c . .75.14A -$1,041.99 T y s ln g e r. M ic h a e l W . and B a rb a ra -3.32A . $107.04 U n ite d S tates o f A m e ric a - IL 4145.09 U n ite d S tates o f A m e ric a O L .B a i. $38.41 U n ite d S tates o f A m e ric a - IL -B a l. $71.42 U n kn o w n O w n e r - IL 412.50 V ance, T heon H a rris , J r. and S andra T . ..79A . $47.07 V a n ce . T h eon H a rris J r. and S a ndra T . -lO A - $44.00 v e a c h . R a y A . and C. S. D ro k e *1L $8.75 V e a ch , R a y A . and C. S. D ro k e *1L $8.75 V e a ch , R a y A . and C . S. D ro k e *1L $8.75 V e a ch , R a y A . and C. $. D ro k e - IL -88.75 V e a ch , K a y A . a nd C. S. D ro k e - IL *$8.75 V e a ch , R a y A . a nd C. S. D ro k e *1L 48.75 V e a ch , R a y A . a nd C. S. D ro k e -IL $8.75 V e a ch , R a y A . a nd C. S. D ro k e -IL 417.50 V e a ch , R a y A . a nd F ra n c e s -32.50A $44.19 V e s t, D a v id L . and Lee M .'-3 .0 4 A -8179.43 V e s t. R onnie L a w re n c e and B o n n ie -IL $259.02 V e s ta l. W esley T h o m a s a n d b la n n e -S -U A • . $148.42 ( c o n t in u e d o n p a g e 5 D ) Public Notices DAVIECOUNTY ENTERPRISI- RI-CORD. THURSDAY. MAY 5. 1Ч8.1 - 5D N O R TH C A R O L IN A D A V ie C O U N T Y R E N O T IC E O P R E S A L E O F L A N D U N D E R F O R E C L O S U R E O F D E E D O F TR U S T U N D E R A N D B Y V tR T U E Of the p o w e r of sale contained In th a t c e rta in d e e d o f t r u it e xecute d b y W o o d va lle H ornet, In c., date d M a y 14, 1979. and re co rd e d in Book t09 a t paoe 276 in th e O H Ice o f Ihe R e g iste r of Deeds o f D a v le C o u n ty; and un d e r a nd b y v irtu e of the a u th o rity v e s te d In th e u n d e rs ig n e d as S u itftu te T ru s te e b y th a t c c rta ln in s tru m e n t date d M a y 6, 19S1, and re co rd e d In B ook U 9 a t page 767. in th e O ffic e o f the R e g fsfe r o f D eeds o f O avle C ounty. N o rth C a ro lin a ; and u n d e r and b y v irtu e o f th a t c e rta in A u th o rix a tlo n . F in d in g s and O rd e r entered b y the C le rk o f S u p e rio r C o u rt o f O avle C ounty on N ove m b e r 23. 1982, and o f re c o rd In F ile B2 SP 97. the unde rsig n e d d id o ffe r fo r saie the h e re in a fte r d escribed re a l p ro p e rty a n d s o ld s a m e ; and w ith in the tim e a llo w e d b y la w . a n upset b id w as file d w ith the C le rk o f S u p e rio r C o u rt d ire c tin g the und e rsig n e d to ra te li fhe »aid re a l p ro p e rty up o n a n o p e n in g b id o f »38,953.35; r^O W , T H E R E F O R E , u n der and b y v irtu e o f th e sa id O rd e r, the C le rk o f S u p e rio r C o u rt o f D a v ie C ounty. N o rth C a ro lin a , and the p o w e r of sa le contained In ttie a fo re sa id deed o f tru s t, the unde rsig n e d w ill o ffe r fo r sale upon .said o pening b id a f p u b lic a u c tio n to th e high est b id d e r fo r c a s h a t th e courthouse d o o r In M o c k s v ille , D avie C ounty. N o rth C a ro lin a , a t 12:00 noon on T uesday. M a y 1 0 .19B3. th e fo llo w in g d escribed re a l p ro p e rty lo c a te d .In D avle C ounty. N o rth C a ro lin a , and m o re p a rtic u la rly describ e d as fo llo w s : E X H IB IT " A " L y in g and bein g In S hady G rove T o w n sh ip , D a vle C ounty. N o rth C a ro lin a , In the L A Q U IN T A S U B .D IV IS IO N . p la ts o f w h ic h a re reco rd e d in the o ffic e of th e R e g is te r o f D eeds of D a v ie C ounty. N o rth C a ro lin a , in the B ooks In d ic a te d , and b e in g: L ots In: B lo c k B -L o ts 64,M .81. a nd 68. show n in P la t Book 4 a t page .132. B lo c k D ..L o ts 7.6,9,10,12. a nd 13. show n In P la t B ook 4 a t page 128. B l o c k F > > t o t s 1.3,3.4.5.14.16 .21.22. a n d 25. s how n In P la t Book 4 a t Page 128. B lo ck l- L o ts 2.3.11. a nd 12. 'S how n In P la t B ook 4 a t P age 128^ B lo c k B «*A n u n s u b d lv fd e d p a rce l, so m e tim e s re fe rre d to as L ots 89 th ro u g h 100 and describ e d as fo llo w s : B E G IN N IN G a t an Iro n stake In the s o u th e rly rig h t-o f-w a y lin e o f G ra n a d a D riv e , sa id Iron s ta ke a ls o bein g th e n o rth w e st c o rfw r o f L o t N o. 88. B lo c k " B " . La Q u in ta S ub-O lvlslon (D a v le C ounty P ia f B ook 4. page 132); ru m ln g thence w ith th e south rig h t-o f-w a y lin e of G ra n a d a D riy e on a c u rv e to th e le ft, being a a rd lu s o f 1041.87 fe e t and an a rc d is ta n c e o f 328.12 feet. tt>e fo llo w in g s ix (8) course s and d ista n ce s: N o rth 42 deg. 24 m ln . 42 see. W est 59.99 fe e t; N o rth 45 deg. 42 m ln . 42 s e c ^ W esf. 59.9»fe « f; N o rth 49 deg. 00 . m ln . 41 sec. W est. 59.99 fe e t; N o rth 52 deg. 18 m ln . 40 sec. W est, 59.99 fe e t; N o rth 55 d e g . 3« m ln . 39 sec. W est, 59,99 fe e t; N o rfh 58 deg. 02 m ln . 02 sec. W est. 26.12 fe e t to a p o in t, the P T . o f s a id c u rv e ; thence co n tin u in g alon g th e south rig h t- of-w a y lin e o f G ra n a d a D riv e N o rth 58 deg. 48 m in . 25 te c . W est. 233.30 fe e t to a p o in t, the P.C . of a c u rv e to th e rig h t; thence along sa id c u rv e to the rig h t, bein g a ra d iu s o f 788.70 fe e t a n d a n a rc d is ta n c e o f 225.52fe e t, th e fo llo w in g fiv e (5) courses and d ista n ce s: N o rth 57 ' deg. 24 m ln . 18 sec. W est, 38.S9 fe e t; N o rth S3 deg. 49 m ln . 25 sec. W esf. 59.99 fe e t; N orih 49 deg. 27 m ln . 53 sec. W est, 59.99 fe e t; N o rth 45 deg. 0« m ln . 21 sec. W est 59.99 fe e t; N o rth 42 deg. 40 m ln . 30 sec. W est 6.92 feet to a p o in t, fh e P .R .C . o r beg in n in g o f a n o th e r c u rv e to th e .le ft; thence alon g s a id c u rve to the le ft bein g a ra d iu s o f 30.00 fe e t and a n a rc d ista n ce o f 24.50 feet, N orth ¿6 deg. 32 m ln . 52 sec; W est. 24.49 fe e t to a p o in t, the P .R .C . o r b e g in n in g o r a n o th e r cu rv e to th e rig h t, a cu l > de-sac In sa id G ra n a d a D riv e ; th e m e a lo n g sa id c u rv e to the fig h t, b e in g a ra d iu s o f 60 feet and an a rc dis ta n c e o f 49,40 fe e t, N o rth 64 deg. 21 m in . 04 sec. W est. 47.37 fe e t to a p o in t In said c u l^ 'S a c ; thence on a new ¡Ine South 46 deg. 33 m ln . 30 sec. W est, 181.10 feet to an Iro n , the c o m m o n c o rn e r o f L a Q u ln ta C o rp o ra tio n a n d C o rn a tz e r; thence a lo n g the n o rth e rly lin e o f sa id C o rn a tre r p ro p e rty , the fo llo w in g th re e (3) courses and d ista n ce s: South 58 deg. 48 m ln . 30 sec. E a s t. 647.96 fe e t; South 47 deg. oe m ln. 30 sec. E a s t. 197.40fe e t; South 39 deg. 20 m ln . 30 sec. E a s t. 6.73 fe e t to' an Iron in th e n o rth e rly lin e o f sa id C o rn a tie r P ro p e rty , also bein g the sou th w e st corner of sa id L o t N o . 8 8 ; th e n c e a lo n g th e w e s te rly lin e o f L o t. No. 88 N o rth 50 deg. 45 m ln . 47 sec. E a s t. 150.04 fe e t to th e p o in t and p la c e o f B E G IN N IN G / c o n ta in in g 3.068 acre s, m o re o r less. S A V E A N D E X C E P T T H E F O L L O W IN G D E S C R IB E D R E A L P R O P E R T Y ; B E G IN N IN G a t a p o in t, an Iro n stake In th e s o u th e rly rig h t- o f-w a y lin e of G ra n d a D riv e , s a id p o in t a ls o b e in g th e N o rth w e s t c o m e r o f L o t. N o. 93, B lock " B " . L a Q u in ta Sub- D lv ls lo n . R u n n in g thence along the w e s te rly lin e of sa id L o t 93, South 33 de g . 12 m ln . 52 sec. W est/ 150J6 feet to a n iro n stake In th e n o r th e r ly lin e o t C o rnatzer P ro p e rty , N o rth 58 deg. 48 m ln . 30 sec. W est. 90 feet to a n Iro n stake. S outheast c o m e r of L o t N o. 96, B lock " B " ; th ence a lo n g the e a s te rly iin e o f> « ld L o t No. 96 N o rth 33 deg. 12 m ln . 52 sec. E ast, 150.56 feet to a n Iro n stake In the s o u th e rly rig h t-o f-w a y lin e ot G randa D riv e ; thence along the sa id s o u th e rly lin e of G ranada D riv e South 58 deg. 48 m in . 25 sec. E a s t, 90 fe e t to an Iro n s ta k e , th e N o rth w e s t c o m e r o f said L o t N o. 93, the p oin t and p la ce o f b e g in n in g . C ontaining 13450.4 M iuare fe e t, and b e in g p re s e n lly kn o w n and desig n a te d as L o t N o. 95, B lock " B " , L a Q u ln ta S u b -d lv ls lo n , D a vle C ounty, N o rth C a ro lin a . S urveyed b y W ayne H o rto n , R egistered C iv il E n g in e e r and S u rv e y o r, dated N ove m b e r 17, ]973. ’ T he a fo re s a id sale w ill be m a d e s u b je c t to a ll erK um brances e x is tin g p rio r to Ihe re c o rd in g o f th e above re fe re n c e d d e e d o f tru s t In c lu d in g a ll v a lid a n d e n to rca a b le lie n s a nd also w ill be s u b je c t to a ll taxe s and S p e c ia l a s s e s s m e n t s o u ts ta n d in g a g a in s t the p ro p e rty . T he successful b id d e r a l Ihe sale w ill be re q u ire d to m a ke an Im m e d ia te cash deposit o f len p e rc e n t (JO) of th e a m o u n t bid u p to a n in c lu d in g O ne Thousand D o lla rs (t1.(X)0.00) plus fiv e p e rc e n t (5) of any e x c e s s o v e r O n e T h o u s a n d D o lla rs ($1000). T h is the 20th da y o f A p ril, 1983. W a lte rW . P h t,J r. S u b s titu te Tru& lee P ost O ffic e Box 49 W inston-S alem . NC 27102 Telephone: (919) - 722-3700 4-28-2tn N O R T H C A R O L IN A r D A V IE C O U N T Y N O T IC E U N D E R A N D B Y V IR T U E o f a po w e r of sale conta in e d In a c e rta in deed of tru s t date d O ctober 28, 1981, execute d by R ic h a rd A . B eck a nd w ife , B illie J. B eck to G eo rge W . M a rtin , S u b s titu te T ru s te e , a n d re co rd e d in Book 117, page 486, D a vle C ounty R e g is try ; and u n d e r and b y v irtu e o f the a u th o rity v e s te d In th e undersigned as T ru s te e a nd an o rd e r execute d b y D elores C. Jo rd a n , C le rk o f S u p e rio r C ourt of D a vie C ounty, on th e 18th da y o f A p ril, 1983, th e d e fa u lt h a v in g been m a de In the p a ym e n t of the indebtedness th e re b y secure d, the sa id deed of tru s t b e in g by the te rm s th e re o f s u b je c t to fo re c lo su re and th e ho ld e r o f fhe in d e b te d n e u th e re b y secured ha v in g dem anded a fo re c lo su re th e re o f fo r th e purpose of s a tis fy in g s a id In d e b te d n e s s and the sam e h a v in g been o rd e re d a n d a p p ro ve d b y sa id o rd e r o f C le rk of S u p e rio r C ourt o f D a v ie C o u n ty , th e unde rsig n e d G eo rge W . M a rtin , .S u b stitu te T ru s te e w ill o ffe r fo r sale a t p u b lic a u c tio n to the hig h e st b id d e r fo r cash a t the C o u rth o u s e D o o r In D a v le C ounty, N o rth C a ro lin a , a t 11:00 o 'c lo c k a .m ., on th e 19lh d a y o f M a y , 1983, th e la n d conveyed In sa id deed o f tru s t, the sam e ly in g a n d b e in g In D a v le C ounty. N o rth C a ro lin a , and l>eing d e s crib e d as fo llo w s : B E G IN N IN G a t a n Iro n p in a t the N o rth e ast c o rn e r ot the w ith in d e s crib e d tra c t a t the in te rse ctio n o f th e S outhern rig h t o f w a y m a rg in o f SR 1100 w ith the W estern rig h t o f w a y m a rg in o f US 601; thence fro m the b e g in n in g South 14 degs. 06 m in . 27 sec. E a s t 642.26 fe e t to a n Iro n p in a f th e S outh E ast c o m e r o f sa id tra c t N o rth east c o m e r o f E . C. T a tu m , (D B 80, p a g e 242); thence S outh 84 degs. 40 m in . 19 sec. W est 685.74 feet to a n Iro n p in In th e E a ste rn rig h t o f w a y m a rg in o f SR 1100 Southeast c o rn e r o f s a id tra c t; thence w ith th e rig h t o f w a y m a rg in o f SR 1100 th e fo llo w in g course s a n d d is ta n c e s : N o rfh 06 degs. 57 m ln . 46 sec. W est 63.69 ft. to a p o in t; N o rth 07 degs. 44 m ln . 29 sec. W est 110.05 fe e t to a p o in t; N o rth 01 deg. 33 m ln . 36 sec. W est 90.85 fe e t to a p o in t; N c rth 11 deg. 03 m ln . 25 sec. E a st 5 9 ^ ft. to a p o in t; N o rth 32 deg. 08 m ln . 04 sec. E a s t 90.54 «fe e t to a p o in t. N o rth 52 deg. 53 u m ln . 29 sec. E a s t 99.25 fe e t to a p o in t; N o rth 60 degs. 35 m ln . 37 sec. E ast 133.34 ft. to a p o in t; N o rth 61 deg. 11 m ln . 15 sec. E a st 338.24 fe e t o t a p o in t, co n ta in in g 7.469 a c re s as show n on a s u rv e y b y F ra n c is B. G reene, d a te d F e b ru a ry 26, 1980. "T h is p ro p e rty w ill be sold s u b te c f to a ll ta x e s , e n c o m b ra n c e s a n d H ens o f re c o rd ." T h is the 18th d a y o f A p ril, 1983. G eo rge W . AAartin, S u b s titu te T ru ste e 4-21-4tnp N O R T H C A R O L IN A F O R S Y T H C O U N T Y IN T H E G E N E R A L C O U R T O F JU S T IC E D is tric t C o u rt D iv is io n 81 C V D 5204 H IL D A M . D IZ E (N ow M ila m ) VS. D A V ID T . D IZ E N O T IC E U n d e r and b y v irtu e o f an e x e c u tio n d ire c te d to th e u n dersigned s h e riff fro m the S u p e rio r C o u rt o f F o rs y th C ounty, In the above e n title d a ctio n . I w ill on th e 20th d a y o f M a y , 1983, a t 2:00 o 'c lo c k p .m .. a t the d o o r o f th e D a v ie C ounty C ourthouse In M o c k s v ille . N o rth C a ro lin a , o ffe r Tor sa le to the hig h e st b id d e r fo r cash, to s a tis fy s a id e x e c y tio n . a ll rig h t, title , and In te re s t w h ic h the de fendant no w has o r a t an y tim e a t o r a fte r th e d o c k e tin g of the Ju d g m e n t In s a id a c tio n had in and to th e fo llo w in g described re a l e sta te, ly in g and bein g In C a la h a ln T o w n s h ip . D a v ie C ounty. N o rth ^ r o lln a . B E G IN N IN G a t a p o in t In the ce n te r o f C a la h a ln R oad (N .C . Road 1314). southeast c o rn e r of W h ite , and ru n n in g thence w ith the c e n te r of s a id ro a d South 7 degrees E a s t 495 fe e t to a p o in t. F re e m a n n o V th e a s t c o rn e r; thence South 87 degrees 30 m in u te s W M t w llh F re e m a n lin e 1275 f e « o an Iro n In W . W . S m ith lin e ; th e n c e N o rth 7 degrees E a s t 975 fe e t to an iro n . M a c k W h ite c o rn e r In G ra d y n a m e s lin e , thence N o rth 80 degrees 25 m in u te s E a st 1186 fe e t TO T H E P O IN T A N D P L A C E O F B E G IN N IN G , co n ta in in g 12.5 a c re s, m o re o r less and bein g the n o rth e rn p o rtio n o f a tra c t describ e d in B ook 81 a t page 54, D a v le C ounty R e g is try , as su rveyed by S. L . T a lb e rt, R egistered S u rv e y o r, N o ve m b e r 19, 1966. T h is 19th d ay o f A p ril. 1983. G eo rge S m ith S h e riff o f D a v ie C ounty 4-214tnp N O R T H C A R O L IN A D A V IE C O U N T Y N O T IC E O F F O R E C L O S U R E S A L E U n d e r and b y v irtu e of the po w e r o f sa le c o n ta in e d In th a t c e rta in deed o f tru s t executed b y J E R R Y N .T H O M A S to R a lp h H . B ow den. T ru s te e (fo r w h o m R O B E R T E . P R IC E ,.JR . has been s u b s titu te d a nd Is now a c tin g as T ru s te e ), date d A p ril 27. 1978, and re co rd e d In D .T . Book 104 a t page 357, In the o ffic e o f the R e g iste r of D eeds of D a v ie C ounty. N o rth C a ro lin a , and u n d e r a nd b y v irtu e of th a t c e rta in o rd e r en te re d b y the C le rk o f S u p e rio r C o u rt o f D avle C ounty on M a rc h 30.1983. and of re c o rd In F ile 63 SP 14, d e fa u lt h a v in g b e e n m a d e In th e p a ym e n t o f th e Indebtedness th e re b y secu re d , end the h old er o f the note w h ic h th e deed of tru s t secure d h a v in g d ire c te d th e u n d e rs ig n e d T ru s te e to fo re c lo su re s a m e u n d e r the pow ers c o n ta in e d In th e deed of tru s t, the u n d e rsig n e d T ru ste e w ill o ffe r fo r sa le a t th e cour- thouse d o o r In the C ity of M o c k s v ille . N o rth C a ro lin a , at noon, o n M o n d a y. M ay 9. 1983, and w ill se ll to -th e high est b id d e r fo r cash th a t c e rta in tra c t o r p a rc e l o f la n d lo ca te d In the C ounty o f D a v le . S ta te of N o rth C a ro lin a , conveyed In s a k i deed o f tru s t, the sam e bein g ow ned o f re c o rd b y J e rry N . T hom as, a nd bein g describ e d as fo llo w s :B E IN G K N O W N a n d designa ted as lo t No. 2 on the P la t e n title d B E R M U D A R U N . L T D ., G O L F D O M IN IU M S , Section 3, w h ic h Is re c o rd e d In P la t B ook 5 a t page 2 In the o ffic e of the R e g is te r of D eeds of D a vle C ounty. N o rth C a ro lin a , a ls o b e in g k n o w n a s 318 R iv e rb e n d C irc le . B e rm u d a R un. A d v a n c e . N o rth C a ro lin a . a il as Is m o re p a rtic u la rly describ e d In the deed of tru s t. T he h ig h e st b id d e r w ill be re q u ire d to m a ke a cash deposit o f ten pe rce n t (10 p e rc e n t) o f the a m o u n t o f the b id u p to and in c lu d in g O ne T housand and No- 100 D o lla rs (S1.000.00). p lu s fiv e p e rc e n t (5 p e rc e n t) of an y excess o v e r O ne T housand and No-100 D o lla rs (81,000.00). T h is sa le w ill be m a d e su b je c t to p rio r en cu m b ra n ce s and re s tric tio n s o f re c o rd and a n / unpaid a d v a lo re m p ro p e rty ta xe s a nd s p e cia l assessm ents. T h is the 30th d a y o f M a rc h . 1983. R o b e rt E . P ric e . J r.. T ru s te e 4-14-4tn S T A T E O F N O R T H C A R O L IN A M th e a s t c o m e r of T R A C T S IX , D A V IE C O U N T Y IN T H E G E N E R A L C O U R T O F JU S T IC E S U P E R IO R C O U R T D IV IS IO N B E F O R E T H E C L E R K F ile NO. 61 SP 113 N O T IC E O F R E S A LE nd being the n o rth e a st co rn e r r th is T R A C T E IG H T ; thence Pith L . A n d e rso n 's lin e South 05 eg. 04' 3 0 " W est 2.987.66 fe e t to n e w iro n pip e on the e a sl b ank f D u tc h m a n s C re e k ; thence H th th e E a s t b a n k o f G A R R Y W . F R A N K , -u tc h m a n s C re e k as It A d m in is tr a to r c .t.a . o f Ih e meanders the fo llo w in g fo rty E s ta te o f W IL F R E D G U Y nes h a v in g c o u rs e s a n d F R IT T S , D ecea se d ,a n d K E IT H rsta n c e s m o re o r fe ss as P O P E , in d iv id u a lly , and w ife . 'H ow s. N o rth 47 deg. 16' 0 0 " L Y N N L . P O P E , , /e st 145.00 fe e t to a p o in t. P e titio n e rs »ence N o rth 44 deg. 44' 00’* vs. Zest 75.00 fe e l to a p o in t, thence A B N E R , B . H A R R IN G T O N , o rfh 0 7 deg. 2 3 '0 0 " E a s t 100.00 SR .. G u a rd ia n o f E U N IC E H . >et to a p o in t, thet»ce N o rth 25 F R IT T S . A R L O N A F . P O P E eg. 4 9 '0 0 " W est 135.00 fe e t to a and husband. C L A R E N C E A . o in t, thence N o rth 54 deg. 51' P O P E , L A R R Y K E IT H P O P E , »" W est 194.70 fe e t to a p o in t. J R ., K R IS T A L L Y N N P O P E , lence N o rth 29 deg. 25' 15" H A V A D A W N K IS E R . Zest 110.30 fe e t to a p o in t, C H R IS T O P H E R T E D K IS E R , lence N o rth 13 deg. 32' 30" and M IC H A E L B R IA N K IS E R , la s t 21030 fe e t to a p o in t. D efendants le n ce N o rth 19 deg. 48' 3 0 " W H E R E A S , th e und e rsig n e d Vest 345.50 fe e t fo a p o in t. A d m in is tr a to r c .t.a o f th e i'ence N o rth 62 deg. 04' 0 0 " E sta te Of W ilfre d G uy F rin s d id /e s t 95.00feet to a p o in t, thence p u rsu a n t to O rd e rs o f th e C o u rt outh 74 deg. 06' 0 0 " W est 60.00 In Ihe above s p e cia l p roceeding je t to a p o in l. thence S oulh 60 oH er fo r s e ll tw o s e p a ra te tra c ts eg. 59' 0 0 " W est 120.00 fe e t to a o f la n d w h ic h sale w as re p o rte d o in t, thence S outh 41 deg. 43' to th is C o u rt; and 0 " W est 90.00 feet to a p o in t, W H E R E A S , w ith in th e tim e Sence N o rth 23 deg. 25' 0 0 " allo w e d b y la w upset b id s w e re « s t 47.00 fe e t to a p o in t, file d w ith the C le rk of S u p e rio r fience N o rth 24 deg. 46' 0 0 " c o u rt fo r D a v le C ounty on each i« s t 96.60 fe e t to a p o in t, thenceo f s a id tw o se p a ra te tra c ts of |o rth 04 deg. 3 3 '0 0 " W est 198.80 la n d a n d a n o rd e r is s u e d « 1 to a p o in t, thence N o rth 01 d ir e c tin g G a rry W . F ra n k , eg. 1 6 '0 0 " E a s t 68.90 feet to a A d m in is tr a to r c .t.a o f th e o ln f, thence N o rth 43 deg. 05' E sta te o f W ilfre d G uy F ritts to p " E a s t.165.00 fe e t to a p o in t, re s e ll s a id tw o tra c ts , ^ence N o rth 54 deg. 47' 0 0 " s p e c ific a lly T R A C T TW O and îa»t 355.00 fe e l to a poin t. Sei .......................................................T R A C T E IG H T ; as h e re in a fte r le n c e N o rth 30 deg. 55' 00' d e s c rib e d ; anci /e sf9 5 .0 0 fe e f to a p o in t, thence N O W T H E R E F O R E , u n d e r p r th 48 deg. 4 7 '0 0 " W est 110.00 and b y v irtu e of a C onsent O rd e r p * a p o in t, thence N o rth 37 entered b y a Ju d g e o f S u p e rio r «0. 21' 0 0 " W est 512.80 fe e t to a C o u rt a nd an o rd e r o f th e C le rk p In t. thence N o rth 87 deg. 45' o f S u p e rio r C o u rt o f O a vle p " W est 215.00 fe e t to a pofn f. C ounty. N o rth C a ro lin a , m a de )e n c e N o rth 07 deg. 30' 00" In the above proce e d in g , th e /« ** 140.00 fe e t to a p o in t, u n d e rs ig n e d A d m in is tr a to r »ence N o rth 01 deg. 50' 0 0 " N O R TH C A R O L IN A D A V IE C O U N T Y N O T IC E O F S E R V IC E O P P R O C E S S B Y P U B L IC A T IO N B e fo re T h e C le rk F ile N u m b e r 81-SP.80 IN R E D E N N IS L A V E R N E N IC H O LS T O : D E N N IS S M IT H . H A R T S V IL L E , S.C. 29550 P L E A S E T A K E N O T IC E th a t the u n d e rs ig n e d w ill h a v e a hearing, b e fo re the C le rk of S upertor C o u rt o f D a v le C ounty. N o rth C a ro lin a , o n th e 26th da y of M a y , 1983. a t 10:00 a .m ., to d e te rm in e w h e th e r y o u r consent Is re q u ire d to be g ive n fo r the a d o p tio n o f a m in o r c h ild by th e p e titio n e r. Y o u h a ve th e rig h t to ap p e a r a t th is h e a rin g a n d sh o w cause w h y y o u r consent Is re q u ire d fo r the a d o p tio n o f th e m in o r c h ild . Be advise d th a t y o u r fa ilu re to a p p e a r m a y re s u lt In th e fo rfe itu re o f your o pportunity to show w h y y o u r consent w h o u ld be re q u ire d b e fo re th e ad o p tio n is ap p ro ve d . T h is 13th d a y o f A p ril, 1983. H a ll & V o g le r, A tto m e y s -A t-L a w B y : C live N . AAorgan, A tto rn e y fo r P e titio n e r D ra w e r 970, M o c k s v ille , N .C . 27038 T ele p h o n y: (704 ) 634-6235 4-14-4tnp N O R T H C A R O L IN A D A V IE C O U N T Y ' E X E C U T O R N O T IC E H a v in g q u a lifie d as e xe cu to r o f the esta te o f N o tle C hunn, deceased, la te o f D a v ie C ounty, m is Is to n o tify a ll persons h a v in g c la im s a g a in s t s a id e sta te to pre se n t th e m to the ur>derslgned on o r b e fo re th e 5th da y o f N o v e m b e r, 1983, o r th is n o tic e w ill be p lea ded In b a r of th e ir re c o v e ry . A ll p e rs o n s Indebted to sa id e s ta te w ill p le a s e m a k e Im m e d ia te p a y m e n t to th e u n d e rsigned. T h is th e 5th d a y o f M a y , 19S3. R o b e rt H . C hunn, R t. 4, Box 256, M o c k s v iiie , N .C ., exe cu to r of the e sta te of N o tle C hunn, deceased. 5-5 4fn c .t.a . o f the E s ta te o f W ilfre d G uy F ritts w ill on Ihe 13th da y of AAay, 1983, a t 12:00 noon a t the e n tra n c e o f the D avle C o u n ty . C o u rth o u s e In M o c k s v ille , N o rth C a ro lin a , o ffe r fo r sale to th e h igh est b id d e r, th e fo llo w in g s e p a ra te tra c ts o f la n d ly in g in F u lto n Tow n sh ip , D a vie C ounty, N o rth C a ro lin a , and m o re p a rtic u la rly describ e d as fo llo w s : T R A C T T W O : B E G IN N IN G a t a n e x is tin g Iro n pipe , sa id iro n p ip e t>e!ng a c o rn e r to E . Z im m e rm a n a nd bein g ix a te d a t the n o rth w e st c o m e r o f T R A C T T H R E E e nd b e in g the n o rth e a s t c o m e r o f th is T R A C T T W O ; th ence w ith th e lin e of T R A C T T H R E E S outh 07 deg. 3 r 5 0 " W est 1,941.54 fe e t fo a new Iro n p ip e In th e c e n te r o f a a s t 275.00 fe e t to a p o in t, ence N o rth 76 deg. ?S' 0 0 " rest 67.50feet to a p o in t; thence >uth 65 deg. 44' 0 0 " W est 140.00 »et to a p o in t, thence South 49 eg. 11' 0 0 " W est 292.50 fM t to a >int, thence S outh 77 deg. 17' r W est 238.50 fe e t to a p o in t, lence S outh 88 deg. 29' 00" /e st 65.00teet to a p o in t, thence outh 64 deg. 15' 0 0 " W est 3 9 5 .» ret fo a p o in t, thence S outh 4) eg. 5 5 '0 0 " W est 104.00fe e t to a o in t. thence S outh 11 deg. 02' 0 " E a s t 150.00 fe e t to a p o in t, le n c e S outh 55 deg. 09' 0 0 " Vest 92.50feet to a p o in t, thence fo rth 66 deg. 20' 0 0 " W est 86.50 eet to a p o in t, thence N o rth 39 ^ g . 22' 0 0 " W est 675.00 fe e t to a M in t, thence N o rth 75 deg. 47' W est 170.00 fe e t to a point, lence N o rth 41 deg. 14' 0 0 " 60 fo o t ro a d rig h t o f w a y . th e -West 395.00 fe e t to a p o in t, so uthw est c o rn e r o f T R A C T fhence N o rth 17 deg. 27' 0 0 " T H R E E . 0 c o rn e r to T R A C T W « *S E V E N a n d bein g th e southeast ,№ ence N o rth 58 dee. 30' 0 0 " c o rn e r o f th is T R A C T T W O ; .E ast 81230 fe e t to a p o in t thence thence w ith th e lin e o f T R A C T ,N o rth 2 5 d e g .3 3 '0 0 " E a s t 465.00 S E V E N and c e n te rlin e o f a 60/e e t to a new iro n p ip e on th e fo o t ro a d rig h t o f w a y the,east b a n k o f D u tc h m a n s C reek, fo llo w fn o e (ghf lin e * as fo d o w s .i^ e sou th w e st corner of TRACT N o rtti 39 d ig . 27' 0 0 " W est M .s o iE V E N ,- ttie n ce w llh the lin e ot te e t to a p o ln ti thence N o rth 11 T R A C T S E V E N S outh U dee. deg. 42' 0 0 " W est 145.S0 le e t lo a 4 ' « " E a s t « 5 .0 0 (e e l lo a new p o in t, thence N o rth 29 deg. 34'З го п p ip e In th e c e n le r o l th e ¿0 0 0 " W est Ш Л О fe e l to a p o in t ln > o o t ro a d rig h t o l w ay, the the D uke P o w e r r lg h l ot w a y ,? o u th e a st c o m e r o l T R A C T thence N o rth Ю deg. 35' 00''iS E V E N a n d Ih e s o u th w e s t W est 147.50 le e t lo a p o in t,f:o rn e r o l T R A C T S IX ; thence th ence N o rth 24 deg. 33' 0 0 "f*H h •I'» "n e o l T R A C T S IX w e s t «5.0 0 ie e t to a poin t,¡S outh i i deg. 14' 4 5 " E a s t • thence N o rth iO deg. 07' 00" 2,425.12 le e t to Ih e p o in t and W est 230.00 le e t to a p o in t,'p la c e o l b e g in n in g , and bein g thence N o rth a deg. 47' 00"1125J2 A c re s , m o re o r less, as W est 2 M J 0 le e t to a p o ln l,!« u rve ye d O ctober ith , Ш 2 , b y thence N o rth 4 i dee. 30- o o "iM a rtin F . H e n n lo e n , R . L . s . L . W est 153.00 le e t lo a new Iro n 2735. p ipe In Ih e c e n te r o l a 60 lo o t F o r re fe re n c e see Deed B ook ro e d rlg h l o f w a y a nd th e ce n te r 3«, page 41«, D eed B ook 3«, page o l a b ra n c h , a nd b e in g th . 3«e a nd D eed Book 41, page ao. n o rth w e s t c o rn e r o f T R A C T T he o pening b id on th is tra c t S E V E N and b e in g In th e lin e oi w ill be t39,5M ,B0. T R A C T O N E ; th ence w llh th |- A ll h-act» a re sold s u b je c t lo lin e o f T R A C T O N E a nd Ih f a n y rig h ts o l w a y a n dc e n le r lln e o la 6 0 lo o tro a d rlg h ro a s e m e n ts a n d e ncum brances o f w a y N o rfh I t aeg. 4«' OO'i ol record a n d a re a lso so ld W est 112.50 fe e l lo a p o in t a t Ih s u b le c t to lh a t 40 fo o t ro a d rlg h l end o f m e ro a d r lg h l o f w a y o '« » У • “ P 'c '''“ "''■ ‘ « " ' ‘■ed thence w ith Ih e lin e o f T R A C l « •» > *" » " " i * ' " ’•P Ч ™ '« ' O N E Ihe lo llo w in g Ih re e lines' Ьу M a rlin F . H ennlgan d a lMN o rth I.d e g .J J 'O O " E a s l 525.5 M i, m i w h ic h Is le e t lo a p o in t, thence N o rth S h ereby In co rp o ra te d h e .e ln by deg. 3 0 '0 0 " E a s l 224.50 fe e t to i ' ’«*»!’« '" - . p o in t, thence N o rth 44 deg. 28 > u b|ect lo 0 0 " E a s t 225.95 fe e l to a ne w Iro r P ro p e rly ta xe s a nd assessm ents p ip e ; thence w ith Ih e lin e o ) '» r V '” " » "b s N u e n t to 19«J. T R A C T O N E S outh 85 deg. 57, The la s t a nd hig h e st b id d e r 40 " E a s t 455J 4 te e t lo Ih e point '« r " ч с ! a t sa id sale w ill be and p la c e o f b e g lh n in g , a n i “'Pf*'! bein g 27.27 A c re s , m o re o r l e s s ; «< P " ’'" ' , ' » as s u rve y e d O c to b e r 4 th , I M 2 b | 'h ' P’“ p e n d in g fin a l M a rtin F . H e n nlgan, R . L . S. L i « n llr m a llo n o r re |e c tlo n 2735. I th e re o l. F o r re fe re n c e see Deed Book S » "“ '«74, page 3’i and Deed Book 3«, »“ b je c t to c o n llrm a llo n b y Ihe page 41«. ' C ourt. The opening b id on th is tra c i T h is th e 27th d a y o f A p ril, w ill be U ,924JB . ! 19>3. T R A C T E I G H T I B E G IN N IN G a t a n e x is tin g 40‘l P o p la r w ith e x is tin g m a rk s a t a fence c o rn e r, s a id 6 0 " P o p la r being loca te d a t th e southw est co rn e r o f C. B a ile y 's tra c t. th< n o rth w e s t c o rn e r o f L [ A n d e rs o n 's tr a c t a n d th e G a rry W . F ra n k A d m in is tra to r c .t.a . ot the E s ta te of W ilfre d G uy F ritts P.O . BOX 1295 L e x in g to n . NC 27292 (704) 246-2203 4-28-2tnp N O R T H C A R O L IN A D A V IE C O U N TY A D M IN IS T R A T O T 'S СТА N O T IC E H a v in g q u a lifie d as A d m in is tra to r o f the esta te of G la d y s A le x a n d e r W a g n e r, deceased, la te of D a v le C ounty, th is Is to n o tify a ii persons h a v in g c la im s a g a in s t s a id estate to p resent th e m to the u n dersigned on o r b e fo re the 28th da y o f O ctober, 1983, o r th is no tice w ill be plea ded In b a r of th e ir re c o v e ry . A ll p e rs o n s Indebted to sa id e sta te w ill p le a s e m a k e Im m e d ia te > p a y m e n t to the undersigned. T his the 28th da y o f A p ril, 1983, B uddie R . z • W agner, A d m in is tra to r C .T .A . o f th e esta te o f G la d ys A le x a n d e r W a g n e r, deceased.4-28 4tnp AUCTION SIVIE Saturday: May F, 1983 10:00 A.M Estate of Hugh Franklin (Shie) Douthit Location: Higiiway 158 East, Just Pas 801 On Right 1967 Chev. Refrigerated Trucit, 2 Ton 1941 Hudson, 4 Dr. (50,000 IMiies) Tandem Trailer 3 Pt. Cultivator 3 Pt. 12" Bottom Plow Torro Self-Propelled Mower ice Cream Box Electric Stove 5 Piece Beautiful WIclter Set Reproof Safe Ksc. Small Tools Ole Dresser ¡Pie Safes lito. Wasiier dding Machine Ma Maple Bed inning Room Chairs 3 " Tires and Wheels Smt- Antiques ■MANY OTHER ITEK- N O R T H C A R O L IN A D A V IE C O U N T Y N O T IC E OF S E R V IC E O F PR O C E S S B Y • P U B L IC A T IO N B e fo re T he C le rk F ile N u m b e r 81-SP-8I IN R E T O N Y D E W A Y N E N IC H O LS T O : R O N N IE H lA L L . B IS H O P V IL L E . S.C. 39010 P L E A S E T A K E N O T IC E th a t the u n d e rs ig n e d w ill h ave a h e a rin g b e fo re the C le rk of S u p e rio r C o u rt o f D a v ie C ounty. N o rth (.•iro iin a , o n th e 26th da y o f M a y . 1983, a t 10:00 a .m ., to d e te rm in e w h e th e r y o u r consent Is re q u ire d to be g ive n fo r the a d o p tio n o f a m in o r c h ild by fhe p e titio n e r. Y ou have th p rig h t to appear at th is h e a rin g and show cause w h y y o u r consent Is re q u ire d fo r the a d o p tio n o f th e m in o r c h ild . Be a d vise d th a t y o u r fa ilu re to a p p e a r m a y re s u lt in th e to rfe ih jre o f y o u r o p p o rtu n ity to show w h y y o u r consent should be re q u ire d b e fo re the a doption (s ap p ro ve d . T his 13th d a y o f A p ril. 1983. H a ll 8. v o g le r. A tto m e y s -A t-L a w B y : C liv e N - M o rg a n . A tto rn e y fo r P e titio n e r D ra w e r9 7 0 ,M o c k s v llie . N .C . 27028 T elephone: (704)634-6235 4-14-<!np N O R T H C A R O L IN A D A V IE C O U N T Y A D M IN IS T R A T R IX 'S N O T IC E H a v in g q u a lifie d as A d m in is tra trix o f th e e sta te of Is a a c W a ts o n D u n n . J r.. deceased, la te o f D a v le 'c o u n ty . N o rth C a ro lin a , th is Is to n o tify a il p e rs o n s h a v in g c la im s a g a in st s a id e s ta te to present th e m to th e u n d e rsig n e d o n o r t>efore the 14 d a y o f O ctober. 1983. s a id d a te bein g a t le a s t s ix m o nths fro m th e d a te o f firs t p u b lic a tio n o f th is n o tic e , o r th is n o tic e w ill be p lea ded in b a r of th e ir re c o v e ry . A ll p e rs o n s Indebted to s a id e s ta te w ill p le a s e m a k e Im m e d ia te p a y m e n t to the un d e rsig n e d . T h is th e 14 d a y o f A p ril, 1983, th e s a m e b e in g th e f ir s t p u b lic a tio n date. L o u is e D . M a y h e w , A d n .In is lT d trlx o f th e e sta te of Isaac W a tso n D unn, J r. B ro c k & A A cC iam rock A tto rn e y s a t L a w P.O . B ox 347 A A ocksvllle, N .C . 27028 P hone: 704-634-3518 4-14 4tnp N O R TH C A R O L IN A D A V IE C O U N T Y E X E C U T R IX N O T IC E H a v in g q u a lifie d as E x e e u frfx of the esta te o f M a rtin F ra n k lin P otts, la te Of D a v le C o unty, th is Is to n o tify a ll p e rsons h a v in g c la im s a g a in st s a id e s ta te to pre se n t th e m to th e u n d e rsig n e d on o r b e fo re th e 5 th d a y o f N o v e m b e r. 1983. b e in g s ix m o nths fro m th e fir s t d a y o f p u b lic a tio n o r th is n o tic e w ill be plea ded fn b a r o f fh e ir re c o ve ry . A ll persons Indebted to sa id e s ta te w ill p le a s e m a k e Im m e d ia te p a y m e n t to th e undersigned. T h is fh e 5 th d a y o f M a y . 19«3. E d ith P o tts R e id , e x e c u trix of the e sta te o f M a rtin F ra n k lin P otts, deceased. A A artin 8. V a n H oy. A tto rn e y s BOX606 A A ocksvllle, N.C . 27028 5-54tnp N O R T H C A R O L IN A D A V IE C O U N T Y E X E C U T O R N O T IC E H a v in g q u a lifie d as e x e c u to r of Ihe esta te o f L in d a G ra y C lem ent, deceased . la te of D avle C ounty, th is Is to n o tify a ll p e rs o n s h a v in g c la im s a g a in st sa fd e s ta te fo p re s e n t th e m to the und e rsig n e d on o r before the 2 ls t d a y o f N ove m b e r 1983, o r th is n o tice w ill be pleaded In b a r of th e ir re c o ve ry . A ll persons Indebted fo safd e s ta te w ill p le a s e m a k e Im m e d ia te p a y m e n t to th e u ndersigned. T h is the 15th d ay o f A p ril 1983. Jam es K . Sheek J r., e x e cu to r, of the esta te o f L in d a G ra y C lem ent deceased. 829 N . M a in St. A A ocksvllle. N.C . 4-21-4tnp N O R T H C A R O L IN A D A V IE C O U N T Y N O T 'C E TO A R E A L A N D S U R F A C E T R A N S P O R T A T IO N P R O V ID E R SThe Y a d k fn V a lle y E conom ic D evelopm ent D is tric t. In c. Is a c c e p tin g p ro p o s a ls fo r p ro v id in g possible c o n tra c te d T ra n s p o rta tio n S ervices to area residents u n d e r the a p p ro ve d counties S ection 18 R u ra l P u b lic T ra n s p o rta tio n P ro g ra m s and th e Y a d k in V a lle y T ra n s p o rta tio n S e rv ic e fo r 1983. 84. T y p e s o f S e rv ic e s m a y In c lu d e D e m a n d .R e s p o n s e . R e g u la r S c h e d u le d , a n d C h a rte r. T h e s e p o s s ib le C o n tra cte d S ervices m a y be of special In te re s t to lo c a l ta x i O p e ra to rs. T ra n s p o rta tio n P ro v id e rs in te re s te d In s u b m ittin g p ro p o s a ls fo r c o n s id e ra tio n s h o u ld c o n ta c t th e C o u n ty S e c tio n 18 T ra n s p o rta tio n P ro g ra m C o o rd in a to r a t the C o u n ty c o m m u n ity S e rv ic e c e n te r o r A n n Dowell a t the Y V E D D I D Ish-Ict O ffic e . Y V E D D i is a n E q u a l O p p o rtu n ity E m p lo y e r a n d S e rvice P ro v id e r. Y a d k in V alley E co n o m ic D e ve lo p m e n t D is tric t, In c. P .O . Box 309. R iv e r R d. B o o n v llle . N .C . 27011 Tele p h o n e : 919-367-7251 5-5 U n N O R T H C A R O L IN A O A V IE C O U N T Y N O T IC E TO D E B T O R S A N D C R E D IT O R S T h e u n d e rs ig n e d h a v in g q u a lifie d as E x e c u to r of the E s ta te o f J a c k s o n H e rm a n M cC u isto n . aka Jackson H . M cC u lsto n . D eceased, la te of D a vle C ounty, N o rth C a ro lin a , th is is to n o tify a ll persons, firm s a n d c o rp o ra tio n s h a v in g c la im s a g a in st th e e s ia te to e x h ib it to th e m to th e u n dersigned a t the o ffic e of D a vis and B re w e r A tto rn e y s , 2419 L e w is v ille -C le m m o n s R o a d , C le m m o n s , N o rth C a ro lin a , 97012. on o r b e fo re Ihe 7th da y o t N o v e m b e r. 1983; o r th is N o tic e w ill be plea ded In b a r o f th e ir re c o v e ry . A ll persons Indebted to the esta te w ill plea se m a ke im m e d ia te , paym e n t. T his th e 5th d a y o f AAay. 1963. E sth e r G. M cC ulsto n, E x e c u to r o f 'th e E s ta te o f Jackson H e rm a n M cC u lsto n . B y : E d w a rd Y . B re w e r D a v is 8i B re w e r A tto rn e y s P.O . D ra w e r 786 2419 L e w is v ille -C le m m o n s R oad C le m m o n s. N .C . 27012 0786 4-28 4tn Р И н а Т Г о р 7 C H I E V E M E N T N O R T H C A R O L IN A O A V IE C O U N T Y E X E C U T O R 'S N O T IC E H a v in g q u a lifie d as E x e c u to r o f the esta te of N o rm a n E . Cook. S r., deceased, la te of D avle C ounty, th is Is fo n o tify all persons h a v in g c la im s a g a in st sa id e sta te to pre se n t them to the u n d e rsig n e d on o r b efore the 38th d a y o f O cto b e r, 1963. o r th is n o tic e w ill be plea ded In b a r of th e ir re c o v e ry . A ll persons Indebted to s a id e sta te w ill p le a s e m a k e Im m e d ia te p a y m e n t to the u n d e rsigned. T his fhe 28th day of A p ril, 1983. N o rm a n E . C o o k. J r. E x e c u to r o f Ih e e s ta te o f N o rm a n E . C ook. S r.. deceased. 4.?8 4 lrp If you ate 9 years old or over phone 634-6297 and ask 'bout joining. rts a Wfl 1982 Unpaid Taxes ( c o n t in u e d f r o n i p a g e 4 D ) V in e s . R ic h a rd and E liz a b e th .1.78A -S130.28 v o g le r, W . L . a nd T . L . H III a nd T . R . A n th o n y • I L -tlO iO v o g le r, W m . F ra n k a nd N o rm a F . -3.60A - 1170.67 W a g n e r. John T o n y a nd J o yce -2.66A -$113.24 W a lk e r. C h a rle s W illia m J r. a nd B e v e rly - IL . 1191.47 W a lk e r, P e a rl C . M rs . H e irs -IL -S18.69 W a lk e r, R o b e rt AA. and D Ia n n L . .1.56A'-S3.90 W a lk e r, W . S. H e irs - IL .»5.70 W a ll, C le m e n t W ayne a nd A A arjorie C.‘ .IL . 1149.05 W a ll, J o h n H u g h .5.03A -861.34 W a ls e r, L . J . .1.17A -H .19 W a rd . C h a rle s R ic h a rd .2.0&A .$117.38 W a rd . G ra d y N . E s ta te .11.75A -B at. $5.87 W a tk in s , B oyd - IL -B a i. $33.81 W a tk in s . John H . a nd H elen - IL 4119.69 W atso n . G e ra ld «1L -$14.00 W ebb. D . B . a n d F a y e B . -4.50A -$95.46 W e n s li, A u b re y Boat .IL .$45.84 W essel. P e te r a n d M a rle n e G . . IL -$301.72 W est. L e s te r a n d E v a R ebecca <1L -$60.22 W h isenhunt, R o y W e b ste r a nd L in d a -5.32A . $131.70 W h ita k e r, B ru c e and J a n ic e -2.90A $141.83 W h ita k e r, C . L . - IL 4 7 J 0 W h ita k e r, D o rs e tte and E liz a b e th -2.54A . $•3.50 W h ita k e r, J a c k H . - IL 476.93 W h ita k e r, J a c k H . a nd C a ro ly n 4 .0 4 A 4154.68 W h ita k e r. Ja m e s F . and D onna N . «.85A -$77.99 W h ita k e r, R o b e rt E . a n d E rn e s tin e K . >1.25A > $104.19 W h ita k e r. R o y H e ir* -9.90A 4205.72 W h ite , C h a rlie H a rtm o n J r. 02.5S A -$130.93 W h lta . G ra c a H . - IL -$7.50 W h ite , H e n ry W . a n d Roaa Leia >.24A 41.20 ~ W h ite , Jessie L . 'ó l 4 à .7 8 W h ite , M a ry C le m e n t - IL 4100.63 W h ite , R o b e rt - IL .$*4.2« W h itle y , B a rry W . a n d M y m a *3.65A $327.37 W ilk e s , J a n ie M . M r« . - IL 42.94 W illia m s , B O M e r N . a n d D e lla L . A L 4123.97 W illia m s , E lg in V . and M a ry U .70A 4189.73 W illia m s , F ra n k lin E d w a rd 4 .6 0 A 4153.90 W illia m s , F ra n k lin E d w a rd .13A -$29.75 W illia m s , H a rv e y L e e a n d J a n ic e B . 4 A « $108 .S3 W illia m s , H a rv e y L e e and J a n ic e D . -1.03A • $10.30 W illia m s , H a rv e y Lee and J a n ic e B . -4.25A • $12.75 W illia m s , H o lla n d G . -56.47A -$329.48 W illia m s , H o lla n d G . -19A -$41.38 W illia m s , J . F ra n k AArs. E s ta te 4 .5 0 A -$37.19 W illia m s , Ja m e s F ra n k lin .4.05A 4100.07 W illia m s , J o h n n ie F . a n d F ra n c e s W . .2A - $93.08 W illia m s , K a re n F . >2.35A .$37.50 W illia m s , L o n n ie F . a nd N e llie - IL -$53.28 W illia m s , AAary F . - I L -$48.97 _ W illia m s , R o b e rt L e e a n d A to ttle -3.30A - $154.» W illia m s , R o b e rt L ee a nd A Aattle .1.25A :$66.16 . W illia m s , W . A . a nd T ru d y S. ..82A -$106.77 W ilso n , W ade a nd C eola 4 A -$65.65 W in ce , A n n ie M . -7.45A 417.70 ______ W in te rs , John and E th e l H . - IL -$11.25 W ise m a n , S a ra h .1A 4127.45 W ishon, D o ro th y B. .1.70A .$48.65 W ishon, R onda G . -2A -$20.00 W ood, R o m a n D . a n d O o rls R . -IL ,412,50 W o o d ru ff/ R o n a ld J . and D e b ra P. - IL .$83.99 w o o d v a lle H om es. In c . - IL -$7.50 W o o d v a lle H om es. In c . -IL -SIO.OO W o o d va lle H om es. In c . -IL 410.00 W o o d va lle H om es. In c. -IL -$10.00 W o o d v a lle H om es. In c . - IL 410.00 W o o d va lle H om es. In c . - IL 410.00 W oodvalle Homes, In c. -IL -SIO.OO W o o d va lle H om es. IN C .-lL **tO O O W o o d va lle H om es. In c. -1L 410.00 w o o d v a lle H om es. IN C .-1 L 410.00 W o o d v a lle H om es, In c . - IL -$10.00 . W o o d va lle H om es, in c . -»L -SIO.OO W o o d va lle H om es. In c. - IL -$10.00 W o o d va lle H om es. In c. - IL -$11.25 W o o d va lle H om es, In c. - IL -$11.25 W o o d va lle H om es, In c. - IL $11.25 W o o d va lle H om es. In c. O L $11.25 W o o d v a lle H om es. In c. - IL -$11.25 W o o d v a lle H om es. In c. -IL -$11.25 W o o d va lle H om es. In c. -1L $12.50 W o o d v a lle H om es, in c . - IL -$12.50 W o o d va lle Homes. In c. - IL 412.50 W o o d v a lle H om es. In c. - IL -$11.25 W o o d va lle H om es. In c. - IL $11.25 w o o d v a lle H om es, In c. - IL $11.25 w o o d v a lle H om es. In c. - IL $11.25 W o o d va lle H om es, In c. .IL -S I),25 W o o d va lle H om es, In c. -1L $11.25 W o o d va lle H om es. In c. - IL -$11.25 W o o d va lle H om es. In c. - IL -$12.50 W o o d va lle H om es. In c . - IL -$12.50 W o o d v a lle Hom es, In c . -IL -S12.50 W o o d v a lle H om es, In c . - IL -$12.50 W o o d v a lle H om es, In c . - IL 410.00 W o o d v a lle H om es, In c . - IL 410.00 W o o d v a lle H om es, In c . - IL -$10.00 W o o d v a lle H om es, fn c . -IL 410.00 W o o d v a lle H om es, In c . - IL -$7.50 W o o d v a lle H om es, In c . - IL -S7.50 W o o d v a lle H om es, In c . - IL $7.50 W o o d v a lle H om es, In c . - IL -$7.50 W o o d v a lle H om es, In c . -IL -S7.50 w o o d v a lle H om es, In c . .IL $9.00 W o o d va lle H om es, In c . - IL $11.00 W o o d va lle H om es, In c. - IL -$7:so W o o d va lle H om es, In c. - IL -$8.25 w o o d v a lle H om es, In c . - IL -$7.£0 W o o d v a lle H om es, in c . -I.IO A $27.50 W o o d va lle H om es, In c. .1.08A -$27.00 W o o d va lle H om es, In c. - IL 412.50 W o o d v a lle H om es. In c. - IL $12.50 W ooten, K a th y M y e rs .IL • B a i. $139.92 W y a tt, V a le ria G. -.60A -$22.22 Y o u n g , C h a rle s R . and J u n e -IL -$290.22 Y o u n g , W a yn e C e cil and K a th ry n - IL -$216.35- Z a la cz k o w s ki S ta n le y J . -6.08A -$69.37 Z im m e rm a n , J a m e s S. J r. a n d L in d a -8.95A •* $491.17 Z im m e rm a n , Ja m e s s. J r. a nd L in d a -IL -• $18.00 Z im m e rm a n . Ja m e s s. J r. a nd L in d a - IL • ' $16.00 Z im m e rm a n . Ja m e s s. J r. and L in d a -IL .. $16.00 Z im m e rm a n . Ja m e s S. J r. and L in d a $ ia o o Z im m e rm a n , Ja m e s S, J r. and L in d a $16.00 Z im m e rm a n . Ja m e s S. J r. and L in d a $16.00 Z im m e rm a n . Ja m e s S. J r. and L in d a $16.00 Z im m e rm a n . Ja m e s S. J r. and L in d a - IL - IL . ! $18.00 Z im m e rm a n . Ja m e s S. J r. a nd L in d a -1.75A - $18.80 Z im m e rm a n , Jam es S. J r. and L in d a -IL -$3.50 Z im m e rm a n . Jam es S. and L in d a L . - IL -$13.12 • IL . - IL . -IL . -IL . A u ctio n eer: BobbyF. C reek W in s t o n - S a le m , N . C .N C A L N o . 5 3 ( 9 1 9 ) 7 8 8 - 8 6 1 7 CATTLE AUCTION Y A D K I N C O U N T Y 10A.M.Thursday MAY 12th OWNER: Michel Bourauin is leevinBJthe U.S. to go to college in Switzerland. He has been raising these cattle as a hobby. AU are very gentle. 7 R c g t s t c r c d H e r e f o r d C o w a w i lh C a lv e s ' 5 R e g lB tc r e d H e r e f o r d S p r in g e r s 1 R e g is t e r e d 4 - y r . O ld H e r d B u U 1 B r e e d in g a g e H e r e f o r d B u U 1 2 Y e a r li n g H e r e f o r d 1 S t e e r 1 B . W . F . C o w w iU i C a lf 2 N o i v r e g « l e r e ^ " T H o r s e , _________ ■ A u c tio a o n P r e m ls e s i From Yadkinville; Intersecdoii 601 and 421 at former Chevrolet dealership take service road No. 1742, go 2.6 mUes to service road 1741, take right, down to auction, • From Winston-Salem, off U.S. 421 expressway take Shacktown Rd. E x it Turn left, go to service road 1742, take right, go 1V4 mUes to state road 1741, watch for signs. ■ Auctions Conducted Вуа Pierce Auction Service & Real Estate 1 9 0 0 B r a n t l e y S t , W in a t o n - S a le m , N . C . 2 7 1 0 3 P H O N E 7 2 3 -5 3 3 8 A u c t io n e e r s ; J C e l ^ . P ie r c e N o . 1 5 4 . T e r r y I r e l a n d N o , 2 9 5 A u c t io n w U I la s t a p p r o x im a t e l y 2 h o u r s . B r in g ir u c k s , b e r e a d y t o lo a d I m m e d ia t e ly a f t e r A u c U o n B a le , e CATTLEAUCTION A U C T I O N S a tu rd a y , M a y 14th a t 1:00 P.M . ( P le a s e N o t e S t a r t in g T im e ) Hub Cleary • Estate Location:In Davie County From Mocksville, Take U.S. 64 West, 1 Mile Past 1-40 Bridge. Then Take Shefneid Rd. N o.1306 N.W. 2.5 Miles. Sale Is On 1/2 Mile On Privale Drive. •Partial Listing- '7 2 C u s t o m C h e v r o le t T r u c k '5 1 D o d g e 2 T o n T r u c k S a w M i l l ( w o r k a b le ) C a s e 4 0 0 P o w e r U n i t (g a s ) A . C . T r a c t o r ( W D ) A . C . 6 0 C o m b in e A . C . M o w in g M a c h in e I - H H a y R a k e 1 6 D is c B o g g ( p u ll t y p e ) I - H 1 2 D is c D r i l l ( o n r u b b e r ) M a n u r e S p r e a d e r - H a r r o w P . T . O . F e e d G r in d e r R o a d B la d e A n v i l M c C u llo c k P r o - M a c 1 0 - 1 0 p o w e r s a w H a n d & G a r d e n T o o ls L o g C h a in s H o r s e D r a w n E q u ip m e n t ( c o le c o r n p la n t e r ) T o b a c c o L is t e r , C u lt . , e t c . O M S h o t G u n C u r e d H a m s C u r e d S h o u ld e r s M A N Y O T H E R I T E M S X R a in O r S h in e SALE CONDUCTED BY YORK -=f=T- AUCTION & REALTY ^ S E R V IN G T H E A U C T IO N P R O F E S S IO N S IN C E 1 9 3 5 H. BUFORD YORK (704) 546-2595 HORACE YORK (919) 766-5500 B II.L YORK (704) 546-2696 6D - DAVII: COUNTY BNTURPRlSli RHCORD, THURSDAY, MAY 5. I‘)83 H o m e E co n o m ist Is P ro A t S tretch in g D o lla rs How can a family of three cal on $'10 a week liiesc days? Ruby and Vann Cox and Iheir lO-year-oId son, Chrislopher, eal very well indeed on Ihc carefully balanced, lasly meals prepared by Ihe Guilford Counly agricullural exlension home economist. Mrs. Cox claims il’s "fun” balancing her food budget."Since I train aides lo work wilh EFN E P fainilies, I like lo practice whal 1 Icach," Her Expanded Foods a n d N u t r it io n Educalion Program aides work one-lo-one teaching nutrition and food preparation on a limited budget lo low- income homemakers. "Many of the low FOR SALE «20,000 Located On Main St.-Cooleemee 1 Financing Available. With Approved Credit And Terms Contact Dianne E. Snipes 284-2542 •NEW LISTINGS - Beautiful Lot In Woodland Development P[enty Of Hardwood Trees And Sloping Just Right For A Basement ’8,900°° Sheffield Park-Convenient To 1-40 3 bedroom hotne with baths, kitchen-dining comb., living room, den with woodstove, utility room, patio, fenced back yard, storage building....... Many extras included. *39,800 Summer home in the Mountains. Beautiful view of the New River. Large k)t. Located in Ashe County ck>se to Elk Shoals Methodist Camp *28,000 136 Cartner Street, Mocksville... Two bedrooms, 1 living room, diniiig rr^>^^rtitchen, screened ^ ,^ ° o rc h , partial baser>i-i^?, seperate garage, paved drive, nice lot. Center Community Approximately 41 acres located off of Tutterow Rd. and Hwy. 64. . Land borders on Interstate 40 Right of Way ‘44,000 478 Avon St. Beautifully Decorated Ranch-Style Brick Veneer Home Convenient To Hospital, Doctor^ An_d Shopping Area. Home Has 3 Bedrooms, 1 ^ Baths, Kitchen-Dining Comb., Living Room, Carport & Storage Room. Nice Lot »58,000 C o u n t r y L a n e E s .t q .t e s Zjilery Nice Lots. May Be Bought Separate Or fogëïliét G a rd e n V a lle y Brick Home With Plenty Of Roonn 5 Bedrooms, 3 Ceramic Tile Baths And Many Additional'Features. Only 75,500 Adfflional Lot Available For ’7,500. S outh w oo d Acres Many lots available.' UREW-ÏÏOOD- JOHNSON.Inc. Phone 634-6281 p e ; le s cost recipes we use wilh E F N E P families have become favorites with my fam ily, especially some of Ihe main dishes," Mrs. Cox says. Since meal lakes Ihc largest bite oul of Ihe average food budget, Ihe recipes provide inexpensive protein. The fam ily lim ils servings of meal lo 3 or 4 ounces per person in one meal a day. At the olher m eals, main dishes contain eggs, cheese, cottage cheese, as, beans and nuls, ess expensive sources of protein. "We also eal a lot of main dishes conlaining only small amounts of meal. ll’s actually a healthier way of eating,” Ihe e x te n s io n hom e economist says. Planning is the second key lo lower food bills. “ I cook jusl the amounl 1 know we will eat, or have a planned use tor the leflovers,” Mrs. Cox says. Having to loss out spoiled food is like having to toss oul dollar bills.She uses newspaper food ads and plans meals a week al a lime around specials and in- season foods. “ I usually go lo two dif­ ferent stores cach week depending on Ihe specials, bul I don’l run all over town.” She also buys in quantity when items are on sale. "Shop wilh a list in hand and do nol buy extras unless there is an unexpected, very good special,” says the e x te n s io n hom e economist IAll of the snacks served at the Cox home are fresh fruit or nutritious items made at home. "Popcorn is one- of our favorites. F o r o c c a s io n a l desserts, I make less rich, more nulrilious items or use fruit. Homemade puddings and baked custard are Iwo of our favorites,” Mrs. Cox -^Rys.The family buys very few soft drinks; an. orange-flavored break­ fast drink is on hand. Powdered or canned milk is used in cooking, and Ihe family drinks low fal milk. "My son does go lo the store with me oc­ casionally, but he learned long ago nol lo beg me lo buy junky foods; Parents have lo learn to say 'no,’ or they will waste a lol of money on low-nulrient item s,” M rs. Cox warns. An example of a nutritious, tasty ; main dish which is also low- cost is Corn Casserole. Radio Dispatched Trucl<s g r . t * - E S ^ Ç О K T RQLi< RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL EXTERMINATING Day 634-5720 r'IG H T 634-3237 V a d k l j w i l l e ^ R o a ^ J V ^ ^ Carolina Ener^ Efficient Homes And Real^ 34 Court Square Mocksville, N.C. B u y N o w W e h a v e f i x e d r a t e s a v a i l a b l e a t 1 0 % ! LISTING S New, 4 bedroom ^^.^aths, 1% story County • *45,000.°“ Six lots in Iredell County Three lots in Hickory Hill Mocksville- Available lots, with water and sewer in Willow Run -Mocksville One lot in Hickory Tree- Mocksville Six wooded lots near Advance One lot in Southwood Acres Two acres of land near Advance 2.3 acres near Clemmons House, and five acres • Beautiful wooded, very private location in Rural Hall - ‘29,900°° 100 Acres near Winston Salem Possible Sub-division of property available New, 3 bedrooi»j^p>c5* baths in Iredell CoM^i^co^ 59,500.°° 100% l\ii'ancing Possible. New homes under construction in several counties. Pre-construction condominium sales available -North Myrtle Beach, S.C. For help with all your building, buying, and selling needs c a ll: Sandra Anderson, Shelby Walker, Broker Sales (704) 634-2252 OR (919) 998-2969 I'orn Casserole 4 eggsTwo-lhirds cup milk (5 07.. can evaporated milk)'i cup self-rising flour 2 cups cream-slyle corn I'-.’ cups low-fat collage cheese 4 lo 0 ozs. American, Cheddar or processed cheese, grated or in small pieces 2 lo 3 ozs. chopped ham 1 large onion, chopped teaspoon chili powder 'i teaspoon black pepper '.1 teaspoon salt, optional Beat logelher eggs, milk and flour. Slir in remaining ingredients. Pour inlo a 9x13x8 inch greased baking dish. Bake at 350 degrees 25 lo 30 minutes or until sel ahd lightly browned in spots. Lei set al least 15 minutes before serving. Serves 6-8. Good wilh fruil salad or baked apples. Tastes good re-healed and freezes well. Deep, You can't see the crabgrass in your lawn before Ihe weather ' warms up, because il is only. present in the ; form of seed. Chances are excellent thal plenly of Ihem are jusl- lying Ihere waiting to germinate. The way to stop this, and thus head off the annual problem of heavy crabgrass in- feslalion of yorr bluegrass or tall fescue lawn, is lo use one of the approved chemical crabgrass hervicides. Agricultural E x ­ le n sio n S e rv ic e specialists al North C a r o lin a S t a le University identify some of these as Balan, Betasan, Presan and Daclhal. Dacthal may reduce stands of red fescues, so consider another product. As wilh all pesticides, these herbicides have specific uses and should be used in strict adherence lo label C rabgrass: T im e T o Stop it Is in Seed R ich S o il R ig h t fo If you’re slarlinL from scratch w ilh roses, here are a few suggestions from North C a r o lin a S ta t e University extension horticulturalisls re g a rd in g b a sic requirements; -Plant roses in deep, rich loamy soil for best ? results. f -The soil should be' well drained and located in a sunny spot. -Provide plenly of water during the growing season and be sure Ihere is adequate planl food available at ail limes. . I l ’s best lo be highly selective in picking Ihe initial planting site, and choose one (hat meels each of Ihe requirments listed. The sunny exposure is important, Ihe NCSU specialists point out, but roses willi do fairly well witli partial shade. They should be in the sun at least half of the R osesday and preferably three-fourths of the directions. Each of Ihe four are for use before Ihe craligrass seed ger­ minate and Ihe pest emerges from Ihe soil. Apply by April 1 in Ihe PiedmonI and by April 15 in Ihe Mountain section of North Carolina. Belhasan, Persan or Datchal may be ap­ plied in Ihe spring following seeding of bluegrass or fescue in Ihe fall. Wait at least one year afler your lawn has been seeded b e f o r ^ p g l ^ i n ^ ^ a b ^ These herbicides are available in various g r a n d u 1 a r t u r f products al home and garden stores. Some arc available in com bination with fertilizer. Shop around and consider total costs. For example, determine which is Ihe mosl econom ical; buying your ferlilizer a n d h e r b ic id e separately, or buying them in blended form. Anolher herbicide called Tupersan may be used |n the spring w h e n s e e d in g bluegrass or fescue. It provides selective conlrol of Ihe crab g rass without banning the desired grass. The NCSU extension specialist caution lhal the effectiveness of herbicidcs in con­ tro lling crabgrass depends on proper liming. You can’t wait until Ihe crabgrass emerges to control il with Ihe m aterials mentioned here. N o t B a d F o r A 1947 M o d e l Paid For By James Nancc FOR SALE «37,000 Located On Highway 601 South Of Mocksville 11 % % Financing Available With Approved Credit And Terms Contact Frank Bahnson 634-6261 Howard Realty & Ins. Afency Inc. 339 Saiisbuiy street Mocksvi№/N.C. PHONE 6 3 4 -3 5 3 8 T t ie p e r c e n t m o n i e s n o w a v a il a b le t h r o u g h F H A - V A . N o w Ib t h e t im e t o b u y a h o m e | ; a I I f o r m o r e I n t o r m a t lo n . ------------------ {-----------N E W L I S T I N G S ----------------------------------------------- C E M E T E R Y S T R E I T - A r e a l d o ll h o u s e . 1 % s t o r y f r a m e w i t h n e w s id in g . 3 b e d r M m , 1 i t h . R e m o d e le d . E x c e U e n t c o n d it io n , $ 5 2 ,0 0 0 . lO 'p c r c e n t m o r lg a g e s o w a v a U a b le - C a U f o r m o r e i n f o r m a t io n E D G E W O O D C I R C U ; '2 4 0 0 S q . F t . o n a t K a u t i f u l w o o d e d , c o m e r lo t . 3 b e d r o o m s , 2 ^ b a t h i F o r m a l l i v i n g r o o m , d in i n g r o o m , d e n w i t h f ir e p la c e , m a r b l e f o y r , t h e r m o p a n e w in d o w s , c e n t r a l h e a t a n d a i r , lo a n a s s u m p t io n . ) в ( 100. S O U T H M A I N S T R E T : 2 3 0 0 s q . f t . in t h is h a n d im a n s p e c ia l, 5 b e d r o o m s , l i v i n g r o in w i t h f ir e p la c e , h a r d w o o d f lo o r s . E x c e ll e n t in v e s t m e n t p r o p e r t j{ 4 3 9 , 0 0 0 . H W Y . 6 0 1 S . : A li t t lc | t b o w g r e a s e w i l l d o w o n d e r s . 3 b e d r o o m , b r ic k - v e n e e r h o m e . L i v i n g o o m h a s f ir e p la c e , o U h e a t , p a r t i a l b a s e m e n t, $ 4 0 ,0 0 0 . \ C O U N T R Y L A N E : g e n t l y r e m o d e le d , n e w c a r p e t t h r o u g h o u t . V e r y n ic e a n d a n c x c e ll e t lo c a t io n . T h is h o m e o ile r s 3 b e d r o o m s , 2 t ia t h r o o m s , f o r m a l l i n g r o o m , d in in g r o o m a n d d e n . P l u s a f u U b a s e m e n t . $ 5 5 ,0 0 0 . ) 8 6 3 N O R T H M A I N S '! N e e d s n o r e p a ir s p r e s e n t o w n e r h a s t a k e n c a r e o f a l l o f t h e s e . C lo s d n t o t o w n , c h u r c h e s , g r o c e r y s t o r e - a ll w i t h i n w a l k in g d is t a n c e . N f s id in g , c e m e n t d r iv e , n ic e y a r d , 3 b e d r o o m s . C O U N T R Y L A N E : O o d s t a r t e r h o m e , 2 b e d r o o m 1< 4 b a t h . E x c e ll e n t r e n t e r p r o p e r t y . O w r r f in a n c in g , $ 2 6 ,0 0 0 . 1 0 9 B I N G H A M S T R E T : N E W L I S T I N G P e r f e c t s t a r t e r h o m e , g r e a t lo c a t io n , U v ln g r o o m i b e d r o o m s , e x t r a n ic e k it c h e n . N ic e lo t . O N L Y $ 2 2 ,5 0 0 . G W Y N S T R E E T : N d s o m e t h in g r e a l c lo s e t o h o s p lt e l? V e r y n ic e n e ig h b o r h o o d . R e c e d y r e m o d e le d . E l e c t r i c h e a t , 2 o r 3 b e d r o o m s , I lv in g r o o m w i t h f i r t l a c e , e x t r a n ic e k it c h e n . O w n e r f in a n c in g , $ 2 8 ,5 0 0 . j S H E F F I E L D P A R K ii lx t r a n ic e 3 b e d r o o m , I V i b a t h r o o m s , a t t r a c t i v e d e c o r , la r g e s t o r a g e 'u i ld i n g , f e n c e d b a c k y a r d . S o i r e f u r n i t u r e a n d a p p lia n c e s . $ 3 6 ,5 0 0 . ----------------- -------------------P -----------------L A N D ---------------------------------------- ' H I C K O R Y H I L L - O n o o t lO O x 2 0 0 $ 6 ,5 0 0 . H I G H W A Y 6 0 1 - B o x t t o d A c r e s 5 lo t s $ 6 ,6 0 0 .0 0 . 3 - A C R E T R A C T O N la in С S Q U O I. $ 8 1 0 0 .0 0 . 2 3 a c r e s o n t h e T u r r i t i n e l. u a u w i t h 1 5 0 - f f e e t o f r o a d f r o n t a g e . W o o d e d w i t h c o u n t y w ^ r a v a ila b le . O w n e r f in a n c in g $ 1 2 0 0 . p e r a c r e , 5 a c r e s o n t h e D a v ie c a d e m y R d . G o o d r o a d f r o n t a g e , lo t s o f t r e e s a n d a s t r e a m . $ 1 5 ,0 0 0 1 0 0 a c r e s lo c a t e d I m o u t h e r n D a v ie C o u n t y , a p p r o x im a t e l y h a l f c le a r e d a n d h a lf w o o d t , w a t e r o n t h r e e s id e s $ 1 4 0 0 .0 0 p e r a c r e . 2 0 0 a c r e s o n t h e R i? e 1 2 0 0 f e e t o f f r o n t a g e , s o m e m a r k e t a b le t im b e r . O n e r Г 1 п , Ь Ч .. и . P r ic e d a t $ 1 ,0 0 0 .0 0 p e r a c r e . 4 8 a c r e s lo c a t e d o n tk M a in C h u r c h R d . $ 2 1 0 0 . p e r a c r c . W U I s u b - d iv i c e I n t o 1 0 a c r e t r i t s . < W o o d la n d - h e a v ily w o « e d 2 a c r e s $ 6 3 0 0 .0 0 H W Y 6 4 W e s t • 4 m i l e r o m M o c k s v U le . 1 0 a c r e s $ 2 7 ,5 0 0 . L o t s o f r o a d f r o n t a g e . E x c e ll e n t I m t io n . P a r k e r R o a d ; 3 t r a c t s l ) 4 a c r e s $ 1 4 ,0 0 0 . ( 2 ) 1 8 a c r e s $ 2 5 ,2 0 0 . 1 2 a c r e s w i t h b a r n , a i r s t r i p h s g a r , p a s t u r e , w a t e r $ 3 0 ,0 0 0 .0 0 ------------------^-------------- H O M E P H O N E S ----------------------------------- & Insurance TE LE P H O N E : (7(M) f o r q ii a l l f l r d h u v e r s Peal Ert.ni — Ineiirancc - All Types H O M E S A V O N S T . - G o o d s t a r t e r h o m e . 2 B R , I B c c n t r a l h e a t a n d n ic e lo t . H W Y . 8 0 1 S .- 3 B R , I B , L R w i t h f p l, la r g e d e n w i t h w o o d s to v e , 4 .9 9 8 A , f e n c e d . I d e a l f o r h o r s e s . H I C K O R Y H I L L - V e r y a t t r a c t i v e , im m a c u la t e a n d s p a c io u s h o m e . L iv i n g r o o m w i t h f p l, D R , 3 la r g o B R 's , p la y r o o m w i t h w o o d s to v e , d e n w i t h f p l . , s t u d y , 3 « , b a t h s . R e la x b y a 2 0 x 4 0 p o o l. T h is a n d m u c h т я г е a t a p r ic e le s s t h a n y o u w o u ld e x p e c t . D A V I E A C A D E M Y R D - , t B R , 2 B , full b a s e m e n ^ , h e a t p u m p , C . P o r t a n d .9-1 A . N e w ly R e d e c o r a te d B R O O K D R I V E - L o v e ly 3 B R , iV jB , d e n w i t h f p l. , o n a c r e - j^ lu s lo t . E x c c l l i ^ t lo c a t io n . D E A D M O N R D . ^ 3 A a n d 3 B R h o u s e . B e a u t if u l s e t t in g . L a r g e E n g l is h B o x w o o d s a n d m a p le t r e e s . Щ a c r e la k e . A i r s t r ip . C a l l f o r s h o w in g . 601 S . 2 - b e d r o o m , 1 b a t h , g a r d e n s p a c e . L ik e c o u n t r y li v in g , q u ie tn e s s ? T h is is i t ! H i c k o r y H i l l I I . L o v e ly A - f r a m e w i t h c e d a r a n d s to n e e x t e r io r o n la k e . I m m a c u l a t e 4 B R , 2 B , 2 - c a r g a r a g e , t o p g r a d e b u il d in g m a t e r ia l, w r a p e a r o u n d d e c k , b o a t d o c k , in n u m e r a b le e x t r a s . T r u ly a s h o w p la c e ! C R E E K W O O D E S T A T E S - 3 B R , 2 B , H e a t P u m p , D e c k . V e r y a t t r a c t i v e h o m e . S . M A I N S T . - A t t r a c U v e S t a r t e r H o m e . 3 B r , 2 B , r e a s o n a b ly p r ic e d . - « . M A I N S T . - 6 B R , 2 V 4 B . v e r y a t t r a c t i v e a n d s p a c io u s o ld h o m e . R e a s o n a b ly p r ic e d . - G W Y N S T . 3 B R b r ic k h o u s e , c c n t r d h e a t , c a r p o r t a n d n ic e lo t . A l l f o r $ 3 1 ,0 0 0 . O w n e r f in a n c in g . C E D A R F O R R E S T L A N E - 4 B R , 2 B it a n c h - s t y le . F a r m i n g t o n C o m m . E x c e ll e n t c o n d it io n , q u ie t a r e a '. N o w a s t e d s p a c e . W I L K E S B O R O S T . - 5 B R , 2 B b r i c k h o m e . H i l l is a n e x c e U e n t p r o p e r t y , la r g e lo t , R e d u c e d to $ 4 4 ,5 0 0 . _____ F A R M I N G T O N R b A D - B r i c k r a n c h e r , 3 B R ; 2 B , d e n w - f p l . p la y r o o m w - f p l „ c a r p o r t , g a r a g e , a p p r o x . 2 A , w o o d e d , f . b a s e m e n t C R E S C E N T B E A C H - C o n d o m i n l u m s $ 5 2 ,9 0 0 .0 0 o r J 5 , 9 5 0 ; 0 ^ f o r 4 w e e lu p e r у м г . № A R 1 -4 0 a t f i r s t 6 4 e x it , 3 B R , 2 Ц B . d e n - ^ 1 . b a s e m e n t - f p l. , a i r c o n d . , 2 - c a r g a r a g e , a p p r o x . 2 A . G A H N E K S T . - 3 B R , b r ic k r a n c h e r , И 4 В . h e a t p u m p , b a s e m e n t, d e c k . F Ä R WilW L A N D A C R E S - 2 H y r . o ld lo g h o m e o n 4 .4 8 A . , 3 B R , 2 B , f u l l b a s e m e n t, 2 0 1 6 s q . f t . h e a t e d . G O D B E Y R D . - N e a t h o u s e o n h ' A . . '2 o r 3 b e d r o o m , I B . B e a u t if u l t r e e s . R e a s o n a b '» p r ic e d , W I L L B O O N E R D - 3 h o m e s t o b e I w U t . E n e r g y e f f ic i e n t , 3 B R h o m e s w i t h m o n t h ly p a y m e n t s a s lo w a s $ 1 5 0 .0 0 i f y o u q u a U f y . C O O L E E M iD E - W e s t v le w A v e n u e o f f G la d ­ s to n e R d . . W e ll p r e s e r v e d 5 r o o m h o u s e a n d 3 r o o m a p a r t m e n t o n 4-1- a c r e s w o o d e d la n d . _ L A N D O A K L A N D H E I G H T S - L o t a p p r o x . % a c r e , z o n e d t o r m o b ile h o m e . R e a s o n a b ly p r ic e d . H O W A R D . S T . - L o t 1 0 0 x 1 4 0 , c it y w a t e r a n d s e w e r . Q u ie t lo c a t io n . ■ n V IN C E D A R S R D . - T w o A lo t s . B o r d e r in g T w i n C e d a r s G o lf C o u r s e . O F F E A T O N C H U R C I I R D . - « fi.5 a c r c s , a p ­ p r o x . ¡iO A o p e n . S o m e p in e h a r d w o o d t im b e r . S o m e b u ild in g s . A p p r o x . 7 a c r c s w a t e r f r o n t . $ 1 3 5 0 . p e r a c r e . M a n y lo t s - R o ll in g H i lls L a n e a i^ J V I il iln g R o a d . H I G H W A Y 8 0 1 - I S A • p a r t o p e n , lia r d w o o d a n d lo n g r o a d f r o n t a s e . H U N T E R S ' P O I N T , D a v id s o n C o u n t y - 5 A , m o s t ly w o o d ^ l, b e a u t if u l la n d . F A R M I N G T O N - 1 1 .5 A . o n la k e & C e d a r C r e e k . B e a u t if u l h o m e s it e . C A R O W O O D S S u b d i v . - L o t s 3 5 a n d 3 6 . R e a s o n a b le p r ic e . 6 0 A , f e n c e d , p a r t g r a s s e d a n d p a r t w o o d e d . S t r e a m a n d p a v e d r o a d s . W i l l s u b d iv id e , H W Y . 6 4 n e a r H i c k o r y H i U . " l4 A . W U l s u b ­ d iv id e . . C L O S E I N - A p p r o x , 1 2 A , 1 0 o p e n , lo n g r o a d f r o n t a g e , g o o d b u il d in g s it e s . B O X W O O D A C R E S - 3 .7 A . m o s U y w o o d e d F A R M I N G T O N A R E A - 5 - a c r e t r a c t s - W .S . N o . N E A R M 0 C K S V I L L E - 5 A . w o o d e d , p a v e d r d . C . w a t e r . M I L L I N G R D .- 3 5 A . f e n c e d , s t r e a m , W .S . N o . p o n d . B A Y V I E W E S T A T E S - L a k e N o r m a n , M o o r e s v llle a r e a , d e e d e d lo t , w a t e r f r o n t a c - c .e s s , g o o d b u il d in g Io t.$ 7 8 0 0 . 8 0 A C R E S - B e a u t if u l la n d , 5 0 u n d e r c u lt iv a t io n , r e s t w o o d e d , D a v i e A c a d e m y a r e a . R e a s o n a b ly p r ic e d . J u U a H o w a r d A n n F . W a n d s M ik e H e n d r ix M -3 7 5 4 M -3 2 2 9 M -2 3 6 6 C .C . C h a p m a n M y r t l e G r im e s C a lv in I ja m e s D o r is S h o r t 6 3 4 -2 5 3 4 9 9 8 -3 9 0 0 4 9 2 -5 1 9 8 9 9 8 -5 1 9 4 E u g e n e B e n n e t t H o lla n d C h a f f in L o u is e F r o s t D a lg ie S a m H o w e ll G r a h a m M a d is o n L u t h e r P o t t s H e n r y S h o r e , K a t h i W a ll 9 9 8 -4 7 2 7 6 3 4 -5 1 8 6 6 3 4 -2 8 4 6 6 3 4 -2 0 6 0 6 3 4 -5 1 7 6 9 9 8 -8 4 2 0 6 3 4 -5 8 4 6 4 9 2 -7 6 3 1 ú í CQUAl HOUtlNI: 634-6111 or6112 DAVIU COUNTY ENTERPRISU RUCORD, TH U RSDAY,M AY 5, 1983 - M USICAL ABORTION A B O R T IO N : F re e P re g n a n cy T e s tin g . F o r a p p o in tm e n t c a ll c o lle c t • W in sto n -S a le m (919) 7 2 M 6 3 0 . A rc a d ia W o m e n 's M e d ic a l C lin ic .11.26 tin A C AUCTION W E C O N D U C T A L L T Y P E S O F A U C T IO N S A L E S . W e are n ow c o n tra c tin g sales lo r S pring o f 1903. C a ll: J im Sheek. A u c tio n R e a lty a t 99B- 3350. N C A L 924. 7.9 tfnS B O B B Y L E A Z E R .X o m p ie te . A u c tio n e e rin g S e rvice . N C A L 3865. R easonable R ates C all 2B4^280.5 -5 » fn B L T .V . SERVICE , AAcC LO UD T V & A P P L IA .'^C E . S e rv ic in g a ll m a lo r brancis. T . V .'s . a p p lia n c e s a nd M ic ro • W aves. C a ll: 996-2851 o r (704) 6338426. ll- 4 tfn M LO S Tand^O U N D ~ ^ U N D : L a rg e dog In v ic in ity , o l 601 N u rs e ry . P le a s e ’c a ll If . y o u r dog Is m is s in g . 492-7791 S -M tp -K B ' P IA N O T U N IN G : R e p a irin g a n d R e b u ild in g . 22 y e a rs e x p e rie n c e . A ll w o rk g u a r a n t e e d . P I A N O T E C H N IC IA N S G U IL D C R A F T S M A N . C a ll W a lla ce B a rlo rd a t 284 2447. 4 8 3 .H n -p f B A IR FARE F O R T H E S A M E A IR F A R E ...A n d fo r ttie tim e it ta ke s you to d riv e to G re e n ­ s b o ro . N . C .. S U N B IR O A IR L IN E S P ro p J e t S e rvice can lia v e you on y o u r w a y fro m S m ith R eynolds A irp o rt to a ll P ie d m o n t d e s tin a tio n s 3 tim e s d a lly . F o r a n in ­ tro d u c to ry p e rio d w h e n you liy S u n b ird Iro m S m ith R eynolds, p a rk fo r o n e h a lf the n o rm a l p a rk in g ra te . F o r re s e rv a tio n s a n d in fo rm a tio n , c a ll: T o ll F re e 1 800.222.9456. 2-10-tfnA C AUTO M O BILE CLEAN UP B O O E R 'S K A R K L E E N , R l. 2, • A to c u v llle , N ,c „ 2S ye a n <X • e x p e rle n c o In a o to recon, ' d ltlo n ln g . W e c le a n ; E nolne«, ; in te rio rs , W a x o r P o lis h and , dye v in y l tops. C a ll »9.3139 o r ‘ 998-3159 fo r a n a p p o in tm e n t. • A nn and J a c k B oger, O w ners > n d o p e ra to rs . ^ ; A N IM A LS ( iR E E P U P P IE S ,,.M ix e d ; D reed c a ll 998.44W .5 -5 -ttp .B E DO G G R 0 0 M IN G ..A 1 I B reeds. - B v a p p o in tm e n t. C a li 998-3322. o yap pv 5 .5 4 t? p C J REPAIRS e x p e rie n c e d p a in te r w ill d o . house p a in tin g , ro o f p a in tin g - o r w h a te v e r. W o rk •g u a ra n te e d . C a ll (704) 492- * 7657.5-5-tfn.C S we need your, help to : fight ----------P ftiV A T E IN VESTIG A TO R P R IV A T E IN V E S T IO A T IO N S : • W ill be s tric tly C o n fid e n tia l. L ice n se N o. 320. T elephone: - S a lis b u ry (704 ) 636-7533. 3-24 tfn J L C H ILD C A R E W ill b a b y s it in m y h om e In the B ix b y c o m m u n ity , M o n d a y th ro u g h F rid a y . F irs t s h ift o n ly . P re fe ra b ly school age. C a ll 998-5441 a t a n y tim e . ^ 5-S.1tp-BS W lilT e e p 'c h ild re n In m y hom e. A ll a g e s a c c e p te d . A p p ro x im a te ly V /t m ile s fro m C ooieem ee S chool. C a ll 284. 2742 and a s k fo r L y n n . F irs t and second s h ifts p re fe rre d . S-S-Stp-LB . W ili keep c h ild re n b H o re and a fte r s c h o o l a n d d u rin g s u m m e r m o n th s a t m y hom e " on C h u rc h S tre e t. C a ll T a m m y O 'N e a l * a t 284.2385, C ooleem ee. __________________________5-5.1tp.TO • ■ C A R D O FTH A r*K S . P O TTS T he fa m ily o f th e la te M a h in F ra n k lin P o tts w o u ld lik e to e x p re s s th e ir th a n k s a n d a p p re c ia tio n fo r e v e ry a c t o f kindness sh o v m th e m d u rin g th e dea th o f th e ir lo v e d one. T he flo w e rs w e re b e a u tifu l, food good, a n d v is its , p ra y e rs a n d c a rd s g r e a tly a p p r e c i a t e d . Y o u r th o u g h tfu ln e s s w ill b e ' re m e m b e re d . M a y G od b le u each one o f you EM PLO YM ENT M U L T I-L E V E L o p p o rtu n ity . O u r p ro d u c t is a n e ce ssity in e v e ry household. D riv e a n e w L in c o ln T o w n c a r. M a k e S660 a w eek to s ta rt. M e e t H a ro ld Sears a t S honey's R e s ta u ra n t. C o lis e u m D r iv e , W in s to n - S alem on M o n d a y 's a t 7:30 p .m . P hone: (704) 364-5509. 4 .l4-4tpH S S T R IK E IT R IC H ...M u s t h a ve 1 to 3 y e a rs sales e x p e rie n ce , needs ia rg ? in c o m e to p a y fo r h o u s e . c a r . fa m ily , a c c u s to m e d to lu x u r io u s liv in g . N e e d e d b y A A A A C o rp o ra tio n w ith 24 ye a rs tra c k re c o rd . 100 p e rc e n t fin a n c in g , 90 p e rc e n t plu s a p p ro v a ls , e x p e n s e p a id tra in in g . C a ll M r. B la c k , 8 a .m . . 10 p .m . a t 1-800-247- 2446. N o In ve stm e n t, w e In ve st In you. 5 .5 1 tp C H E L P W A N T E D ...E x c e lle n t in c o m e fo r p a rt tim e hom e a s s e m b ly iw o rk . F o r In fo rm a tio n c a ll (504) 641.8003 , e x t. 8645. 5 .5 3 tp .G C A rM SCELLAr'EOUS F O R S A L E : A T A R I P R O D U C T S ...Р а с M a n , P ro g g e r. C onkey K o n g . E .T ... S ta r W a rs . E T C ; A L S O R ad io s. S tereos. C B R adios and T a p e p la y e rs . See a t : R A Y B U C K S . R t. 1. R edland R oad, A d v a n c e . N .C . P hone 998-4216. 12-30 tIn R T E L E P H O N E R E P A IR C E N T E R : A ll w o rk g u a r a n te e d . T e le p h o n e s a le s ...K e y S y s te m s ... in VEH IC LES F O R S A L E : 1970 ^ v e r lc k . In G O O D ru n n in g c o n d itio n . P ric e d re a l re a so n a b le . C a li: C ly d e L a k e y a t 634.2213. 5 -5 1 tp .C L F O R S A L E : 1973 M G B . N ew T o p . N e w T ire s , w ire w heels. A M P M . 8 tra c k , a nd In G O O D c o n d itio n . 58.000 m ile s . *2500. C a ll 634-2159. 634-5230 a fte r 5 p .m .5 -5 -ltp .J E « .'Ù iiio n s “,:. c o 'r'd i« .-p h o n « , '= ? « lo u d b e lts , tone c o rd s , la c k s , C o rd o o a ,.E X T R A A V O N You Can Earn $6 to $10 Per Hour. We Will Teach You Howr. CALL COLLECT 873-0917 W ire a n d m a n y o th e r c o m ­ m u n ic a tio n n e e d s . T H E P H O N E P L A C E . M o c k s v ilie . N .C . P h o n e : 634-2626. 218-82 P P F O R S A L E : G o o d U s e d G a lv a n lie d ro o fin g ... 11 ft. 15ft. a nd 25 ft. le n g th s . $8.00- S15.00 p e r sheet. N o R u st. C a ll 998-3908 o r 998-2121. 3-31 «tnpW W A n y o n e IN T E R E S T E D In R ID IN G in a v a n (o r second s h ift d o w n to w n W in s to n - S alem to R .J . R e yn o ld s p la n t. . plea se c o n ta c t: E d d y D otson a t 998-6029 fo r a ll in fo rm a tio n . * T h e c h a rg e . U 2.50 p e r m o n th . I 4-28.2tp-E D ■ ' ■ ........ ■ 4E W C A M P U S R ID G E M E A L ■ R E P L A C E M E N T D IE TI P L A N ...in th re e d e lic io u s • fla v o rs , c o m p a ra b le to ■ C a m b rid g e . C am pus R idge a t • M o c k s v ilie D ru g C om p a n y. * AAaIn S tre e t. M o c k s v ilie . N IC E ...F u lly E q u ip p e d . Sun R oot. M u s t S e ll. S1495.00 C all 998-3720.5 -5 -ltp B G F O R S A L E ..1970 M e rc u ry C o u g a r...E x tra N ice ...tl5 0 0 .0 0 449 S a lis b u ry S tre e t. M o c k s v ille . N .C . P hone 634- 3977.5 -5 1 tp F O R S A L E : C A M P E R ...1973 W ild e rn e s s 18'. Sleeps 6. Self- c o n ta in e d , a n d In G O O D c o n d itio n . *2,250.00 c a ll 998- 4411.5 -5 -ltp -A B F O R S A L E ...1975 C h e v ro le t N o va ...C u s to m ...a ir c o n d itio n , p o w e r b ra k e s a n d s te e rin g . E x c e lle n t c o n d itio n . *2500.00 C a ll a fte r 6 p .m . 998-4703. 5-5.ttp Resort Property FOR REN T • D O N 'T T H R O W IT ! AW AY_____Will c le a n , o u tb u ild in g s a n d ba se m e n ts. ■ C a li 2 r 4280 ■ 5 -5 tfn -R L■ ^ ¡ F O R S A L E .i.B E E S A N D B E E •% , S U P P L IE S ...F a c to ry m a d e ' R E N T A L ..B e a c h C o tta g e a t S outh M y rtle . 2 tje d ro o m s a n d b u n k s , sofa bed. 2 b a th s , a ir c o n d itio n , c o lo r C able T .V . n e a r ocean. D a ily o r w e e k ly . C a ll 634-3875 o r 634- 3650. 4-14-tfnW L N E E D A R E L IA B L E p erson to c a re fo r tw o c h ild re n in the h o m e . A g e s 3 a nd 9 n in th s o ld . R e fe re n ce s, piea sei C a ll 634-5874 a t a n y tim e . 5 5 -ltp -D L H E L P W A N T E D ...A t B e rm u d a R un S n a c k B a r. e m ployees a re needed fo r d a y tim e v ra rk s ix d a y s a w e e k In clu d in g w e e k e n d s ; a ls o w a itre s s e s fo r e v e n in g w o r k . C a ll J o h n S ln k e ld a m a t 998-8156. S-5.1tnp-JS H E L P W A N T E D ...A s a la d person fo r th e k itc h e n a t R am ada In n in C le m m o n s. A p p lic a n ts a p p ly in person. 5-5-1tnp.R l CARPENTRY w o oden w a re . C o m p le te lin e . C o m p le te H iv e . *25.00. B rood F o u n d a tio n , 65 c e n ts p e r sheet. C a li fo r o th e r p ric e s . C ool S p rin g s a re a . (704) 872* 8488. 5-S:2tp-CD C A R W A S H ...S a tu rd a y . M a y 7, fro m 8 a .m . u n til o n D e p o t S tre e t. W a tc h fo r s ig n s. A c o m p le te c le a n in g jo b in sid e a n d o u t fo r o n ly *7 .0 0 . • P roceeds w iil b e used fo r C e d a r G ro v e C h u rch Y o u th . P le a se s u p p o rt th e yoU ng p eople! - r t -5S.V P F O R N E W C A M P U S R ID G E M E A L R E P L A C E M E N T D I E T P L A N ...in th re e d e lic io u s fla v o rs , c o m p a ra b le to C a m b rk jg e . C am pus R idge a t D a v ie D is c o u n t D ru g s , C ooleem ee. N .C . LANO FOR SALE F O R S A L E ,.,J 1 A c re s 0( la n d In D a v ie C o u n ly . C o n ta ct D o y le B ro vm a l 4?2*5160.S .i.T to D B ^'IOBILE Н0ГЛЕ8 FOR SALE F O R S A L E : M O B IL E H O M E ...L o a n A s s u m p tio n . F o r d e ta ils , c a ll: (704) 492- 5249 a lte r 5:30 p .m . 4.21-4tnp.R A F O R S A L E : 1973 V In d a le M o b ile H o m e .,1 2 X 6 S » .(ik e n e w .C o m p ie te ly fu rn ish e d , w a s h e r, d ry e r, re frig e ra to r. V/3 b a th s . 2 be d ro o m s. Saie In c lu d e s u n d e rp in n in g a n d b lo c k s , p o rc h . P ric e d fo r q u ic k sale. C a ll 472-7564. 4-28-2tp FO R S A LE ...1980 K ln g sw o o d L u x u ry M o b ile H om e 14X56. fire p la c e , M ic ro w a v e , Je t A ir G rill. 2 b e d ro o m s , g a rd e n tu b . C a ll 492-5658 a lte r 5 p .m . 5 -5 -ltp F O R S A L E ...1973 M o b ile H o m e ... 2 b e d ro o m s ...a ir c o n d itio n e d , w o o d s to v e . fu rn is h e d a nd u n d e rp in n e d . *6.000 C a ll 998 8647. 5 -5 1 tp -P P F O R 's a l e . . . 1980 O a k w o o d M o b ile H o m e o n Vt a c re tot. T ra ile r Is u n d e rp in n e d , p o rc h and g a rd e n space. C a ll 284. 2513 a t a n y tim e . ________________________5 -5 -4 tn p JW M OBILE HOME FOR RENT F O R R E N T ...2 b e d ro o m a n d 3 b e d ro o m T ra ile rs . P hone 492- 5561, B u ste r P h illip s . R t. 6. M o c k s v ilie , N .C . 27028. 5 -5 -1 tn p B P F O R R E N T ... N ice su p e r clean a ir c o n d itio n M o b ile H o m e on la rg e lo t w ith tre e s , 2 b e d ro o m s , w a s lie r, d ry e r, sto ve , re frig e ra to r w ith ice m a k e r a n d b e a u tifu l ca rp e t. N o p ets o r c h ild re n . 2 m ile s fro m i-40 a nd 801 cro ss in g on R e d la n d R d. C a li 998-4588, If no a n s w e r c e il W8-5730. 5 -5 .ltn p .J H HOMES FOR RENT F O R R E N tT ..L o v e ly 1 b e d ro o m C o tta g e ...6 m ile s e a s t o f M o c k s v ille on US 64. A ir c o n d itio n e d . *165.00 p e r m o n th . C a ll 998-5210. 5-5-ltnp-W S FO R R E N T ... 3 b e d ro o m B ric k house w ith ba se m e n t and c a rp o rt. E x tra n ic e . R e fe re n c e s a n d d e p o s it re q u ire d . *325.00 p e r m o n th . C a ll 284.*;688. 5 -5 -ltn p -L T HOMES FOR SALE - YARD SALES RFPEAT YARD S A L E ...S a tu rd a y , M a y 7. fro m 9 a .m . u n til 3 p .m . Sofas, c h a irs , o rg a n , T .V , a n d M O R E I H w y. 601 S outh past L a k e w o o d M o te l on M cC u llo u g h R o a d ; g o 1 m ile to D a n ie l R oad, IV ] m ile m o re . W a tch fo r signs) S ale w ill be in the ba se m e n t of th e T ony G reen R esidence. 5-5-1tp F L E A M A R K E T 8. Y A R D S A L E ...F irs t F rid a y a n d S a tu rd a y o f e ach m o n th . F ri., 9 a .m . - 7 p .m ., a nd S M ., 7 a .m . - 7 p .m . *5.00 to set u p p e r day. M u s t fu rn is h o w n ta b le . M O C K S V IL L E D E A L E R S A U C T IO N . l o r m e r l y . P e n n in g to n C h e v r o le t C o m pany in M o c k s v ilie . F o r in lo rm a tlo n c a ll: L ib G ru b b at (704 ) 284-2566. 5-5-12tp-LG FO R S A L E : 3 B e d ro o m house In C ooleem ee. N .C ., o il fu rn a c e ca rp e te d . M u st S ell. *15.000. C a li a fte r 4 p .m . (704 ) 663-6833 o r 663-2812. •4.213t. F O R S A L E ...3 b e d ro o m . 2 b a th hom e w ith d o u b le g a ra g e on D ea d m o n R oad. A u to m a tic g a ra g e d o o r o p e n e r, b u ilt In b a rb e c u e , v a c u u m , h e a t p u m p , a ir c o n d itio n , scre e n po rch p a tio . M a n y E x tra s . C o il 634-3336. 5 -5 -ltp -N M Y A R D S A L E ..S a tu rd a y . AAay 7. 8 a .m . • 3 p .m . D irt R oad o ff H w y. 158 b e tw een R edland Road a n d B a ltim o re Road. S aby e q u ip m e n t, b a b y clo th e s and M U C H M O R E I 5 5 -ltp S B Y A R D S A L E ...S a tu rd a y , AAay 7 8 a .m . • 3 p .m . L o ts of la d le s and c h ild re n 's clo th e s in a il sizes. Toys a n d odds a nd ends. L ocated 1 m ile o ff H w y . 158 on H o w a rd to w n R oad. 5-5 -ltp -G P O A V IE C O U N T Y ..M O C K S V IL L E A R E A ...40 acres a p p r o x im a te ly , r e c e n tly re m o d e le d 3 b e d ro o m , b ric k h o m e . b a rn , to o l shed. shop. Ideal fo r s m a ll c a ttle o r horse f a r m . M O C K S V I L L E INSUR ANCE AND R E A L T Y ...(7 0 4 ) 634.5917. n ig h ts an d w eekends (919) 998- 4541 o r (704) 634-5128. 5-5-3tnp.M I A F F O R D A B L E H O M E ..M O C K S V IL L E ...T W 0 b e d ro o m , la rg e d e n w ith h e a tila to r. u tility b id g ., la rg e c o rn e r lo t. *29,000.00 M O C K S V IL L E IN S U R A N C E A N D R E A L T Y . (704 ) 634-5917. n ig h ts a n d w eekends (919 ) 998- 4541 o r (704 ) 634-5128. 5-5-3tnp-M i Y A R D S A L E ...S a lu rd a y . AAay 7, fro m 9 a .m . u n til 4 p .m . c re e kw o o d s e ctio n II. G ordon D riv e , M o c k s v ilie . A n tiq u e s. C ra fts . C lo th in g . F r e e ie r . O dds and E n d s. R a in d a te w ill be AAay 14.1983. Sat. T W O F A M IL Y Y A R D S A L E ...S a tu rd a y . M a y 7. 8 a .m . • 3 p .m . R a in o r S hine. T o ys, T .V .. household ite m s, clo th e s, m a n y o th e r ite m s too n u m e ro u s to m e n tio n . W o odland D e v e lo p m e n t. H w y. 158. F irs t house on le ft. W a tch fo r slg n sl H U G E Y A R D S A L E ...S a tu rd a y . M a y 7. O N L Y fro m 7 a .m . u n til 8 p .m . a t th o w h ite house b etw een M o n le ig h G a rm e n t C o m pany a n d P la c e o f T re a s u re rs . Y a d k in v ille h w y .. 601 N o rth . W atch fo r sig n s, in fa n t to a d u lt c lo th in g , la m p . H a rilq u ln books, shoes, h ig h c h a ir, hou se w a re s, 4 p iece c e ra m ic w a ll p la q u e a n d M O R E f. 4 F A M IL Y Y A R D S A LE ...H W V . 801 in A d v a n c e . F o rk c o m m u n ily . A t the W illia m W . C a m p b e ll R eal E s ta te O fM ce. F rid a y a nd S a tu rd a y . M a y 6 & 7, Iro m 8 a .m . u n til ????H ou seh old Ife m s. clo th e s (la rg e , s m a ll a n d m e d iu m ), a nd M U C H M O R E I R a in o r Shine. B IG Y A R D S A L E ...F rid a y . M a y 6. O N L Y fro m 9 a .m . u n til ? ?? l* /j M ile s N o rth ol G re a s y C o rn e r. W a tc h fo r s ig n s. O ak C hina C a b in e t. O ak W a sh S ta n d . P in o C h in a C a b in e t. T w in P o ste r beds, c o n s o le s te re o a n d L O T S M O R E I C a ll 998-8478. 3 . F A M I L Y YARD S A L E ...S a tu rd a y . M a y 7. fro m 8 a .m . u n til, ? 7 ? B a ltim o re R oad o ff H w y. 158. W a tch lo r sig n s. H a rle q u in B o o k s , p a tte rn s , e x e rc is e b ik e , clo th e s and M O R E I R a in o r Shine. J .F A M IL Y Y A R D S A L E ...« ) South, 3 rd house on le ft p ast C re a s y C o rn e r. A n tiq u e v ic tro ia , a n tiq u e w oo d sto ve . g a rd e n tille r, m e n . la d ie s and c h ild re n 's c lo th in g , c u rta in s , be d sp re a d s, a n d m a n y m o re ite m s , to o n u m e ro u s to m e n tio n . S a tu rd a y , M a y 7, S • a .m . u n til 5 p .m . R a in d a te w ill be S a tu rd a y .. AAay 14. Y A R D S A L E ...S a tu rd a y . M a y 7. O N L Y ...601 N o rth to D a n n e r R oad, tu rn ie lt a t sig n . AAANY B A R G A iN S I C a n c e lle d .11 ra in in g . B IG 4 F A M IL Y Y A R D S A L E ...S a tu rd a y . M a y 7 . fro m 8:30 a .m . u n til 2:30 p .m . IV i m ile s d o w n S ain R oad o fl H w y. 158. W a tc h fo r signs. C lo th in g o f a il sizes, D o d g e w h e e ls tir e s a n d h u b c a p s , g la s s w a re , b la c k a nd w h ite p o rta b ie T V , P re sto b u rg e r, e le c tric d e e p fry e r a nd LO T S M O R E I Y A R D S A L E ...S a tu rd a y , AAay-7, fro m 9 a .m . u n til 4 p .m . C re e k w o o d S u b d iv is io n , o il 801. W a tch fo r s ig n s. • I M OTORCYCLE F O R S A L E : 1980 Y a m a h a m o to rc yc le . 400 cc. E x c e lle n t co n d itio n C a li 998.5194. 4-7 MnS S A L E : 7 4 S u iu t(l 500 .Lo o ks a n d ru n s G O O D . *350.00. C a ll 634-3403 4-28-2tpD S NOTICE WANTED TO BUY LIVESTOCK B n f C a t t le , h o g s , v e a li, o r f a e d e r c a t t le . I h a v e an o r d e r f o r a ll t y p e s o f c a t t le . . W ill p a y m a r k e t p r ic e f o y o u r liv e s t o c k , r ig h t o n th a f a r m . P a y m e n t in c h e c k o r c a s h W h ic h e v e r y o u p i l f e r . P R O M P T P I C K - U P S E R V I C E I w i l l b u y 1 h e a d e r a w h o le h e r d . Oiva me a calll!! Fred 0. Ellis Livestock & . Auctioneering Rt. 4, Mocksville, N.C. 634-5227 or 998-8744 L if e - lo n g r e s id e n t o f D a v ie IN M E M O R IA M T h e re w e re tw o frie n d s o f m in e S pecial fo lk s , one-o f-a -kin d . W e w e re frie n d s fo r q u ite a w h ile F rie n d s th ru |o y , p a in a n d tria l S om e ye a rs ago. R a lp h w e n t to- h e a ve n 's h om e. N ow , F ra n c e s , to o , is gone. One d a y w e w ill b e to g e th e r ag a in F o re v e r frie n d s-- in h e a ve n 's fa ir la n d . (in m e m o ry o f F ra n ce s and R a lp h F e lm s te r) A frie n d , A u d re y B ra w ie y 5 -5 *ltn p A B " T i l ! : " ? M p \o V E M E N T ..C .rp .n le r W o rk , 33 ye a rs e x p e rie n ce . A ll typ e s. N e w o r re m o d e lin g in sid e a n d o u t. R o o fin g and cabinets.- Quality w o rk m a n s h ip . C a ll 634-3329.5 5 -2 tp -J B 5-5-2fp vQ iO iy I C o m a tze r F o reig n C a r Service 3 0 0 D E P O T S T R E E T M O C K S V IL L E , N . C . 27028 " S p e d a llilB g b V o U isw a g e n a G aa f t 1 И см !** \cQÍÍ& Т е п у C o n u U ic r 1704Г 634-5676 Ray's TV ' NOW O ffe rin g S e rv ic e to D a v ie C o u n ty re s id e n ti. W e s e rvic e • It m a lo r b re n c k . W e o ffe r p ic k -v p e nd d e liv e ry se rvic e , p lu s In h o m e s e rv ic in g . R esidents o n (704) exctie n o e m a y c a ll a t n o e x tra coet. P hone: 9МгЭ40Э fo r s e rvic e o r a p p o in tm e n ts . Shop N o. Is ( f m 7 4 М Я 4 . L o ca te d a t 1 Ш J o n e s to w n R o a d . W in s to n * S a le m . N .C . 27)03, beside L ittle L e a g u e b a ll p a rk . $ 2 0 ,0 0 0 P e rV e a r RaisingCHINCHILLAS F o r I n f o r m a t io n w r it e t o : tIeasB give name, age and pnone number) R A N C H E R S P.O. Box 3566 Dalton, Georgia 30721 ( 4 0 4 ^ 7 M 8 2 8 E X P E R T C A R P E T C L E A N I N G by Von Schrader Method Call: Stanley Randall 6 3 4 - 5 6 2 9 HELP WANTED — F u l l T i m e E m p l o y m e n t — S e r v i c e S t a t i o n A t t e n d a n t ' s I— F r e e H o s p i t a l & L i f e I n s u r a n c e I— P a i d V a c a t i o n — P r o f i t S h a r i n g P ic ic U p A p p l i c a t i o n s A t S e r v i c e D i s t . C o . S t a t i o n N 0 . I & N o . 2 M o c l c s v i l l e , N .C FLEA MARKET & YARD SALESi . Coming to Mocksville in one location .;I .First Sale-Friday May 6-Sat. May 7 We will.continue these sales^on the . > first Friday and Saturday of each month thereafter ; F r id a y s - 9 : 0 0 A . M . - u n t i l 7 : 0 0 P . M . ’ : S a t u r d a y s - 7 : 0 0 A . M . - u n t i l 7 : 0 0 P . M . EVERYONE WELCOME Come, look, buy, or sell I f y o u a r e p la n n in g a y a r d s a le o r w o r k t h e - f le a m a r k e t s l> r ln g y o u r m e r c h a n d is e h e r e , . J u s t $ 5 . 0 0 p e r d a y ,t o s e t u p . W e w i l l d o a ll . t h e a d v e r t is in g a n d y o u w i n b e e x p o s e d t o p le n t y o f t r a f f i c f o r s u c c e s s fu l s a le s . W e w i l l b e a d v e r t is in g in s e v e ra l n e w s p a p e r s - H a n d b ills w i l l b e p a s s e d o u t in F le a M a r k e t s . • in N . C . , S . C . a n d V a . . _ . W e w i l l b e o n t h e g r o u n d s F r id a y 's 8 : 0 0 A ; M S a t . 6 : 0 0 A . M . t o h e lp y o u g e t a g o o d s s t - u p - . E v e r y o n e m u s t f u r n i s n t h e i r o w n t a b le s , L o c a t e d o n t h e g r o u n d s o f M o c k s v ille O e a le r fs ' A u c t io n in D a v ie C o u n t y f o r m e r l y P e n n in g t o n ' C h e v r o le t C o . For More Information Cali: Lib Grubb - Fred Ellis - -' ^04-284-2566 (Home) 704-634-5216 MOCKSVILLE FLEA MARKET ; 704-634-5077 Sale Dav O nly_______________ - D A V I E M O B I L E H O M E R E P A I R S All Types of Repairs _ P H O N E 6 3 4 - 3 3 3 4 F R E E E S T I M A T E S Honda, Yamaha, Suzuki, Kaw ajaki Davie Cycle Center Sanford Ave, 1,4 Miles pasl IngersoII-iand R e g is te r f o r F R E E $ 1 0 0 . 0 0 G i f t C e r t if ic a t e t h r u 6 -1 A il accessories and services NOW 15% O ff thru. 6-1-83’ Ciieck our prices on new and used cycles- P h o n e : 6 3 4 - 3 9 2 9 WANTED Livestock Beck Livestock- & Co., Inc. Wholesale Meats Thomasville, N.C. W I L L B U Y 1 o r 1 0 0 C O W S - .J lS O B u lls , V e a lS i F e e d e r s , C a lv e s W e P a y C a s h F o r A l l C a t t le W h e n P ic k e d U p W E W I L L P ic k u p - K ll i- P r o c e s s Y o u r L o c k e r B e e f A.L Beck. Jr. Rt. 1 Thomasville C a ll C o lle c t A n y t im e W in s t o n - S a le m 9 I 9 - 7 B 8 - 9 0 0 8 o r 7 8 8 - 7 5 2 4 P h o n e A f t e r 6 P . M . o r E a r ly A . M . 9 1 9 - 4 7 6 - 6 8 9 5 NEW AND USED OFFICE FURNITURE ★ Safes ★ Files ★ Fire Proof M a in S t r e e t S a lis b u r y , N . C . P h o n e 6 3 6 - 8 0 2 2 REBUILT STARTERS& ALTERNATORS For Am erican Cars '24.95 W ith Trade In S34.95 w ith Internal Regulator Boger Texaco Seivice 185 N. M ain Street MocksvUle, N.C. Earle's Office Supplies 120 N orth Church Street Salisbury, N.C. Phone 636-2341 Office Supphes Furniture, Systems A rt Suppl ies Y our MocksvUle Representative it : Jeff Heard M o c k s v i l i e F u r n . & A p p .j 6 3 4 - 5 8 1 2 S e r v i c e O n M o s t M a ¡ o r B r a n d O f A p p l i a n c e s & T e l e v i s i o n s HELP WANTED S e rv ice S ta tio n M a n a g e r S e r v i c e D i s t r i b u t i n g C o . M o c k s v i l l e , N .C . * 1 2 .5 0 0 P l u s C o m m i s s i o n P i c k U p A p p l i c a t i o n s A t N o . 1 & 2 S t a t i o n FOR SALE $ D IA M O N D SPEQIALIST • Setting • Re-mounting • Worn prongs repaired| !* Lost stones replaced ^ e i r - e / e * ^ downtown, Mocksville | 634-5216 mastercharge/visa 900 per acre 37.4 acres located on Hwy. 601 near the South Yadkin River 1 1 % % FINANCING Available With.Approved Credit And Terms Contact Frank Bahnson 634-6261 SUBSCRIBE to theDavic County Enterprise Record J u i t f i l l I n a n d m a ll t o irculation Department .0 . Box 525 Mocksville, N.C. 27028, (Check applicable boxes.) North Carolina $ 1 0 . 0 0 ________ Out of State $15.00_ P le a s e E n c lo s e P a y m e n t N a m e . A d d r e s s - C i t y .S t a t e .Z l p - T e l e p h o n e . D A V I B C O U N T Y S M Cmmtm 0 » Н ш ! M O CKBVJLLK N. C. 27028, ^ т ш т т ш т т т т ш т ш т ^ ш т т ^ т ш т т ш ш т т к 8D - DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, THURSDAY. MAY S, 1983 CLOSE OUT ALL TIMEX WATCHES a / 2/ "77— P R I C E T h u rs., F ri., & S a t.l EXTRA SPECIAL All Atari And All Intellivislon Cartridges REPEAT OF SELL OUT 14K Gold Italian Chains 0 0 ■ C o m p l e t e 7 " B r a c e l e t e .........................* 7 ° ° 1 6 " N e c k c h a i n ________* 1 6 ® ® 1 8 " N e c k c h a i n ________* 1 8 ® ® 2 0 " N e c k c h a i n c . . . *20°® D i a m o n d 3 P i e c e Necklace & Earrings, All In 14K Gold'“ Coojnplete With 18’’ Gold Chain R e g u la r *1 4 9 .9 5 59' E X T R A S P E C I A L F O R M O T M Va C a ra t T o ta l W e ig h t kTERNITY RING 2 4 " N e c k c h a i n .24 0 0 F R E E - w i t h P u r c h a s e o f a n y N e c k c h a i n 14K Gold Floating Heart L A D I E S 9 D I A M O N D W h ite o r Y e llo w G o ld HORSESHOE RING O N L Y O M P A R E A T *4 0 0 .0 0 2 8 9 ’ ® 9 9 9 5 9 -D ia m o n d s A dd-A -B ead 14Kt GOLD BEADS P R I C E SATURDAY ONLY P acfyian D o n k e y K o n g P itfa ll F o o tb a ll B a s e b a ll F ro g g e r E.T. D e fe n d e r G o r f P h o e n ix D O W N T O W N M O C K S V IL L E W IL L S A V E Y O U M O N E Y SAVE — ONE COMPLETE D I S P L A Y O F P I E R C E D E A R R I N G S V A L U E S T O *2 0 .0 0 YOUR CHOICE 1 4 K G o ld 1 4 k P o st S te rlin g G o ld F ille d S ta in le s s 14 KARAT GOLD SEIKOS FOR DAD FOR MOM R e g u la r *3 ,2 7 5 .0 0 R e g u la r *1 ,9 7 5 .0 0 $39 50 0 »4 9 9 *^ Q U A R T Z M O V E M E N T 7 DIAMOND CLUSTER White Or Yellow ONLY C O M P A R E A N Y W HERE $ 3 9 9 5 3 M M .. 4 M M .. 5 M M .. 6 M M 7 M M . ____________3 7 ' . . . . . . . 7 7 * ............ 9 7 * ..........................M « --------« 197 SAVE OVER 70% I4 K GOLD WATCH & BAND Wedding Bonds 1 4 K & I O K H A V E S L A S H E D 'O F F ' O50% O N E C A R A T 1 4 K G o l d D I A M O N D H E A R T N E C K L A C E M O T H E R S D A Y S P E C I A L > 4 3 9 9 5 14K Gold Charms N O . 1 M O M N O . 1 G R A N D M O T H E R I P . 1 W I F E Y O U R C H O I C E 1 4 9 5 H O O P S W IR ES PEARLS O N Y X № l i p O T S B irth s to n e s C A M E O S JA D E O P A L S 1 0 0 s o f S t y l e s ' O N L Y ^ . M P C O K E S D O W N T O W N STOP BY AND REGISTER FOR; Eldest Mother >100°° Gift Youngest Mother ’100* Gift Mother with most children *100” Gift Awarded by yrour Downtown Mocksville Merchants P O L A R O ID and K O D A K FILM $ 4 9 9 D O N ' S O F F E R C O M P L E T E J E W E L R Y A N D W A T C H R E P A I R , A P P R A I S I A L S E R V I C E A V A I L A B L E ] E I T H E R I N H O M E O R S T O P B Y COMPLETE TELEPHONE ACCESSORIES - PHONES LARGE ASSORTMENT^ LARGE ASSORTMENT IfLEPHONES ^PR IC E S START AT * 2 9 ’ * HOURS 9-6 MONDAY THRU SATURDAY D O N ' S J E W E L R Y a n d M U S I C 124 North Main Street 11 Phone 634-3822 R a d i o S h a c k D e o l e r " M ocksville, N.C. / . Á T . B a b y S p a r r o w R e s c u e d Little Jennifer Barron com forts a baby sparrow rescued by firem en Saturday from the chim ney of a burning house. Jennifer plans to give the baby a home, hopefully nurturing it to m aturity. She is the daughter of M r. and M rs. Steve Barron of M ocksville.__________________________________________________________________ Town Water Plant To Be Renamed After Hugh Lagle The Mnpksvillp Wafpr Plnnl on I nitio \uhn cppupH n« Mnrksvillc Department ano StreetThe Mocksville Water Plant on Sanford Avenue will be renamed Ihe “Hugh Lagle Water Plant” in memory of Ihe man who devoted -10 years to its design and main­ tenance. The M ocksville Town Board agreed Tuesday to change the name of the plant and erect a bronze plaque at the site in Lagle's honor. F o rm er CCC M e m b e rs Are S o ugh t Throughout Ihis year of 1983 the , National Association of Civilian Conservation Corps Alumni (NACCCA) is celebrating the 50th Anniversary of the establishment of Ihe Civilian Conservalion Corps (CCC). One of Ihese camps was located in Mocksville, jusl off Wiikesboro Street, on the site now occupied by Th rifli-M art, Super Dollar and Foster-nauch Drugs. The NACCCA is trying to locate • about two-million former members and persons who were connecled or affiliated with the CCC during the igUO's and IB'lO's. A special letter to this newspaper from Victor Vengrouskie, 2212 Areola A ve., Silver Springs, Maryland, 20902 says Ihe CCC lives agaiiuin Ihe NACCCA. •i am sure tliat many of your readers have often wondered whal l)ecame of Ihe CCC. You can lell Ihem the CCC lives again in Ihe NACCCA. II is a young and growing organization with chapters in slates throughout the nation. One of its major objectives is lo have the CCC reactivated,” wrote Mr. Vengrouskie, whose telephone nunibcr is (liOl) 942-51R0 in Silver Springs, Maryland.In his letter he points out lhal a commemorative postage stamp honoring the 50th Anniversary of Ihe establishment of the CCC has been available for purchase since April (i, 1983.Anyone interested in Ihe orginization can write lo NACCCA, l.oehniiinn’s Plaza, 7245 Arlington Blvd., Suite :)18, Tails Church, Va. 22042, for further informalion and literature. Lagle, who served as Mocksville Waler Department superintendent from 1929 lo 1961, died February 12 al Ihe age of 88.Lagle was born in 1895, one mile east of Mocksville, son of Jack and Emma Lagle. He was one of 8 children.He atlended Miss Mattie Eaton’s School for one year, 1911, then went lo the public school in Mocksville. In 1910 he joined the army and was a member of a group known as the “ Iredell Blues” . He went overseas and saw action in a nuiTiber of World War I campaigns, including the Meuse-Argonne of­ fensive. Following service with the army, he worked with Southern Railway in Ihe track maintenance department. Later he was employed by the State Highway Commission as repairman for a section of highway near Yadkinville. He Ihen went to work al Ihe Mocksville lee Plant. II was while working here in 1929 Ihat the lale John C. Sanford, representing the Mocksville Town Board of Com­ missioners, offered him a job with the lown. From 1929 lo 19G1 he was Superintendent of Ihe W aler 7v Hiijili La¡;le Department ana Street M ain­ tenance. In 1961, he semi-retired but continued to work part-time assisting his son, Andrew, in his position as General Superintendent of Public Works for Ihe Town of Mocksville. On June 30, 1969, Hugh A. Lagle retired after 40 years of service to Ihe Town of Mocksville. " I’ve been in maintenance all my life. I always liked my work. Sometimes il was rough....but I always like il,” he was quoted as saying at the lime of his retirement. Always a modest person, Hugh Lagle seldom talked aboul during Ihe days of Ihe depression when he kept Ihe water pumps of Mocksville going lo supply the lown with water, working nighi and day wilh baling wire and olher makeshift equip­ ment....and going without pay until Ihe town could collect necessary funds.And, for 30 of his 40 years with the lown, he served as assistant fire chief.During his 40 years of service to (Continued to Page 2) T r i s k a i d e k a p h o b e s Friday-13th All triskaidekaphobes may want lo stay in bed tomorrow, or at least lake some precautions if going oul of Ihe house. Tomorrow is Friday Ihe 13th, Ihe most dangerous day possible for triskaidekaphobes, people who believe Ihcir unlucky number comes up on Friday Ihe 13th. For them, any 13 is unlucky. And of you are a friggaphobiac also, you’re in for double trouble, becausc you feel lhal all Fridays are unlucky. According to the superstitious, Ihere are al least two ways to slay out of trouble on Friday the 13th. If you meet a lopeared dog, be sure to tip your hal, but be sure not to stir your coffee wilh a knife. Triskaidekaphobes have a list of Ihings lo do and nol lo do on Friday Ihe 13th.Leave your hal on while riding in elevators, wink at white horses, let any hay wagons you come across have the right of way, and whistle while passing graveyards. Also, don’l eal bananas with (Continued to Page 2) Town Seek $471,000 Grant Thirl>-lour million dollars is a lot of money, bul il will fall far short of covering Ihe $119 million in Com­ munity Development Block Grant requests submitted May 2 by 202 cotiimunilies, including Mocksville. In applications received by the Deparlmeni of Natural Resources and Communiiy Development, Ihe 164 cities and 38 counties have requeslecl funding for coinnnmily rcvitalizalion projects ranging from housing rehabilitation lo street paving and for development planning projects designed lo identify critical communiiy needs and formulate plans to meet Ihose needs. The request from Mocksville totals $471,000 for Coinmunity revitalization activities.Eligible applicants include the state’s 100 counties and, except for the fifteen largest cities, all municipalities. The fifteen cities, who continue to receive Community Development Block Grant funds directly from the federal govern­ ment are: Asheville. Winston- Salem, High Point, Greensboro, Burlington, Charlolle, Gastonia, Concord, Salisbury, Durham . Ualcigh, Fayclteville, Jacksonville, Wilmington and Hickory.The 202 applications signal Ihe beginning of an intence period of review by slate staff, according lo NHCD Secretary Joseph W. Grimsley. "With requests totaling over threel31 limes the available money, il is imperative Ihat each project be reviewed very clo.scly on Ihe basis of Ihe established scoring syslem lo ensure Ihat the limited allocation will be utilized in the most effective manner possible," he said.Each community revitalization application will receive scores in Ihe areas of community needs, project design, benefit to low and moderate income persons, other public and private funds to be used for project aciivilies and a project’s consistency with slate policies and programs. DevelopmenI plaiming projects are reviewed on the basis of need, feasibility and local commitment.G rim sley feels the scoring syslem, first used in 1982, is a sound one and credils input from local officials as being a key factor in the overall program success. "The cooperation and assistance we received from local officials, those persons direclly involved wilh comnumity improvements efforts, have provided us wilh a perspective on program design and ad­ minislralion which maximizes Ihe local impaci of each dollar av^ar- ded," he staled. Lasl year ninety communities were awarded a total of $45 million for com muniiy revitalization, development planning and economic development projects which resulted in Ihc rehabililalion of over 1800 houses. Ihe creation of 700 jobs and the leveraging of an additional $7 million in olher public and private funds. Although there is no minimum amounl established for a grant request. no community revitalization project may exceed $750,000 and development planning projects are litniled lo $10,000. Each projecl must primarily benefit low and moderate income people, defined as an annual income of $15.GOO for a family of four and al corresponding levels for various size households. DAVIE COUNTY P.O. Box 525, Mocksville, N.C. 27028 28 PAGES $10.00 Per Year in North Carolina $15.00 Per Year Outsidc North Carolina TH U RSD A Y, M AY 12, 1983 gingie Issue - 25 cents Davie Team Wins In State Moot Court Competition A two member team from Davie High School came away victorious from moot court competition in Raleigh Friday, a mock Irial where sludenis argued hypothetical cases. Tonya Turner and David Scolt of Mocksville, arguing for the slale, were named winners afler gaining favorable rulings from Ihree N.C. judges. They defeated Barry Mims and Tod<i Yeary of Durham High who argue'd for Ihe petilioner in a case based on a Fourth Amendment automobile search and seizure issue. Each leam argued Ihe issue as if it were on appeal to Ihe U.S. Supreme Court. Juslice J. Wiliiam Copeland, N.C. Supreme Court; Judge James H. Pou Bailey, N.C. Superior Court and Judge Sidney S. Eagles, N.C. Court of Appeals heard the case. The Davie team was named victors afler gaining favorable rulings from all Ihree judges. Tonya, 15, is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Tommy Turner of Country Lane. She is a sophomore a I Davie High School. Tonya is very active in church, community, and school affairs. Prior lo Ihis year some of her ac­ tivities included being Ihe chief cheerleader of the Junior Varsity Cheerleading squad as well as Co­chief for Ihe Varsity squad. She was on Ihe A Honor-roll, and won the school award for reading as well as , the school award for history. She was a finalisi for student of the year, won the school declamation contest, and was first-runner-up in Speaking beeIhe Slale 4-H Public contest. She has also been a member of the Junior Beta Club and school newspaper staff and won Ihe outstanding cheerleader award. Although Ihis is Tonya’s first year in high school, she is already in­ volved in the history club, Jr. Civitan Club, Student Council, and National Forensic League, in which she does Lincoln-Douglas Debate. A nominee for the N.C. School of Science and Mathematics, she also runs on the girls’ track team, has completed 12 year? of dance lessons in ballet, tap, and jazz, and was the 1983 recipient of the Valley Forge Freedom Foundation’s Honor Award for Youth. She presently serves as president (Continued to Page 2) S p a c e M a n ? Jim Hendricks, County Line V F D , em erges from a burning building covered in soot and w ater. He was one of 30 volunteer firem en participating in authentic training exercizes Saturday. See story on page 12. On The Inside ■Sheriff’s Dcpartmenl, I’olico, Highway Patrol Pg.2 ,1. C. Cibbs Honews Old I'ricnclsliips Pg. I .N'oteil Chiilarist I-'ntcrtains Pg. (i .Social.News Pgs. ii, Kl. II I'ircnicn Undergo H calistic Training Pg. 12 .May Is High lllood Pressure .Moiilh I’g. i:i .May Day llrlngs Varied Ac- liviiies ■ Pg. 1-Ii Craig Willianis Uuns For The Pg.3-HOlympics District Court Churih .News .Area Ohiluaries Public .Notile Ileal Kslate Classifieds Pg..'i-I) Pg. «-It Pg. 11-11 Pg. Il-H Pg. 12-1! Pg. i:i-ll 2 DAVIU COUNTY UNTliRPIUSlI RUCOKI), THURSDAY MAY 12, 1У83 M ayor D. J. M am lo congratulates finalists in a countywide contest w here local students designed an official em blem for the Town of M ocksville. Ray Tutterow ( eft) was named winner. Finalists include (right, back) Brian Smith (front, I to <r) M arty M cEw en and Shane Dyson. Town Gets New Official Seal A logo designed by a Davie High junior has been selected as the official Town seal by the Mocksville Town Board.Ray Tutterow, son of Mr. and Mrs. Clay Tutterow of R l. 1, M ocksville was named winner Tuesday following countywide competilion open to all Davie County students. Mocksville Mayor D. J. Mando said that over 100 en­ tries were submitted wilh Tut- ■terow’s selected as the official Town seal. He received a $50 check in honor of his winning design. Due to the outstanding entries, the Mocksville Town Board named three finalists and a second place winner. Marty McEwen, 13, of North Davie Junior High, received the second place award of $25. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Russell' McEwen of Route 8, Mocksville. Shane Dyson, William R. Davie; Christie Jones, North Junior High; and Bryan Smith, North Davie Junior High, were named finalists, each receiving $10. Shane is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Wayne Dyson of Rt. 6, M ocksville. Christie is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Gene Jones of Advance. Bryan is the son of Mr. and Mrs. David Smith of Route 3, Mocksville.Mayor Mando commended the students for their outstanding en­ tries during the Town Board meeting May 3. “ We were over­whelmed with Ihe participation,” he said. “ Our first plans called for naming only first and second place winners, but the excellent work- Sherriff’s Department /MOCKSVILLE N.C. Arnold Ray Parker, 24, Rt. 1, MocKsville was arrested May 9, and charged with seven counts of writing worthless checks.Roger Dale Hellard, 21, Rt. 7, Mocksville, was arrested May 9 and charged with one count of assault on a female. Roland ,H. Stanley, Mocksville, reported larceny of a tiller valued al $100 May 3. Paul C orrell, Cooleemee, reported larceny of tools valued at $350 May 3. Fred Cranrill, Rt. 8, Mocksville, reported breaking and entering May 4. Randall Dean Johnson , 23, Rt. 8, M ocksville was arrested and charged wilh writing worthless checks May 4. Karen Sue Haynie, 34, Rt. 3, Advance, was arrested May 5 and charged wilh one count of driving under Ihe influence and one count of having no operator’s license. Jerry Wade Loflin, Watt St., Cooleemee, was arrested May 4, and charged with one county of injury lo properly and one counl of assault by pointing gun.Gladys S. Rose, Rt. 1, Mocksville, reported larceny of a lawnmower valued at $140 May 5.Ken Duncan, Rt. 2, Pinebrook Drive, Advance, reported May 0 lhat a flute had been laken from the bandrooni al Pinebrook School. The flute was valued at $350. Waller Henry Brown, R l. 7, M ocksville, was arrested and charged wilh assault on a female May G. I.ola Juanita Clement. 25, Rt. 7, Mocksville, was arrested May 7 and charged wilh one count of carrying a cont'ealed weapon and one count of assault and inflicting serious injury. Terry Flint Sninot, 24, Pine Street M ocksville, reported damage to properly May 7. ThurmanTucker, Rt, 1, Advance, was arrested May 8 and charged with one count of simple assault and one counl of communicating threats. Uenae Ridenhour, UI. 3, Mocksville, reported larceny of wire wheel cover May fi. The cover was valued at $100. I^eonard Marklin, Maple Avenue, Mocksville reported damage to property May 6. manship of the entries mandated naming five winners.”Tutlerow’s design consists of a drawing of the Mocksville Town Hall encircled by an outline of Davie County. The words Mocksville, N. C. top the design with ils founding date, 1839, al the bottom.Mando said Ihe design will be submitted to a professional artist who will scale the logi tor use on Town vehicles and stationery. Friday-13th (Continued from page I) catsup, don’l pick up safety pins off | thestreel, don’t take a rake through i the living room, and don’t open an umbrella indoors.And if you have a baby born on this day, bite his fingernails off to keep him from growing up lo be a thief. All hunters should wear a bittern claw amulet if going hunting on this day while it is considered an unlucky day to plant potatoes for a successful crop. There are, however, a few lucky Ihings one can do on Friday, the 13th. If you’re looking for a mate, • hold a pullet's white egg in your mouth and then run outside and listen lo hear the first name spoken for your mate's identity; and if you have a bad complexion, crawl through a scratchy bramble at high noon. Many famous events occurred on Friday the 13th. Friday, June 13, 1498, Columbus firsl set foot on Ihe North American continent. Friday, October 13, 1792, conslruclion began on the While House, and on Friday, Sept. 13,1814, "The Star Spangled Banner” was written. Friday, August 13, 1943, gasoline rationing was cut from four lo Ihree gallons a coupon. The United Slates Navy is said never to lauiich a ship on Friday Ihe 13th, and some passengers and crewmen won't depart on the unlucky day. The I3lh floor isn’t marked in many buildings, while addresses skip 13 in many European cities. A 14th diner-somelimes hired for the job-joins the guests who are superstitious of breading in numerical imitation of Christ on His 12 disciples at the Last Supper. The crucifixion occurred on Friday. Babe Ruth always touched first base for luck while heading for the oulfield on a Friday Ihe 13lh baseball game. And a Los Angeles man mysteriously explains that he protects himself from cily traffic on lhat date by gluing an English halfpenny lo his stomach. .Seals sometimes swim 6,000 miles over a period of eight months without once touch- jng land. Official Town & County Map Could Soon Be Available An official town and county map complete with road names, school' and points of interest could be available by next week. Will Hyman, Mocksville-Davie Chamber of Commerce director, said the map had originally been slated for sale by mid-April. But errors found in the proof copy delayed initial printing. He said if all goes well, the first copies could be available by the middle of next week. According to Hyman, the map was designed due to lack of an updated, readable county.map. The most current is a 1973 revision printed on a 9x12” sheet. "K was grossly outdated not to mention difficult to read,” he said. The new map was designed by the local Chamber of Commerce and Champion Map Company of Charlotte. It will bea standard 24” x 36” printed in black and brown. Hyman explained that one side feature a map of Davie County with roads indexed with state numbers and names.' Several points of interest will be marked including fire districts, volunteer fire departments, townships, schools, airports, and historical landmarks. ’The county version will also feature insets of 5 areas in Davie with high population density. Included are Cooleemee, Advance, Bermuda Run, Hickory Hill, and one diagram encompassing Greenwood Lakes, Davie Gardens, Creekwood and Woodlea subdivisions. Mocksville will be featured on the reverse side of the map, again complete with street numbers and names. The latest annex areas will be shown. Points of interest within the city limits will be highlighted. They include the Mocksville Town Hall, Davie County Courthouse, Board of Education, post office. Masonic Picnic Grounds, Davie County Hospital, Rich Park and others. “ The map should prove valuable to newcomers as well as permanent residents of the area,” said Hyman. “ Everything included is as accurate and current as we were able to determine.” Hyman commented that several months of research has gone into the new map to assure accuracy. “Apparently Cooleemee has never been mapped,” he said. “ Our research could not uncover one.” Hyman commented that roads and other standard information will be printed in black. Points of interest will be highlighted in browns to assure easy reading.- The maps will sell for $1 each and will be available at the Chamber of Commerce Office on Salisbury Street. At present, 5,000 maps will be printed.- R ep o rt From R aleigh by Rep. Betsy Cochrane There are several innovations being proposed to combat our growing prison population. Last week my Corrections Committee examined a program of intensive probation This week we studied the Community Penalties Program. This program' provides alter­ native punishment for non-violent felons. II gives Ihe judge another option besides prison for felons who require less institutional cr.stody but more than regular probation supervision. This program is primarily for youthful offenders 16 to 25 years old. Anolher aspect of the program is lhat non-violent felons make restitution to victims of crime Ihrough reimbursemeni or com­ munity service. Greensboro has a Communi'y Penalties Program lhat is 10 years old lhat has 225 volun­teers from Ihe community assisting youthful offenders to find jobs and supervising them in community projects.The Greensboro program has a 75 perceni success rate. The judge used this program in sentencing the 17 year old boy who was driving drunk and wrecked, killing his four teenage companions. A part of his senlence is 120 hours of community service.The slate is now providing $500,000 for such local communily penalties programs statewide. With 1,000 young people presently in the program, that is less expensive than $8,500 per prisoner per year in cur penal system.Al Adams, D-Wake, introduced a bill that would allow the state lo renovate the old Seaboard Coast Line building as a "multipurpose cenler” for slale employee recreation, containing a gym and a cafeteria. The bill calls for an ap­ propriation of half a million dollars. In these lough budget times, wlien we are all looking for ways lo cut back, this seems like a luxury Ihe taxpayers cannol afford. I am sure our stale employees and teachers would rather have a raise than a heallh spa- Another bill introduced in the House would provide a $),000 in­ come lax credit to those who l)rovide home care for elderly in­ dividuals who would otherwise be institutionalised. Once again it saves the stale money, for it is less expensive to offer this tax incentive, Ihan lo provide institutional care. New legislation introduced in­ tends that children not fall viclim lo interrupted support payments, because of court appeals. The legislation, if passed, provides that initial custody arrangements and child support payments would slay in effect during either spouses appeal of Ihe decision.Superior courl iudees would no longer be elected s’tate-wide if a bill introduced this week passes. II would require regular superior courl judges lo be nominated and elecled in the judicial dislrict in which they reside. The House passed and sent to the Senate a bill thal would nol let school boards consolidate or close any school, of at least (M pupils, without a public hearing. Many school boards already do this by choice, but this legislation would make the public hearing man­ datory.Finally, Ihe House passed a Senate Resolution urging the United Stales government to refrain from disposing of decommissioned nuclear submarines in the ocean off the North Carolina coast. We were happy to have Teresa Shew, daughter of Mr, and Mrs. Paul Shew serve as a page in Ihe General Assembly this week. David Scoli Tonva Turner Local Team Wins State Title (continued from page I) of United Methodist Youth in her church and as Treasurer of the Davie County Sub-District. Tonya served as a Governor's page in May of 1981, and participated in the Youth Legislative Assembly in Raleigh in March of 1983. She is scheduled to serve as a Legislative page the week of May 16-20 of this year.After graduating from high school in 1985, Tonya hopes to attend college and a credible law school. Her future goal is to pursue a career in crim inal law , and possibly politics.Scott, a senior, is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Wayne Scolt of R l. 2, Advance. He is an honor student at Davie and a strong member of the Davie Society of the National Forensic League. Scott was recently named stale champion in Lincoln-Douglas Debate. The moot court competition was only one part of a statewide Law Day celebration sponsored by the N.C. Bar Association. One-hundred immigrants became U.S. cilizens at a mass swearing-in ceremony conducted by Federal Judge Franklin T. Dupree. U.S. Senator John East was featured speaker. Winners of a high school essay contest and an elementary school art contest were honored. U.S. Senator Sam Ervin was awarded the N.C. Bar Association's Liberty Boll award. In 1958 President Dwight D. Eisenhower signed a presidential proclamation establishing a special day of celebration of American law and justice. This year is Ihe 2Glh anniversary of Law Day . The theme was “Sharing in Justice,” which emphasizes Ihe participation of every American in Ihe shaping of our system of law and justice. The Hugh Lagle Water Plant (Continued from page 1) Ihe Tow., cf Mocksville, Hugh Lagle contributed much. Not only did he serve with loyally and devotion, but his skill and know-how provided the groundwork for Ihe modern and extensive water system today. In addition he Irained his successor, his son Andrew, who look over as the town’s Superintendent of Public Works in 1961. “ I raised Andrew on the job...- while I was operating the road machine pulling ditches behind the truck, little Andrew, who was only 8 to 10 years old, drove the truck. He had lo stretch lo see out the wind­ shield,” Hugh once said and ad­ ded....“Andrew’s smarter than me. I laughi him everything I know, plus whal he learned since on his own.” Hugh married Ihe former Jessie Holshouser, who preceded him in death in January 1974. They had Ihree daughters: Mrs. Doris (Ar­ nold) Lingle of R l. 3, Salisbury; Mrs. Carolyn (Wade) Hendricks of Shelby; Miss Shirley Lagle . of Mocksville; and one son, Hugh Andrew Lagle, Jr. of Mocksville.Dedicaiion ceremonies will be announced laler. Fire Log Cooleemee F ire Department responded lo a fire on Daniels Road al 7:45 a.m. May 10. Wm. R. Davie Fire DeparlmenI responded lo properly damage at intersection of US 601 and NC 801 April 3 al 11:00 p.m. Jerusalem Fire Department responded lo a liquid nitrogen spill on NC 801 and Deadmon Rd. May 5 al approximately 5:50 p.m. Smilh Grove Fire Department responded lo a diesel fuel spill on NC 801 and Interstate 158 May 5 at approximately 9:15 p.m. Wm. R. Davie responded to a personal injury on Liberty Church Rd. May 5 at 10:00 p.m. Fork Fire DeparlmenI responded 10 a fire al the resident of Leon Bailey May 6 at 10:45 a.m. Fork Fire Department responded lo a car fire May 8 at 8:20 p.m. Cenler Fire Department responded to a grass fire at he conlrolled house burning at ap­ proximately 4:40 p.m. May_7. I\ly name is John Brandon Green. I was one year old Friday, May 0. My parents celebrated my birthday by having a cookout. My parents are Mr. and Mrs. Wayne Green of Route 7, Alocksvillc. I have one sister Cindy Green. Several people attended the cookout including Mr. and Mrs. William Carter and Wanda Carter. Mr. and Mrs. James (iodhey and Dan'ctte Godhey, Mr. and Mrs. Johnny Bradford and Jonathan Bradford, and Greg Dunn. My grandmothers also attended. They arc Mrs. Beulah Hamilton and ¡Mrs. Nelli'e Green of Mocksville. I want lo thank everyone for the nice gifts I received. Newspaper Ads A recent survey showed 71 per­ cent of food shoppers checked newspaper ads before shopping in 1982, compared with 61 percent in 1977. Tlie same percentage also made a list before going to Ihe store, compared wilh 58 perceni of shoppers in 1977. Social Security Q&A I ’ll be 65 in a couple of monlhs and am going to apply for Social Security retirement payments. My former wife asked me lo let her know when I apply because she wants to apply on my earnings record. Can she do this even though we’ve been-divorced for 8 years? Yes, if you and your wife were married for at least 10 years before your divorce, she can get monthly Social Security benefits at C2 if you retire afler working loan enough under Social Security. If you die. she can get monthly payments as early as 6U. C O U N T Y Г Г 127 Soulh Main street MocksvillCiN.C. Published every I'hursday by the DAVIE PUBLISHING COMPANY MOCKSVILLf ENTERPRISE 1916-1958 OAVIE RECORD 1899-19S8 CC>OLEEMEE JOURNAL 1901-1971 Gordon Tomlinson.....................................................Editor Publislier Associate EditorsKathy Tomlinson Becky Snyder, ; . . Robin Firgusson . Birectqr of Advertising Sccond Dass Postage Paid in Mocksville, N.C. 27028 SUBSCRlPTIOiJ RATES S in g le C o p y 2 5 C e n t s $ 1 0 . 0 0 p e r y e a r I n N o r t h C a r o lin a $ 1 5 . 0 0 p e r y e a r o u t s id e N o r t h , C a r o lin a P o s t m a s t e r : S e n d a d d r e s s c h a n g e s t o D a v le C o u n t y E n t e r p r is e R e c o r d P . O . B o x 5 2 5 , M o f3 < s v llle , N . C . 2 7 0 2 8 DAVIi; COUNTY lENTCRPRlSP: KHCOKD. TIIUKSDAY. MAY 12. 1983 3 Robért Patillo Davie Kligli band instructor, conducts members of the Jazz Ensemble during last year's band day activities. B an d Day Is S atu rd ay iMusic, food and games will be fealured attractions al Band Day Saturday al Davie Coimty High School.The event, sponsored by the Davie Band Boosters Club, will feature perforniances throughout the day by North and South Davie Junior High bands, plus the Davie High marching and concert bands. The Davie High Jazz ensetnble is also scheduled to perform.Barbecue chicken cooked over an open pit will be served from 11 a.ni,- 7 p.m. Persons may dine in Ihe school cafeteria c order take-out boxes. Chicken will be sold by halves or quarters.Band siudents are sponsoring a car wash during Ihe day. Viedo games will be available along with bingo. Bingo prizes include a wide array of ilem6 including savings bonds, cash, furniture and much more.B ill Edw ards, Davie Band Boosters president, said proceeds from Band Day will go to buy needed supplies for all school bands in Davie Couniy. “ This in our major fund raising event of Ihe year," he said. “ We urge community support in an effort to raise money for purchase of band uniform s, equipment, and to defray costs of sending our school bands to com­ petition.”The event will be held rain or shine. School bandsPatillo explains that all Davie Coui perform during Saturday's event. (>roceeds will purchase needed equipment and uniforms.help day plans are (i to r) Marilyn Harper, Frances Venable, Sarat Robert Patillo. The event is sponsored by the Davie Band Boosters Robin Brock To Enter N.C Veterinary School Uobin Nannelte Brock, a 19R0 graduate of Davie County High School, is among 72 sludenis selected for the Ihird class of North CaroUna Stale University’s School of Veterinary Medicine. Daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John T. Brock, P.O. Box 241, Mocksville, she will earn her bachelor’s degree from NCSU in animal science in May. An honor student, Brock is a member ol fni Kappa Phi ana Alpha Gamma Della honor fraternities. She has also par­ ticipated in the NCSU Fellows program. The 72-member class of 1987 is Ihe third class of veterinary siudents to be admitted to Ihe nation’s newest veterinary schoo). Construction was begun in 1979; the first siudents were admitted in 1981; and the building was recenlly form ally Health Program Offered At S. Davie Legislative A lert hy Rep. James Lambeth The Governor’s Commission on the Future of North Carolina (“ North Carolina 20!)0” ) has just issued its final report and sum­ mary. While North Carolina 2000 was an excellent exercise, I believe the role of agriculture, and Ihose Individuals involved, is so vital lo Ihe future of Ihis slate lhal more attention is needed. According lo recent projections of population growlh in Ihe year 2000, only 17 years away. North Carolina and the nation will need to increase food and fiber produclion by up to 50 percent. Bul this enormous hike in agricultural needs will come at a time when America is losing three million acres or more per year to various forms of development like shopping centers, housing units, airports, and highways. Even today, over one million prime acres of American farmland are lost each year to development. To adapt lo these future needs, the agricultural community will have to look carefully at crop planning, new crop introduction, crop management, and soil con­ servation. Manpower and machinery needs, as well as availabilily, must also be studied^ Technological advances, in chemicals and machines, will have to be utilized. And, even more so than in Ihe past, innovative marketing and financial planning will have to be carefully applied. Because of these many needs, and because of the seeming lack of attention in Ihe North Carolina 2000 Report, I have met with Ihe governor-along with a number of other legislators representing agricultural districts-to ask for a more concentrated effort on agriculture’s behalf. The governor has assured us lhat he will look carefully al Ihe situation, and possibly take executive action. Personally, I am hopeful that a cooperative strategy for future planning will evolve belween Ihe several agricultural communities (Ihe farm er, farm er’s organizations, (he N.C. Depl. of Agriculture, N.C. Slate Universily, and the legislature) that are most certainly involved now, and will iTiost certainly be involved in agriculture in the year 2000. Wreck On US 601 S A Mocksville" man was charged with failure lo reduce speed lo avoid a collision afler a rear-end bump-up May 4 on US 601 Soulh. According to the Highway Patrol report, Jerry Thomas Polls, 28, RI. G, Mocksville was following Linda Stanley Shores, 34, R t. 6, Mocksville. Shores was attempting lo make a turn into a private drive. Potts struck Ihe Shores vehicle in the rear, and then preceded on across the road, running off on the left side striking a mailbox, the property of Johnny Rummage. Damages to (he Shores vehicle, 1967 Pontiac, were estimated at $400. Estimated damages to Ihe Potts vehicle were $1,200. In ­vestigating officer was Trp. R. D. Mass Clinic Day At Health Dept. The Davie County Heallh Department will sponsor a mass clinic on May 13 al the Health Department. Health Department nurses will be on hand to screen patients for Glaucoma, Glucose, Hemoglobin, and Breast Cancer. This is a free clinic. No fee will be charged for any of these screening services on this dale. Screening will be done from 8:.30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. In the past, Ihe Health Depart­ ment has sponsored sim ilar screening days and we encourage all citizens to take advantage of Ihis opportunity. Bernice Roberts, RN of the N. C.Commission for the Blind will be on hand (0 conduc( the glaucoma screening along with other Heallh Dept, personnel. The a ir puff machine will be used for Ihis test. It is quick, painless, and accurate. In conducting the various tests, if nurses find anything abnormal with a patient, they will refer the in­ dividual lo a doctor or they will follow-up with a re-check if the abnormality appears borderline. These patients will be given at leasl two follow-up checks by Ihe Health Dept, ai no cost.For further information, call the Health Department at 634-5985. Betty G riffith , School Health Coordinator, recenlly announced a new heallh program being offered lo a select number of sludenis al South Davie Junior High School. The focus of the program will be lo cncourage students to avoid (he smoking habil entirely or lo abandon il early. The acceptance of personal responsibility in the areas of diet, exercise, alcohol, and drug use, stress managemenl and regular examinations for early detection of disease is extremely important. According to The American Heart Association, most smoking related diseases (cancer, heart disease, emphysema, chronic bronchilis, and others); once (hey have ad­ vanced to Ihe detectable stage, have already done much damage. Although medical professionals can attempt to reduce Ihe impact of these diseases, death and disability from smoking related illnesses can be expeclcd to increase unless in­ dividuals make the firm decision lo avoid smoking. For some time, sludent smoking has been a major disciplinary problem in Americans schools, and Ihe issue of whether or not to permit smoking in school has created a great deal of controversy among school administrators across the Country. Despite the fact lhal most schools have rules governing smoking in buildings and on the grounds, more and more students seems to ignore Ihem. II is felt that if the school assumes Ihe responsibility of informing the students aboul the hazards of smoking, il may help to control this problem. One, six hour session has teen conducted at South Davie involving a sm all number of students. Al the end of the session, the great majority of the students indicated they would try to stop smoking and all Ihe students acknowledged thal il can result in serious health problems. dedicated with an open house.The 300,000-square-fool facility houses a veterinary teaching hospital to open in m id-July, research laboratories, operating rooms, examining rooms and classrooms.The. school offers a four-year curriculum leading to the doctor of veterinary medicine degree. II will reach a student, capacity* of 288 professional veterinary medical siudents and aboul 85 graduate students, interns and residents. The faculty will be supported by ap­ proximately 300 slaff.Governor James B. Hunt Jr. said during Ihe recent formal dedication of the School of Veterinary Medicine lhat ils research and preventive animal disease programs will bring an enormous economic return lo North Carolina farm ers and livestock producers. In addition lo acting as a referral cenler for practicing veterinarians, the school will be active in con­ tinuing education programs for North Carolina’s livestock producers and animal owners. Join In The Fun at D avie B an d Day M^yJ4, 1983 - 11:00 A.M. ■ 8:00 P.M. Davie High School • Barbecue Cliiclten Plates • Bingo • Car IWash • Video Games Hear"All Davie County School -Bands Perform- Sponsored By The Davie Band ^ Booster - Club - MOCKSVILLE. N.C. □ C l i n i c ' s g o t y o u r s t y l e ! C liiiic S h m ; Deep-down cushiony comfort lias made Clinic America's favorite duty shoe. You !! find il in all Clinic styles. From Ihe timeless classic looks to the new fashion designs. When il com es to real deep-down comfort. Clinic's gol it! There’s No Escaping the Excitem ent! The human race has met its match. The Beebols of Bem and their Killer Bees have Invaded. Conventional weapons are useless! Nuclear weapons do nothing! Saving Ihe earth is in your hands! This exciting video game has 26 dif­ ferent levels of challenge, each one faster and tougher than before. II features high-level scoring with memory, plus exciting sync-sound action when played through the Voice of Odyssey. The Killer Bees have arrived! $29.95 • 26 C H A L L E N G E L E V E L S niEVVfS CAROLIKA TIRE CO Relgil Division o( Bratj Ragan, Inc- „ .c 9C 2 Yadkinville Road Phone: 634-6115 Manager— Rusty Carmichael. 4 - DAVIE COUNTY UNTURI’ RISI! RUCORD. THURSDAY. MAY 12. 1983 P a r e n t s O f R e d s k i n C o a c h Mocksville Revisited By Kalhy Tomlinson“ I ’ve golta a lol of good memories aboul Mocksville,” J.C , Gibbs said Friday during an improplu visit lo Ihc Enlerpriso-Record office. "Visiling is like coming home." •I.e. Gibbs is a slocky, muscular builil man, a physique befitting his former career as a member of the N.C. Highway Patrol.Bul Gibbs has long relired from law enforcement, devoting his time lo a very different sort of job. Currently, the jovial, gray-haired Gibbs spends his lime recruiting players for Ihe Washinglon Red­ skins team, 198.3 Superbowl champions. This seams a logical position, especially since his son, Joe Jackson Gibbs, is Ihe very popular and successful Washington Redskins coach.Gibbs and his wife were in Mocksville last week to renew old friendships formed during his High­ way Patrol days here in 1940-44. II was while Gibbs was stationed in Mocksville lhat his son, Joe, was born. The bouncing baby boy was delivered by Dr. W.M. Long, Nov. 24, 1940 in the Mocksville Hospital located in a building on Court Square. Dr. Long's records show the baby weighed in at a whopping 10 pounds, 8 ounces. At Ihe time of his birth, Dr. Long recalls his nurse, the late Nell Holthouser, prophetically announcing, “ What a big, sturdy baby... he's built almost like a football player." Time has proven lhal no truer words were spoken.The Gibbs visit to Mocksville was b rie f...Frid ay afternoon Ihrough Saturday morning...but the couple crammed a lol of visiling into a few hours. •Traveling from Sun City, California, IheGibbsmadea special point to stop in Mocksville for a visit with Mrs. Sheek Bowden, Sr. on Wilkesboro Street. Her husband, the late Sheek Bowden, was Sheriff of Davie County while Gibbs worked locally with the Slate Highway Patrol. Sheriff (as Gibbs fondly refers to Bowden) and I were Ihe best of friends," he laughed. “ We chased many a moonshiner down 601 to Cooleemee. We got out of some mighty tough spots together," he fondly recalled. "Ah, that was the life." Gibbs also stopped by Dr. W.M. Lon's office Friday for a brief, visit with “ Doc". “ It's greal to see him again," said Gibbs. “ Being here is like coming home." The Gibbs made a special trip to Salisbury to check on H.G. Frymoyer, former N.C. Highway Patrol Sergeant, under which Gibbs served. Gibbs said lhat while his son was a small boy when they left Mocksville, he slill remembers the area and slill claims il as his hometown. “ He said lo tell everyone, hello," the senior Gibbs said. Gibbs served with the N.C. High­ way Patrol in Davie County from February, 1940-1944. He then assumed the position of security guard with the Asheville based America Enka Corporation. Six months later he returned to the Highway Patrol, soending the next three years in Lexington. Following this,' Gibbs spent 10 years as an investigator with the Buncombe County Sheriff's Department. He then went lo W hittier, California where he worked in the legal department of the Bank of America for 24 years. He relired from this position last November. Gibbs and his wife now make their i'f J. C. Gibbs, father of Washington Redskins coach Joe Gibbs, recalls his four years in Davie as a N. C. Highway Patrolman. He and his wife were in Mocksville last week to visit friends, Mrs. Sheek Bowden, Sr. and Dr. W .M. Long. home in Sun City, California. Gibbs talked of his son with paternal pride. Joe Gibbs went to California, attended San Diego Slale where he played football. Following graduation he served as assistant football coach to Don Coryell al San Diego State. He also worked for John McKay al Southern California and with the Tampa Buccaneers professional team. His other coaching assignments have been ' with Frank Broyles at Arkansas and Bill Peterson at Florida Slale, as well as wilh Coryell with the St. Louis Cardinals and the San Diego Chargers. Gibbs never played professional football. Gibbs was the offensive coor­ dinator with the San Diego Chargers and was responsible for the highly explosive passing game which featured Dan Fouls and his back-to- back 4,000-yard passing seasons, Bobby Beathard, the Redskins' general manager, had his eyes on Gibbs for many-years, according to highly ppublicized accounts. “ I knew him firsl al San Diego State where 1 used to hit ’em hard in scouting," said Beathard. “ During Ihe past few years I have closely followed his career." “Joe always stuck out in my ' mind. Of all Ihe assistant coaches in the N FL, Joe is the most thoroughly prepared for the job. Also, he believes in the things thal are im­portant to our developing a good program." said Beathard. “ We have a word in scouting - blue chip. Well, Joe Gibbs is the blue chipper we found. He's the best, the very best." Beathard wasted little time getting Gibbs. As soon as Gibbs' Chargers were eliminated by Oakland in Ihe AFC championship game on January lllh , Beathard asked San Diego for permission to interview Gibbs. On Monday, January 12lh, Gibbs new from Ihe west coast lo meel Beathard and the late Redskin owner Jack Kcnl Cooke. Afler talking things over in a New York hotel room, Gibbs signed a three- year contract believed to be worth $100,000 per year. Ihe firsl issue of the new year of 1983 (dated January Glh), this newspaper carried the story: “ Joe Gibbs Chosen as N FL Coach of the Year for 1982." In his second year as Redskins coach, Joe Gibbs became the toast of Washington, D.C. and the football world because: -He masterminded and guided Ihe Redskins lo Ihe best record in Ihe National Football League in 1982.-He was the runaway winner for honors as the top N FL Coach of the Year. -He formulated the game plans and guided Washington through the Nalional Football League playoffs and inlo Ihe Super Bowl. -And, he was the coach, leader and director who masterminded the Redskins lo the 1983 Super Bowl Championship in the Rose Bowl. Range Cleaning Tips Save Time I A clean range lasts longer and , certainly looks better, says Dr. I Nadine Tope, extension specialist- in-charge, foods and nulrilion. North Carolina Stale University.' She offers the following hints which can keep the stove from becoming stained and dirty: -Wipe up food spills immediately, using a soft, sudsy cloth or sponge. -Use baking soda on stubborn spots on porcelain. To cut grease. use a laoiespoon of household ammonia' in the wash waler. A coarse scouring powder will scratch the finish, damaging it per­ manently. -A sudsy pipe cleaner or old toothbrush is perfect for crevices and around switches and handles that cannot be removed. -Use heavily-soaped steel wool pads to clean chrome rings around Ihe units of the electric range or ^ u r n e r ^ n h ^ £ a ^ s t o v e ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ G la m o u r H o tir C in d y B a ile y G o t d r a b b r o w n h a i r ? M a k e i t g l i s t e n w i t h o u r n e w G l a m o u r B a t h T i r e d o f p a y i n g a s m a l l f o r t u n e f o r a g o o d p e r m ? T r y o u r “ F e e l s S o L i v e l y P e r m ” $ ^ g O O I n c . C u t Phone: 998-8266 M o n d a y t h r u F r id a y , C lo s e d S a t . & S u n . Located on Redlend Rd.- off ISg-East of '‘''ocksviUe Davie County Firemen’s Assn. Hold Meeting The Davie Counly Fircm en’.'i a^soc■inlion held ils May meeting al William R. Davie station, Monday, May 9. During Ihe business session, Iho Koontz Serves Ori Am. Angus Board Rocking K Farm , Samuel A. Koonlz, Mocksville, North Carolina, has been elecled lo membership in Ihe American Angus Association, reports Dick Spader, executive vice-president of the national organizalion wilh headquarters in SI. Joseph. Missouri. The American Angus Association, wilh some 38,000 active life and junior members, is Ihe largest beef caltle registry association in the world. Ils computerized records include detailed informalion on nearly 10 million registered Angus. The Association records ancestral information and keeps records of production on individual animals for its members. These permanent records help members select and male Ihe best animals in their herds lo produce high quality, efficient breeding caltle which are Ihen recorded wilh the American Angus Association. Most of these regislered Angus are used by Ihe U.S. farmers and ranchcrs who raise high quality beef for U.S. consumption. following was discussed: Firemen's Musler, which is set for September 17, at Center Ball Park, (rain date, September 24), 4-H Fire Prevention program lhat is scheduled for the firsl week in September, annual pumper test and formal mutual aid agreement. Chris Hooper, area instruction coordinator, discussed Ihe Pied­ monI Firemen’s Association officer Irnining, and an inquiryio the needs of each departmenl’' for future training programs. The program was presenled by the Forestry Service on burning l)ormits, safety points and con­trolled burnings. The next meeling will be a dinner meeting and is scheduled for Monday, June l.l, al Ihe Advance Fire Station. Symphony Sets Goal Of $6,850 The Davie County Chapler of Ihe N. C. Symphony has sel a goal of $0,850 during its current mem­ bership drive. The local membership drive has been going on for the past few weeks. Mocksville Middle PTO, Co61eemee PTA, and Shady Grove's PRA, are jusl a few of the organizations that contributed funds. The next two dates lo bring in funds for Ihe drive are Thursday, May 12 and May 19 al 7:00-8;15p.m. at thetoavie County Public Library. Davie Dance Academy Ms. Jessica Shields, Instructor will present her students In two special programs; Saturday, May 14, with a matinee at 1 p.m. entitled: A Tiny TotGala,atNorthDavie Jr.HighSchool; Saturday evening at 7:15 entitled Showtime on Broadway. Shown above are some of the dance students: L-R: Tara Smith, Angie Queen, Rene Patillo; center, Cara Parker; L-R : Melissa Propst, Kevin Warton and Loretta .Bowles. Mrs. Connie Kowalske has joined the Davie I<c.iUy firm as a licensed real estate broker. Her appointment was effective May I. Mrs. Kowalske has been a licensed real estate broker for the past five years working primarily in upstate New York. She is a graduate of Central .Mieliigan University, receiving a US degree in Physical Kducation. She is a former teacher. Mrs. Kowalske and her husband, Gary, reside in ,Suu(/iHood Acres. The KcMulskes liavetuo children, Kristy and Kelly. D.A.V. Chapter 75 To Meet Monday The regular monthly meeting of Ihe Disabled American Veterans Chapler 75 and Auxiliary will meel Monday nighl May 10, at G:30 p.m. wilh a covered dish meal al Ihe Holy CrosK Lutheran Church.Officers will be inslalled for Ihe new 19B3-84 fiscal year. Plans for special events will be made during Ihe business session.All members are urged lo come out and participate. G O n CO O LERS 'On The Inside GottTOTE-6 Got! TOTE-12 Gott Picnic Chest • The perfect pack 'n go lolel' • Chills up lo 6 beverage cans. • Comes with patented retreeze bottle. • Handy carry handle locks lid in place. • Greal lor sporting events. • Retreeze tioltle reduces need tor Ice. • Holds two six-packs comlortably. • Easy carry locking-handie. 3 0 Q u art S ize • 30-quart capacity cooler chest. • Food tray-Hinged seal top lid. • Sturdy no-pinch-loiding handles. L im ite d Tim e Q96 «« T im e GLASSWARE -DISPOSABLE DINNERWARE Dixie Disposables Plastic Coated-Soak Prool-Plales & Bowls Mosl popular Flower Patch pattern lor all every day home activities and lor Ihose special occa­sions. Bright-colorful. Flower Patch 7" Pie Plates P k . o i ^ 7 9 Flower Patch 9" Dinner Plates Pkg. ol 50 ■ 1 9 9 Flower Patch 6 Inch Bowl Pkg. Ы 25 -|39 Flower Patch 7-Oz. Cups Solo Plastic Party Cups 2016-Ounce Cold Drink 8 9 * ^ 18-10-0unce Clear Plastic 7 9 « ^ PICNIC JUG By Gott 1 Gallon Size Keeps Drinks Hot or Cold 24-Piece Tumbler Sets Available In Crystal ' or Honeygold 8-16 Oz. Ice Tea 8-12 Oz. Beverage 8-9 Oz. Rocks g?6 is^i,/ Plastic Picnic Forks & Spoons 5 0 F o rk s o r 5 0 S p o o n s Y o u r P ic k 8 9 ^ Foster-Rauek D r u g C o m p a n y M O C K S V IL L E , N .C . Phone: 634-2141 T h e m e : L i v i n g W a t e r s Soil S te w a rd s h ip W eek- M ay 8 -1 5 The Davie Soil and Water Con­ servation District is joining the nationwide celebration of Soil Stewardship Week May 0-15, 198.'!, according to an announcemcnl by I. H. Jones, District Chairman. The theiTie of Ihis year's celebration is "Living Waters.” The National Association of Convervation Districts (NACD) has sponsored Soil Stewardship Week since 1955, in cooperation with Ihe nation’s nearly 3,000 soil and waler conservation districts. “ If our water management practices in the past have been adequate, we may ignore Ihe rising population, the incJieased in­ dustrialization, and expanded irrigation, all of which require more waler from our reservoirs," cites NACD in their Soil Stewardship Week material. "One of our more compelling social and economic needs is for a full appreciation of the true value of our abundant supply of water. II is lime to think seriously about conservation, pollution, priority usage and our dependence upon it.” "If we are to make certain that supplies w ill be adequate for present and future needs, we are obligated lo abide by Ihe universal laws and to help, rather than hinder, the process by which the constant supply of waler is recycled and repurified,” according to NACD.On Tuesday, May 4, 191)3, Ihc Davie Soil and Water Conservalion L i v in g WATERS V<*»/ « W * - .Mrtv H I'ffi I Legislative Report By Senator Robert M. Davis Newsweek Magazine last week pictured Gov. Jim Hunt sealed among school kids at a Clinton County lib rary dedication. The article, citing North Carolina’s advances in education, underscored Ihe state’s leadership position in American education. At the same time, Gov. Hunt was heading up a task force made up of other governors, as well as business and civic leaders from across the nation, as they finalized a much publicized report on Ihe changes needed in educalion on a national scale. The governor’s group, the Task Force on Education for Economic Growth, made a number of recommendations for improving education in America, and sup­ posedly North Carolina. Of course, the Newsweek article, entitled “ It’s Working in North C aro lina,” provided convincing evidence that our slate already has a convincing' lead in this important endeavor. That lead is one that North Carolina lawniakers do not wish lo forfeit. The task force, among other things, recommended high pay and belter training for teachers, lengthening the school year, more administrative help for principals, and a “ higher budget priority to education” by the state legislatures.Nol surprisingly, each recom­ mendation seemed fundamentally sound and deserving of serious consideration. Even less surprising, each recommendation would likely cost large amounts of taxpayer dollars. Unfortunately, in Ihe General Assembly in Raleigh, we have been ■ forced to look at the hard realities of dollars and cents for the past m n n l h c As has already been reported, this budgetary session of the legislature began deliberating in January with the need lo reduce budgeted outlays by upwards of $100 million, before any new spending items could be adopted. One of the most pressing tasks for all of us in January, and now, was to find the additional funding needed to grant teachers and ' other stale employees an equitable pay raise.In an effort lo find that additional funding, the Assembly leadership directed the various appropriations subcommittees to identify three percent of each department’s- budget that could be cut. Wilh thal job done, we are now waiting for the April tax revenue figures lo become available lo ■ begin serious deliberations over the next slate budget. With Ihe recent,, widespread reveleations about education, serious cuts in our education budgel seem highly unlikely. A pay raise for teachers, obviously, seems even more likely. But the taxpayer, which of course includes teachers and other state employees, can rest assured that Ihese decision are being made under the constitutional constraints of a balanced budget. Finally, on a more lighthearted note, Dr. J . Cullen Hall of Salisbury served one day last week as (he legislature’s “ physician of the day.” If your’re not one of the H.258 babies Dr. Hall delivered in his long career in medicine, then you probably knew him as one of the greal community servants of the 2.3rd Districi. H ere’S how ^ ^ C hiropractic tre a ty W h ip la s h “Whiplash" is not a specific injury or disease in itself. It is a type of injury which comes from a sudden, shocking movemeni which snaps the body with force. It causes a variety of injuries to the neck and upper spine. The doctor of chiropractic is uniquely ti*ained to deal with problems of the spine and nervous system. Modern chiropractic manipulative techniques are directed specifically to eliminate the causes of pain and malfunction. Early detection and correction of a whiplash problem can eliminate related symptoms and effects. Dr. Ramey Kemp 501 Wiikesboro St. Mocksville, N.C. Ibally Office Hours By Appointment 634-2512________________ ■ DislricI hosled a breakfast meeling for the Davie County Ministerial Association at Horn’s Kountry Kitchen. Informative material on Ihc Soil Stewardship Week theme was distributed to local miiiisters for their use in participating in this observance. The material included program blanks, litany, bookmarks, adult and children’s supplements, and a booklet.■Extra materials are available in Ihe Soil and Waler Conservation Office and may be obtained free of chargc by calling G34-5011. We’re a nation blessed with natural rcsources-snil and water resources lhal make us one of the richest agricultural countries in the world. To help keep il Ihiit way support your local soil and W ater con­ servation efforts. DAVIE COUNTY ENTERI’ RISE RECORD, THURSDAY. MAY 12. 1<383 - .S New Column "Woman's Health" Starts This Week In The Enterprise Si’cond l,t. Todd J. .loscph. son of Williiini IC. and Lynn Joseph of 7;!4 licrnuuhi Hun, Advance, N.C., lias i;riuluale<l from U.S. Air Force pilot training, and has received silver wings at Vance Air Force Base. Okla. Joseph will remain al Vance. He is a ItlKI graduate of the University of Georgia. Athens. Whal kinds of exercises are best for women during pregnancy? What's new in the treatmeni of breast cancer? How can distur­ bances in Ihe reproductive tract lead lo infertility? These and other questions will be answered in the new columns, “ Woman's Health,” which starts Ihis week in Ihe En- terprise-Uecord, Page II.Written by James L . Breen, M.D., president of The American College of Obstetricians and GynccoloRists, the columns will give women and their fam ilies a better un­ derstanding of women’s health problems. Among the subjects to be explored are the father’s role during pregnancy, testing for genetic defects, weight gain during pregnancy, fetal monitoring, women and nutrition, having a child afiler 35, common contraception niyihs, genetic counseling, menopause and breast cancer. The column will appear weekly. Dr. Breen is the author of numerous articles in the field of obslelrics and gynecology, as well as a contributor to many textbooks on these subjects. He is presently clinical professor of obstetrics and gynecology al Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia. Pa., and chairman of the department of obstetrics and gynecology at St. Barnabas Medical Cenler in Livingston, N.J. You can make an ex­cellent pincushion out of a covered steel wool ball or pad. It keeps nee­dles and pins very sharp. Willow Oak Shopping Centre B E N F R A N K L I N B e t t e r q u a l i t y f o r l e s s Mocksville, N.C. w S S D E S T D U Y S _ Ladie’s A SH O R T SET • ContrastiniContrasting Binding Polyester & Cotton Asst. Colors P E P S I-F R E E 7 -U P and S U N K IS T S p e c i a l o n l y . . . 19 2-UTER BOntES Available in Regular o r Diet FLOATING LANTERN Batteiy Included $^88 ■ Each Ladl«»’ Casuals G re a t sh o e s (o r c a su a l lo o k s i C o tto n d u c k fa b ric w ith K ra to n ru t)b e r s o lo . C h o ic e o f co lo rs , sizes 5 -10. 22 Choice 177 Stratch Laca Tuba Bras P e rfe c t fo r w e a r w ith b a re s u m m e r to p s i W h ite In sizes 32-36. 9 7 Bedding Plants C h o o s e f r o m v e g e t a Q i e s a n a f l o w e r s . Perennial Sommer Flowering Bulbs Double Begonia • Dahlia • Gladiolus n “ p . . Pkg. Contains From 2 To 30 1 8 -In c h P o rta b le B a rb e c u e G rill GASOLINE CAN 2-gallon rust - resistant can. 3 2 - O z . S i z e S w e e t h e a r t D i s h w a s h i n g L i q u i d C o m p a re d S s k 'e l S to ck u p n o w a i th is low sa le p rice . OurLowPilce 7 8 Î V -N e c k Top • Solid Color • Short Sleeve • 100% Cotton Out-Standing Value $ 0 8 8 *7“ Value B o x o f 1 2 S t a y f r e e S u p e r P a d s Just right for over­ night! Buy now and save. 1 4 3 box 2 4 - 0 * . B a b y P o w d e r H elps h eep ba by dry. Perfect for the rest of the family, tool Compared to Johnson & Johnson Baby Powder 1 9 9 each E a r t h t o n e C e r a m i c W i n d C h i m e s P e rfe c t fo r p a tlo l C h o ic e o f stylos. 1 6 - 0 1 . T e a r l e s s B a b y S h a m p o o G entle form ula Is' Our Low Price perfect for the whole family! Compared to JohnsoniJohnson Baby Shampoo 1 4 6 each 4 - R o l l C h a r m i n stock up now at this great sale price! White only. 1 17 pack 6 - DAVIE COUNTY lîNTnRPRISE RECORD. THURSDAY, MAY 12, 1983 His classical guitar solos delighted the many persons attending his concerts.The delicate sounds of the dulcimer delighted audiences. Bumgarner performed for several groups including a public concert Saturday. His informal concerts proved a crowd pleaser. Bumgarner conducted question and answer sessions at each. Stan Bumgarner - Noted Guitarist Delights Local Audiences * U itm rT a *> n o n 'e ri n it a V if f i l l in fA t« m a l n n t m c m l n l l t v ________ ______- » —Sian Bumgarner, noted guitarist, delighted audiences last week during special performances sponsored by fhe Davie Arts Council. During his week-long tour here, Bumgarner performed in concert for several organizations including the Mocksville Rotary Club, Crown Wood, Prqducts arid South Davie Junior High students. He also ap­ peared in concert at Fran Ray Rest Home, Autumn Care, and fhe Mocksville based division of the ‘ N.C. Department of Correstions. Bum garner performed for the public Saiurday evening during a special concert at the Davie Couniy Public Library. Bumgarner’s delightful, informal performances included a mixture of solo pieces on the classical guitar and Renaissance lute. His concerts were highlighted wilh anecdotes, songs and question and answer sessions.A native of weslern North Carolina, Stan Bumgarner received a degree in Music Educalion from Lenoir-Rhyne College and studied classical guitar at the North Carolina School of the Arts. A former CART-Affiliale Artist, Stan travels extensively in the eastern United States, giving inform al performances and concerts. Reflecting on his week-long (our In Davie County, Bum garner PniSBIRGH N P R E -M E M O R IA T O P Q U A L I T Y P A I N T S A T B I G , B I G S A V I N G S ! NOW THRU MAY 31, 1983 WALLHIOE' Utex Flat Wall Paint Uling Ih« patented Microllo Process'. Stams spots and normal houscfioid dirt clean up easily e»ceHem covering power in mosi colors Pittsburgh' Exterior Latex Flat House Paint Ideal lor new or re­ paint work Hesisis cricking, peeling flaking Resulling paint film is mildew resictani for its own protection, . tasy application Over 750 colors Sun-Proof' Acrylic Latex Semi-Gloss House & Trim Paint nesulling paint (ilm IS mildew (este(an( lor Its own prolec-tIon. Weather lesrsiani Dries IO a semi-gloss sheen fast drying, reccat •n 4 nours Use on both sidmg and inm LATEX CEILING WHITE PAIHT Aneconornical im- isn lor ceilings only High hiding Dries 10 an axracifve nch white Hat linish Eicellent resistance to yellowing Easy appi>cai>on. soap and water clean-up 162 Sheel( Street Mocitsville, N.C. 27028 Phone 634-2167 commented on the hospitality shown him. “ I ’ve made many new friends,” he said, “ and was over­ whelmed with the response to ms concerts.” He said he enjoyed sharing his music with Davle Couniy residents, and hopes to perform locally again. He thanked Ihe Davie Arts Council for spon­ soring his tour. Derrick Parks Completes Jnfantry Training Pvl. Derrick F . Parks, son of Emogene Parks of Cooleemee, NC., and Dewey A. Parks of Route 5, Mocksville, N.C., has completed one station unit training (OSUT) at the U.S. Army Infantry School, Fort Benning, Ga. OSUT is a 12-week period which combines basic combat training and advanced Individual training. The training Included weapons qualifications, squad tactics, patrolling, landmine warfare, field communications and combat operations. Completion of this course qualifies the soldier as a lighl-weapons infantryman and as an indirect-fire crewman. Soldiers were taught to perform any of the duties in a rifle or mortar squad. Stan Bumgarner, noted guitarist; performs for students at South Davie Junior High as part of his week long tour here. The event was sponsored by the Davie Arts Council. C o n s id e r L iv in g W a te r L i v i n g m x E R s \V;iiciiii)g ;i suasci ill ,S:in I'ninci.sto li:!y, you ;mcl I Vi'hilc the сп'сп1пц spreads ai’alnsi ihc red sky I h:\ve seen blrih. growth, and death. N'ol ready yet Гог my last breath.' Are we an age without belief or meaning? Dreaming of atomic oblivion — waking up screaming? I.i\’ing w.-irer disappearing like a ihiel' in a gang. Are we a world that ends with a whisper, not a bang? c;iiies' waste and farmlands' soil pollute our lakes. C’lOd mourns from burdens of purifying our mistakes. The G u lfs rivers sweating oil. Tbe human race gathering on stoney soil. Ilis gift of earth's water — we marvel at its constancy, When gentle winds or luirricane power lilts a torrent .sea. Making clouds of ocean pores thundering like drums in a band. Released as rain to refresh life and the thirsting land. Cicntle raindrops (o nilglKy Hoods possess the field. It slides as a giant reptile cjuietly concealed. Down the creeks and mighiy rivers through (be plain. I loiiie lo Ihe womb o f the .se.i in raplurmis pain. People before yesterday lingering In the shadows of lime. W'atch today's stewards o f re.sources in our prime. Harness water's power, great is (be reward. Loosen res(rain(s. i('s a two edged sword. ■■(Jonsider l.iving Water; consider it well " S o i l S t e w a r d s h i p W e e k - M a y 8 - 1 S, 1 9 8 3 Davie Soil A n d Water Conservation District D a v i e C o u n t y O f f i c e B u i l d i n g S o u t h M a i n S t r e e t M o c k s v i l l e , N . C . DAVIECOUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD. TIIURSDAY, M AY 12, 1983 - 7 Many Vegetables Are Well Traveled Vegelables ordinarily slay pul afler planling, bul il is Inlriguing lo remember Ihat (hey have Iraveled a long road from Iheir origins a long lime ago in such exolic places as Afghanistan and Ihe Andes. Explorers, traders and botanists all had a hand in bringing new edible plants lo Ihe notice of curious people. The opening of trade routes between East and West was one avenue to new vegetables, and Ihe Crusaders aroused Western Interest in Ihe exciting flavors and spices of the Orient.Columbus sought spices in the New World, but whal he found in­ stead were new vegetables: sweet potatoes, peppers and beans. Many of these originated in South America but over the centuries were carried north by the Indians. The Indians thus taught the first English settlers how to grow these plants, as well as corn, squash and pumpkins.The planting practices of (he Indians also were adapted by the early colonists; planting corn and pumpkins together; the Indian rule- of-thumb for “ sowing when the oak leaves are as big as a mouse’s ear” ; and the idea of planting corn and beans together so the latter could use the corn stalks as bean poles.Our word squash is derived from the Massachusetts Indian “ askutasquash” meaning “ eaten raw,” quite possible (and tasty!) with young, freshly picked vegetables.Corn, or maize, is a native lo South America and was used by the Mayans more lhan 1,200 years ago. II was carried northward over the centuries, the hard kerneled vegetable being ground and used in the form of meal.Sweet corn did not become available until the mid-1800s and virtually all of it had white kernels. II was not until 1862, when golden bantam was introduced, that yellow varieties werethoughl fit for human consumption.Other natives of the Andes are the white potato, often depicted on Peruvian pottery, and the tomato, which is slill found growing wild there on the mountain slopes. By the time Spanish explorers arrived, tomatoes had spread widely and were a major crop in Mexico. They were not accepted as food in Ihe United States, however, until after 1830. While many of our vegetables originated in the New World, others were brought from other con­ tinents; parsnips from the Caucasus; carrots from Afghanistan; radish and. cabbage from China; beets from the Mediterranean coasts ofEuropeand North Africa; melons from Persia and cucumbers from India, to cite just a few. Whatever the vegetable gardener tends, it is certain to include representatives that have traveled from the far corners of the Earth. As the gardener hoes or weeds, It adds (o the pleasure to recall their origins in distant places and times to see how far a journey they have made to grow in North Carolina. Regir^ald Chunn With U.S. Infantry Pvt. Reginald E . Chunn, son of Adell Nelson of 447 South Ave. Mount Vernon, N .Y., and Charles E . Chunn of Route 4, Mocksville, N.C., has completed one station unit training (OSUT) at the U.S. Army Infantry School, Fort Benning, Ga. OSUT is a 12-Week period which combines basic combat (raining and advanced individual training. The training included weapons qualifications, squad tactics, patrolling, landmine warfare, field communications and -combat operations. Completion of this course qualifies the soldier as a light-weapons infantryman and as an indirect-fire crewman. Soldiers were taught to perform any of the duties in a rifle or mortar squad. Contestants Sought For "Miss Teen” Pageant Contestants are now being sought lo represent their home county in the 1983 official N .C. State Preliminary of the U.S.A. Teen Miss Scholarship Pagent, to be held Sunday, July 31st, al ¡he Raleigh Marriott Hotel. Applications are now being ac­ cepted from teen misses wishing to be considered for the title and crown of Davie County Teen Miss 1983. The newly crowned County Teen Miss w ill compete before a distinguished panel of judges with other county finalists for the state crown and title of N.C. Teen Miss; plus, a $1,000 cash scholar­ ship award.The state winner will go on to represent N.C. in the Washington, D.C. National Finals.The selected contestants w ill officially serve in their county for one year during which time they w ill represent the pageant in local aclivilies. To qualify as a con­ testant, the teen miss must be a student in grades seven thru twelve, a resident of Ihe county in which she is applying, a USA citizen of good character and standing in the communily and of a charismatic personality.Applications for the state finals may be obtained by sending a stamped, self-addressed envelope lo; N.C. Teen Miss Pageant, 31 Mill Plain Road, Danbury, Conn. 0(5810 or by calling 203-748-(i082. F O O D L IO N These prices good thru Saturday, May 14,1983 Sliced FREE $ 1 9 8 ■ , Lb. USPA eholei - Biif Ronnd Fall Cut R o u n d USDA Chole« Bt«f Chuek - Ri4 • Rl|i* C h u c k C a lif o r n ia S t e a k R o a s t S tn w lw r r ie s J $j59 4/M M“ . 9 9 .-. 16 Ot. Botilat - Carion of 8 Peps! Cola 7.25 O2. - Food Tonin Macaroni & Cheese USDA Baaf Chuek - Bonalati Chuck Roast Juicy Western Cantaloupes 9 9 * Half Sallon ■ VonlH Duck O range Ju ice «Я Ш КЯ I DOVALO 9 9 * 32 Oaiict P el M onte Catsu|>| Why Pay M.t9 $ -|6 9 49 Ounea Cold Power 1 Lb. - Food Town Margarine Quarters IS 0>. ■ Cil Ftoi ■ Ilvir/Miil/Fiih aciilekiii Puss N' Boots 3 9 . 10 Oz. • Aitortad Liquid Slender 303 Can - Whola/Craaiii Styla Stokely ColdenCorn 5 9 . 4 Paek -1 Ply Page Toilet Tissue ••1 5 lb. ■ Criiikla Cul Interstate Potatoes a / 9 9 . 303 Can - Franeh/Cal Stokely Green Bea^ II/ u u n c f Jeno'sPizza Why Pay M.29 Ш Buns & Priiti at Mtilttvilli Fill l\on SiHti 8 - D A V It COUNTY UNTI-KPRISE RECORD, THURSDAY, MAY 12, 1983 I Birth Announcements | Bennett-Miller •Mr. and Mrs. Larry D. Brinkley of Rt. 3, Advance, N.C. announce the engagement of their daughter, Karla Patrice Bennett, to Eddie Ray Milleri son of Mr. and Mrs. Cletus R . M iller of Rt. 7, Mocksville, N.C. ' Miss Bennett is a 1981 graduate of Davie Hi^i School. ‘ Mr. M iller is a 1979 graduate of Davie High School and is employed by Miller Sheet Metal of Mocksville. r The wedding w ill take place May 19th at Waikiki Beach in Honolulu, Hawaii, where they w ill also spend their honQrmoon. A reception w ill be held in their honor at Ramada Inn, Clemmons upon their return home. I ■' ____ Slates Host Engagement Party June 12. The home was beautifully decorated with arrangements ot mixed cut fresh flowers; and a color scheme of pink, blue and white was carried out in the decorations. The refreshm ent table was covered with a white imported cut- work cloth, and centered with an arrangement ot pink roses flanked by lighted pink tapers. At one end was a silver punch bowl holding fresh Slrawberry punch; and at the olher a coffee service. Assisting with the pouring were Mrs. Carol Johnstone and Dr. Jane Crow.The guests were greeted by Mr. and Mrs. Jack Pennington; and directed to the receiving line. Dr. and Mrs. Slate, Moira Slate and Roland Miethe. Approxim ately two hundred guests called during the appointed hours from 8 p.m. until 11 p.m.Refreshments consisted of an array of dainties, sandwiches, mlnature meat balls, cheese pen­nies, m ints, decorated cake squares, mixed nuts and punch. Mr. and Mrs. Tony Butnor ot Germanton, N.C. announce Ihc birlh ot Iheir tirsl child, a daughter, Kara Belh, born Thursday, April 28, al Forsylh Memorial Hospital in Winslon-Salem, N.C. The baby weighed 9 lbs. and was 21':; Inches in lengih.Maternal grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. E . G. Moore ot Advance, N.C.Paternal grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. Uay Bulner ot Germanton, N.C.Great grandparents are Mrs. Nellie P. Moore and Mrs. Jeanie Key; both ot Winston-Salem, N.C. Mrs. Bulner is the former Paula Moore ot Advance, N.C. W m . R . D a v i e M e n u The menu tor William R. Davle school tor the week ot May 16-20 is as follows; MONDAV-Fish or chicken pattie, slaw, creamed potatoes, peanut butler cookie, roll, milk. Breakfast: Pancakes, butter, syrup. Juice, milk TUESDAY-Barbecue or Sloppy Joe, slaw, French tries, catsup, bun, cake, milk. Breakfasi: Hash Brown, sausage link, loasi, jelly, juice, milk. WEDNESDAV-Fried chicken or ham, creamed potaloes, peas, Jello, roll. Breakfast: Cheese toast, apple pie, milk. THURSDAY-Pizza or corn dog, salad, corn, fruit, cookie, milk. Breakfasi: Cereal, donut, juice, milk FRIDAY-Barbecue Rib or Ham and cheese, lelluce, pickle, potato rounds, cookie, bun, milk. Breakfasi: sausage biscuit, ap­ plesauce, milk. Mr. and Mrs. James L. Sparks of Route 2, Advance, N. C. announce Ihe birlh ot their first child, a son, Daniel Jacob, born Friday, May G, al Davie County Hospital. The baby weighed 8 Ibs, G ozs. and was 21 inches in lengih al birth. Maternal grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. Roy A. Wall.Paternal grandparents are Mrs. Oilberl Sparks and the lale Mr. Sparks. Mr. and Mrs. Gray A. Potts P o t t s C e l e b r a t e s 2 S t h A n n i v e r s a r y Kevin Crews Wharton of Pincvillc Hoad, Ht. .i, iMiicksville, N.C. has hi-en accepted for the North Carolina School of the Arts Summer s i's s io M . Kevin is a 10th grader at Davle High School, and a student of Davie Dance Academy. His parents are Mr. and Mrs. William T. Wharton. W e s t m o r e l a n d s A w a r d e d D i a m o n d S t a t u s Mr. and Mrs. Gray A. Potts ot Route 4, Advance were honored with a surprise Hawaiian luau in celebration of Iheir 25th wedding anniversary on Saturday, May 7 at Ihe home ot Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth R. Polls, hosts tor the evening. Upon arrival, the approximately thirty guests received leis and silk flowers to complement Iheir Hawaiian atlire , before being served sunshine slush punch and an assortment ot raw vegetables with dressing. The use ot torches, Hawaiian music, bamboo fans, pineapples, and silk flowers helped lo furlher Ihe desired islands Iheme. Everyone enjoyed a buffet dinner featuring Hawaiian baked ham, W aikiki m ealballs, Polynesian chicken, and various olher Polynesian tastes. Afterwards, champagne toasts were given, followed by the culling of a 3-liered, red velvet wedding cake baked by Nancy Grooms. Catering the occasion were Rulh Tullerow, Lynne Doss and Laura Tullerow. Assisting in the serving were Katherine Hursey, Cindy Hursey and Carla Hursey. Photographer for the evening was Timmy Hursey. Mr. and Mrs. Potts plan to spend Iheir anniversary on a cruise Ihrough Ihe Hawaiian Islands laler this month. Rawlcigh Distributors James and Dot Westmoreland of Mocksville, N.C., have become Triple Diamond Executive Distributors. This an­ nouncement was made by the W.T. Rawleigh Company of Freeport, II. Triple Diamond status is awarded to only the mosl successful Rawleigh Distributors. The W.T. Rawleigh Company is a founding member of the Direci Selling Association with thousands ot independent distributors across the country. The Westmorelands became Rawleigh Distributors in 1974. During Ihe next nine years, Ihey worked lo build a successful in­ dependent Rawleigh business by selling Rawleigh Products directly to consumers and by building an organization of other distributors who also excelled al direci selling. Today, Ihe Westmorelands enjoy the rewards ot Iheir profitable in­ dependent business, along wilh the honored distinction of being Triple Diamond Executive Distributors. The W .T. Rawleigh Company was founded in Freeport, II, in 1889. Since then, it’s grown to become a world-wide organization with distributors throughout the United Slates, Canada, New Zealand and Australia. The Rawleit for its Vani Cinnamon, . Medicated Ointment and over 250 olher products people need and use everyday such as spices, extracts, gourmet foods, medicines, vitamins, personal care products, jew elry,' household cleaning products, insecticides and Mr. Groom Pet Care products. Dr. and Mrs. Francis Slale of M ocksville, N.C. hosted an ¡engagement party at their home on ;Norlh Main Street, Saturday ievening, A pril 30, for their daughter, Moira Helen, who will wed Roland Gunter Miethe of : Nassau, The Bahamas, Sunday, A r o u n d ^ A b o u t GRADUATES SUNDAY FROM LENO IR-RHYN E C O LLEG E Sabrina Foster, daughter of Dr. and Mrs. Bob M. Poster of Mocksville, graduated Sunday, May 7, from Lenoir-Rhyne CoUege, Hickory, N.C. with a B.S. degree in Biology. Charlotte E . Funderburk, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Charlie W. Messick, also of MocksviUe, received a B.S. in Nursing. The 92nd annual graduation exercises were held at 3 p.m. Sunday with 244 students conferring degrees and certificates. ’The address was delivered by a Rockwell attorney, Otto G. Stolz. Tonya Turner Presented As A ^^Showstopper’’ Tonya Turner of Mocksville was presented as a "Showstopper" by Ihe Baylin Dance Studios of Clemmons and Winsloo-Salem during performances Saturday night al Reynolds Auditorium. Miss Judy Baylin presented Miss Turner as a "Showslopper” during the May 7 recital. The “Showslopper” (roupe consists of eight of Miss Baylin’s most ad­vanced performers. The troupe featured during two recitals Friday and Saturday nights. Other “ Showsloppers” from Davie includes Mislie Clontz, a Davie High senior, and Lori Livengood, a junior at Catawba College. Tonya is the daughler of Mr. and Mrs. Tommy Turner of Country Lane, M ocksville. She is a sophomore al Davie High and has had 12 years ot dance Iraining in lap, jazz, ballet and acrobatics. was held T w e n t y C o u p l e s R e n e w M a r r i a g e V o w s Twenty couples of the Dulin and Smith Grove United Methodist churches began National Fam ily Week, Sunday, May 8, by renewing Iheir marriage vows, following the worship service. The pastor, Ihe Reverend J.C . Lane used as his topic, “ Ten Commandments For Husbands and Wives.” The couples assembled at Ihe ' altar for their renewal of the wedding vows. A total of 527 years was involved in Ihe impressive service. Par- licipating from Dulin Methodist were Mr. and Mrs. George Foster, Mr. and Mrs. Allen Blakely, Mr. and Mrs. Larry Campbell, Mr. and Mrs. Lee McCIamrock, Mr. and Mrs. H .R. Hendrix, Jr., Mr. and Mrs. Moody Bowers, and Mr. and Mrs. Elm er Hendrix.Smilh Grove Methodist Church couples were: M r. and Mrs. Kermit Sm ilh, M r. and M rs. Richard Beeding, Mr. and Mrs. Lee Caudle, Mr. and Mrs. Otis Howard, Mr. and Mrs. David Miller, Mr. and Mrs. Bennie Boger, Mr. and Mrs. James G. Hendrix, Mr. and Mrs. Jerry Armsworthy, Mr. and Mrs. Jack D. Paige, M r. and M rs. Roy Whisenhunt, Mr. and Mrs. Carl Jacobs, Mr. and Mrs. Jim Gregory and Ihe Reverend and Mrs. J.C . I iiinr - Springtime means Savings Time! Automobile Auction EVERY WEDNESDAY NIGHT 7:30 P.M. Located In Mocksville, N.C. In The Building | Which Was Formerly Pennington Chevrolet E v e r y o n e W e lc o m e T o B u y O r S e ll O p e n T o D e a le r s A n d Individuals W e W ill S t a r t A c c e p t in g C a r s A t 3 : 0 0 P . M . O n S a le D a y S e lle r s M u s t H a v e G o o d T i t l e O n E a c h C a r . | W e W ill N o t S e ll T i t l e A t t a c h e d C a r s . C h e c k s W ill B e A c c e p t e d B y D e a le r s O n l y . I n d iv lf lu a l s M u s t P a y B y C a s h . Make Plans To Be With Us Each Wednesday] Night! Sell A Car— Buy A Car Enjoy ТЬ»* Evening And Make Money, Too! | We Pledge Fairness To Everyone! For More InformEtion, Contact: Fred O. Ellis (919)998-8744 (704)634-5210 Lib Grubb (704)2F4-2566 — ELLIS AUCTION CO.— Fred I .343 DEALER'S MEPXHANDISE AUCTION Buyers and Sellers Welcome! 2 B i g S a l e s E a c h T u e s d a y EVERY TU ESD AY - 11:00 A.M . U N T IL 5:00 P.I'/'. SECOr!D SALE Oh! TU ESD AY - 6:30 P.M. U r'T lL L o c a t e d in M o c k s v ille , N . C . o n W ilk e s b o r o S t r e e t In t h e b u il d in g w h ic h w a s f o r m e r l y P e n n in g t o n C h e v r o le t C o . A l l T y p e s o f N e w M e r c h a n d ls e . . . H a r d w a r e . . H o u s e h o ld G o o d i. . . T o y s . . . G r o c e r ie s . . . T o o ls . . . C o s m e t ic s . . . C lo t h e s . . jn d M a n y M o r e M o n e M a k in g I t e m s . I f y o u o w n o r m a n a g e a b u s in e s s o r w o r k t h e f le a m a r k e t , t h is Is t h e p la c e y o u w a n t t o b e ! B u y y o u r m e r c h a n d is e h e r e b e lo w ' W h o le s a le P r ic e s ! E V E R V O N E W E L C O H /IE ! P le a s e b r in g y o u r s a le s t a x n o . o r y o u w i l l b e r e q u ir e d t o p a y s a le s t a x o n m e r c h a n d is e . FOR MORE IM FO RP'.ATIO r CALL: F r e d O . E l lis / '0 4 - 6 3 4 - 5 2 t 0 - 9 1 9 - 9 9 8 - 8 7 4 4 L ib G r u b b 7 0 4 - 2 8 4 - 2 5 6 6 A u c t io n T e le p h o n e N o . 7 0 4 - 6 3 4 - 5 0 7 7 (S a le D a y O n l y ) Fred O. Ullis Auctionei-T N .C.A.L. 343 D A V I I - C O U N T Y H N T U U P K I S l i R L C O R D . T I l U R S n A Y . M A Y 1 2 . I ‘) 8 J N o rlin a H onors C lin t H ege The town of NoHina designated last Friday as "CHnt Hege Day” and honored ils high school prin­ cipal for his 33 years of servicc lo Ihe school and communily. A native of Davic County, Clint Hege is Ihe son of Mr. and Mrs. C. L. Hege of Ul. 2 Advance. He is a graduate of the Shady Grove High School and N.C. Slale University. He i.s married lo Ihe former Marian Rowland. They have Iwo children. Lew and Pam. The festivities honoring Mr. Hege look place in Ihe school’s gym- lorium with Ihe student body and townspeople in attendance. In addition lo Principal Hege, Ihe school honored Mrs. Bessie Rooker Hicks, who is retiring after a teaching career Ihat spans 45 years, the last 36 at Norlina. Assistant Principal Roosevelt Alston presided over the assembly and read a proclamation from Mayor E . L. Perry honoring Hege. The devotional was given by Ihe Rev. Cnrtis Cainpbell, paslor of the Norlina United MelhodisI Church. Following a presentation by the Blue Wave Chorus, several persons paid tribute lo both Mr. Hege and Mrs. Hicks. Paying tribute to Hege were Supl. Michael Williams, A. M. Ward, and Mrs. V. J . Galling. Mr. Hege spoke last and gave an cmolional speech telling of his love for Norlina and Ihe people in the ■school and community. He closed his remarks by telling Ihc crowd, "Il's what you do lhal you don’t have to do thal makes life worth living." The principal for Ihc pa.'it 12 years received a standing ovation at the conclusion of his remarks and told Ihe students, "God loves you and I love you." Botii honoroes received gifls from Ihc teachers and student groups. Following the presentations, Ihe NHS Band rendered two selections and Ihe crowd closed the assembly by singing “ Auld Lang Syne.” Following the program, the students held its annual field day for the final time. Ti'i'Csii Slicw, a senior al Diivic C'ount.v High School, served as a page for llu' General Assembly in Italeigti, iNliiy i-(l. Teresa was reconiniended by.^cprescntativc .1. I’. I.iinibetli of Ihe Thirty-sevcnlh House District, and »|ipoin(ed by Ihe Speaker nf (be House, I.islon Hanisey. Teresa is (he daughler ot ¡Mr. and Mrs. Paul Shew, Houle I, Mocksville. T a k i n g A D i p ! A warm spring day gives this dog an inspiration to take a refreshing dip in a cool pond. ( Photo by Deree Eaton) Local Students Receive Degrees At UNC^CH The following sludenis from Davie Counly are among degree candidates for 1983 spring graduation al the University of Norih Carolina a( Chapel Hill: Tamara Denise Allen, R l. 2 Mocksville, Bachelor of Arts. Gina Louise Howell, R l. 7, Mocksville, Bachelor of Science in Denial Hygiene. Elizabelh Gayle K elly, 133 Wandering Lane, M ocksville, Bachelor of Science in Denial Hygiene. Stella Deane McCullough, Rt. 4, Mocksville, Bachelor of Arls. Aaron Bayne Miller, 212 Wan-' dering Lane, Bachelor of Science in Chemistry. Belinda Gave Rollings, Rt. 6, Mocksville, Bachelor of Arts.Barbara Ann Shore, R t. 7, Mocksville, Bachelor of Arts in Education. Lori Colleen Tutterow, 716 Yadkinville Road, M ocksville, Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy.David King Brownlow, Rt. 3 Advance, Bachelor of Science in Business Administration.Jennifer Ann Meader, Bermuda Run, Bachelor ot Arls. The crocodile continually grows new sets of teeth to replace old teeth. F l e e t F i n a n c e n t e r OVEN-RANGE SALE! C U T Y O U R M O N T H L Y P A Y M E N T S B Y 5 0 % OR MORE L E T F L E E T F I N A N C E N T E R H E L P Y O U P A Y Y O U R C U R R E N T D E B T S W IT H A C O N S O L I D A T I O N L O A N O F * 2 0 0 0 T o ® 2 @ ,0 0 0 * FAIMILY BUDGET PROBLEM CONSOLIDATION- LOAN ACCOUNT OW ED ? ?y m e h t s SOLUTION LOAN , *2100 AUTO LOAN *2600 HOME REPAIR , LOAN ‘1000 CHARGE CARDS 1500 STORES ’ ^ ’ •7000 •115 •226 • 65 • 50 • 40 •436 Amount of Loan •9,000 Amount Needed to Pay Bills V.eOO ’ Extra Cash (or You •1,200 Now Monthly Paymem *162.17 10y^s. 10.(X3 APR Total Paym iinis 19,460.40 Monthly sevings ot ¡^133.03 Can you Imagine wt^atyou could do with />n extra $300.00 por month? This is onl/ ono Dxam/iln ul what Flaot Financenter can do tpr YOU.' JuBt figure how mucli money you'll need for everything— THEN PHONE US! • SubiSCt to Oiir U w # / Craclit Policy O ur P olicy: 1. Wv'ro In buslneM to flr>d ways to make lo&nt.2. Wa can't build a bi'»li>e%a Ly turning away bualntia. 3. Wa think llko a ciitOmair. Fleet Financenter 1111 yadkinville Rd. ‘‘hopping CenterWillow Oak о Mocksville, N.C. Phone: 634-3596 Ш I t o tl^ JC rb X iJr^ l^Bargains Ä pc Bloom ing| D a n ie l F u rn itu re BIG 17.2 CU. FT. CAPACITY NO-FROST REFRIGERATOR-FREEZER □ 17.2 Cu. ft. of storage space U 4.74 Cu. ft. freezer section ¡a 12.41 Cu. ft. fresh food capacity ® 2 Freezer cJoor shelves 11 2 Easy-Release'^“ ice trays□ Equippetj for optional ice maker 03 Covered dairy compartmentH Removable egg trays • ^U Large twin fruit and vegetable bins, f c Almond Only now just... b'549* INFINITE HEAT ROTARY CONTROLS @ 30" Oven-range wilh slay-up Calrc^® surface heating Gnils- @ Automatic oven timer Lift-off oven door @ Removable trim rings/pan’s S Surface unit "ON" indicator light.' STAY-UP CAIROO» UNITS Model RB734A " ■ *4 6 9 » REMOVABLE ORAWER FOREASYCIEANINC Я'> ^ STARTS AS AVALUE ...STAYS AVALUE! - EASY-CLEAN OVEN-RANGE SALE! 40" RANGE AT A GREAT LOW PRICE! [3 Automatic oven timer and clock [3 Full-width cooktop lamp (3 . Lifl-oK oven window door [3 Sur­ face unit "O N " light. Model RC548W jBst ^ 5 39” D A N I E LFurniture and Electric Co., Inc. ridge P h o n e : 6 3 4 - 2 4 9 2 tLU N O 120 SYSTEM ! CLEAN D ISH ES W ITH W A TER TEM PER A TU R ES A S LOW A S 120° ■ 9 Cycle built-in with Econo 120 System to save water, energy, money ■ Light V^ash, Rinse 8 Hold cycles ■ Crystal ClearTw rinse dispenser ■ Soft food dis­ poser B Sound Insulated. Model HDA865 95just » 4 1 9 L O W P R I C E South bflainStri at the Overhei Mocksville, N.C. ■Serving th e D a v ie C o u n t y a r e a f ! f o r o v e r 4 0 y e a r s . " 10 - DAVIE COUNTY BNTEIU’ RISU Rl-CORD. THURSDAY. MAY 12. 1983 Kuban-Rupard ■ • Catherine Anne Kuban, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ray Kuban of Brighton, Michigan, is engaged to lie married to Joseph Howard Rupard, the son of Estelle Kluttz and Clarence Rupard, both of MoclcsViUe., Miss Kuban is a 1978 graduate of Brighton High School and 1982 graduate of David Lipscomb College in Nashville, Tennessee. She is an intern medical technologist with St. Thomas Hospital in Nashville. Mr. Rupard is a 1977 graduate of Davie County High School and graduated from David Lipscomb College in 1981. He is currently a graduate student in the field of chemistry at Vanderbilt University in Nashville. '-‘A July isth wedding is planned. Mistie Clontz Honored Saturday im s. M A R K L A V E R N E C O H EN ... was Sheila Mae Reavis Reavis-Cohen Vows Spoken ■ ■ Mislie Cloniz was entertained . with a party Saturday night honoring completion of 12 years of ■'Idance training with the Baylin bance Studios and her upcoming iiigh sciiool graduation. The party was iield at her home on Country : I Lane and hosted by her parents, Mr. land Mrs. J . C. Clontz.- it, The party followed the Baylin ' Dance Recital held at Reynolds Auditorium in Winston-Salem. Mistie is a member of the Judy Baylin “Siiowstoppers” , a position she has held for three years..;—- A large number of family and friends attended the recital and party. Special guests included her gramdmothers, Lillie Clontz and Ella Mae Plott. Mistie received C o u p l e H o n o r e d A t F a r m i n g t o n The Reverend Raymond ' L . Surratt of Farmington and his fiancce Miss Anita Booe of Jacksonville, Florida were honored with a covered dish supper and shower Saturday, April 23 at the Farmington Masonic Lodge. Miss Booe was presented with' a white daisy corsage for her white suit.'Hosts were young adults of tiie Wesley Chapel and Farmington United Methodist churches. The couple, Miss Booe’s mother, Mrs. Karlene Cope, and several out- of-town fam ily members were sealed al a (able covered wi(h a pink tablecloth, overlaid with cream lace, and centered with an arrangemeni of rose carnations and lavendar and wiiite mums. The couple, who will be married June IB, received many useful and lovely gifts. many beautiful and useful gifts. Following graduation from Davie High May 31, Mistie plans to con­ linue her studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. C h o r u s A n d V o c a l E n s e m b l e I n C o n c e r t Davie High School Chorus and Vocal Ensemble under the direction ot Mrs. Letty Smith, will present a concert, Thursday, May 12, at 7:30 p.m. at South Davie Junior High School. No admission w ill be charged. Soloists will be Jerry Brooks, Leesa Masten, Aylisa Hellard, Susan Thompson and M elissa Myers. Selections include a medley of songs from “ Oklahoma,” “Tomorrow” , “ Going On Seven­ teen” , and “ New York.” A dance to Fame, choreographed by Susan Thompson will also be performed. The public is invited to attend. CORRECTION In last week’s issue of the paper, thè wedding of Ms. Betsy Snipes lo Jesse Ray Faulkner, both of Southern Pines, N .C .; the bridegroom’s name was incorrectly listed. It should have read under the picture: Mrs. Jesse Ray Faulkner. B B Q C h i c k e n S u p p e r A Barbecue Chicken supper will be held Saturday, May 21, at Cor- nalzer-Dulin Fire Department. Take oul boxes will be available. L o r i T u t t e r o w T o R e c e i v e P h a r m a c y D e g r e e Lori C, Tutterow of Mocksville, N.C. will receive the BS Pharmacy degree from Ihe University of Nortii Carolina at Chapel Hill during graduation ceremonies on May 15.She is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd F . Tutterow of 71G YadkinviUe Road, Mocksville, N.C. and is a 1978 graduale of Davie Counly high scliool in Mocksville. Following graduation she will be employed wilh Revco Drugs in Winslon-sSalem . Al Chapel Hill, Miss Tutterow was a member of:Kappa Epsilon Ph arm aceu tical F ra te rn ity (awards chairman); little sister of Kapp Psi, American Sociely of Hospilal Pharmacists, American Pharmaceuiieal Associalion, and Ihe Wake Counly Pharmaceutical Associalion. “hot 5)flash Shoe Show 196 VWilkesboro Street Mocksville. N.C. reg. 7.99 -----La(jles5-10 Navy, red, or natural canvas anci elastic. Candy stripe or solid colors. HOURS: 10 10 9 Mon. - Sat. 1 • 6 Sun. Mark LaVerne Cohen, son of Mr. and Mrs. LaVerne Cohen and Sheila Mae Reavis, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Merriel Reavis were united in marriage, Sunday, May 8, at 7:00 p.m. in a double ring ceremony at Chestnut Grove United Methodist Church. The Reverend John Fowler officiated Ihe ceremony. The altar was decorated with green palms and mixed spring flowers. One fan candelabra cen­ tered the altar flanked by two round candelabras. Sunburst yellow candJoE provided light for Ihe ceremony. Mary Katherine McDaniel directed the wedding. A program of wedding music was provided by Geneva Renegar and vocalist, LuAnn Eaton. The bride, given in marriage by her father wore a floor-length gown of while organza lined with acetate taffeta. The dress was designed with a sweetheart neckline and sleeves overlayed with lace, but­ toning at the wrists. A fitted waistline allowed layers of laced tiers to flow down the back of the dress into a chapel length train. The froni of Ihe dress was sheer white organza with the neckline in­ terlaced wi(h sequins and pearls. She chose a raised caplet headpiece of waist-length illusion and mat­ ching lace; and 'carried a silk bouguel of yellow roses, daisies, babies’ breath and greenery with white streamers. Miss Lisa Stumbo of Mooresvllle, cousin of the bride, was matron of honor, Mrs. Vanessa Cohen and Miss Lisa Myers, both of Mocksville were bridesmaids. Miss JoAnn Reavis of Slalesville was also a bridesmaid. Miss Crystal Reavis was flowergirl. The attendants wore full-length gowns of soft yellow organza, lined in acetate taffeta, designed with ruffle front and back neckline with capped sleeves and bow trim. The skirts were flared with flounced hem. The matron of honor carried two white silk roses with yellow ribbon. Each bridesmaid carried one white silk rose wilh yellow ribbon. The flowergirl carried a basket wilh yellow rose petals. The at­tendants wore matching yellow wide-brimmed hats wilh a bow on Ihe back. LaVerne Cohen served as his son’s best man. Ushers were Richard Cohen, Mickey Reavis, brother of Ihe bride, and Harold Speer, all of Mocksville. Ethan Boger was ring bearer. The molher of Ihe bride chose a fuii-lenglh gown of silk qiana in a burgundy color. She wore a silk orchid lhal matched her gown. The molher of Ihe bridegroom chose a soft lavender full-length gown of silk qiana. An orchid was also chosen for her gown. Both mothers were presenled with a long stemmed red rose and card at Ihe end of the ceremony. Miss Lisa Sherriel of Mocksville kept Ihe regisier. Miss Kristy Markiin of Mocksville provided programs and rice bags. The bride is a 1981 graduate of Davie High School and is presently employed by Drexel Heritage Furniiure Company of Mocksville. The bridegroom is a 1982 graduate 'of Davie High School and is presenlly enlisted in Ihe U.S. Army. Afler a wedding Irip to Myrtle Beach, S.C. the couple will make Ihcir home in Fort Bragg, N.C. R E C E P T IO N . Anniversary Rings On April 23, the bride was again honored with a shower given by Ruby Bailey, Mary Howard and Vanessa Cohen al the home of Ruby Bailey. Refreshments were served lo approximalely 25 guests. The bride received many useful gifts at both showers. N ew Arrival Mr. and Mrs. Brian Eugene Diggs of Roule 10, Salisbury, N. C. an­ nounce Ihe birth of their first child, a daughter. Brandy Nastassia, born Tuesday, May 3, 1983, at Davie Counly Hospilal in Mocksville. The baby weighed 8 lbs. 7 ozs. and was 21 inches in. length. Malernal grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Mason. Paternal grandmother is Mrs. Kaye C. Diggs. ’I n i Im m ediately following the ceremony, Ihe guesis were en- lertained with a receplion in the fellowship hall. The bride’s table was covered in yellow overlaid with white lace. The centerpiece was an arrangement of assorted flowers. ’Two silver can­ delabras flanked the center arrangement. The reception was arranged by Agnes Wooten. The four-tiered wedding cake was decorated with yellow roses and miniature roses and topped with a miniature bride and bridegroom. A fountain decorated Ihe cake un­derneath. Cathy Boger baked the cake. Refreshments consisted of punch, peanuts and mints. Shirley Lanning and Ruby Boger served. REH EA RSA L DINNER On Saturday, May 7 following the rehearsal, Ihe bridegroom’s parents entertained Ibe guesis with a dinner al Iheir home. The menu consisted of ham, chicken pie, potato salad, green beans, rolls and pecan pie. The couple chose this time to present gifts lo their attendants. SHOWERS On April 16, the bride-elect was honored with a shower given by Shirley Lanning and Ruby Boger at Ihe home, of Shirley Lanning. Refreshments were served to ap­ proximately 39 people. Shoemaker-Prevette No formal invitations are being issued but all relatives and friends are being invited to the 3 p.m. wedding and reception June 26 of Debbie Jill Shoemaker and Douglas Eugene Prevette at Fairview Baptist Church, Statesville, N. C. The bride-elect is the daughter of Lois B. Moose and William Shoemaker both of Statesville. She graduated from West Iredell High School and the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. Miss Shoemaker is employed by the Iredell County School System. The prospective bridegroom is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Calvin Prevette of Route 1, Mocksville. He graduated from Davie' County High School and North Carolina State University and is vocational agriculture teacher at North Iredell High School. C h r i s t i a n W o m e n M e e t W e d n e s d a y Luncheon Wednesday, May 18 at . 11:15 at Bermuda Run Country Club in Advance. There is a charge of five dollars for the buffet. The program will feature Special Gifts of T . Bagg Merchant, Old Salem; Musical Memories by Jodie Chetwood; and Cherished Words from Katiiy Beckwith. Kathy Beckw ith, the guest speaker from New Bern, is a former teacher and the wife of Cardiologist, George Beckwith. Originally from Virginia, Kathy graduated from Longwood College and received her masters degree from the Universiti of Virginia. A nursery is provided for the children by calling Carole Rhoades al 767-2771. It is a free nursery at Macedonia Moravian Church. II is necessary that reservations be made by May 16 and essential lhat cancellations be called in. Call Ruby Leagans at 998-.3598 for reservations or any information. Kathy Blaclcv/ell ...J Christian Women’s West cordially invites all interested women to a “ Precious Moments’ The Club, Around and About | у в т е IN CALIFO RN IA, M EXICO, ARIZONA & ’TEXAS Mrs. Stacy Beck and Mrs. Era Latham were among those traveling to San Francisco, California recently with the Board of Education members. Following the meetings, Mrs. Beck and Mrs. Latham took a bus tour of Southern California seeing sights of interest in New Mexico, Flagstaff, Arizona, and Wichita Falls, Texas, where they visited Mr. and Mrs. Curtis Newsom. Mrs. Newsom is the daughter and granddaughter of Mrs. Beck and Mrs. Latham. They also spent a day in Vernon, Texas where they were . luncheon guests of Mrs. Latham’s cousins, Minnie Halibut and Mary Horn. They returned h(ime from Dallas, Texas by plane. M OTHER’S D A Y GATHERING Sunday luncheon guests of Mr. and Mrs. Prentice Campbell were their grandsons, Jim m y and Mike Campbell of Statesville, N. C., and Mrs. Troy Boose of Mocksville. Their dinner guests were their son and daughter-in- law, Major Ret. Jim Campbell and Mrs. Campbell of Statesvill^ Americans drink erage-averaging soda pop than any other bev- gallons per capita annually. American Outlet 6 6 Court Hou|se Square Mocksville, N.C. Look at these values Work Jeans ’5“ Jordache ‘25* Lee ’20” Wrangler *12” Live In Jeans 40'” Now taking trade In with purchase of any Jean Other Values Include; Dee Cee Blouses *8” Dee Cee Shorts *6“ Dee Cee Shirts For Men ‘8* Children's Jeans yVrangler Western Shirts ’8“ DAVIE COUNTY liNTLKI'KlSI-, К1л OKI), Till KSDAY. MAY 12, 1983 - II M RS. M A R C U S D A L E I-IAR R IS ... was M ary Lynne Eaton Eaton-Hanris Votvs Are Spoken MRS. S A M U EL C R O TTS SPR Y .. was Linda Faye CoUoway Golloway-Spry Vows Spoken Mary Lynne Eaton and Marcus Dale H arris were united in marriage Saturday afternoon, May 7, at 2 p.m. at the First Baptist Church in Mocitsville. The Rev. Charles Bullock officiated at the double ring ceremony. . The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. N. Wayne Eaton of 256 Park Ave., Mocksville. She is a dental hygienist employed with Dr. Gary E . Prillam an in Mocksville. The bridegroom is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Clyde C. Harris of Roule 3, Yadkinville. He is employed with the Pepsi Cola Company of Spencer.A program of wedding music was presented by John Jordan, organist and Miss Lou Ann Eaton, soloist., Mr. and Mrs. Donnie Livengood kept the guest register. Mrs. Candice Poplin and Miss Leigh Jones directed the wedding.The bride, given in marriage by her father, wore a gown of schiffle lace with open effect yoke edged with ruffled lace and ruffled neckline. A peplum accented the waistline and the gown featured puffed elbow length sleeves. The skirt, formed from tiers of lace, extended into an opera length train. Her headpiece was a halo of white silk flowers accented with satin ribbon streamers. Miss Lou Ann Eaton was her sister’s maid of honor. Bridesmaids were M rs: Teresa Maysilles of Chapel Hill, N.C., sister of the bride, Mrs. Judi Smith of King, N.C., sister of the groom and Mrs. Linda Eaton of Durham, M.C. sister-in-law of the bride. The attendants wore pink linen D a v i e G o l d e n A g e C l u b H a s M e e t i n g The Davie Golden Age Club met Wednesday May 4th in the Rotary Hut with over 20 present. The meeting was called to order by the vice-president, Mrs. Haire. Mrs. Ruth Jones, with Mrs. Lucille Smoot at the piano, led the group in singing. “ He Keeps Me Singing’’ and “ To God, Be The Glory” . The Rev. David Hyde was in­ troduced by Mrs. Jones. He gave a very inspiring and thoughtful message, using St. Matthew 7-1. “Judge Not, Thai Ye Be Not Judged.” II would be much better if we followed Jesus’ way and reach out in Love, rather than judge the people we meet.Several things were announced. Mrs. Emma Grant said there is more empty seats on the bus to go to the zoo May 17. If anyone wants to go call one of the members. The club will have a skit on the program al Fun Day in May.The Rev. Charles E . Bullock gave a very educational program on Soil and Water Conservation by tape and pictures. Happy Birthday was sung to members lhat have birthdays in May.Frank Stroud closed Ihe meeting with prayer. Cookies und coffee were served by Mrs. Honeycutt and Mrs. Shore. Pen-And-Ink And Watercolor S k e t c h e s O n D i s p l a y A t L i b r a r y Watercolor and pen-and-ink sketches by Phyllis Swanson will be on display al the Davie County Library May 9-30, Paintings by Odessa Penninger are being shown in the Assembly Room. Branch Bank on Gaither Street has a display of paintings and drawings by Davie A rl Guild ■members: Connie Dickens, Denise Donaldson, Darrell Edwards, Ann Frick, Marjorie Hoyle, Annette Ratledge, and Ann Williams. Paintings displayed al Fisher­ man's Quarters this monlh include works by Nancy Collette, Anna Marshbanks, and Pearlene Reavis. skirts and white blouses with lace accents. They carried long stem­ med pink carnations. Mr. Frank E . Harris was his brother’s best man. Ushers were Mr. Monty G. Harris of Yadkinville, N.C., brother of the groom and Mr. J . Clay Eaten of Durham, N.C., brother of the bride. After a wedding trip to the South Carolina coast, the couple will make their home at Route 3, Yadkinville, N.C. RECEPTIO N Im m ediately following the rehearsal on Friday evening, a reception for the attendants, close friends and family was held at tbe home of the bride’s parents. The bride’s table was overlaid with pink, covered with white lace, and cen­ tered with an arrangement of mixed spring flowers. ■ The guests were served a four tiered red velvet wedding’ cake, vegetable finger sandwiches, Black­ eyed Susans, nuts, mints, and iced cranberry punch. Assisting in serving were Mrs. Joyce Eaton and Mrs. Susan Eaton. Barney-Hujfman Mr. and Mrs. Ronald L, Barney of Route 3, Advance, North Carolina announce the engagement of their daughter, Susan Elizabeth to Joel Kevin Huffinah, son of Charles L . Huffman of Route 10, Salisbury, North Carolina and Janet G. Huffman of Route 10, Salisbury, North Carolina. Miss Barney, a 1976 graduate of Davie High School and Forsyth Tech is presently employed by Prudential Life Insurance Company in Winston- Salem, N.C. M f. Huffman, a 1976 graduate of North Rowan High School and Nashville Auto Diesel College is employed by Power Curbers Inc. of Salisbury, North Carolina. The wedding is planned for July 2nd, 1983, at 4:00 p.m. at Advance United Methodist Church in Advance, North Carolina. D e b r a L y n n G r a h a m N a m e d M a r s h a l marshals are Kathy Crisp of Horse Shoe, Kimberly. Fletcher of Boone, Elizabeth Jordan of Salisbury, and John Ann Shearer of Fayetteville. Debra Lynn Graham of Mocksville has been named a marshal at-Peace College. Selected on the basis of academic achievement, marshals rank at the top of the freshman class for first semester work. Marshals will assist in commencement and fall con­ vocation activities at Peace. In addition to Debbie, 1983 Debbie is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas H. Graham of Route 6, Mocksville. She is a 1982 graduate of Davie High School. Peace is a two-year college for women offering associate degrees in liberal arts, music and business. Miss Linda Faye Golloway of Winston-Salem, N.C., and Samuel Crotts Spry,'son of Mr. and Mrs. William C. Spry of MocksviUe, N.C. were united in m arriage on Saturday, May 7 in a three p.m. ceremony at Maple Springs United Methodist Church in Winston- Salem. The Reverend Frank Cook officiated with the Reverend Phillip Cole assisting, at the double ring ceremony. A program of wedding music was presented by Jim Sink, organist. Patti Cosmidis of Winston-Salem, N.C. was maid of honor. Bridesmaids were Nancy Lamm, bride’s sister of Graham, N .C.; Sandy Cosmidis of Winston-Salem; Tina Crotts and Regina Draughn, both of Mocksville, N .C.; and Diana McBride of Kinston, N.C. William C. Spry of Mocksville, N.C. was his son’s best man. Ushering were John Golloway, bride’s brother of Atlanta, Ga.; Rick Spry, bridegroom’s brother of Mocksville, N .C.; Woody Lamm, bride’s brother-in-law of Graham, N.C.; Darryl McBride of Kinston, N .C .; and B a rry Stew art of Lewisville, N.C. The bride’s parents are Mr. and Mrs. John Golloway, Sr. of 4030 Tangle Lane, Winston-Salem, N.C. She is a graduate of Reynolds Senior High School; and is employed by Bowman Gray School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, N.C. >i The bridegroom is the son of Mr. and Mrs. WUliam C. Spry of Route 7, Mocksville, N.C. He is a graduate of Davie High School, and Forsyth Technical School. He is employed by North Carolina Baptist Hospital of Winston-Salem, N.C. After a wedding trip to Smith Mountain Lake, Virginia, the couple will make their home in Mocksville, N.C. i RECEPTIO N A reception was held in the church fellowship hall, im m ediately following the wedding for the wedding party and guests. Hosts were the bride’s parents. P r e g n a n t F a t h e r s By Jame.s L. Brevn, M.D. 1’rc.sident, The American College of Obslelrician.s and GynecoloKlsLs For women, pregnancy i.s somewhat like having a b irth­ day for nine m onths — you are tlic center o f attention, A nd alter ch ildb irth , you sliare llie lin ic lig h i w ith your baby. And w liat aboul fKHir old D ad’.’ W e ll, llie role lo r I'aiher.s during pregnancy, labor, and delivery is changing. M ore and more men are taking an active role in the pregnancy. Tlie y go w ith llie e.xpectani m other to die obstetrician, they are tliere lo hear Ihe baby's I'irsl lieanbcat. and stay w ilh her il' any tests need to be done. M en also are taking part in llie aclual birth. In prepared ch ildb irth , the lather has d e fi­ nite jobs to do during labor and delivery. He is the coach, and lielps Ihe m other in labor hy tim ing herciinlractions. leading her in breathing exerci.ses, g iving lier massages and wash- cloths, and generally providing enioiional support. M ore and m ore hospitals are allow ing fatlicrs 10 b.' in Ihe operating rixm i during a cesarean delivery if the w ife is awake lo give her com fort and reassurance. In tlie past, lathers were rarely physically involved in labor and deliver)'. B ut lim es are changing and many men are actually involved viith the birth and stay w ith llie m other in Ihe d elivery rixin i. A fte ra ll, fathers fee! excited and liappy and also feel scared, anxious, uncertain about Iheir a b ility as a parent, and concerned aboul changes the baby w ill make in the rela- tion.ship. A nd becau.se most o f llie attention is focused on Ihc wom an, they often feel unable 10 talk aboul their feelings: I'aihers should realize that they have an im portant pari in having a ch ild. A lthough pre­ natal care, sleep, diet, and exer­ cise all are necessary fo r a good pregnancy and healthy baby, so is the father’s support, under­ standing and reassurance o f the wom an. ■ A nd after the baby conies. It's im porlanl fo r Ihe lather lo have physical contact w ith his infant — by touching, holding, and playing. M ore lathers today arc changing diapers, feeding and bathing ihe infant, and ac­ tive ly involved in childcare. A lth o u g h il m a y seem strange, some fathers become so involved in a pregnancy lhat they put on w eighl. become nau.seous, and have cram ps. Tlie expectant couple should check lo see if their hospilal a l­ lows fathers in Ihe delivery room s, and what kind o f ch ild ­ birth classes are available. It also m ight be helpful if the father goes » iih the wom an lo the obstetrician, as he can ask questions and meel the doctor before labor and delivery. A fte r a ll, the baby has bolh a m other and father. Nr.M w't't'k: Prt fiihiii^y mut \l\ir i П Ш Ш T h e w o r d " p l a s t i c " c o m e s f r o m t h e G r e e k p la s lilto s , w h ic h m e a n s " a b le t o b e m o ld e d , " QUAKER STATE D eluxe 10W 40 M o to r O il Regularly 1.15! Quaker State 10W40 motor oil. Limil 5, P alm o live D eo d o ran t B ar Soap Regularly 39'! 4.75 ounce bars o f Palmolive deodorant soap, Limil 6 bars. Rompers And Short Sets •R om pers in prihts or stripes. P oly/cotton tops and woven short-looi< bottom s. S ,M ,L . •S h ort Sets in stripes or solids. Terry or poly/cotton tops w ith m atching woven shorts. S ,M ,L . \ LAUNDRYDETERGENT .B o x A rm A n d H am m e r D etergent Regularly 1.39! 65 oz, laundry detergent. Limit 2 boxes. 3 19 K leenex B ox D iapers 24 Kleenex disposable Super Dry extra absorbent diapers. Diaper Bags........................3.99 S '! c^ ^ S um m er ^ ^ P r . Sandals Compare Up To 6.99! Ladies’ and children’s colorful sandals including thong & slip-on styles. Prices Good At All Family Dollar Stores Through This Weekend While Quantities Last. QuBntltles Limited On Some Merchandise. No Sales To Dealers. M o n .-Fri. - 9 a.m .-9 p.m. Saturday - 9 a m • 8 p.m. Sinilav - 1 p .m .-6 p.m. 1 2 -D A V II-C O U N T V liNTERPRISE KI£CÜKD. THURSDAY. MAY 12. 1983 Smoke billowed from the second story of this house as firefighters gained valuable training w hile attem pting to bring the blaze under control. Gene Brannon _____ i; burning house. They ^ Brown and Jim Dwiggins. > '■ ■ 1 (left) instructor, gives pointers to firem en before entering the . They are (I to r) J. H. <'Butch" C artner, Jim Hendricks, Steve COMPUTER WORKSHOP FOR THE BEGINNER • L e a r n . A b o u t T h e C o m p u t e r R e v o l u t i o n • R e c e i v e H a n d s - O n E x p e r i e n c e • A t t e n d F o u r C l a s s e s : M a y 2 0 & 2 1 , M a y 2 7 & 2 8 • . . . A n d T h e C o m p u t e r B e c o m e s Y o u r s ! WORKSHOP COST: *250°° Topics I"'!!! Include: Word Processing, Educational Instruction Data IV<anagenient, Color Graphics and T’ ore. ENROLLMENT LIMITED TO 73 Contact the Continuing Education Office: 637-4464Catawba College HELD OVER! — D UE T O P O P U L A R D E M A N D — But Hurty Selection Is Limited To Stock On Hand! Realistic Training For Davie County Fire Fighters Clouds of black smoke billowed from Ihe roof of a burning house Salurday as firemen from Ihree volunteer deparlmenis ballled Ihe blaze.However. Ihe objeel wasn’l lo save Ihe siruelure. Inslead Ihe house became a blazing inferno, providing excelleni on-lbe-spol rescue Irainlng for new firemen eager lo learn Ihe ropes of effeclive fire fighling.Aboul 30 firemen from Sheffield- Calahaln, Cenler and Counly Lino Volunleer deparlmenis parlicipaled in Ihe exercise Salurday al an abandoned house adjaceni lo Ijames BaplisI Church.Men were given an opporlunity lo lesi air packs, conduci search and rescue ladies, plus gain experience on Iho ladder and in nozzle conlroi. "This is aboul as close lo Ihe real thing as you can get," said Norman Korrest, Cenler fire chief. Men gain actual training in all phases of firefighting, going-in and oul of Iho burning building lo fighl Ihe blaze, conduci rescues, etc." Forrest explained thal Iho training called for men lo don air packs, allowing Ihem lo spend up lo ;«) minutes inside Ihe burning structure. Part of the seminar in­ cluded obstructing vision wjth black plastic, allowing men lo conduci rescue missions in total darkness. Firemen were also allowed Ihe opportunity lo invesligale Ihe origin of the fire. Jack Kooniz, Counly Line Volunleer Fire Deparlmeni, said Saturday’s firefighting exercises were especially important because il IS becoming more difficult to find old structures lo burn. “This is the best way lo ef­ fectively leach and learn fire fighting techniques,” he said. “ Bul il is becoming increasingly difficult to find old structures lo burn.” He added lhal any person wishing lo donate an old structure for fire training should contact the Davie Firemen’s Associalion.Gene Brannon (Yadkin Counly) and Jim Barrow (Forsyth County), both certified fire fighling in- slruclors Ihrough Ihe Deparlmeni of Communiiy Colleges, conaucled the training session. They were assisled by Robert Tullerow and Mark WilliaTns, Cenler VFD , also cerlified instructors. Firem en participating in Ihe seminar gained classroom credits towards firefighting certification. Leazer Is Elected To Angus Association Chloe S. Leazer, Jr., Mocksville, North Carolina, has been elected lo membership in Ihe American Angus Associalion, reporls Dick Spader, executive vice-presidenI of Ihe naiional organization with headquarters in S I. Joseph, Missouri. The American Angus Association, wilh some 38,000 active life and junior members, is Ihe largest beef callie registry association in Ihe world. Ils computerized records include detailed informalion on nearly 10 million registered Angus. The Associalion records ancestral informalion and keeps records of produclion on individual animals for ils members. These permanent records help members select and male Ihe best animals in their herds lo produce high quality, efficient breeding callie which are Ihen recorded with Ihe American Angus Associalion. MosI of Ihese registered Angus are used by Ihe U.S. farmers and ranchers who raise high -aualilv beef ' (P h o to s b y R o b in F ergusson) Firem en, equipped w ith a ir packs, aw ait their turn to enter the blazing building. The house used during the training session is located adjacent to ijam es Baptist Church. In s ta n t C re d it B u y H e re -P a y H e re \We finance our oiivn E U R E K A BARG AIN Y e a r ! I Power drivt-n 12‘ bt- a ter-hjr brush mil. R n t.i.M u lic * iv lf- s ciju ttin K p«Mi-rh>-ad adjuBU tn any cur|>ct hriKht. and •* larKc cu- pacUy diip-tsablf dust ’ ( bag M o d a l 1 7 4 6 S 1 5 9 S a v e $ 6 0 iSMUFitVtOPELtSD Upright Vac TourhCunlrol handle keep» >ou in conlrni Ilf the vac at nil 11 mi>». e (c l u• I wI- V I llr J • Orunmtr'i) b jr ro ll luoaen* deep >;ri'. anil Kround-in d irt, .ind Ihe h rillu n l hejdht(ht »i-i-k* out dirt Model StW7 $ 1 7 9 ^ = S a v e $ 3 0 M ADE in Am erica! Save $ 6 0 T h is E u re k a u p riK 'h t is a O n lliir S a v i/ii; vac. B u d g e t p ric e d a n d p a c k e d w ilti fe a lu re s . i,\H S A V K M C b Q Q 9 5 I'mlmilM ^ INCLUDES TOOLS { E U R E K A U P R IG H T w ith 4 -w iy D U J A -N ip * M odal 1425 ^D U A L EOCC KLEENER^ Save 5 2 0 " i l . E U R E K A A L L S T E E L C A N IS T E R w ilh 1.2 p e a k H .P . m o to r T U '* $ 69” We carry all shapes and sizes of ' GENUIN E EU REKA D ISPO SA B LE DUST BA G S! BONUS! BUY2 ^ S — PACKAGES OF I p H DISPOSABtE I ■ № DUSTBAGS, I m GET1 FREE! C a r o l i n a T i r e C o . 9 ss^ 9 6 2 Y a d k i n v l l i e R o a d M o c k a v l l l o . N . C . P H O N E 6 3 4 - 6 1 1 5 I I.—........... - — - , , _ r*i>RPgerI We Still Have: Free DBlivery Personal Pervice Free Parking | Rusty Carmichael DAVIECOUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, THURSDAY, MAY U , I4S3 ^ 13 r M o cks N ew s T his sc en e m e e ts th e ey e of those w ho tra v e l th e S anford R oad in ru ra l D avie C ounty. May Is Proclaimed As High Blood Pressure Month In N.C. An esiimated 1.2 million North Carolinians are victims of a silent killer known as hypertension, or high blood pressure.' In an effort to make Nortif Carolinians more aware of the dangers of the disease and Ihe importance of controlling It, Governor James B. Hunt, Jr. has proclaimed May as High Blood Pressure Month. “ Wc call hypertension the silent killer because there may be no early warning of the disease,” State Health Director Dr. Ronald H. Levine said. “ La le r symptoms might be kidney failure, stroke or heart at­ tack, and all of these are potentially fatal. The only way lo tell if you have high blood pressure Is lo have it checked." He explained that blood pressure varies within a normal range, and generally, a person’s blood pressure increases slighlly with age. He said blood pressure should be checked at least once a year. There are two blood measuremenis - a (op and bottom number. The normal maximum for Ihe top number is 140 and Ihe nor­ mal maximum for the bollom number is 90. A person wilh a blood pressure that remains al 160 over 95 or greater, for example, is con­ sidered to have high blood pressure and should be under Ihe supervision of a physician. “ Persons wilh blood pressure readings between 140 over 80 and 160 over 95 are considered lo have borderline high blood pressure,” Levine emphasized. “ II preventive measures such as reducing salt intake, weight reduction and exercise are nol started, Ihis in dividual could develop true high blood pressure in the future.” He said lhat no one really knows whal causes high blocxl pressure,, but some of the contribuUng factors may be family history, obesity, high sodium (salt) and cholesterol diets, smoking, exposure lo con slant stress and the presence of anolher chronic disease such as are two blood pressure diabetes. Mocksville Elementary School Menu, May 16-20 W ED N ESD A Y: Meat loaf. High blood pressure is treatable through weight reduction, special diets, exercise, and medication prescribed by a doctor. If il goes unlrealed, il can lead to kidney failure, stroke and heart attack. One oul of every six Americans has high blood pressure. Among blacks the rate Is one oul of every four. “ We don’l know why more black Am ericans have high blood pressure or why they seem to have 11 more severely,” Levine Said. “ Our slale has esiablished a number of blood pressure educalion and health promotion programs designed to reach specific ethnic and ago groups. Blood pressure screening clinics are also offered al many job sites and churches.” Levine urged all North Carolinians lo have their blood pressure checked regularly. This can be done easily by local health rieparlmenls or family doctors. People who do have a high blood pressure problem should see a doctor lo keep il' under medical control. Mr. ¡md Mrs. Guy Lyon of Mocksville; Mr. and Mrs. Larry Markland nnd children of Advanco, Mrs. Eugene Ri-eyes and children of Lexington, and Mr. and Mrs. Tom Chaffin and children of Mocksville were supper guests of Sunday of Mr. and Mrs. Pedie Carter. Mrs. Grace Foreman and daughter, Mrs. Robin Dent of Altanta, Gal, and Bobby Miller of Fayetleville spent Ihe past week here-with Mr. and Mrs. Henry M ille r T h fv w ore liorp tn he with. Iheir mother, Mrs. Grace Miller who has been seriously ill in Davle County Hospital for the past,week. Mrs. Herman Orrell and Mrs.. Ann Burney of Clemmons visited Mrs. Helen Myers Thursday.Mr. and Mrs. Amos Spady of \'()rkl()wn Va. spent Ihe weekend with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. C.W. Moser and attended church here on Sunday. Steve O rrell underwent knee surgery al Forsyth Hospilal Thursday. P i c k Y o u r O w n . . . S TR A W B E R R IE S O p en W ed. M a y 11th 8 :3 0 a.m . D ally “ excep t Sunday Locatedon Sanford~ iid. Just Off 601 North at MO »2,75 a g a lló n A SSO R T E D H A N G IN G B A SK ET S S6.00 READY PICKED CALL AHEÁD 704-634-3759 . The menu for- M ocksville Elemenlary School for the week of May 16-20 is as follows: MONDAY; Pork patty, french fries, carrot curls, pickles, baked apples, bun. TU ESD AY: Taco & cheese, corn, lossed salad, cake square creamed potatoes, green peas, canned fruit, roll THURSDAY: Hoggie or ham­burger, potato rounds, lettuce, pickles, cookies, bun FR ID A Y : Sausage biscuit, green beans, slaw , peanut butter & cracker, chocolate pudding._________ FREE ESTIMATES DIRTY CARPETS? Truck - Mounted Power Cleans Deep Where Dirt & Odor Stay DIRTY DRAPES Proffessionally Picked-Up Diy Cleaned & Installed Call Rick Hinsley 998-5093 R&S C lean in g S ervice FIRST FEDERAL TAKES YOU TO THE MARKET Mocksville DiscpuntDrug M onday - F rid a y .. . 9 :3 0 to 6 Saturday 9 :3 0 to 1 (nnv m w iaflom ent/new Pharm acitt/naw p rio n ) 1 » N.MaIn St. Mocklvlll«,N.C. (34-2111 Q U A N IT Y ITEM PRICE 1 0 0................................Lasix 40 m g ......................................12.E7 100................................D yazide...............................................12.49 1 0 0 ................................Tagam et 3 0 0 m g .. . . .................29.79 100................................. Inderal 40 m g..................................12.F9 100.................................A ldom et 250m g.............................13.99 1 0 0 ...............................A kJom ot SOOmg.. ;----------- ■ ,26.79 100..................................Lopressor BO m g.. . .1 4 .9 9 100 .................................D iabineie 2 5 0 m g .........................26.99 100 ................................,Tolinas6.250m g....................... 27.89 1 0 0 ,................................Inderal BOmg..................................22.99 100 .................................Procardia lO m g.............................22.29 100 .................................Aldoril - 2 5 ........................................20.99 100 .................................Capoten 25m g...............................24.89 2 1 ....................................Feldene 20m g................................17.99 iOO...................................Corgard 40m g................................28.99 100 ..................................Clinoril 200m g...............................49.99 100 .................................Clinoril 150m g.................. ... .40.99 100...................................M otrin 600m g............................ .?8.99 100 .................................N aprosyn 250 m g.................... . 41.99 100 .................................Nalfon 600m g................................30.99 100.................................B-D Insulin Syringes...................15.98 N P H ......................... U-100 Insulin.................................6.69 30 .................................N itro Disc - 5 .....................................31.00 28 .................................Keflex 2i50mg....................................16.20 The above Items require a physician's prescription. Other new low prices, Call and check with us. —------------------ B O N U S ------------------------ Bring this ad in and get *2°° Off, on any new or transferred prescription. lAII prices reflect 10% cash d iscount| I I I I I I In tro d u cin g D ial-A -Trade^'" a D is c o u n t B ro k e ra g e S e rv ic e T h a t’s O n ly a P h o n e C all A w a y N o w , s u b s t a n t ia l s a v i n g s o n B r o k e r a g e C o m m i s s io n s a r e o n ly a p h o n e c a ll a w a y . D ia l-A -T r a d e ^ “ a n e w D is c o u n t B r o k e r a g e S e r v ic e A v a ila b le a t F ir s t Fetderal, e n a b le s y o u to s a v e u p to 7 0 % o n B r o k e r ’s C o m m is s io n s . T h a t ’s righ t, 7 0 % o r e v e n m o re , w h e n y o u m a k e y o u r o w n t ra d in g d e c is io n s . W it h D ia l-A -T r a d e ^ “ y o u c a n n o w h a v e y o u r s e c u r it ie s a c c o u n t a t F ir s t F e d e ra l, a n d e n jo y t h e c o n v e n ie n c e o f h a v in g all s e t t le m e n t s p r o c e s s e d a u to m a t ic a lly . A c o o p e r a t iv e a r r a n g e m e n t w ith F ir s t F e d e ra l a n d C a p it a l D is c o u n t B r o k e r a g e , In c. m a k e s D ia l- A - T r a d e a v a ila b le to y o u s o th a t y o u c a n s t a r t s a v in g w ith y o u r v e r y n e x t tra d e . C a ll o r c o m e b y a n y o f o u r c o n v e n ie n t o f fic e s t o fin d o u t m o r e a b o u t D ia l-A -T r a d e ^ “ B FIRST FEDERAL SAVINGS M a in O f f ic e : 2 3 0 N . C h e r r y S tre e t B r a n c h O f f ic e s ; 4 9 0 H a n e s M a ll/ 3 4 4 3 R o b in H o o d R o a d / 1 3 0 S. S tra tfo rd R o a d 2 8 1 5 R e y n o ld a R o a d / 3 0 0 1 W a u g h t o w n S tre e t ^ D i a l 'A * 3 f V lo c k s v ille O f f ic e : 1 42 G a it h e r s tr e e t E S L IC u__________l l r a d e ^ “ C l e m m c n s O f f ic e : 2 4 2 1 L e w is v ille -C le m m o n s R o a d ............' 14 - DAVIE COUNTY UNTI-RI’ RISU RECORD, THURSDAY, MAY 12, 1983 In se cts Ki M o re P eo p le T h an S n akes Bees kill more people each year Ihnn do rattlesnakes. In fact bees, spiders and other insects kill more people each year than all of the poisonous snakes kill. And in addition to the deaths caused directly by slings and bites, some of those insects transmit deadly diseases such as Rocky Mountain spotted fever which, hits North Carolina harder than any other state.The . National Safety Council reported that a 10-year study showed that stings ot bees, wasps, hornets and ants caused 50 percent ot 460 fatalities. Snake bites killed 30 percent of the total.Lam ar Gunter, manager ot the North Carolina Insurance News Service (N .C.I.N .S.), said, “ In this slate tick bites are a serious con­ cern becausc their bites can tran­ smit Rocky Mountain spotted fever, which often causes death if il is not treated promptly. "People are going to be spending more time outdoors in the next tew monlhs and they should take precautions against insect and snake bites,” Gunter said. He continued: “ There has been one reported case this year, but Ihere were 1£ deaths in North Carolina last caused by Rocky Mountain spotted fever. There were 17 in 1980 and another seven in 1981.”Health authorities say lhat early detection and treatment w ill prevent the disease from becoming serious. N.C.I.N.S. will provide tree single copies ot a pamphlet on Rocky Mountain spotted fever lo interested persons who send a stamped, self-addressed envelope lo N .C.I.N .S., Post Office Box 1152G, Charlotte, N.C. 28220.Gunter said, “ Health experts say it is important when you are in wooded areas to check yourself every couple of hours. They say the tick musl teed on a person tor aboul five hours before the disease is transmitted. So prompt allention is the best prevention tor Rocky Mountain spoiled fever, "Even Ihough only 5 perceni or less of the American dog licks are carriers, people should nol lake chances with tick bites. Brushy areas and the edges ot wooded areas are likely places for ticks. If there is a wooded area around a person’s home, he or she should be alert to S H O P W I T H u s A N D C O M P A R E O U R M E A T A N D P R O D U C E P R I C E S T O A N Y O T H E R S T O R E I N T H I S A R E A . Y O U 'L L F I N D T H A T O U R L O W E R P R I C E S C A N S A V E Y O U M O N E Y E V E R Y W E E K . I c o o iC E m e E ---------------,----------- L ocated On H w y. 801 C ooleem ee, N.C. W e A ccep I W IC we welcome vouchers A nd Federai Food stam ps, sto re Hours: a« a n ix e v FOOD.STAMP . M on.-Ttiurs. 8:30am -6pm . Fri. 8:30am ^8pm , Sat. b U P E R M A R K E T S H O P P E R S 8:30am -6pm , C losed S undays. Q uantities R eserved. the presence of licks.”In the 10-year study of fatalities from bites and slings, spiders caused 14 percent of the 4G0 deaths. Scorpions caused 2 percent ot Ihe deaths. Children, more often Ihan adults, die from the biles ot Ihe brown recluse spider, Ihe scorpion and other such creatures. 'i The stings ot bees imd related insects prove fatal lo adults more often Ihan to children. In Ihe study, among the 229 deaths caused by bees and related insects, only 7 percent of the victims were under Ihc age ot 20. "Sweet smells attract bees,” Gunter said. “ Experts say that you should avoid strong perfumes, hair sprays and Ionics, and sun Ian lotions if you are going into areas where bees may be present. W E G I V E Y O U T H E L O W P R IC E S O T H E R S T O R E S T A L K A B O U T P L U S T H E C O U R T E S I E S O F A H O M E T O W N ^ S U P E R M A R K E T . VALLEYDALE ALL =aatiuahocon ^ FRANKS c 9 9 ' 9 9 < VALLEYDALE ALL MEAT BOLOGNA VALLEYDALE SLICED BACON VALLEYDALE SAUSAGE USDA GRADE A FRESH WHOLE FRYERS = USDA CHOICE FAMILY PACK CUBED ^ 9 9 1 2 - O z . P k g . STEAK Lb. USDA CHOICE ... GROUND f t P P P 4-Lb. Pkg.DCtr Lb. USDA CHOICE EXTRA LEAN G R O U N D C H U C K USDA CHOICE EXTRA LEAN S T E W B EEF USDA CHOICE BONELESS S IR L O IN S T E A K USDA CHOICE BONELESS C H U C K R O A S T USDA CHOICE BONELESS C H U C K S T E A K USDA CHOICE BONELESS S H O U L D E R R O A S T USDA CHOICE BONELESS S H O U L D E R S T E A K A SS'T . FLA V O R S...C O BLE FIVE V A R IET IES B A N Q U E T Q U A LIT Y uppers B A N Q U E T C H IC K E N , BEEF O R TURKEY Meat Pies RUSETTE C R IN K LE C U T French Fries M A Z O L A Q U A R T E R S Margarine M O R N IN G FR ESH SW EE T O R BU TTERM ILK Biscuits pfcT KRAFT A M E R IC A N C H E E SE Singles 1 H U N T 'S T O M A T O Ketchups? 1” R EG U LA R F LA V O R T W IN PET Dog Food QT. JA R ... JFG C R E A M Y M a y o n n a is e 59*^LIMIT 1 W ITH $7.50 OR MORE ORDER V A N C A M P 'S P O R K A N D Beans isi 39*' JFG Tea Bags r/ 1” S IX 1-LITER BO TTLES Colcfi 059BTL DEPOSIT M m LIBBY'S V IE N N A Sausage .0, 39^ LIBBY'S PO TTED Meat is 4/* 1 U B B Y 'S BEEF ' Stew 124-O Z. CAN M A X W E L L H O U S E REG U LAR, A D C O R ELECTRA-PERK C o ffe e LB. PKG.1 D e s e rts to n e D in n e r w a r e N e x t 3 W e e k s ^OOR CHOICE OF ITEMS Feature Ends May 2 ath F A N C Y RADISHES 1 3 ^Lg. P k. I W A SS'T . H I-D R I P A P E R TOWELS , 5 9 ^ M E X IC O N CANTALOUPES 7 9 < i # J F E ach B O U TIQ U E S TISSU EKLEENEX 1 2 5 a . B ox w Æ E A ST E R N W H ITE POTATOES 1 0 l b . 1 39 B ag I L A U N D R Y D E T E R G E N T CHEER 4 9 -O z . 1 9 9 Box I .Æ V A L U A B L E % ^’1 .0 0 S A V E ’1 .0 0 'I I I I S A V E TH IS C O U P O N IS G O O D FO R *1 .0 0 O F F O N Y O U R N EX T G R O C E R Y PU R C H A SE O F $15 O R M O R E AT C O O L E E M E E SU PERM ARKET. U M IT O N E CO UPO N PER CUSTOMER PLEASE V O ID AFTER SAT., M A Y 14 ■ ■ ■ I C O U P O N B obby B ow ers, m a s te r of cerem o n ies fo r th e celeb ratio n , an n o u n ces th e n ex t p erfo rm an ce. T h e fin ish ed p ro d u c t, a b r i g h t l y m u ltic o lo re d pole d isp la y in g th e w o rk of th e t e n w r a p p e r s . M a y D a y (M o r e P h otos on Page 4B ) C e l e b r a t i o n A t M o c k s v i U e M i d d l e M ild weather and sm iling faces provided the perfect setting for (he Mocksville Middle School Parent- Teacher Organization’s third an­ nual M ay D ay celebralion Thur­ sday. S tudents c a m e skipping in to begin th e V irginia R eel. Students presented a selection of dances representing areas from around the world. Mexico, England, Ihe South Seas, and Scotland were just a few of the countries represented. Various students also presented Ihree different gym nastic routines. M rs. Alexandi'a Jackson and M rs. Elizabelh M arlin ’s classes began Ihe celebration with a dance routine lo the m usic of “Chariots of F ire .” Next, M s. Debra M cCune’s class presented a Scottish dance. Representing Mexico and early Am erica were M rs. Sarah Ford and Mrs. M argaret Brock’s class doing a Mexican Hat dance and clogging. M rs. E sth e r W a ll’s cla ss represented E n gla n d w ilh an English country dance wilh M rs. Sharon Caviness and M rs. Sarah Alston’s classes taking everyone back to Ihe days of the pioneers with Ihe Virginia Reel. M rs. M a ry Sine and M rs. Ann Ebert’s classes en- terlained all wilh tinkling and limboing lo the m usic of “The Entertainer.’’ Next lo form was M rs. M arie E llis' class doing a Yugoslavian dance to “Savila Se Bela Loza.” Representing Ihe country of Greece was M rs. Janice Southern’s class perform ing a Grecian dance. M rs. Earle B arker’s class represented Austria with the wallz lo the m usic of “The Blue Danube” by Johann SIrauss. Also perform ing at various times during the celebration were approxim ately 20 female students exhibiting their gym nastic skills. The celebration was concluded w ilh len students doing the traditional wrapping of the M a y Pole. S tudents fro m M ocksville M iddle School g iv e a little kick in th e Y ug o slav ian d an ce. _________________________ B obby B ow ers p re se n te d M r s . P e g g y E v a n s w ith a b o u q u e t of flo w ers a fte r th e c e l e b r a t i o n w a s c o n c lu d e d fo r a ll th e w ork sh e had p u t into th e M a y D a y C e le b r a tio n . D A V I H C O U N T V F e a t u r e I B M a y 1 2 , 1 9 8 3 P h o t o s a n d S t o r y b y D e r e e E a t o n r ' 4 i - M r. Ju liu s S uiter p resen ts M rs. R uby O 'N eal w ith p resen ts for a ll of th e h ard w ork sh e h as done for M ocksville M iddle S chool's Paf-ent- T e ach er O rganization. f A ngie K eller an d D ane hlilton m ove on dow n in th e V irg in ia R eel. S tu d en ts joined h a n d s a n d w e n t u n d e r th e b rid g e in th e V irg in ia R eel. 2В - DAVIE COUNTY UNTERPRISl- KECORD. THURSDAY, MAY 12, 1983 D avie's G ray M c C la m ro c k W ins In IH R A wins National R acin g A t R o ckin g h am D ragw ay By Ralph Sm ilh The IH U A W inston Pro-A m Nationals al Rocltingham Dragway on M ay 1st saw several hundred of Ihe nalions lop drag racers battling il oul wilh Iwo Piedmonl arerf drivers capturing victories. Ricky Smith of King, Ihe current IH R A Winston Pro-Stock division national champion, drove his new pro-stock Thunderhird to victory with an impre.ssive win over Ihe C am aro of Lee Shepherd of A rlington, T exas even after Shepherd had clocked a record setting qualifying run. Smith blazed down Ihe one-quarter mile strip with a winning time of 7:70 seconds at 180 miles an hour, m arking another chapter in Sm ith’s quest for another championship. Receiving the honors for having Ihe besI appearing car of Ihe entire meet was the sleek candy apple red C am aro of Don Plem m ons of V.';:iSton-Salem. Plem m ons is a regular contender at Farm inglon D rag way in the car. For Davie County’s Gray M c­ Clam rock the race proved lo be a milestone in Ihe young racer’s career. McClam rock, who will lurn nineteen this month, powered his Chevy Vega to victory in the Super- Rod division, which had fi field of thirty-Iwo drivers, to capture his first national event win. On the final run McClam rock was clocked al 113 mph wilh an elapsed time of 10:14 seconds. On the previous run M cC lam rock had clocked an even quicker time streaking down the strip in 9:90 seconds at 121 mph. “We ran five rounds in Super-Rod and it was in the fourth round that I clocked m y best time - 9:90 seconds right on my “dial-in” lime,” said McClamrock. “In the fifth and winning round m y opponent jumped the starting light early, drawing a “red-light”, but I wasn’t sure that he had red-lighted so I went full bore down the track. As I approached the finishing lights I glanced over and saw that my opponent was nowhere near me so I eased off the throttle a little just as I crossed the line.” M cC lam rock and Sm ith are regulars al Farm ington Dragw ay with both breaking into drag racing al the one-eighth mile facility located on 801 north. McClam rock’s father. Jack McClam rock, is a well known Mocksville race car builder who is now in his nineteenth year of competing in drag races at F a r­ minglon. “I used lo go out to the F a r­ mington track with Dad when I was Gray McCIamroch still in grade school lo watch him race,” recalls Gray, “and 1 guess I made up m y mind Ihen lo get into racing myself. The dream became a reality shortly afler Gray turned sixteen and obtained his license. He ran his first race al Farm ington in the sam e Vega lhal carried him lo his win at Rockingham. “M y firsl race was in the modified-slreel division at Farm inglon in the ¡980 season,” says Gray, “and I was running a small-block 327 cubic inch Chevy engine in the Vega lhal Dad and I built.” He finished second in his firsl Farm ington race, but il was Ihe following season that his firsl real break came. “In the '81 season I began experimenting with a larger 350 cubic inch block, and for awhile went to a sm aller 302,,’ Gray ex­ plained. Bolh of these engines proved lo be successful for him and al Ihe end of (he '81 season G ray had captured the Pro-Street division championship al Farm inglon. B y the time the ’82 racing season came around al Farmington, Gray was ready for more power, and switched to the large 427 cubic inch Chevy engine in his Vega - the same powerplanl which carried him lo victory in Ihe Rockingham IH R A Winston Pro-Am Nationals. In addition lo his racing, M c­ Clam rock is now attending classes al Forsylh Technical Institute in Winston-Salem working on a degree in duto mechanics. On any given evening when he is not racing, you can usually find him al work in his father’s race shop, McClam rock Automotive in Mocksville, either working on he or his father’s race car or preparing a race car for Davie Girls 3rd In Conference Meet Davie girls captured third place in their only conference meet at West Rowan M a y 3. Davie had two girls lo take first place honors and both were in field events. Machelle Pulliam finished firsl in the shot put with a throw of 34 feet and li- inch, and Selena Fowler swept first in the discus wilh a throw of 102 feet. Fowler placed below Pulliani in the shot, capturing third with 31 feet and GV., inches. Vanessa Waller finished fifth in the Shannon Pulliam Signs With UNC-Greensboro Shannon Rulliam of Mocksville w ill play basketball for Ihe University of North Carolina al G reensboro according to Ron Mikeals, head coach. Pulliam was recruited from Surry C om m u n iiy College where he averaged 16.5 poinis per -game. Surry Coach W ayne Moltsinger said the 6’1” guard averaged 6 rebounds per gam e with a 50 percent field goal average. Pulliam is a graduale of Davie Count High School where he played on (he varsity basketball (cam. UNC-G coach Ron Mikeals said “we’re looking forward to Pulliam ’s 2 year’s eligibilily.” discus with 87 feel 7 inches. Donna Whitlock placed second in Ihe long jump with a leap of 16 feet and 7 inches. Pal Gadson finished third in the high jump, and V. Waller finished sixth. In Ihe running events Whitlock finished fifth in the 100m run with a (inie of 13.37. In (he 200m low hur­ dles, S. Gadson placed fourth wilh a lime of 33.20. In the 1600m run Frankie Chaplin finished second wilh a time of 5:56.64. D avie’s P. Gadson finished Ihird in the 400m run wilh a time of 63.73, and Angie Browder finished second in the 800m run with a time 2:36.34. finished in fourth place with a lime In the 800m relay, D avie's leam h plai of 1:55.76, and in the 400m relay the Davie leam finished fourth with a lime of 55.5. D avie’s 1600m relay team finished Ihird lo complete the meet wilh a lime of 4:35.61. ^KRTIRVED \ C L A S S RINGS JNC K o fte r-R a u c h D ru fft. 700 W iik e s b o ro S i — * Ш e:i4-2NI ! l » l t Щ i T i l ì b A i - i T i i i ! p l T l T ' H o w to c a ll th e D o c t o r W lienever you call your doctor’s office for an appointment, tell the secretary why you are coming. By explaining what you want or need, you will be better served when you arrive for your meeting. If you jusl need an injection or to have a blood sample taken, the amounl of time required is obviously negligible. If, however, you’re due for a major check up, plan for a much longer slay. " D o c ” will appreciate your helping him schedule his appointments to serve you belter. You mighi even save yoursell a few dollars! ALTHY SAVINGS Foster-Rauch Drugs We Appreciate Your Busineaa • m ■ ■ • ■ • Г i f l i p 1Ш ГМ! T iT ii' another drag racer. "W e are building the chassis for a drag race car for Randy Disher of Oldlown right now,” said Gray, “Randy is a new driver just gelling started at Farminglon, and lasl year we built the chassis for the Cam aro of Don Vestal of Advance.” Vestal cap­ tured a Pro-Drag series in Ihe Cam aro netting him a top purse of $2,000 al Farmington. You can be sure lhal the Mc- Clam rocks spend an equal amount of lime on their own race cars. The elder McClam rock has built a sleek, new Corvette that he drives in Ihe Top Gas division at Farm inglon, with Gray running in the same class in his Vega. Three Pro-Drag Series races are on lap at Farm ington for the remainder of the season along with an IH R A Winston World Title Series event set for July 30-31. The Pro- Drag series races carry a purse of over $5,000 with the lion’s share, a shopping $2,000, going lo the winner of the Top Gas class. The World Tille Series will have a purse, in­ cluding contingency award money lolaling close to $20,000, and it goes wilhoul saying thal G ray and Jack will have Iheir sleek Corvette and Vega geared, ready for the aclion when it starts. Davie Nine Upsets Trinity 4-2 Davie Counly pitcher Dan Riddle handcuffed Trinity by allowing only three hits in a 4-2 upset of Ihe front- running Bulldogs in high school baseball action here Monday night. The loss left Trinity al 9-3 in North Piedmont Conference play going into tonight’s game with Asheboro. Second place Salisbury, 7-3, will hosi Lexington tonight. Riddle struck out 15 batters, while walking five. He allowed only one : earned run in recording his fourth win against two losses. C u rly ,2 b M ille r,с W h lli.s s A lsto n ,p T ic k le ,lb ' B ry e n t.rl R o b crls.cr VW orle.cl La P oint,3b B a rn e y .lf T o ta l» T rin ity D a v li C ounty D A V IE C O U N T Y a b r t i b l a b r t ib l3 1 1 0 R oberfson.cf4 0 0 0 Jam es,3b 3 0 0 0 E d w rrls .s s 3 0 1 0 B a rn h a rd t,rf 3 1 1 1 B lv e n t.d h 3 0 0 0 R id d le .p 3 0 0 0 K e ily,1 b 1 0 0 0 W h ite .c3 0 0 0 S te w a rt,lf 3 0 0 0 H ow ard,3b 3 1 0 0 3 0 0 0 3 0 1 1 0000 1 0 10 3 0 10 3 1 3 0 3 1 1 0 3 0 0 0 < 3 1 1 3 2 1 4 7 334 3 3 1 T o ta ls 160 100 0 ~ 3 040 ООО X - 4 E — Rldd>e. L O B —T rin ity 6, D a vie C ounty 4. H R '-T lc k re . S B —G u riy , A lston. S—S tu a rt. A is to n ,L R Iddie.W H R E R B B SO 7 4 4 5 7 3 2 1 5 15 Davie Has 2 First Places In Meet Davie’s boys Irack leam had two members to place first in the con­ ference track meet at Thomasville, M ay 5th., Jam es Hollis won the high jump event with a jump of 5 feet, 10 in­ ches. Barry Pulliam perfected his undefeated record by capturing the 110 meter high hurdles. Robert Joiies captured second place for Davie in the triple jump. Darren Peebles finished third in the Discus along with Bobby Roach who finished third in the pole vault. Randy Mayfield also finished third in the high jump. Jam es Fowler finished fourth in Ihe shot put followed by teammate Chris Jacobs, who finished fifth. Tim Barker finished fourth in the 110 meter high hurdles with a lime of 15.81 seconds. D avie’s 800 meter relay team also finished fourth. Davie had a com ­ bined score of 64 points to finish third oul of nine teams. Roberts Gets Eagle At Twin Cedars Jam es L.’ Roberts of Charlotte, N.C., a form er resident of M coksville, N.C. w as in town Saturday, M ay 7, and played golf with his two sons, Sieven and William ; and a friend, Jim m ie Olin Lookabill at Twin Cedars Golf Course. On Ihe first hole, M r. Roberts hit a 5-iron down to the edge of the green and took a pitching wedge and chipped on the green, the ball took one bounce and jumped inlo the cup for an eagle. This is the firsl lime, after 13 ■ears of playing on Ihis course Ihat le had ever made an eagle, (two under par) and was “happy” lo say the least. Roberts is married to the former Lettie Wagner of Mocksville. Free Health Screening Free Health Screening will be held al Ihe Davie Counly Health Department, Friday, M ay 13, from 8:30 a.m. until 5 p.m. Anyone desiring m ay get tested for Glaucoma, Hemoglobin, Blood Pressure, Glucose, Breast Cancer, and receive refreshments following testing. Informalion m ay be obtained by calling: 634-5985. К W A T C H R E PA m Cheerleading Award Di'cna Campbell, sixteen year old (laughter of Mr. and Mrs. I.arry Campbell of Houle :t, ¡Mocksville. N.C. is n National Award Winner in Cheerleading. She was notified last week of this honor; and her name will be in (he United S(a(es Achievement Academy O fficial Yearbook for 11)811. This award is a prestigiuiis honor thal very few students can ever hope to attain. In fact, (he Academy recognizes less than III percent of all American high school students. Wrestlin^Camp Open to Davie Boys Davic Wrestling Camp will be open to boys who are from Dayie Counly are are in grades 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9. This camp will be held at North Davie Junior High School G ym ­ nasium beginning Monday, June 20, and continuing Ihrough Friday, June 24, from 6 p.m. until 8 p.m. each day. The camp will be conducled by Coach Ron Kirk of North Davie and Coach Tim Johnson of South Davie, wilh guest instructors from the Davie High wrestling team. Both coaches have had great success wilh their wrestling program s in Ihe pasl years. Bolh have coached several undefeated wrestlers and N PC champs. The purpose of having a wrestling camp is to teach technique, and whal true deducation and attitude really mean. Wrestlers will learn and experience the true meaning of training. This camp will stress techniques in takedowns, mat wrestling, counters, and pinning combinations. All youngsiers will be grouped according lo size, age, and physical abilities.. "W hile wraslling is a leam sport, more importantly, it is an in­ dividual challenge, accomplished by pairing equally sized opponents against each other. We believe your son will enjoy wrestling and we pledge to you lhal he will be laughi and cared for in the safest way possible.” says Coach Ron Kirk. There will be a charge of fifteen dollars per person that will include T-shirls, insurance and awards. A lournament will be held on Friday for all participants. An application m ay be mailed lo : Ron Kirk, Rl. 2, Box 1.39, North D avie Junior H igh School, Mocksville, N.C. The deadline is M ay 20, 1983. D avie B ooster C lub Raises $ 2 ,8 0 0 In B e n e fit In excess of $2,800 was raised in the recently held Card Benefil- Silenl Auction sponsored by the Davie High Athletic Booster Club. The success of this year’s event has been' attributed to the over­ w helm ing support given by b u s in e s s e s , p r o f e s s io n a l associations, artists, industries and Ihe support of Ihe community in general.. Last year the Athletic Booster Club decided to conduci one fund raising project for the year lo award repeatedly soliciting organizations throughout the year. Contributing donors for Ihis Second Annual Card Benefit-Silent Auction exceeded all expectations. Approximately 140 auction and 120 door prizes were donaled. This compares lo 60 and 80 items respectively last year. There was a trem endous increase in con­ tributions and participation over last year despite the curreni economic conditions. This year Ihere were m any contributors from Salisb ury, W inston-Salem and Clemmons. The funds raised this year will be used to sponsor various Booster Club projects during the year such as the annual sports banquets and awards ceremony. Due to Ihe huge success of this Ladies Softball At Smith Grove Smith Grove Community Center mens and ladies softball tour­ nament will be held M ay 20, 21 and 22.For further information contact Dean Sm ith 998-3088; Thom as Tucker 998-2304; or Wayne Frye 998- 2.341. years fund raiser, the Booster Club will contribute lo the irrigation system project for the practice and game fields al the high school. This project is an investment in the future thal will not only benefit the football teams but others who use the facilities. This project will improve Ihe safety of the fields by reducing the hardness of'the ground caused the sun baking the surface and the buck tile type soil The Athlelic Booster Club would like lo lhank all those lhal have contributed lo the success of this year’s fund raising projecl. A spccial Ihanks lo the kind generosity of those who atlended the affair and grariously bid on the auction items. All supporters of Davie High Athletics are urged (o attend the Booster Club’s monthly meeling which is held the third Monday of each month. The next meeting is scheduled for M onday M ay 16. Your support is needed and appreciated. Davie Stars To Play At Rich Park Davie Stars will play Row an’s Baseball team in a gam e" Sunday, M ay 15, al Rich Park in Mocksville, N.C. The game will start at 7 p.m. The public is invited to attend. Boosters To Meet The Davie High Athlelic Boosters Club will meet Monday, M a y 16, 1983, al 7:30 p.m. in the school cafeteria. All members are urged to be preseni. I I THANKS I f THE DAVIE HIGH ATHLETIC BOOSTER CLUB \'Uould like to thank the follow ing contributions vvho throitgh their generosity m sde the recently held Card benefit and Silent A uction a complHte success,....... C.R. A N D E R S O N L U M B E R CO. A N D Y 'S U N IO N 76PEG G Y A N G E L LB A G /SH O E P L A C E - Clemmons JU D Y B A IL E Y B A K E R F U R N IT U R E B E L K B EN F R A N K L IN ST O R E B E T T Y ’S F L O R IS T B IT S O F B R A S S B A R -B -Q U E H A U S B R A N C H BAIVIKING & T R U S T CO. B R O C K & M c C L A M R O C K , Attornays B R O W D E N F A M IL Y D A L E BR O W N H A IR S T Y L IN G B U E N A V IS T A G A R D E N SH O P Clemmons B U E N A V IS T A G A R D E N SH O P Country Club Rd., Winston-Salem B U R N E T T ’S H O M E F U R N IS H IN G S & A P P L IA N C E S C 's B A R -B-Q U E C A R O L IN A T IR E C O M P A N Y C A U D E L L L U M B E R C O M P A N Y C E N T E L Telephone C E N T R A L C A R O L IN A B A N K & T R U S T CO .-M ocksville C E N T R A L C A R O L IN A B A N K A T R U S T CO. - Cooleemee C H A P T E R O N E -Sa lisb u ry C IN D E R E L L A B E A U T Y S A L O N C O C A -C O LA - Winston-Salem REP. B E T S Y C O C H R A N C O L L E T T E A N T K 3 U E & A R T S U P P L IE S C O O L E E M E E D A V IE D ISC O U N T D R U G C O O L E E M E E F A SH IO N SH O P C O O L E E M E E F L O R IS T iC O O L E E M E E H A R D W A R E & SP O R T IN G G O O D S C O O L E E M E E S U P E R M A R K E T C O U N T R Y C U P B O A R D C R O W N W O O D P R O D U C T S D A V IE A U T O P A R T S D A V IE C O U N T Y E N T E R P R IS E - R E C O R D D A V IE FISH C A M P & S E A F O O D D A V IE H IG H A T H L E T IC B O O ST E R S C LU B D A V IE JE W E L E R S D A V IE P R IN T IN G C O M P A N Y D A V IE T R A C T O R & IM P L E M E N T CO. D E A N O 'S B A R - B-Q U E D ISC O U N T H O U SE J A M E S D O N A L D S O N D O N 'S J E W E L R Y 8. M U SIC E D G A R B F U R N IT U R E - Clemmons F A R M & G A R D E N S E R V IC E INC. F A R M S T E A D A N T IQ U E S F A SH IO N S T A T IO N • Hillsdale F C X - Mocksville F8.F B A R -B -Q U E F IR S T F E D E R A L S A V IN G S S.L O A N A S S O C IA T IO N ■ Mocksville F O R M A C A U T O M O T IV E F IS H E R M A N 'S Q U A R T E R S F O S T E R 'S JE W E L E R S F O ST E R -R A U C H D R U G C O M P A N Y F U R C H E 'S M O T O R C O M P A N Y G A L A X Y F U R N IT U R E INC. G E R R I'S S T IT C H 'N SU CH SH O P - Clemmons G IN N l'S T H IN G S F O R W O M EN - Clemmons G R A Y 'S E X X O N G R E E N A C R E N U R S E R Y J.P. G R E E N M IL L IN G CO., INC. G R E E N 'S W H O L E S A L E CO. L A R R Y G R O C E G U Y S & D O L L S B E A U T Y S A L O N H A N E S CO RP. K N IT W E A R D IV . H A R D E E 'S H A Y E S J E W E L R Y - Lexington SEN. J E S S IE H E L M S H E N D R IC K 'S F U R N IT U R E H E R IT A G E F U R N IT U R E H O R N O IL C O M P A N Y H O R N ’S C O U N T R Y K IT C H E N C A R L H U M P H R E Y G O V . J A M E S H U N T W IL L IA M IJA M E S, AHorney IN G E R S O L L -R A N D C O M P A N Y IN T E R S T A T E A U T O M O T IV E - Advance K E N T U C K Y F R IE D C H IC K E N R O G E R K E T N E R - H IC K O R Y H IL L C O U N T R Y C LU B J. L A R R Y L E D F O R D . C PA ■W A D E L E O N A R D , Attorney LIB & F R E D A U C T IO N S A L E S L & L IN D U S T R IA L S A L E S IN C. - Winston-Salem M A R T IN H A R D W A R E & G E N E R A L M E R C H A N D IS E , D E N N IS M cC U LLO H ' M c D O N A L D S - Clemmons M E R L E N O R M A N ST U D IO M IL L E R ’S R E S T A U R A N T M O C K S V IL L E B U IL D E R S SU P P L Y M O C K S V IL L E D ISC O U N T D R U G CO. M O C K S V IL L E F U R N IT U R E & A P P L IA N C E INC. M O C K S V IL L E L A U N D R Y & D R Y C L E A N E R S M O C K S V IL L E S A V IN G S L O A N A SS O C IA T IO N M O C K S V IL L E SP O R T IN G G O O D S, INC. M O N L E IG H G A R M E N T C O M P A N Y INC. B.C. M O O R E & SO N S M O T L E Y 'S H O R T IC U L T U R E S E R V IC E M U T T 'S C H IC K E N 'n B ISC U IT S P A L M E R ’S S T A T IO N E R S - Salisbury D E W E Y P A R K & SO N S H O M E IN ­ S U L A T IO N S E R V IC E P&G A U T O P A R T S INC. P IE D M O N T A IR L IN E S P IZ Z A H U T E D W A R D R O SS E R F L IG H T S E R V IC E S E A R SR8.J SP O R T S INC. N A N C Y S H A N K S S M IT H 'S SH O E S T O R E S P O R T 'S W O R L D S P O R T SW O R LD - Clemmons A IL E E N S T E E L M A N SU N S P O R T - Clemmons SW EET S U R P R IS E S INC. - Clemmons SW IC EG O O D IN V E S T M E N T S T A Y L O R SH O E SH O P T H E H A R D W A R E S T O R E T H E A 'S B E A U T Y SH O P U N IV E R S IT Y O F N O R T H C A R O L IN A W A SH IN G T O N R E D S K IN S W D SL R A D IO ST A T IO N W E ST E R N A U T O A S S O C IA T E S T O R E Cooleemee W E ST E R N A U T O A S S O C IA T E ST O R E Mocksville W IN ST O N P R IN T IN G CO. - Winston-Salem W O N D E R K N IT INC. Y O R K U N IO N 76 S E R V IC E D avie Boys P lace T h ird In C o n feren ce T rack M e e t Davie High boys placed Ihird in Ihe North Piedm onI Conference track and field meel held Iasi Thursday al Thomasville. Davie scored 64 points. Salisbury was first with 13G'i points, capturing their 11th con­ ference title in 14 years. Thomasville had 99 points to place sccond. Olher totals: North Rowan 61; West Rowan 40; Lexington 34; Trinity 21; and North Davidson 0. Winners for Davie Counly were B arry Pulliam wilh a record lime of 14.37 in the 110 hurdles and B. J. HollisjW lh a high jump of 5-10. S hol p u t - J o riU n (S ), 55-3'A; S titI« (T H ), U -S W i R Ic h a rd i (L ), 4 M V i; F o w H r (D C ), 4 9 -:U | J ic o M (D C ), U -3 : P o o lf (A ), 44-4M .O lic u l - H o o ka r (S , 137-3M ; P o c ll (A ), IJ4-2) P io p lt i (D C ), S IM li (T H ), W V !i; O ith ln g i iT H ), 126-«,' G m io w a y (W R ), l» . | .------------ - - l ) , 2 | . | o y i ; r - T e a m s c o r i n g Salisbury 136 Va Thomasville 99 Davie Counly 64 North Rowan 61 Asheboro 52'A West Rowan 40 Lexington 34 Trinity 21 North Davidson 0 T rlp H lu m p - T IIU I (S ), 44-1; J o n lt (C 43-9.- W lld tr (T H ), 43.«; S w »y (L ), 4J.1 M c N a ir (A ), 43-5; f m ii (W R ), 43.4.H ig h lu m p - H o N Il IO C ), 3-10/ C annon (S ), 5-10; fla - M a y fla ld (D C ) a nd H a lrtto n (U ), S-10; tia - H a ll (S ) a nd S w a n iy (A ), 500.P ola v a u ll — Lena (T H ), 1J.)0 (ra c o rd ); B ro a d w a y (N R ), 1 3 4 ; R oach (D C ), 13-«;Bfw«ufT«)r IJ-V, K oecn lU U b ia*e; R o fb u c k 12*0/ O ie if IN R Í, Ш ; B ryent (A), 10*0. 100 - M c R il (T H ), lO .M ( rtc o rd ) ; M a ih o rt (S ). 10.79; M o o k t (U ), 11.04; B ro c k (T H ), t l.U ; A b r tm i (T H K 11.22; W ood (S ), 11.23. ^200 - M c R it ÍT H J , 22.16/ M ilh o r # (SJ, 2J.37; A b re m i (Т И . 2 2 .П ; W o ^ (S ). 23.14; B ro ck (T H ). 23.31; A iito n (A ). Зз!з4. 400 - M c R a » (T H ), S Í.M ; L t w li (S ), 51.2в; B o yd (S ), Э1.М ; S h ir r lll (W R ), 52.12; F onvlIJ»(A ), 53.93; L t v i r t t t t ( L ). 54.49. 100 r K v in i (NR). 2:05.6; R. J o n e i (TH). 2:01.19; R . J o n n ( L ), 2:01.6; G o ld m a n (S ), 2:11.45; S ia w a rl (TR), 2:12.2a; F lih tr (S). ' 1MÓ - E van» (N R ), 4:45.44; S tiw e rt (T R ). 4:50.71; D u n n in g (T H ). 4:53.67; M iio n ( L ). 4:55.97; H a ll (S )r4 :5 6 .7 7 ; B ra y (Á ). 5:01. 3 » 0 - S tu ff» (T R ). )0;44,99; H a ll (5 ). 10:46.13; W h tta (A ). 10:53.6; A n d r tw i (A )l ¡1:02.59; O x a n d in t (D C ). 11:04.4; S te w a rt (T R ), 11:06.16.И 0 hig h h u r d lti — P u llia m (D C ). 14.37 (ra * c e r d i; TíT üf (S í. 15.25; H yda ÍN R ), 15.3; B a rk e r (D C ), 15.11; S ch la r (A ), 16.39; P lo w a r» (T H ), 'зсю In tm , h u rd le » - H yda (N R ), 40.71; T ltu t (8 ). 41.67; B v a n i (S ), 4 1 .7I; R Itla r (A ), 42,19; P lo w a rs (T H ), 43.06; B a rk e r (D C ), 43.09.400 r e la y '* r T h o m a B v llla (M cR a e , P rin c e , B ro c k , A b ra m s ), 43.07 (ra c o rd ); S a lis b u ry , аз.М; A ttle b o ro , 44.47; W a»l R ow an, 44.66; D a vie C ounty, 45.25; N o rth R ow an, 47.41. , f0 0 re la y - W e it R ow an d ía m e » , Im es, G ra y , P eace), l: 3 l. l; A sheboro, 1:32.46; Thom « a s v llle , 1 :Э 2.Я ‘ D a v ie C o unty, 1:35.33; N o rth R o w a n /1:96,93.1600 re la y ~ W e»t R ow an (S h e rrill, Peace. Im es, G ra y ). 3:31.6; N o rth R ow an, 3:33.9; S a llib u ry , 3:36.6; 'T h o m a » v llle , 3:40.01; Lex- ; Ington, 3:40.2; A ih a b o ro , 9:44.15. Tennis Qualifying Round Is Set At Tanglewood oh M a y 16-18 Ihere a lennis tournam ent a l Tanglew ood prelim inary to the qualifying round of a professional lennis tournament. Local residents compete for the one wild card spot in the Tanglewood- E d gar В Tennis Classic qualifying rounds. For m ore information, call 766-5396. Davie Nine Loses ToThomasville Thom asville defeated Davie 11-9 in a North Piedmont Conference baseball gam e there last Friday. : Thom asville collected 14 hits off three D avie pitchers. Davie • had nine hits, with Lefty Stewart leading the team in R B Is with two. : The loss dropped Davie to 4-7 in conference play, 5-7 overall. Thom asville moved lo 5-6 and 5-9. Davie High Girls In Regional Track Meet Davie High girls scored six points to finish 20th in a 32 leam Western Region track and field meet held Iasi Friday at North Rowan. The three lop finishers in each event qualified for Thursday’s Western Regionals. Davie had no qualifiers. Michelle Pulliam placed fourth ih the shotput wilh a heave of 34-27',i: and Chaplin placed fourth in the 3200 wilh a time of 12:25:41. T e a m s c o r i n g Garinger 74 Independence 66 South Mecklenburg 65 North Mqcklcnburg 30 Concord 28 Myers Park 26 South Rowan 24 North Rowan 23 Northwest Cabarrus 20 West Rowan 18 Central Cabarrus ' 14 Kannapolis 12 East Mecklenburg 12 North Gaston 12 East Rowan .' 11 Albemarle 8 Charlotte Catholic 8 Mt. Pleasant 7 West Charlotte 7 Davie County 6 Hunter Hiiss 6 East Gaston . 6 South Point 5 West Mecklenburg 4 Lexinglon 2 Lincolnton 2 Harding 2 Salisbury I North Stanly 0 West Stanly 0 East Lincoln 0 Ashbrook 0 T H O M A S V IL L E a b r h b l a b r h b l2 I 0 0 D in n ll.r l 4 3 333 0 I 0 D a rr,ll 4 1 1 12 0 1 0 a oo d ftM r.cl 3 3 3 1 0 0 с J H o ld e r,c f 0 0 0 04 1 2C N Iff.l» 4 1 2 1 4 2 2 0 S ln s le ta ry .P 4 1 2 2 0 0 0 0 M a rlln .c 4 0 2 20 0 0 0 L a m b e th ,lb 2 0 0 0 4 1 1 1 M c C la ry .2 b 4 1 1 0 3 2 1 0 H one ycu tt,2 b 0 0 0 01 OCTO K ln a rd ,3 b 4 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 F a n t,3 b 0 0 0 0 3 1 0 0 1000 4 112'■ 31 9 9 3 T o ta l» 33 11 14 10 042 *1500 3 - 9 211 200 X - 11 E *~Johnson, Jem e » 2. H o w ard, D a rr, M e* Qualifying Standards Changed For Sectionals Qualifying standards for the North Carolina High School Alhlctic Association's sectional boys track and field meet at North Rowan High School on Friday have been changed by the N C IISA A . Meet director Ralph Shatterly said the N C IIS A A decided to allow first and sccond place conference finishers to compcte in (he scctional becausc of the bad weather during the spring. Adm ission for the meet is $2. R o b rt» o n ,ct jo h n io n .pS hlpp.pF o s te r.p E d w a rd » ,!» K e lly .lbN a ll.lb V ^h lte .c R ld d le .d hB a rk e r,rl S m o o t.rtJam »» ,3bH o w a rd ,2 b N a y lo r,2 b S te w a rt,lfT o ta l» D a vie.T h o m a » vllle JOIIIC» d, nVTTO, u, •••fc C la ry 3. K In a rd . D P -T h o m a » v ll1 e . L O B -D a v le 6. T h o m a » v llle 7. 2 B -S h fp p . S te w a rt. S lnflle- ta ry , M a rtin . 3 B - K e lly . H R -0 e n n 1 » 2. IP H R E R B B SO D avieJ o h n » o a L iw 9 B 5 1 2S hipp 3 '/i 5 3 2 4 3 F o s te r . 1 0 0 0 0 1 ■ T h o m a » v llteS In g te fa ry, W 7 9 9 3 5 2W P -S ln g le ta ry , S hipp 2. P B - W h lle 3. M a rtin 2. T -2 ;2 0 . First Hole-ln-One On Twin Cedars No. 4 M ark A. Swaringen of Winston- Salem, N.C. is the first ever to m ake a hole in one on No. 4, at Twin Cedars Golf Course. He was playing with Bob Sutton, Stewart Swain and Sam Rhyne. M ark used a 5 wood. Davie Girls Softball Second In Conference The Davie H igh girl’s softball team stan d s second in the conference with a record of 12-1. They face undefeated N orth Davidson W ednesday in a double header here. Davie defeated Salisbury in a double-header M a y 4 in Salisbury with scores of 10-4 and 7-5. Dawn Brow n and Sherri Kepley were leading hitters in the first game with three each. M elissa Matthews, Teresa Sm ith and Donna Hendrix made two hits each. K im Howard, Michele Shore, Lisa Hepler and Cam m ie Paige each m ade one hit. M e lissa S m ile y w as leading pitcher. Dawn Brow n was leading hitter in the second gam e with 3 for 4. Teresa Smith, K im Howard and Lisa Hepler m ade two bits each. Players with one hit were Michelle Deal, Cam m ie Paige, M elissa Sm iley and Susan Howell. M e lissa Sm ile y w as w inning pitcher. Foster’s Jewelers 171 N . M a in S treet Announces R e m o d e lin g S ale N O W I N P R O G R E S S DAVIU COUNTY UNTERPRISU RUCORD, THURSDAY, MAY 12. l‘)83 3B: Davie American Little League Opens At Smith Grove Field M .x l,' : Craig y/illiams - Worl.ing for the Olympics C raig W illia m s W an ts To R u n In 1 9 8 4 O lym p ic s Soft-spoken Craig W illiam s of M ocksville has one goal in mind. He wants lo run in the 1984 Olympics. For mosl, Ihis could be no more lhan a dream. Bul Ihis D avie County m an gears his every move to achieving his goal. A I Ihe young age of 23, W illiam s has been running and winning races since he first signed up for the track leam al Cooleemee Elem enlary School. He was a valuable member of the track leam al Davie High, continuing his work-outs wilh the team at Pem broke University. While a sludent at Pembroke, he regularly competed in National Championship "Тпак. He has raced all across the nation including Texas, North Carolina, Louisiana, Georgia, and Wisconsin. Training for the Olym pic Trials next June keeps W illiam s busy. He runs at least 80 to 90 m iles per week raising his training to 120 miles a • week during peak racing seasons. W illiam s said he has won too m any 10,000 m eler (6.2 mile) races lo mention, his most recent being Ihe News-10 К Run in Mount Airy. He defeated 356 runners on a hilly, wind-swept course with a finishing time of 33:29. To qualify for Ihe Olym pics, W illiam s must gel his time to 28 minutes for a 10,000 meler run, a lime he feels confident he can achieve. “I am an athlete who strongly believes in building en­ durance,” he said. “I ’m determined lo sel a world record sometime in my life. Getting his time lo 28 minutes isn’t far out of reach. W illiam s best lim e for a 10,000 meter race is 30:19. W illiam s attributes his love for running to the m any track coaches influencing his life....Charles C renshaw at Cooleem ee....Burl Barger al Davie High....Ed Crain at Pembroke. “They’ve had an impact on m y life,” he said. “I ’ve been very fortunate lo have such good coaches. With Ihe Olym pic Trials just a year away, W illiam s plans to step up his training plus compete in as m any races as possible. “I ’m determined to m ake it,” he said smiling. Palomino Horse Show May 28-30 “The North Carolina Palom ino Exhibitors Association will hold a Ihree day horse show Mem orial weekend. M ay 28, 29, and 30, at 9:00 a.m., al Piedmont Saddle Club, Colfax, N.C., (near Greensboro) For Registered Palom ino Horses. If you own a Palom ino and would be interested in joining the North C arolina P alo m ino E x h ib ito rs Associalion, contact Paula Nelson at 919-882-9682. Waiting The typical Am erican spends 40 m inutes a day w a itin g-a t sloplighls, in lines and restaurants. • • • L e t 's k e e p o n e t h i n g c le a r W A T E R ! SUPPORT YOUR CONSERVATION DISTRICT Sfi//U (4'A* - - W iM '^ Davie Soil And Water Conservation District D a v ie C o u n ty O ffic e B u ild in g S o u th M a in S treet M o c k s v ille , N .C . The D avie A m e rican Little League opened Iasi Saturday al Ihe Smith Grove Com munity Ccnjcr. The results were as follows: T H.nll - n odgrrs 7 Phillies 2.S Poe-Wee - Aslros 13 ■ Priâtes 11. Orioles 17 - Reds 10. AA - Red Sox 13 - Reds 14. Jessie D alton hit i hom eruns. 1 triple...powering the Reds to vie- liiry. Yankees 9 - Gianis 13. A A A - Aslros 6 - Biaves 19. Alex Nail and Rodney Cline led the hil­ ling with 1 homerun each for Ihe Braves. A A A - Reds 12 - Orioles 9. Padres 2 - A 's 7. Shane Duncan pitched 3 shutout endings and had a triple for Ihe Padres. Brian M yers hit a triple...bases loaded for the A ’a. Girls M inors - M idgets 12 - Angels 8. Dusters 9 - Bom bers 5. Girls M ajor - Rockets 13 - Tigers 8. Cubs 19 - Fillies 17. M ajor League - M arc +tolconib hit a dram atic homerun the bottom of Ihe6lh ending lo break a 8 lo8 tie for Ihe Braves. Orioles had lied the gam e by scoring 4 runs in the lop of the 6lh ending. M arc Holcomb came in al Ihe lip of the 6th ending lo relieve Blake Livengood who had allowed only 3 hits to save games. Astros defeated Phillies 8 lo 4. Tanglewood Steeplechase Is Saturday Horse racing, picnic lunches, live m usic, hot a ir balloon flying, gym n astics and sk y d iv in g are am ong the activities planned for Tanglewood Steeplechase 1983, to be held from 10 a.m. until 5 p.m. this Saturday, M ay 14 al the park near Clemmons. The horse races, the featured events of the day, will actually begin at 2 p.m. A tolal purse of $30,000 is offered. The races are as offered: 1. The Stoneybrook -a 2-mile steeplechase wilh a $7,000 purse 2. The Winston - a flat race on turf wilh a $1,000 purse 3. The Salem - a 2-m ile steeplechase with an $8,500 purse 4. The Tanglewood Cup - a 2-mile steeplechase with a $12,500 purse 5. The Camden - a flat race on turf wilh a $1,000 purse. The Tanglewood Steeplechase is bul one of m any races in Ihe circuit followed by |he horses racing Salurday. Aboul 20 races are in­ volved on the circuit wilh a lolal purse of m ore than $600,000. The circuit runs from M arch until June and covers an area from Alden South Carolina to Maryland. The race has experienced bad weather the last two years il has been held, but officials are hoping for belter weather in 1983. The race will be held, however, rain or shine, according to W. Roger Lem m ons, Tanglewood Park Direclor. Item s which Lem m ons recom ­ mends bringing are lawn chairs, blankels, and of course, a picnic lunch. “ W e’re hoping everyone w ill eome to enjoy the races, have a nice picnic lunch and just enjoy Ihe day at the park,” said Lem mons. Tickets for reserved parking, priced at $40 each, are still available, and allow up to six persons per vehicle lo enler a reserved space. Additional persons in the vehicles will be charged'$5 each. General adm ission (ickels al $5 each are also available. In 1982, about 14,000 persons a l­ lended Ihe day’s events. Lem m ons said that if the weather is favorable, more m ay attend in 1983. Outslaiiding hitting from Fraiiky Blake, M ark Davis, Jason Men- cienhall. M ark Hughes and Jonathan W agoner gave Astros an early lead in game. The Phillies cam e back lo rally and tied score 4 to 4 in 3rd inning, wilh good hits from Chris R ally, B en ny H ow ard, Allen Newsom, M ike Koonlz and Craig Cartner, however; continued good hitting and excellent defense from Aslros team gave Ihem 4 more runs to win gam e. Jonathan W agoner w as w inning pileher giving up winning runs, 5 strike outs and allowing only 2 walks in last 3 innings. Senior League - Senior 13 year old teams opened by taking 2 gam es from (ho Nalional League Coun­ terpart in firsl g a m i^ R c d Sox in a leam efforl defeated a gam e wilh Expos 20 lo 3. Tony Foster allowed the Expos only 2 hits. In second gam e Orioles defeated Rangers 17 lo 11 after trailing 9 to nothing in 2nd inning. W hile Orioles collected 13 hits, relief pitcher W. M iles allowed Rangers only 3 hits in Olh ending. Sen ior 14-15 year split with N atio ns! League the R a n g e rs defeated Expos 6 to 5 in a thrilling 10 innings. Excellent pitching by Tony Talum of Rangers and R. M arlin Expos is what made an excellent game. In second gam e - Reds scored 3 runs in Glh inning to break open close gam e and defeated Yankees 6 lo 2. C. Kurfees pitched strong 7 innings for Reds lo get the win. All leam s at open day got the jitters bul settled down to play good sound baseball. Athletic Open House At Davie , The D a vie H igh Athletic Department in conjunction with Athletic Booster Club will hold ah open house of the athletic facilities for rising tenth graders who are interested in participating in the high school sporis program. The evenl will be held on Monday, M ay 30 at 7:30 p.m. in the high school gym nasium . The intent of the open house is to orientate incom ing sophom ore athletics with the athletic facilities at Ihe high school. Mem bers of the coaching slaff of all sports program s al Davie High will be availa b le representing their respective sports. Regardless of your sporting in­ terest, sludents and their parents are cordially inviled to attend. Davie High Athletic Booster Club m em berships will be available. Refreshm ents will be served. Registration For Midget & Jr. Girls Softball T he M o cksv ille Recreation Department will have registration for Midget and Junior Girls Softball on Thursday, M a y 12 from 6 - 7 P.M . at Ihe Mocksville Town Hall. ;■ Eligibility is as follows: M idget' G irls - A ny girl who is not 13 years of age before January 1,1983 is eligible lo participate. Starting age should be 9 years of age. Junior Girls - A ny girl who is not 16 years of age before January 1, 1983 is eligible lo participale. The recreation department is asking for volunteer coaches. If interested in coaching or for more inform alion, conlacl M ichae l Garner al 634-2325 or 634-.3970. FlEfl mflRKET U W E M VER S C A M P 6 R 0 U N » Highway U.S. 64 5 Miles West Of Mocksviile All Day Saturday, M ay 14,1983 Over 400 Different Displays Open Free To The Publii ^ 9 Д.М. til 5 P.Mi 4В - DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, THURSDAY, MAY 12 1983 Centel To Buy Cable TV In Iowa And Florida Centel Corporation of Chicago, parent com pany of Central Telephone in North Carolina, has announced that it will buy cable TV operations in Iowa and Florida. The agreem ents, estim ated at $3!i million, would boost the number of Cenlcl’s cable customers by about 42,000, to more than 200,000. The larger of Ihe two tran­ sactions, Cable Communications of Iowa, Inc., m arks Centel’s entry lo Ihe Iowa cable TV market. CCI serves about 30,000 basic customers in 13 communities throughout the state, about a third of them in Burlington, Iowa. The second acquisition would expand Centel’s current cable operations in Polk County, Fla. This system is owned by W arner Amex Cable Communications, Inc., and serves more than 12,000 customers east of Tampa. The operalion would nearly double Centel’s cable customers in Florida to 26,000. The Florida acquisition, which is adjacent lo Centel cable properties Ihere, follows Centel’s policy of buying system s close to existing properties to achieve greater economl4s of scale. The operalion also provides attractive growlh prospects. Cen'el is one of Ihe nation’s largest and m ost diversified communications companies. In addition to current cable T V properties» in seven states, Centel operates the nation’s fifth largest telephone system, including service to som e 250,000 telephones in w eslern and Piedm ont North Carolina. The com pany also m anufactures and m arkets a variety of communications producLs and services. The longest national anthem is that of Greece, which contains 158 verses. B e ^ tti'/^ sh b u rn a n d G ary M cC ulloh show th e ir a b ilitie s to "T h e B lue D an u b e." L A W I M -B O Y SUPREM E 2 1 ” PUSH M O W E R w ith S id e B ag! FEATURING: • Up fo 30% more usoble power • Solid-state ignition Quiet under-the deck muffler • Lightweight • Fingertip storting Patented Lown-Boy safety features Big side catcher pivots to allow both-<idcs trimming M o d e l 7268 C O U P O N S A V IN G S SALE! Lown-Boy Mower Model 7268 SAVE *50®* Our Regular $369.95 WITH THIS COUPON ONLY...*319i95 I Coupon Good at CaroUna Tire, Througli May 30,1983. I____________________ Whil£_Quantjtics _________________________j ^ t i m e g o e s b y , y o u ’ll k n o w w h y . CAROLINA TIRE CO Retail Divi'ipn nl B'i'1 Ragan inc Rmty Carroich'Ml • М»пч!<т ggj »iii|iin.i|lf Road ~ Phone: 634-61Г5 D oing a one h an d ed c a rtw h e e l a r e A tnv F erg u sso n a n d K a te rin a G reen . G y m n astic g ro u p s p erfo rm ed th ro u g h o u t fhe M ay D ay c e le b ra tio n . Improving Bicycle Techniques Use Caution For Safe Cycling when bicycling on the roads in any state,- cyclists are vulnerable to motorists and roadside hazards. To help prolect you and others, the Bicycle Program of the North C arolina D epartm ent of T ra n ­ sportation (N CD O T) encourages everyone to becom e b icycle­ conscious. F o r m otorists and cyclists alike this means learning to share the road. For cyclists in particular, this means im proving riding techniques. A good place to begin im proving cycling techniques is m aking certain you are riding in good position. Assum ing the bicycle has been properly adjusted to fit your body, you should sit with your back al a 45 degree angle with your elbows slighUy flexed. Keeping your elbows flexed and your wrists as straight as possible prevents in­ juries from road shocks and insures greater control over the bicycle. The mere you bend your elbows, the more power your legs transfer lo the cranks. Proper gear selection is also important. If the gear selected is too high, your legs will tire before your lungs. If Ihe gear is too low, your lungs will tire first. It is important to adjust the gearing on the bike if you feel either your lungs legs are wearing out loo you feel either your lungs or your legs are wearing out loo quickly. Proper gear selection will help to m aintain a steadier speed for a longer period of time. The more you ride, the greater Ihe chances lhat you will have to react to a potentially dangerous situation. “You can sharpen your coor­ dination and control of the bicycle by practicing a few sim ple maneuvers in a nearby parking lot,” according to Curtis Yates, Coordinator for Ihe B icycle Program . Y a le s recom m ends riding in a straight line, while looking behind you (usually over your left shoulder) and riding one- handed to execute proper hand signals. This should be done by placing the right hand on top of Ihe handlebar near Ihe brake lever in order to leave Ihe left arm free lo »* ^ Ц € Щ у Is O u r Best S alesm an" Family Restaurant Tuesday Special P e r c h & F l o u n d e r Thurs.-Fri. »Sat.-Sun. Always A Different Special (AII\You'Can Eat)Wednesoays ^rimp-Calabash Fried or Boiled (Hot or Cold) Hours 4:30-9 Tues.-Wed.-Thurs. Fri.-Sat. 4-9:30 Suq. 4:30-9 Closed Mon. Take Out.Grbers 4B81Country’Club Road 765-0948 signal. “While these techniques appear simple,” Yates said, “few cyclists are able to m aintain a straigh t line when p e rfo rm in g Ihem.” Yates said lhat both these maneuvers are easy to practice and have become invaluable skills when riding in Iraffic. Two other basic control tech­ niques recom m ended by Ihe Bicycle Program are cornering and obstacle-avoiding. When cornering at any speed, it is important to keep the cenler of gravity as low as possible. This can be accomplished by shifting some of your weight off Ihe saddle and onto Ihe pedals. The inside pedal should be up and the oulside pedal down. This technique prevents the inside pedal from grabbing the ground and throwing you into the street. To practice obstacle-avoiding, lay oul a winding course of irregularly spaced objects. You should be able to ride through Ihem al speeds both lower and higher than you feel comfortable. Now that you have had a chance to sharpen your cycling technique, il is time to get out on the road. The first thing for most - cyclists is overcom ing Ihe fear of traffic. Although a natural fear, it should not keep you from riding and should stress the importance of riding safely. The key to safe cycling in traffic is to become a part of the traffic floWi Bicyclists usually become accident victim s because Ihey com m it gross errors such as riding on Ihe left against traffic, running stop signs and m aking abrupt left turns from Ihe right shoulder. Becom ing part of Ihe traffic flow also means riding on the right side of the Iraffic lane, not on the curb or gutter. When passing parked cars, safe distances fnr opening car doors should be considered. also suggest that a key phrase to consider when cycling in traffic is “share Ihe road.” Regardless of the lype of vehicle being ridden, fam iliarize yo u rse lf w ilh yo u r surroundings and understand and obey Ihe rules of the road. F o r m otorists, this m eans realizing thal the bicycle is a legitimate m eans of transportation and recognizing lhat bicyclists face special problems. For bicyclists, Ihis m eans riam g predictably, signaling your m oves to su rro u n d in g traffic, ob eying proper traffic regilations and being responsible and courteous to motorists. F o r m ore inform ation about bicycle safety or bicycling in North C arolina, contact the B ic ycle Program , N CD O T, P.O. B ox 25201, Raleigh, N C 27611, (919 ) 733-2804. Paid Pol. Adv. — J IM H U N r s — P o litic a l M a c h in e ! (the politicians behind Jim H unt and the cam paign against Jesse Helms) Jim HuntHunt РАС Ted Kennedy Liberal РАС Head “ H u n t , w h o h a s h is e y e o n H e l m s ' S e n a t e s e a t, w a s c re d ite id w it h m o b ili z in g a n t i- H e lm s f o r c e s . " T he W a s h in g to n P ost 1 1 /5 /8 2 T h e u n f a ir n e g a t iv e c a m p a ig n a g a in s t J e ss e H e lm s w a s e x p re sse c d b y B L A C P A C 's J u lia n B o n d : “ I 'd lik e t o s e e u s r u n a p ic t u r e o f J e sse H e lm s in N o r t h C a r o lin a n e w s p a p e r s w it h a r if le 's c r o s s h a ir o v e r h is Julian Bond BLAC РАС Head c h e s t Jesse JacksonBlack Voter Registration Activist Vic Kamber AfL-CIO-PROPAC A tla n ta C o n s titu tio n 5 /2 /8 2 "There’s a streak of meanness and intolerance in the campaign to ‘get’ Helms that has no place in American politics—and that should be distur­ bing to all regardless of party label or ideology.” T h e A u g u s ta C h ro n ic le 3 /1 9 /8 3 A s k Y o u rs e lf — W h y A re T h e s e L ib e ra l P o litic ia n s B e h in d Jim H u n t? D e m o c ra ts fo r Jesse... A M a n o f C h a ra c te r Pjid for by HUMS (or Scraiv. Stephens. Ire^surcr Bert Lance Hunl^s Allanla Big Bank Fundraiser W alter M ondalePro-Hunt Davie County District Court The following cases were disposed of during Ihc M ay 3 session of Davie Counly dislricl courl wilh Iho honorable R ob e rl W. Johnson, presiding judge. M ary Frances Mason, possession of a controlled substance, voluntary dismissal. B ruce R aym on d W akefield, driving 70 mph in a 5,'i mph zone, dism issed with leave. Wanda Absher, false pretense, no probable cause. Jam es F. Colhrcn, dam age to personal properly, dismissed on cosls. Jam es F. C olhrcn, assault, dism issed on cosls. Billy Joe Blankenship, exceeding safe speed, cosls. Roger Dale Godbey, improper equipment, costs. Donald Clay Beaver, exceeding safe speed, costs. Jerry Dean Brock, exceeding safe speed, cosls. ' David Kenneth Bailey, improper equipment, costs. Mitzi Lee Dixon, exceeding safe speed, costs. Jam es Albert Hairston, exceeding safe speed, cosls. Andrea G. Hawkins, driving 70 mph in a 55 m ph zone, dismissed with leave, W illiam E. Clarke, driving 70 mph in a 55 mph zone, dism issed wilh leave. Patricia A. Hibbs, driving 70 mph in a 55 mph zone, dism issed with leave. Jam es Laurence Momier, driving 69 mph in a 55 mph zone, dismissed wilh^eave, Ernest L. Malone, driving 70 m ph in a 55 mph zone, dism issed with leave. Kenneth W illiam Little, driving 70 mph in a 55 m ph zone, dism issed with leave. Janice Greer Osborne, driving 70 mph in a 55 m ph zone, dism issed wilh leave, David Richard Miller, driving 70 mph in a 55 m ph zone, dism issed with leave. R o y A rnold, Jr., w orthless checks, voluntary dismissal. Herbert R ay Kinzer, assault, voluntary dism issal. D aisy Elizabeth Parsons, driving 69 m ph in a 55 m ph zone, $10 and cosls. Janice Lindsay West, driving 83 mph in a 55 m ph zone, pay $50 and costs, only drive in accordance with limited driving privileges; operate vehicle between hours of 6 a.m. and 6 p.m. Burton E. Grubbs, driving 70 mph in a 55 m ph zone, dism issed with leave. Richard Michael Dale, D U I, no probable cause. Vance Allen Lapish, D U I, sen­ tenced to 6 months suspended for 2 years, pay $100 and costs, allend D U I course al m enial health, or­ dered not to violate any stale or federal law s, rem ain of good general behavior. Haam id Abdul Laleef, driving 80 mph in a 55 m ph zone, pay $50 and costs, drive in accordance with driyipg privileges. Jam es Hayw ard Wall, Jr., im ­ proper equipment, costs. Rachelle G. Gunning, Jr., driving 80 m ph in a 55 mph zone, $50 and 'costs. Joan Patrick Parker, driving 50 mph in a 35 m ph zone, $10 and cosls. W illiam Anthony Malone, driving 70 mph in a 55 mph zone, $10 and costs. W illiam Nathan Allen, driving without corrective lenses, $25 and costs. Annie Sm ilh Morrison, driving 70 mph in a 55 m ph zone, $10 and costs. Roberta Ann Wright, driving 67 mph in a 55 m ph zone, $10 and costs. W illiam R. McCullom , driving 65 mph in a 55 m ph zone, $5 and cosls. Terry Lynn Kim m er, disturbing Ihe peace, costs, . G ary Dean Flippen, exceeding the posted speed, costs. Kristy Jo Potts Brown, driving 70 mph in a 55 m ph zone, $10 and costs. Katherine Carol Bartt, driving 70 mph in a 55 m ph zone, $10 and costs. Dwight Douglas Bristol, driving . 70 mph in a 55 mph zone, $10 and cosls. M arcus Ray Berger, driving 66 mph in a 55 mph zone, $5 and costs. Roberl Oriey Bailey, driving 65 mph in a 55 mph zone. $10 and cosls. Stanley Leon Clements, driving 70 mph in a 55 mph zone, $10 and cosls. R egina E arle n e Goodm an, following too close, cosls. Angela Lynn Hairston, driving 70 mph in a 55 mph zone, $10 and costs. David Lee Sutton, driving 70 mph in a 55 mph zone, $10 and costs. W illiam Larkin Nieman, driving 70 mph in a 55 mph zone, $10 and cosls. Robert M ark Settle, driving 68 mph in a .55 mph zone, $10 and costs. Tresa M cKancy Perry, driving 70 mph in a 55 mph zone, $10 and cosls. Roberl Gus Fleshman, driving 70 mph in a 55 mph zone, $10 and costs. Randy Glen Vaughn, driving 65 mph in a 55 mph zone, $5 and cosls. Harold Aaron Sears, driving 70 mph in a 55 mph zone, $10 and costs. Reym an Luther Foster, driving 70 mph in a 55 mph zone, $10 and costs, Thom as Andrew Dickson, driving 69 mph in a 55 mph zone, $10 and cosls. Trum an Eariey Duke, driving 68 mph in a 55 mph zone, $10 and costs. Carolyn Annette Mabe, exceeding safe speed, costs. Kevin Douglas Sebastian, driving 70 mph in a 55 mph zone, $10 and cosls. M arshall Oneil, driving 69 mph in a 55 mph zone, $10 and costs, Robert Steven Thompson, driving 70 mph in a 55 mph zone, $10 and cosls. D en nis W ilbert Fincannon, driving 67 mph in a 55 mph zone, $10 and costs, W arren Francis Beeler, driving 70 mph in a 55 mph zone, $10 and costs. Terrell Edw ard Drum , driving 70 mph in a 55 mph zone, $10 and costs. Sandra Smith Landin, driving 68 mph in a 55 mph zone, $10 and costs. W aller D, Peterson, driving 69 mph in a 55 mph zone, $10 and cosls. Clinton Gray Cine, driving 70 mph in a 55 mph zone; $10 and costs. Ronald Francis McGhin, driving 70 mph in a 55 mph zone, $10 and costs. Nancy F. Coatney, driving 70 mph in a 55 m ph zone, $10 and costs. Jeffrey D avis Greene, driving 68 mph in a 55 mph zone, $10 and costs. Brain Eugene Braswell, driving 69 mph in a 55 mph zone, $10 and cosls. Louis M arkam Stanback, ex- ' ceeding safe speed, costs, Jam es M , Costello, driving 70 mph in a 55 mph zone, $10 and costs. H ickey D onnail Cleveland, driving 50 mph in a .15 mph zone, $10 and cosls. ' Richard Arlen Markle, driving 69 ' mph in a 55 mph zone, $10 and cosls. Billy R. B. Shoffner, Jr., driving DO mph in a .15 mph zone, $10 and cosls. Kenneth Eugene White, driving left of center, cosls. William Clinton Ray III, driving 70 mph in a 55 mph zone, $10 and cosls. Fred erick H am ilton Arm field, loud muffler, costs. Frederick Hamilton Armfield, no drivers license, $25 and cosls. Ronald Allen Jones, Jr., driving 70 mph in a 55 mph zone, $10 and costs. Lloyd Allen Fletcher, driving 55 mph in a 35 mph zone, $10 and costs. Small Grain Field Day Scheduled An opportunity is coming up for Davie County sm all grain producers lo gel updated on their crop, says Ronnie Thompson, Davie County agricultural extension agent. A sm all grain field day has been scheduled for Ihe .Piedm ont Research Station near Salisbury on Wednesday, M ay 18. ‘‘Most of the wheat, oats, and barley experts from Ihe N.C. Agricultural Research Service will be on hand lo explain their work and answer questions,” Thompson said. Some of the topics to be covered include new varieties with resistance lo mildew and rust, schemes for m anaging diseases, nitrogen rales, growth regulators, new herbicides, and control of the cereal ieaf beetle, "Grow ers can also see m axim um yield studies and get a general update on growing sm all grains," Thompson added. The field day will be Ihe first at Ihe Piedmont Station in two years and probably Ihe last unlil 1985, according lo Superintendent Billy Ayscue. “A unique feature of Ihe field day is Ihe starting time," Thompson said. “It doesn’t begin until 5 p.m. “This permits farm ers lo put in nearly a full day and get updated on sm all grain production in the early evening.” Food will be available. For more information on the field day, contact D avie A gricu ltu ral Extension Service (634-6297). r (iking patlòn, stock FM stock pens.confinement buildings, lecd supple­ments. adding lo your hcrd.vacclnations... it’s the language o( farming. And you’ve got lo speak It lo succeed. We speak your language. We make short term loans for equipment purciiasus, operating expenses - you name It, whatever you need for your livestock operation. We're iarmer-ovfned and farmercontrollcd. We know what you’re up against.Call or conie by today Ln^TOCKspoken here.F A ^ CREDIT SERVICE 3 9 0 S a l i s b u r y S t r e e t M o c k s v i l l e , N X . ^ « V 6 3 4 - 2 1 5 9 LsjM ichael R. Morton, Assistant Vice-President M n 'H . Ervin, Loan Officer The All New 1984 CORVETTE M a r k o f E x c e l l e n c e I f y o u l o v e s p o r t s c a r s . y o u a r e i n v i t e d t o v i s i t B e l l & H o w a r d C h e v r o l e t ' s S h o v i / r ó o r n . . . t o s e e a n d t o u c t i t h e c a r t h a t i s _______________ s v y / e e p i n g t h e c o u n t r y i n a l l - t i m e s a l e s . H С Ofé*t! No И ю п г 7 0 4 /8 7 3 * 9 0 d 4 DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD. THURSDAY. MAY 12, 1983 - 5B Pinebrook Students Visit Discovery Place The second and third grade classes from M o cksv ille ’s Pinebrook Elem entary School were in Charlotte, Monday, M ay 2, lo visil Discovery Place. Discovery Place, the Southeast’s largest science and technology museum and one of the major science centers in Ihe country, emphasizes the “hands-on" ap­ proach lo learning. The Pinebrook slu de nls p a r­ ticipated in special program m ing in the m useum ’s Life Center. Some of the sludents took part in “Meet Cardio", where they studied the heart and good heallh Ihrough a special musical presenlalion. The resl of Ihe class studied the Digestive System by looking at and d iscu ssin g the physiology of digestion. In addition to' Ihe spccial programs, Ihe group toured Ihe other exhibit areas including Ihe Aquarium, Ihe Knighl Rain Forest, Science Circus, and the Energy area. The sludents touched live sea creatures, generated electricity, sent whispered messages across a room, and observed a mounted eight-foot tall Kodiak bear. H o w T a l l ? S usan W ard, rig h t, m e asu res c la ssm a te C hris AAann, left, in D iscovery P la c e 's Life C enter d u rin g th eir'iH ass's re c e n t v isit to th e m u seu m . C lau d ette W ishon, 8, a stu d e n t a t P inebrook E le m e n ta ry School to u ch es live sea c re a tu re s in D iscovery P la c e 's T ouch T ank. CHARCOAL LiGHTER CAMP STOVE ^ 3 iO T I Gott 2-Gallon Coolej (8.4 liters) GILMOL. QUALITY/ NOZZLE^ One of our most popula” . rugged, die cast metal body, heavy gauge handle, durable polymer valve, positive clip lock to hold nozzle open. $2.57 Value VALUE PRICED OSCILLATING SPRINKLER COVERS UP TO 2,550 SQ. FT. M O D EL 1010 $9.99 Value walerlng'poslllons Rugged Cycolac® housing 16 precision water openings R ID -A -B D G T E S T C O N T R O L $13 13 Value G ilm o u r '$ 2 ^ 9 ' , 4529 FLIPPER CDRIVEWAY COATER $3.99 lvalue » (io$ from on« lo ine other for spmadhv 564-C 5 -G allon C an b L A C K T O P ^ E A L E B . Douglas BLACKTOP SEALER V i i 8 ^ ^ •nd Sfflooihtftg drrtrvway dreisngs. root coatng« and мрГмП 1 SM ttri.Breiies — ZfOMOfbto.i.TiPoiyproc^Mneper'raniintty ) hut tused lo Woch. Uimnwd IV.*. Bock — tt* to*m Poiy propylene wnn engted 11 * squeege and mr«a()ed hoM HarxM — 4в* I % * oiametef, tiveaded. Packed 24 drive««) coalers and 24 n«r«iM per srt«ping carton. Snipp<n0 2в toa. СоЬе 1.973 cu It. A AMES’..C iO * wcOo'«vg* c(v $12.00 Value/ MIRACLE GRASS Miracle-plui >No. 23.062121 Push cut grass shear action Precision tiollow ground blades Blister-prool handles Long-lasting rugged design B la c k s t ie e k e p . 8124 16" DOUBLE.EDGE SHRUB &HEDGETRIMMER Hi<;n qua»!» 10 inpiii mosl needs For topuMi ii;>!S tl) doubi** »"JqctJ tfcip ro cji DUijHS peimii cullinij iiC(ir<i-i a^/ert.u/' jCWrunmQ m nule Srt'.'iv i Alien locus on ii,rnsoit i loucn 01 irie itiqqcf f rcctirm f.iitirn if>i fTioto« iinii Ci.idfl prnieciio" kV'..f.^rounn tor e.tiy ccni«oi ,ccimlt>ttib ie rei» A A M E S * . .iiiifc j a McOor>ough conDELUXE- TRUK HOSE REEL No. 23-805 Holds ISO'of hose. Delacti leel, converts lo handi-truk Iqi yaid and jiarden tasks Double 'O ’ !•«) pieventt leaks $52.35 Value F lu id m a ste r* 4 0 0 -A T o ile t T an li R e p a ir V alv e _ Stop lollet tank noise, leaks and water waste, once and for all. The Fluidmaster 400-A replaces oldfashloned corroded float ball and f rod assemblies. It's easy to install and fits $ C 4 9 most toilet tanks. 3 MR. BARTENDER $ 7 3 0 Value С AP.COAL LIGI ■$9.58 Value HTERCHARCOAL KIrrtiB gril! tires tho easy way. Eie-Jtrlc — pafer — no dan- gro'Ji flDshbLCksI Solld-stato ('.etr.icri tor added safety. 3- prong cord, 6>tt. long. UL- P L A S T I C S P R A Y E R W \ $34.97 Value Q U A LIT Y C H A P IN _ C O M P R E S S E D r - ^ i A IR s p r a y e r ! ^ FO R Н О М Е Г O R F A R M Hardw are Store, Willow Oak Shopping Center Mocksville. N.C. 704-634-3322 SB - DAVIU COUNTY BNTERPRISU RECORD, THURSDAY. MAY 12, 1983 Cutting Back Without Feeling The Pinch Salt Savvy Our doctors have told us, Thnc magazine has told us. Consumer groups and government experts have told us: Our bodies don’t need as much sail as wc use. Sail, or more accuralely Ihe sodium in salt, seems to conlribule lo high blood pressure (H BP ) in some people. Scienlisls believe that some people can cul Iheir chances of gelling H B P by culling down on Ihe sodium Ihey consume. With Iheir doctor's advice, some people who already have high blood pressure can reduce Ihe amount of medicine Ihey need or lower pressures io healthy levels wilhoul using drugs al all. According lo a nalional survey, 40 perceni of the U.S. population is trying lo cul back. How? The first step is to lake Ihe salt shaker off Ihe table. Next, eat fewer foods lhal taste salty: bacon, sausage, hot dogs, potato chips, pickles, sauerkraul, elc. These changes will help, bul as a sail-wise shopper and cook, you can do more. . The shopper wilh salt savvy knows that nearly all processed foods are m uch higher in sodium lhan fresh foods. For example, a raw tomato has 14 m g of sodium but one cup of canned tomato soup, prepared with an equal am ouni of waler, has 932 mg, and a cup of commercial tomato sauce has 1,498 mg. Sodium is included in alm osl every kind of processed food, in­ cluding baked goods, lunch meals, canned foods, prepared frozen dinners, cereals, candy, cheese, condiments, and even ice cream. ■ On package labels, m any dif­ ferent words mean lhal the product contains sodium : salt, monosodium glutamate, sodium benzoate, and di­ sodium phosphate are some corn- m on sources of sodium in ■processing. M any companies are starling to specify the amount of each kind of sodium on the label. If a label does not give the exact ;am ounts, ■ rem em ber that ingredients are listed in order of quantity: those cutting down on sodium m ight avoid buying products when a sodium word is ;ambng the first Ihree ingredients listed. . • Shoppers today who , want to reduce the sodium in their diet have more choice than ever before in the ■low sodium prepared foods available. Som e large companies .like Cam pbell Soup offer low ; sodium products. Some grocery stores post shelf m arkers telling shoppers about tow sodium foods. Local grocery stores have special .areas for dietetic foods which in­ clude some low sodium food items. ■ LoW salt foods are available on shelves wilh regular foods; which ‘ makes reading labels very im- • porlanl. In cooking, Ihink about what the ■salt in a recipe will contribute before you add it automatically. Take desserts. D o you really taste ’ the salt in a chocolate cake? D o you ; want the taste of salt in a fruit pie? Yet almost any conventional recipe for cakes and pies contains salt. Contrary to what som e cooks believe, reducing or elim inaling that sail from home baked goods, including breads, will nol affect rising or texture. Using low sodium baking powder is anolher easy way toreduccd sodium in desserts. The sam e is true for that “pinch of salt” you are told lo add lo beaten egg whiles and lo cooking waler for vegetables or pasta. It won’l con­ tribute m uch lo taste or texture, yet a generous pinch m ay contain more sodium than a whole d a y 's recommended intake. Two gram s of sodium or 5 gram s of sail per day is called moderale sodium restriction. One teaspoon of salt contains 2,325 m illigram s or 2.3 gram s of sodium. Thus a diet moderately restricted in sodium should contain no added salt, because naturally occurring sodium is already present in m any foods. Anolher place where taste won't suffer without salt is in highly seasoned foods like curries and chili dishes. Very fresh foods cooked briefly have more natural flavor and often can tastefully sland alone. Sometimes sail aclually lakes away from lasle appeal. M any people find, for example, lhal salting dishes already flavored with herbs and spices overpowers the subtle individual flavors and dulls the finished taste. Although there are m any painless ways like these lo cut salt from recipes, some dishes, such as eggs and potatoes, m ay seem to cry out for salt. But there are other good lasting options. If you are restricting sodium as pari of high blood pressure treatment, try being creative with salt-free seasonings. A combinalion of lemon juice, pepper, and tarragon or parsley is a good allernative to salt, as is the homemade "salt substitute” in the recipe below. A sk your doctor ' before using a commercial salt substitute. Those in good health who are trying to use less salt as part of sensible eating might season with a sm all am ouni of salted -whipped bulter or m argarine to get a hint of salt lasle at a relatively low sodium count. One tablespoon of whipped salted butter or m argarine has only 74 m g of sodium, 6,901 m g fewer than one tablespoon of salt. Whipped versions are also lower in fat and calories than regular butter and margarine. And lake heart. Most people find lhal the less salt they use, the less they want. Nutritionists say it can lake as few as seven salt-free days for a “salt craving” to begin to lessen. Although cutting down on sodium can make a difference to your / health, don’t forget lhat olher eating habits like controlling calorie and fat intake are just as important. M osl of the time, however, eating foods lhal are low in calorie will also help you cut down on sodium. S A L T S U B S T IT U T E R E C IP E R o fa ir a BRUSH CUTTERS B u i l t F o r P e r f o r m a n c e ! FREE STAR BLADE & SHOULDER STRAP.. Free with the purchose of each Model NB16F or NB23F Robin Brush Cutler! This Is a limited time offer, so hurryl YOU SAVE $17.90* ' S u g o e ile d R eloll V alue R O B IN M O D E L N B 1 6 F • 15.4. cc engine •automatic centrifugal clutch • recoil starter • diaphragm type carburetor for all position operation »weighs 8.8 lbs, • comes complete with nylon cord trim­ mer head, blade guard, tool kit and In- slfuctlon monual. Model NB23F N O W $ O N L Y ...128 0 0 R O B IN M O D E L N B 2 3 F • 22,5 cc engine • automatic centrifugal clutch •reco il starter »diophraom typo carburetor for all position operation • weighs 9,2 lbs, • comes complete with nylon cord trimmer head, blade guard, tool kit and Instruction manual. NO W $ O N L Y ...178 0 0 TIRE CO. R etail D ivision of B rad R agan, Inc AsuBiitiiiii Qco DH Rustv Carmlchflel,01 »«AOI.W« me 962 Yadkinvilto Rd. Manager Phone:634-6115 1 teaspoon chili powder 2 teaspoons ground oregano 2 teaspoons black pepper 1 tablespoon garlic powder (not garlic sail) 2 tablespoons dry mustard 6 tablespoons onion powder (not onion salt) 3 tablespoons paprika 3 lablespoons poullry seasoning M ix all seasonings together and put in your salt shaker. (Courtesy of the South Carolina Departmenl of Health and E n ­ vironmental Services.) The following recipes are sodium and calorie conscious. H E R B E D L IN G U IN E 12 ounces linguine noodles I medium-sized bunch broccoli, cut inlo 1-inch pieces (about 6 cups) -1.1 cup walnuls, coarsely chopped 'i cup ( ‘i: stick) unsalted m argarine 1 tablespoon oil I'i; pinis cherry tomatoes, stems removed 1 large clove garlic, minced ' i teaspoon red pepper flakes l',i teaspoon sweel basil 1 cup chicken broth (made with 1 unsalled bouillon cube in 1 cup boiling water) '/I cup fresh parsley, chopped '„I cup freshly grated Rom ano cheese In a G-quart kettle, start cooking Ihe pasta in boiling, unsalled water, following directions on label. Add Ihe broccoli lo the linguine during the last 5 minutes of cooking time. Drain, Rinse wilh cold water. Toast the walnuls 5 minutes in a 350 degree oven. Mell 2 tablespoons of m argarine and the oil over moderale heat in a m edium -sized skillet. Add the lomaloes and cook, stirring often. Cook 2 minutes. Add the garlic, pepper flakes, and basil and cook 25 minutes longer, until tomatoes are lender but still, hold their shape. Rem ove from heat, cover, and keep warm. Melt Ihe rem aining 2 tablespoons of m argarine in the pasta kettle. Return broccoli and linguine to kettle. Toss lo coat with margarine. Add the tomatoes in their sauce, the ■ broth, and Ihe parsley. Toss lo blend. Divide pasta am ong 4 lo 6 plates. Sprinkle the top of each serving with some of the walnuls and some of the grated cheese. Serve immediately. W ilh French bread and green tossed salad with sprouts, this is a very filling mealt 4-6 servings. If ch erry tom atoes are unavailable, use 6-8 m edium tomatoes cut inlo wedges. (Reprinted with permission from : l.iving Without Salt, Karin B. Ballzell and Terry M . Parsley, Brelhren Press, 1P52.) F R IJ O L E S R A N C H E R O S (Ranch-style Beans) 1 cup dried pinto beans 6 to 8 cups water 1 pound fresh pork shanks, (2), skin and flanks removed 1 mediiim onion ■A teaspoon black pepper 2 bay leaves 5 garlic cloves, minced 1 dried red pepper pod Sauce: I fresh tomato chopped onion, chopped 1 teaspoon oregano 1 teaspoon m argarine 1 tablespoon W orcestershire sauce W ash and drain beans. Place beans and waler in a pan and boil 2 minules. Rem ove from heat. Cover and allow to soak 1 hour. D o not drain. Add pork, onion, pepper, bay leaves, and garlic. Bring to boiling and reduce heat. Sim m er until beans are lender (about 1'« to 2 hours). For sauce, saute chopped onion in m argarine until soft. Add lomalo and oregano, and continue cooking over a low heal about 3 minules. Add sauce to beans, and cook beans for an additional 15 minutes. M akes 4 servings. (Reprinted wilh permission from Favorite F a m ily R ecip es for Sodium Restricted Diets, by N or­ theast Valley Health Corporation Com m unily Educational System for H B P Control; H ealth System s M anagem ent Corporation; and Ethel Trice-Sanders.) U N S A L T Y ’S P IC K L E S You can m ake your own pickles by boiling up a little dill, pickling • spice, sugar, and white vinegar and Ihen pouring over sliced cucum bers , lhat have been placed in a jar. Cover, cool, and refrigerate. Mg. sodium negligible. (Reprinted wilh permission from Cooking Without a Grain of Salt, Elm a W. Bagg, Doubleday and Co., 1904.) P A R S L E Y E D P O T A T O ES 1 pound potatoes (3 medium) 2 lablespoons unsalled m argarine Two-thirds cup snipped parsley 2 teaspoons finely chopped onion '.i leaspoon grated lemon peel ' I leaspoon sugar Freshly ground pepper Pare potatoes and cul inlo balls wilh melon ball cutter or cut into 'A- inch slices. Cook potatoes covered in 1 inch of boiling water until lender, about 5 minutes. Drain. Melt m argarine in saucepan: stir in parsley, onion, lemon peel, and sugar. Season wilh pepper. Add potatoes and heat, stirrin g frequently, until potatoes are coated wilh m argarine and hot. M akes 4 servings. NO sodium content listed. 125 calories per serving. (Reprinted with permission from Living With High Blood Pressure, Joyce D. M argie and Jam es C. Hunt, H L S Press, 1978.) S M O T H E R E D C A B B A G E 1 (4 to 5 pounds) head green cabbage 1 pound fresh pork shanks (2 each) 2 tablespoons m argarine 1 medium onion, chopped 2 to 3 garlic cloves, minced leaspoon dill seed 1 tablespoon vinegar 'l' leaspoon black pepper 1 dried red pepper pod Rem ove skin from pork hocks. In a covered kettle, cook 2 cups water with garlic for 40 minutes. Core, wash, and cut cabbage inlo sm all pieces. Heat m argarin e until bubbly. Add pork shanks, cooking liquid, and all olher ingredients. Cover and cook over medium heal for 10 to 12 minutes, stirring frequently. Cabbage should be pale green in color. Do not ovcrcook. M akes 6 ser­ vings. 1.30 mg. sodium per serving. 182 calories per serving. (Reprinted with perm ission from Favorite F a m ily R ecip es for Sodium Restricted Diets, by N or­ theast Valley Health Corporation Com m unily Educational System for H B P C on lrol; H ealth System s M anagem ent Corporation, and Ethel Trice-Sanciers.) S T IR ‘N ‘ R O L L B IS C U IT S (no salt) 2 cups all-purpose flour 1 tablespoon plus H i U low-sodium baking powder One-third cup vegetable oil Two-thirds cup skim m ilk Unsalled m argarine Heal oven lo 450 degrees. Measure flour and baking powder inlo bowl. Pour oil and m ilk inlo m easuring cup (do not stir); pour inlo flour mixture. Stir with fork until m ixture cleans side of bowl and form s a ball. To knead dough: turn onto waxed paper. Lift paper by one corner and, fold dough in half. Press down firm ly and pull paper back. Repeat ■ ughi i;-inc Ipi . .unlil dough looks smooth. Pat or roll dough '/.¡-inch thick between 2 sheets of waxed paper. Cut with unfloured 2-inch biscuit culler. Place on ungreased baking sheet. Bake 10 to 12 minutes or until golden brow n., Serve hot with m argarine and, if desired, with jelly, honey, jam, or syrup. 86 mg. sodium per biscuit. 110 calories per biscuit. Variations; Herb Biscuits: Add 1 ‘/j teaspoons caraway seed, JA teaspoon crum ­ bled leaf sage, and 'h teaspoon dry m ustard to flour mixture. Drop , Biscuits: Increase skim m ilk lo 1 cup. Omit kneading and drop dough by spoonfuls onto greased baking sheet. (Reprinted wilh perm ission from l.iving With High Blood Pressure, Joyce D. M argie and Jam es C. Hunt, H L S Press, 1978.) Special Singing Saturday At Calahaln The Singing- Servants and the Redeemed Trio will be featured performers Salurday, M a y 14 at the Sheffield C alah aln R u ritan Building. The outdoor concert will begin at 7:00 p.m. and is sponsored by the Sheffield-Calahaln Ruritan Club. Refreshm enls will be served. No adm ission will be charged. Participants are urged to bring a lawn chair for Ihoir comfort during the outside concert. ..Thaddcus W ayne Johnson, son o( T e rry and S an d ra Johnson of M ocksvillc was 1 year old M arch 28th, A party was given M arch 27th. Thads birthday cake was In the design of the Easter Bunny and was baked by his m other. H is grandparents are M r. and M rs. W. Brodis Clontz Sr. of Rt. 1, Advancc and M r. and M rs. Charlie Johnson o( Sanford Rd., Mocksvillc. ..G reat-gran dp aren ts are M rs. Lillie Clontz of Advancc, M r. Ira C. E llis of Clemm ons, M r. and M rs. Floyde Pope of Matthew s and Mr. and M rs. Wesley Johnson of Mocksville. Thad would like to thank everyone for all the gifts and a special thanks to his sister Terra for helping with his party. Wm.R. Davie Field Day Is Tuesday The last P T A meeting for W illiam R. Davie School will be a special m eeling held in conjunction with Field Day. The Field D ay activities will begin at 6:30 p.m. and will conclude wilh the P T A business meeling to be held in the gym nasium . All of these festivities will be held on Tuesday, M ay 17, beginning at 6:30 p.m. All parents are encouraged lo allend and bring a lawn chair for comforl. D avie 4 -H C lu b N e w s A training session for volunteers working with the 4-H sponsored H andicapped R id in g C anip is scheduled for Tuesday, M ay 17 al 6:30 p.m. The session, for bolh volunteers and horses, will be held al the 4-H Horse Arena off U.S. 801 near Farmington. Alice Bishoff, certified trainer from Mecklenburg County, will servo as instructor. Jeep W ilson, chairm an, said volunteers are desperately needed to assure the success of the H an­ dicapped Riding Camp. “We urge, support of this very worthwhile, project,” she said. Persons wishing to assist m ay do so by attending the first training session or by calling the Davie County 4-H office (day) or Mondale Ellis (nighi) at 998-47,38. T R A IL B L A Z E R S Apr Trailblazers 4-H Club mel al the home of Jeep Wilson. The meeling was called to order by Vice- President, Catl^erine Johnson. We had the treasurer's report, and the minutes of Ihe last meeting were read. There were 13 m em bers presenl and 4 visitors'. The visitors were Karen Horton, Chrlsti Canter, Killie Wishon, and Cindy Ellis. We discussed our old and new business. The program included a dem onstration by K atherine Meadows. Kerri Wilson told about Horse Bowl and Judging Reasons. Dell E llis then told about Horse Camp. Certificates were given to len fticqibers from the Region at the G reensboro H o rse Bow l. The mem bers accepting these awards were Katherine Meadows, Phil Ivey, Catherine Johnson, Shelly Hardwich, April Russell, Dell Ellis, Kerri Wilson, Toni McClam rock, Ellis Johnson, and Pepper Bishoff. The m eeling was then adjourned., 'Charlynne Ellis Reporter "What nobody seeks is rarely found." Pestalozzi A nderson^ S U P È R B R U S H B U S T E R The thicker It is, the better the Stihl®FS-90cu ts it. An(j the better you’ll like the FS-90. Save on an optional accessoty kit, including a heavy-duty saw blade. Il’s Stlhl’s w ay of help­ ing you overpow er the under­ brush. Phone 634-5605 H ig h w a ^ o l^ o u S T {'"ocksviile 5' 3 Ф SA V E $25.00 O F F REG U LA R PRICE S TIH IZ T H E W O R L D ’S L A R G E S T S E L L IN G C H A IN S A W RECEIVE FROM Baity's Discount Tire Sales U.S. Sayings Bonds from Uni Royal w hen you purchase 4 Tires 2 Tires You Get You Get ^50®®®"Bond At Competitive Prices Participating UniRoyal Dealer Baity's Discount Tirè Sales ^UNIROYAL 634-2365 W inston Salem 722-3018 Yadkinville 679-2111 G reensboro 294-4246 Highw ay 601 South M o c k s v ille Hours: 8 :0 0 A .M . to 5 :3 0 P .M . M on. thru Fri. 8 :0 0 to 12 on Sat. 634-2365 Courtney 463-5561 S tatesville 872-6193 W ilkesboro 667-5068 Local Classes O ffere d O n H ow To M easu re H igh B lood Pressure M ay is Nalional High Blood Pressure Monlh. As pari of a nationwide focus on high blood pressure, Ihe N orlh w esl N orih Carolina Chapler of Ihe Am erican Red Cross is sponsoring eighteen educational sessions lhat will leach people with lillle or no heallh background how lo measure blood pressure. The sessions have received unanimous endorsement from Ihe Executive Commlltee of Ihe Forsylh-Stokcs-Davie Counly Medical Sociely. The classes, which last 2-3 hours, will be held on Salurday, M ay 21 and Monday, M ay 23 ■ Friday, M ay 27. Three classes will be held each day at a a.m. - noon; 1 p.m. -4 p.m., and 7 p.m. - 10 p.m. Locations for the classes include selected sites in Forsyth, D avle, and Y ad kin Counties. A $7.00 fee which includes a workbook will be charged. Pre- reglslration is required and can bo done at tho Red Cross Chapler House, G90 Coliseum Drive, W in­ slon-Salem, N.C. on Monday, M a y 9 Ihrough Friday, M ay 13 and M on­ day, M ay if) Ihrough Friday, M ay 20 from 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. "T he purpose of Ihe classes,” reports Mrs. Dot Hurley, Nursing and Heallh Services Director of Ihe local Red Cross, “is lo enable in­ dividuals who have lillle or no health background lo be able lo correctly measure blood pressure. These days more and more people are becoming interested in learning self-help sk ills -sk ills lhal w ill enable them lo lake better care of their health. Since blood pressure is a vital sign of health and illness, knowing how to measure it is im ­ portant for m any people. The friends and relatives of persons who need Iheir blood pressure measured regularly al home is another group that can benefit from these classes. Ind ivid uals with high blood pressure can have five or six measurements laken over a period of lime thal is convenient lo them and in a setting that m ay be less stressful for them Ihan a doctor’s officc. They can then report the findings to Ihe doctor who will be May Day Festival At Dulin Saturday M ay D ay Festival will be held Salurday, M ay 14, from 4 p.m. until fl p.m. at Dulin United Melhodisl Church. Gam es will be played, crafts, food and auction sales, as well as a lol of fun for everyone. The public Is invited to attend. Cooleemee School Menu, May 16-20 The menu for Cooleemee School for Ihe week of M ay 10-20,1983, is as follows: >. M O N D A Y : Cheeseburgers, let­ tuce, pickles, French fries, catsup, buns, and dessert. T U E S D A Y : Beef-a-roni, green beans, tossed salad, rolls, and dessert. W E D N E S D A Y ; R ibs, slaw, French fries, fruit, cookies, and buns. T H U R S D A Y : Taco’s, buttered corn, lossed salad, fruit, peanut butter & crackers. F R ID A Y : Pork patties, slaw, ' rice, green peas, rolls, and dessert. DAVIE COUNTV ENTERPRISE RHCORD, THURSDAY, MYA 1983 7B better able lo regulate their Irealm enl." The classes consist of self­ learning w ith a w orkbook, demonstration and lecture, prac­ tice, and testing. Each student who successfully completes Ihe class will rcceive a Red Cross certificate. Class size Is limited to 6-10 students. Instructors for the classes are volunteer inslruclors certified lo leach by Ihe Red Cross. For more information call 724- 0511. "A p p e a ra n c e s are ofte n deceiving." Aesop T h i s A d G o u l d S a v e l b u r H e a l t h . A good night’s sleep is vital to good health. A nd proper support is vital to a good night’s sleep. But everybody has individual needs w hen it com es to the precise support required. A t the Consum er Inform ation Center in Kingsdown’s Sleep G allery you can see exactly w h at support your body w ill get from different m attress and boxspring constructions. Then use our Q uality Checklist to determ ine w hat benefits you need, and pay only for those benefits. S A V E * 2 0 0 ® ® Right n o w yo u ’ll find specicd introd ucto ry sale prices on m any sets of handcrafted Kings- down bedding. But hurry. These incredibly low prices are for a lim ited tim e o n ly MA’nKi:s.s . n Alicr^Fmr . ft . n P t>ftturìzcdS (i,tt m l " » No’ïtofl ID«0U»ir*IWlln3 : .ft : & & Uq< It I i.t sM .ii.t rd Oà(n■^Уc^' ■ % m Self\fenUlaib«& Coollfl« ft EnayToiliUHlIc N o C ç tlfte l ^ BOXSPRING COIL : ft AlIcr^N her ft i^rovUtittl^ToGO^UMignr MattnMttUIe ftft ExlmSltTJi^Soqipart ft Piwit«rii«ISii№Ort f t Z u u lm l f t n o rd c riP tttfe rtk m f t C o n d irP -ro te c U o a________________ ft ft a ftidlvldtmlCrmtmirSiij^ori f t N o C M IS (|U tta k ft H!gli-Sire«aF«anw ' ManS^BSpring, *KINCSDOWN •499” S L E E P G A liE IW W h e n ^ u B u y A M a tb e s s , ThereS s O n ly O n e P la c e 'fe u C a n S e e W h at1 ifo iA :e G e ttin g . DANIEL Furniture and Electric Co., Inc S e rv in g th e ^ D a v ie C o u n ty area f o r o v e r 4 0 y e a rs ." , SOUTH MAIN STR EET at the O verhead Bridge Phone 634-2492 M ocksville, M.C. 8В - DAVIU COU N TY IÌNTURPRIS1-. R U C O R D , T H U R S D A Y , M A Y 12 1983 W oodleaf N e w s The local lo m a lo g ro w e rs, who losi thousands of to m a to plants In Ihe fields d u rin g the freeze several weeks ago, h a v e fin a lly found enough plants lo re-set their fields. These plants a re m u c h sm aller, however, they w ill m a k e the grad e bul will delay (he m a rk e l about a inon(h and sh o u ld b e read y for picking around (he first of July. M rs. Leilha W e sm o re is hom e from Ihe O rth o p e a d ic H osp ital in CharloKe w h ere she- u nd erw lnl surgery and w a s h ospitalized for several weeks. S h e is slo w ly in- proving. M rs. R a lp h D a m e r o n h a s returned to h e r h o m e in Chat- innooRa, Tenn. afte r sp e n d in g som e Wc(-(ime with her mo(her, Mrs. more, during her illness. The Rev. and Mrs. David Henry and children, E lizabelh and Christopher are attending a seminar on local church history this week in Montreal. Mrs. Mack Gatewood of Asheville was here over the weekend with her brother, Talmadge Nesbit, and a sisler, Mrs. Clinard Howard in Mocksville. A m em ber of the Gideon Organization will bring the message to the congregation at Unity Presbyterian Church Sunday morning. Civitan Club Has M e e tin g The M o cksville C iv ita n C lu b neia its second seek m e e tin g for new m em bers in 1983 on M o n d a y , M a y 9. The dinner, m e e tin g w a s held at H orn’s C ountry K itc h e n at 6:30 p.m. Guest sp e ake r fo r the m eeting was Jim W h iten er of A lb em arle. M r. W hitener is p a st go ve rn o r of District W esl C iv ita n C lu b s in N orth Carolina. H e is a lso the 19V9 recipient of the h o n o re d K e y Aw ard, and chairm an of the N o rth C arolina Sp ecial O ly m p ic G a m e s h eld yearly. He is w e ll-kn o w n in civitan clubs for his in te re st in a re a Special O lym pics gam es. Visitors at Ih e m e e tin g w ere Je rry Sink, S te v e J o rd a n , D a v id Hefner, and O p a l F r y e . M e m b e rs attending w e re : B ill Y a rb o ro u gh , Dr. and M rs. W .M . L o n g , D a vid Joyner, Jack N a y jo r, K a r e n Sm ith, la y i and Andy A n d e rso n . E llis H ayes,P aul S la p f, B o b R auch, . The, Mocksville Civitan Club meets’ on the second and fourth Monday evenings at Horn’s Country Kitchen. Anyone interested in. becoming a Civitan is asked to contact any member of the club. The club is accepting donations for a yard sale to be held on Salurday, June 11 at the Willow Oaks Shopping ' Cenler. Anyone having an article to donate, is asked to contact any member of the club. Proceeds from the yard sale will go for community service projects and lo assist and develop mentally and disabled persons in Davie County. Oak Grove UMYF Sponsors Car Wash Oak Grove UMYF will sponsor a car wash at Juan Cohen’s Sunaco Station on 601, just above 1-40, Salurday, May 21.- • There will be a charge of five dollars for each car. For additional information, call 998-5616 or 998-3311 Four C orners M other's D ay was observed nt Courtney Baptist Church. The oldest mother was M rs. Nettle Cranfill. Mother wilh the youngest child was M rs. Brian Mosteller. All other molhers present received a beautiful book m ark from Ihe W. M. U . Mr. and Mrs. Mike Furgeson left Sunday to return to Louisana after spending a week wilh Mr. and M rs. Leonard Shelton. M rs. Johnsie Shelton spent the weekend al Myrtle Beach with her children annd grandchildren. Mr. W. A. While was Sunday night supper guest of Mr. and Mrs. Joe While and Mark. M r. and Mrs. Grady Beck was Sunday dinner guesl of Mr. and Mrs. Will beck. Mr. and Mrs. Jerry Polls and K a p p a H o m em akers Christian recording artist Dan Tatum w ill be presented in concert on Sunday, IMay iii, at 7;:10 p.m. in the san ctu ary of the Green IMeadows Itaptist Church on High­ w ay Я01. Ilis рсгГогшапсе will in- eliide many of the songs he has recorded and his personal ex- perlence wilh Christ as well. Tatum is p resen tly engaged in an evangelistic music and recording m inistry traveling from church to ch u rch and m aking guest ap­ pearances on Christian radio and television programs. Before his conversion, Dan Tatum was a member of back-up singing groups to a number of well-known per­ form ers during the IDSO's and lOfiO's as well as a professional entertainer on his own making night-club and other performance appearances. The public is invited to this concert, and a love offering will be received for Tatum . Green IMeadows Baptist Church is locatcd on highway 801 between 1-41) and Farmington. The Kappa Extension Hom em akers held their monlhly meeling, Tuesday, M ay 3 al Davie A cadem y C om m unity Building. Hostesses for the meeling were M rs. Margaret Shew, and Mrs. Lucille Smoot. M rs. Shew opened the meeting wilh devotions on “Mothers” , after which the group sang “D ixie” . Reports were made by various com m ittee m em bers. A n an ­ nouncement was made that on M ay 16-19, Nancy Hartm an will have a workshop on trunk restoration. Pre- registration is required for same. Fun Day Davie County Fun D ay for senior citizens will be held Salurday, M ay 21, from 10:30a.m. until 2:30 p.m. at Jerusalem Fire Deparlment No. 1. Each person is asked to bring a picnic lunch and to come prepared lo enjoy Ihe feslivities of thè day. There will be group singing, skits, monologues, jokes and a spelling bee for entertainment. Each senior sitizen m ay wear old timey clothing if they so desire. The fire department is localed on highway 801 near the intersection of 801 and 601. A program on load safely, in­ cluding a slide presentation, was given by Mrs. Osteen West, County Home Extension Agent. The meeling was closed wilh the club colled. Refreshments were served by the hostesses. ARC Summer Camp Planned The Davie Counly Association for Retarded Citizens will hold a dinner meeting at 6:30 p.m. M ay 17 al the B. C. Brock cafeteria. The meal will be supplied by the A R C with each family urged to bring a dessert. All members are urged to attend. The business session of the meeling will finalize details of the annual A R C sum m er camp. Mike G arner, M o cksville Recreation director who assists in the effort, will be guest speaker. The greatest mountain range lies under the sea. It is known as the Dolphin Rise and it extends from the Arctic to the Antarctic through the Pacific. cliildren were Sunday dinner guests of Mr. and Mrs. Clifford Fleming. Mr. and Mrs. Dana Triplett, Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Shelton, Mr. and Mrs. L. S. Shelton Jr. attended Ihc Baylin Dance rccilal Salurdaii.night at Reynolds Auditorium in Winston- Salem. Special Service Mainville A.M.E. Zion Church will have a special service al Ihe church, Sunday, M ay 15, al 3 p.m. Guest speaker will be the Reverend Quincy Caldwell.- The choir will presenl special music. The public is invited to attend. . East Davie Senior Citizens The regular monthly meeting was heldul Bethlehem United MelhodisI Church, Monday, M ay 9, al 10:30 a.m. President Mabel Allen presided. W ilma Smith, devotion leader, presented Rev. D avid Barney, paslor of Yadkin College Baptist Church, who gave^n inspiration for the dav.Plans for annual Fun D ay to be held at the Jerusalem Fire Dept. No. 1 at Greasy Corner intersection of 801 and 001 M ay 21 al 10:30 a.m. was discussed. Other discussions included the Yadkin Valley Telephone M em ­ bership Corporation C om ­ munication concerning the Federal Communication (FCC) issue. The club unanimously voted to seek help Ihrough our Senators and Congressmen. The Dislrict V ll meeling to be held M ay 27lh at the Salisbury Recreation Center was announced. Also plans were made for a Irip lo M O R A V IA N M A C E D O N IA M O R A V IA N C H U R C H R ev. E . H a m p to n M o rg a n , J r., P astor H w y. BOI & F a rm in g to n Sunday Sct>ool ’'0 :0 0 a .m . W orship 11:00 a.m . E vening 7:30 p .m . S E V E N T H D A Y A D V E N T IS T S E V E N T H D A Y A D V E N T IS T M illin g Road A l M a za t. P a sto r Sabt>ath School 9 :3 0 a .m . w o rs h ip 1 1:30a.m . P E N T E C O S T A L H O L IN E S S C L A R K S V IL L E P E N T E C O S T A L L ib e rty Ch. R d. R ev. A lb e rt G e n tle ' S unday School 10:00 a .m . W o rsh ip 1 1:00a.m . M O C K S V IL L E P E N T E C O S T A L H O LIN E S S ■ M illin g Road R ev. C u rtis W ood S undayS cho ol 10:00a.m . W orsh ip 11:00a.m . S unday n ig h t S ervices 6 ;0 0 p .m .' E v a n g e lis tic 7 :0 0 p .m W ednesday 7:30 p .m A S S E M B LY O F G O D N E W B E T H E L A S S E M B L Y O P G O D B09 N . M a in S tre e t M o c k s v ille , N .C . R e v . M ik e B r a k e S u n d a y S c h o o l 1 0 :0 0 a .m . M o rn in g W o rs h ip I1 :0 0 a .m . E venir>g W o rs h iD 7 :0 0 p .m . BAPTIST A D V A N C E B A P T IS T C H U R C H H ig h w a y 801 S u n d a y S c h o o l 9 :4 5 a .m . A A orning W o rs h ip 1 1 :0 0 a .m . W e d n e s d a y E v e n in g 7 :0 0 p .m . B E A R C R E E K B A P T IS T C H U R C H B e a r C re e k C h u r c h R d .' B L A IS E B A P T IS T C H U R C H H ig h w a y 601 N o r th a t 1-40 R e v . D »v1d H y d e . P a s to r S u rtd a y S c h o o l 9 :4 5 a .m . W o rs h ip ' iito o a . m . E v e n in g 7 :0 0 p .m . W e d n e s d a y ' 7 :3 0 p .m . C A L A H A L N F R I E N D S H I P B A P T IS T C H U R C H C a la h a ln R o a d R e v . G ra h a m W o o te n , P a s to r S u n d a y S c h o o l 1 0 :00 a .m . W o rs h ip 1 1 :0 0 a .m ., S u n d a y N ig h t W o r s h ip 7 :0 0 p .m . W e d B lb le S tiK ly fc P r a y e r S e r 7 :0 0 p .m .' C A L V A R Y B A P T iS T C H U R C H H ig h w a y 601 S o u th R o u te 7, B o x 9 2 , A A o c k s v ille , N .C . J im G ry d e r, P a s to r S u n d a y S c h o o l 1 0 :0 0 a .m . W o rs h ip 1 1 :0 0 a .m . E v e n in g 7 :0 0 p .m . W e d n e s d a y 7 :0 0 p .m . C E D A R C R E E K B A P T IS T C e d a r C re e k C h u r c h R o a d C H IN Q U A P IN G R O V E B A P T IS T C H U R C H C O M M U N IT Y B A P T IS T C H U R C H G la d s to n e R d . S u n d a y S c h o o l 1 0 :0 0 a .m . W o rs h ip ll:0 0 a . tn . C O R N A T Z E R B A P T IS T C H U R C H A d v a n c e , N .C . ^ D A V IE B A P T IS T T A B E R N A C L E F o rk , N .C . S u n d a y S c h o o l 1 0 :0 0 a .m . W o rs h ip 1 1 :0 0 a .m . E v e n in g 7 :0 0 p .m . W e d n e s d a y 7 :3 0 p .m . CAUDELL LÜMBERCO. 1238 Bingham Street Mocksville, N.C. Phone 634-2167 COBLE LIME & FERTILIZER SERVICE Highway 801 Cooleemee, N.C. Phone Business 284-4354 Home 284-2782 DAVIE TRACTOR & IMPLEMENT CO. Ford Farming Sales and Service New Holland Equipment Highway 601'South Mocksville, N.C. Phone 634-5969 EATON FUNERAL HOME 328 North Main Street Mocksville, N.C. Phone 634-2148 G O D 'S FIVE MINUTES "... T h e r e is a tim e fo r e v e iy th in g Ecclesiastes 3rl, The Living Bible; D U T C H M A N C R E E K B A P T I S T C H U R C H H ig h w a y eol o H 6 4 E A T O N 'S B A P T I S T C H U R C H E a to n 's C h u r c h R d . S u n d a y S c h o o l w o r s h ip 1 0 : 0 0 a . m . I 1 : 0 0 a .n n . E D G E W O O D B A P T IS T C H U R C H H ig h w a y 801 W e s t C o o le e m e e , N .C . F A R M IN G T O N B A P T IS T C H U R C H F a r m in g to n R o a d S u n d a y S c h o o l 1 0 :0 0 a . m . W o rs h ip 1 1 :0 0 a . m . Y o u th T r a in in g U n io n 7 :O O p .m . F IR S T B A P T I S T C H U R C H 3 9 0 N . M a in S tre e t M o c k s v ille , N .C . S u n d a y S c tM o l 9 : 4 5 a .m . W o rs h ip ll: O O a . m . E v e n in g 6 :3 0 p .m .» O c t. t h r u M a y F IR S T B A P T IS T , C H U R C H C o o le e m e e , N .C . R e v . L e e W h it lo c k s S u n d a y S c h o o l 7 :3 0 8 . 9 :3 0 a . m . W o rs h ip l l ; 0 0 a . m . E v e n in g 7 :3 0 p . m . W e d n e s d a y 7 :3 0 p . m . F O R K B A P T I S T C H U R C H 6 M ile s E a s t o n H w y . 64 S u n d a y S c h o o l 9 : 4 5 a . m . W o rs h ip 1 1 : 0 0 a .m . E v e n in g 7 :2 0 p . m . G O S P E L B A P .T IS T C H U R C H R t. 6, M o c k s v ille , N .C . S u n d a y S c h o o l W o rs h ip E v e n in g W e d n e s d a y 1 0 :0 0 a . m . 1 1 :0 0 a . m . 7 :0 0 p . m . 7 :0 0 p . m . G R A C E M I S S I O N A R Y B A P T I S T C H U R C H R a tn ^ jo w R o a d , M o c k s v ille , N .C . R e v . H a r o ld T u t t le S u n d a y S c h o o l* - 1 0 :0 0 a . m . w o r s h ip l 1 :O O a .m - E v e n lr> g 7 :0 0 p . m . W e d . P r a y e r A A e e tin g 7 :0 0 p . m . G R E E N H I L L B A P T IS T C H U R C H G re e n H ill R o a d R e v . S te v e H e d g e c o c k , P a s to r S u n d a y S c h o o l 9 :3 0 a . m . W o rs h ip 1 0 :4 5 a . m . E v e n in g 7 :0 0 p . m . W M n e s d a y 7 :0 0 p . m . 'G R E E N M E A D O W S B A P T IS T H ig h w a y 8 0 1 - F a r m ln g to n R e v . D a v id E . R o b e r ts S u n d a y S c h o o l 1 0 :0 0 a . m . W o rs h ip 1 1 :0 0 a . m . E v e n ir> g 7 :3 0 p . m . W e d n e s d a y 7 :3 0 p . m . H O P E B A P T I S T T A B E R N A C L E H ig h w a y 1 5 8 E a s t N o r m a n S . F r y e , P a s to r S un d ay S c h o o l 9 ;4 5 a . m . w o r s h ip 1 0 :4 5 a . m . E v a n g e lis t ic 7 :3 0 p . m . W e d n e s d a y 7 :0 0 p . m . I J A M E S C R O S S R O A D S B A P T I S T C H U R C H K e n n e th H y d e , P a s to r S u n d a y S c h o o l W o rs h ip E v e n in g W e d n e s d a y MOMENTS FOR MEDITATION T h ere are three things God will not do. O ne, He w ill not offer to us things we cannot receive. He will not taunt us so criiely. But remember, th e G ospel contains both optimism and reality. It may not be too late to become what God wants you to be. • T w o . He w ill not offer His will to us in order that we may consider It along with olher choices. T o consider means indecision and indecision is the breeding ground of failure. God always conditions a man for the moment of revelation. T hree. G od does not approve of the act of treating the sacred as if it were secular. The loss of power, o r the presence of God can usually be measured in terms of what seem lo be infinitely small things, such as know ing the difference between right and left. ATTEND CHURCH THIS WEEK Tbi» column bflonitt to our rtidcrt. W» »»»ll »reepl pnnlible нет» *nd pay 15.00 for f*ch Hem publtthed. In the r*»e of quotationi. the name ol Jh* author and Ihe title and pubhiher ol the hoolt rou*l br fivrn . Addrr«» Itemi lo "Cod'» Five Minute»." P.O Bn* IM I2. Asheville. N (’ 2B804 Communily AdvertliJng 9 :4 5 a . m . 1 1 :0 0 a . m . 6 :0 0 p . m . 7 :3 0 p . m . J E R U S A L E M B A P T IS T H ig h w a y 6 01 S o u th S ur> day S c h o o l 1 0 :0 0 a . m . . W o rs h ip 1 1 : 0 0 a .m . E v e n ir> g 7 :3 0 p .m . W e d n e s d a y 7 :3 0 p . m . N O C R E E K P R I M I T I V E B A P T IS T C H U R C H NO C r e e k R d . o f f 64 S M IT H G R O V E B A P T IS T C H U R C H H ig h w a y 158 E a s t T R I N I T Y B A P T IS T C H U R C H R o u te 4 , A « \o c k s v lIle , N .C . G e n e B la c k b u rn , P a s to r S u n d a y S c h o o l ‘W o rs h ip 'E v e n ir> g W e d e n s d a y T U R R E N T I N E B A P T IS T C H U R C H R t. 7 . M o c k s v ilie R e v . J u d g e J o h n s o n S u n d a y S c h o o l 9:45 a .m . W o rs h ip , 1 1 :0 0 a .m . E v e n in g 6:30p.m .< W e d . P r a y e r A ile e iln g ?:00p.m . Y A D K IN V A L L E Y B A P T IS T C H U R C H Y a d k in V a lle y R o a d N O R T H M A IN 51 ' C H U R C H O F C H R IS T R o bert D a rn a ll. M .«ister 10:0 0 a .m . S un d a yS ch o o l 1 0 :00a.m . 1 1 :0 0 a .m . W o rs h ip ll:0 0 e .m . 7 :0 0 p .m . E ve n in g 7 :0 0 p .m . 7 :0 0 p .m . W edensday 7 :3 0 p .m . C H U R C H O F G O D C H U R C H O F G O D C ooleem ee. N .C . C L E M E N T G R O V E C H U R C H O F G O D H ig h w a y 64 W est I.W . ffa m e s . Pa%1or S unday School 1 0:00a.m . W o rsh ip 1:00 p .m . E v e n in g 8:00 p.m . W ednesday 8 :0 0 p .m . CATHOLIC S T . F R A N C IS O P A S S IS I C H U R C H H ig h w a y 601 N o r th S a t. E v e n in g M a s s 5:00 p .m . S u n d a y 1 0 :0 0 a .m . C H U R C H O F C H R IS T C O R IN T H C H U R C H O F C H R IS T M in is t e r : C h a r lie H a rris o n , J r. W o rs h ip : S u n . 1 1 :0 0 a .m . E v e n in g 7 :0 0 p .m . M O C K S V IL L E C H U R C H O F C O D H w y. 64 E . & D epot St. S undayS cho ol 10:00 a .m . W o rs h ip 11:00 a .m . E ve n in g 7 :0 0 p .m , W ednesday , 7 :0 0 p .m .E P ISC O P A L C O O L E E M E E E P IS C O P A L C H U R C H O F T H E G O O D S H E P H E R D R ev. W illis M . R ose n th a l. P rie s t S erm on 9 :3 0 a .m . S und a yS ch o o l 10:50 a .m . F O R K E P IS C O P A L C H U R C H C anon C. N ic h o ls . P a sto r A scension 1 0 :o o a .m . W o rsh ip 1 1:00a.m . W ednesday 7:45 p .m . IN T E R D E N O M IN A T IO N A U M O C K S V IL L E IN T E R D E N O M IN A T IO N A L C H U R C H P a sto r-R e v. L in d sa y W a ite rs S unday School 9:45 a .m . AAornlng W orship i i :00 a .m . R adio P ro g ra m (W D S L ) 1:00 p .m . Y o u th S e rvice 6 :3 0 p .m . M id -W e e k B ib le S tudy b y : M rs . KnoK Johnsto n 7 :0 0 p .m . L U T H E R N H O L Y CROSS L U T H E R A N C H U R C H H w y. 601 S. A te c k s vllle , N .C . S undayS cho ol 9:45 a m W o rsh ip H :0 0 a .m . M E T H O D IS T A .M .E . Z IO N M E T H O D IS T C H U R C H A D V A N C E U N IT E D M E T H O D IS T C H U R C H ‘ A dvance, N.C. B A IL E Y 'S C H A P E L U N IT E D M E T H O D IS T • B a ile y 's C hapel R d. B E T H E L U N IT E D M E T H O D IS T B ethel C hurch R d. B E T H L E H E M U N IT E D M E T H O D IS T C H U R C H R edland R d. o ff 158 E a s l C E N T E R U N IT E D M E T H O D IS T C H U R C H H ig h w a y 64 W est C H E S T N U T G R O V E M E T H O D IS T 2nd & 4th Sunday Sunday School 10:00 a .m . W o rsh ip 1 1:00a.m . C O N C O R D U N IT E D M E T H O D IS T C h e rry H ill R d. ' C O O L E E M E E U N IT E D M E T H O D IS T C H U R C H R ev. A lto n F itz g e ra ld , P a sto r C O R N A T Z E R U N IT E D M E T H O D IS T C H U R C H • C o rnatzer R d. D U L IN M E T H O D IS T C H U R C H A dva n ce , N.C. E L B A V IL L E U N IT E D M E T H O D IS T C H U R C H H w y. 801.A dvance, N.C . F A R M IN G T O N M E T H O D IS T C H U R C H S undayS cho ol (1 s tS unday) 1 1:00a.m . (2nd, 3 rd , 4th Sun.) 1 0:00a.m . W orship (1st Sun.) • 1 0:00a.m . (3 rd S u n .) 1 1:00a.m . F IR S T U N IT E D M E T H O D IS T C H U R C H N o rth M a in St. A A ocksville, N .C . R ev. G eorge A u m a n , P a sto r S undayS cho ol 10:00 s W o rsh ip 11:00a.m . F U L T O N U N IT E D M E T H O D IS T H w y. 801 a t F o rk H A R D IS O N U N IT E D M E T H O D IS T J e ric h o C h u rc h R d. H U N T S V IL L E M E T H O D IS T W orship (2nd Sun,) 10:00 a.m . (4th Sun.) 11:00a.m . L IB E R T Y U N IT E D M E T H O D IS T C H U R C H G ladstone R d. ’ M O C K S U N IT E D M E T H O D IS T 'C H U R C H A dvance. N.C. AT. O L IV E M E T H O D IS T C H U R C h ' * U. 5, M o c k s v ilie W orsh ip (2nd Sun.) 11:00a.m . i^ th S u n .) 10:00 a .m . S unday School (4 th S u n .)- 1 1:00a.m . (ls t,2 n d .3 rd S u n .) 1 0:00a.m . N E W U N IO N U N IT E D M E T H O D IS T R ev. K e rm it S hoaf, P a sto r S undayS cho ol 1 0:00a.m . w o rs h ip 11:00 a .m . O A K g r o v e : U N IT E D M E T H O D IS T H ig h w a y 158 E a st S A L E M U N IT E D M E T H O O IS T D avie A c a d e m y Rrt. S M IT H G R O V E U N IT E D M E T H O D IS T H w y. 158 E a st .M o c k s v ille R ev. J.C . Lan e , P a s to r W o rs h lp d s t 8 .3 rd ) 10:00a.m . (2nd, 4th, 8 .5th Sun.) 11:00 a .m . Sunday School (1st ahd 3 rd ) 11:00a.m . (2nd. 4th, 8 .5th ) 10:00a.m . B ible Stud y W ed . 7 :3 0 p .m . U N IO N C H A P E L M E T H O D IS T R ev. John F o w le r 1 st,.^rd . 8. 5th Sunday School 10:00p-m . W orship 11:00 a .m . W E S L E Y C H A P E L M E T H O D IS T A dvance, N .C . W orship (1st Sun.) 10:00 a .m . (3 rd S u n .) 1 1:00a.m . Suriday School (3 rd S un.) 1 1:00a.m . (2nd, 3rd . 4th Sun.) 10:00a.m . S U P P O R T Y O U R M E R C H A N T S W H O B R IN G Y O U T H IS IN F O R M A T IO N - A T T E N D T H E C H U R C H O F Y O U R C H O IC E FARM & GARDEN SERVICE JN C . 9 6 1 Y a d k ln v llle R o a d M o c k s v ille , N .C . Phone 634-2017 or 634-5964 FOSTER-RAUCH DRUG CO. w ilkesboro Street Mocksville, N.C. Phone 634-2141 J.P. GREEN Milling Co., Inc. Makers of D A IS Y F L O U R We Custom Blend Depot Street Mocksville, N.C. Phone 634-2126 JEFFCO CO. JNC In the Hillsdale Com m unity Route 1 Advance, N.C. Phone 998-8192 R E D L A N D P E N T E C O S T A L H O LIN E S S R ev. P a u l C. L e d b e tte r Sunday School 10:00 a .m . w o rs h ip 11:00 a.m . L ile iin e rs 6:00 p .m . E v a n g e lis tic 7:00 p .m . W ednesday 7:00 p .m . P R E S B Y T E R IA N B IX B Y P R E S B Y T E R IA N C H U R C H S unday School 10:00 a .m . W orsh ip 11:0 0 a .m . E ve n in g 7:00 p .m . W E S L E Y A N L IB E R T Y W E S L E Y A N C H U R C H J e ff C o illn s, P a sto r M O C K S V IL L E W E S L E Y A N C H U R C H H o sp ita l S treet A ftocksviile, N .C . R ev. D ^ g S m ith S undayS cho ol 9:45 a.m . W o rs h ip s . E ve n in g 6 :0 0 p .m . W ednesday 7:00 p.m . MARTIN Hardware & General Mdse. Feeds, D ry Goods, Groceries and Fertilizer Depot Street Mocksville, N.C. Phone 634-2128 C.A. SEAFORD LUMBER CO. Jericho Road ч, Mocksville, N.C. V Phone 634-5148 SHEFFIELD LUMBER & PALLET CO. Route 6, Box 153 Mocksville, N.C. Phone 492-5565 Ed Fisher PLUMBING SERVICE Cooleemee N X . Plione 284-2721 Or 284-2232 Expert Repairs & New Inslallalion ^lec Eslimatcs & Emergency Servicc D A V IEC O U N TY EN TER PRISE RECO RD, TH U RSD AY. MAY 12, 198,? (Ж' Methodist Rally At Genfer Sunday Davie County United Methodists will hold a rally al the Center United Methodist Church arbor, Sunday, M ay 15, at 7 p.m. This rally, under Ihe auspices of the Davie County Council on Ministries and the Center Church will have as Its theme, "The Community of Fairh”. The service will conclude a day of special services al Center United Methodist Church. At 11 a.m. they will conclude Ihcir spring revival w ilh the Rev. Robert Carter, D istrict Superintendent of the Salisb u ry D istrict, as guest preacher; at 4 p.m. the U M Y F groups from the county will gather at Center for their final meeting of the school year; and at 7 p.m. United Methodists of all ages and from all parts of Davie County will gather for this spccial rally. The preacher for the rally will be The Rev. Dr. M. Wilson Nesbitt, Jr. pastor of the Davie Charge, which consists of Salem and Center United Methodist Churches. Dr. Nesbitt has long been noted for his service to rural churches and churches of small membership. Twenty-five years of his m inistry have been as the leader of support ministries for the rural church and the church of sm all membership, it is therefore very appropriate, that befor<> Dr. Nesbitt retires in June he leads Ihis rally of United Methodism in Davie County. There are over 4000 United Methodists In Davle County and all are urged to attend Ihls special service, to worship God, to hear good preaching, to listen to a special choir, and to participate in the congregational singing of the old hymns. A dvance A very impressive Mother’s Day Program was presented Sunday morning at the Methodist Church. The Junior Methodist Youth had charge of the program. Janna Jones read a poem, LuAnn Browder also read a Mother’s Day poem. Jennifer Vogler had the closing prayer. Taylor How ard- read the song "Rocking Alone in an Old Rocking .Chair”, since no m usic could be found for tlje old song. After the 'children’s 'program Mr. Howard presented gifts to Mothers. Four lead cutKirystal bud vases were given lo the youngest, mother- Mrs. Nancy Chandler-29 years., ^mother with the most children •present was Mrs. Ann Browder with :3 children; oldest mother was Mrs. Hazel Shutt-86 years . M iss Ethel Smithdeal received the fourth vase ;as the oldest church member. She :Was 91 in April. ■ Mrs. Jennie Charles and Friend Mrs. Harriett Wagner of Winston- Salem were F rid a y afternoon ■visitors of M rs. Hazel Shutt. Mr. and M rs. .Bradley Cornatzer ,of Detroit, Mich, are spending ■several days here visiting relatives. ^They were among the visitors at Melhodisl Church Sunday morning for the worship service, being with his sister M rs. Recie Sheets during Ihe weekend. Mrs. Hazel Shutt was a Sunday luncheon guest of her children Mr. and M rs. Bill Zimmerman. Mr. and M rs. Larry Carlton at­ tended Ihe newly opened "Stevens Center For the Perform ing Arts” iri Winslon-Salem last Tuesday night. They enjoyed seeing the play “Kiss M e Kate.” M rs. Lucy Fulk was readmitted to a Winston-Salem Hospital Thursday suffering from severe food poisioning. At present she is at home and somewhat improved. Paul Barney remains in serious condition at Forsyth Hospital after a severe heart attack. Get well wishes go out to him. M r. and M rs. G ray A, Potts of Route 4 Advance were honored with a surprise Hawaiian Luau Saturday night at the home of their son and daughter-in-law M r. and M rs. Kenny Potts. Upon arrival the approximate 30 guests received Leis of silk flowers to compliment their Hawaiian attire! The party was in celebration of Mr. and Mrs. Pott’s 25th Wedding Anniversary which falls on M ay 18. They are planning to spend their anniversary in Hawaii later on Ihls month. Visitors of Mrs. Clara Baity during the weekend were M rs. Alice Angell Beauchamp and her sister Mrs. Sue Angell Sm ilh of Lewisville visited Friday. On Saturday Mrs. Lib Potts and Mrs. Eula Lee Led­ ford; Charlie Mock of Winston- Salem on Sunday and Tuesday Mrs. N ancy M ock and sister M rs. Margaret M yers were visitors of Mrs. Baity. On Sunday Mrs. Baity enjoyed a Mother's Day luncheon at Ihe home of her neice and husband Mr. and Mrs. Steve Orrell. Mrs. Orrell's mother, Mrs. Flossie Jones was also present for the luncheon. Visilors of Mrs. Minnie Bryson and M iss Rebekah Talbert during weekend were M iss Fallie Mock, M iss Lillis Mock and Mrs. Ruby Ray of Winston-Salem. Mr. and Mrs. Harold Brown, Mrs. Carol King and son Geoffery of Charlotte were Mother’s D ay guests. Also Mr. and Mrs. Francis Greene and children B ryse and T rina of Mocksville. NUGGEITS m a d e fro m y o u r gold O b itu aries K E L L Y L IV E N G O O D Kelly Dawn Livengood, 24, of Houte 1, Lawsonville, formerly of Mocksville, died Friday night at Forsyth Mem orial Hospital, Win- slon-Salem, from injuries sustained In an automobile accident two weeks ago. The funeral was held Monday at Fork Baptist Church by the Rev. Gordon Joyner and the Rev. Clyde Akers. Burial was in the church cemetery. Born M ay 23, 1958, in Davidson County, she was a daughter of Mrs. Gilda Fosler Howard and W.A. Livengood Jr. of Lexington. M iss Livengood was a costomology in­ structor at North Stokes High School and was a member of Fork Baptist Church. In addition to her mother and father, survivors are a brother, Ricky Livengood of Lexington; a half-sister, Vanessa Livengood of Lexington; her grandparents, Mr. and M rs. Gilm er Foster of Route 3; and M rs. Lessie Livengood of Route 5, Lexington. M R S. M A R Y B E L L G R IF F IT H Mrs. M ary Bell DeVere Griffith, 45, Mocksville, Rt. 1, died Sunday at Baptist Hospital after an extended illness. The funeral was conducted at 4 p.m. Tuesday at Society Baptist Church by the Rev. Sidney Grimes, and the Rev. Wilson Nesbitt. Burial was in the church cemetery. •Mrs. Griffith was the wife of Daniel Webster Griffith and was em ployed by D re xel H eritage Furniture Company. She was born in Lugoff, S. C. and was the daughter of the late Allie W. Hamm ond and Charlotte Hawkins Hammond. Surviving in addition lo her husband are her m other of Salisb ury, one daughter, M rs. Crystal Griffith Dyson, Rt. 1, Ad­ vance; two sons, D an n y and Michael Griffith, both of Ihe home; twosisters, M rs. Vida Barbee, Rt. 1, W oodieaf, M rs. C arol Kolb, Columbia, S. C.; three brothers, Ed Hammond, Spencer, Jerry H am ­ m ond, Rockw ell, and Bobby Hammond, Lexington. M R S. R O SA B E L L A M O S Mrs. Rosa Bell Am os of Ger- manton, died Thursday at her home after an extended iiiness. She was a native of Henry County, Va. and a member of Redland Church of Christ in Davie County. Surviving are four daughters, Millie Rhynehard and Gracie A. Rhynehard, both of Mocksville, Nannie A. Sim s and M argaret A. Damon, both of Winston-Salem; two sons, Joe Thom as and Jam es Henry of Germanton; one granddaughter, Claudette Douglas of Freemont, Ca.; four sons-in-law; 11 grand­ children; 26 great-grandchildren; Ihree great-great-grandchildren; a host of nieces, nephews, cousins and friends. The funeral w as conducted Monday at 11 a.m. at Redland Church of Christ in Davie County by Brother Magellian Stevenson with burial in the M ayo Baptist Church Cemetery In Henry County. )ls trlc t M e th o d is t W o m en H old A n n u al M e e tin g The Thomasville D islricI United Methodist Women held their Annual M eeling, M onday, M a y 2 In Lexington, N. C. The meeting began with.a buffet dinner served al Ihe Y.M.C.A., with enlertainmeni, business and program following in Ihe First United Methodist Church of Lexington. Mrs. Sybil Myers, District President, presided. Follow in g invocation by Dr. Wilson Nesbitt, Mocksville, en- lerlalnment was provided by Ihe Vocal Ensem ble of Ihe Sallsbury- Rowan Choral Society. Five hun­ dred and twenty-three answered roll call of churches taken by the DistricI Secretary, M rs. Pansy McClam rock. M rs. Barbara Price, District Treasurer, reported thal $38,193.77 had been given lo m issions in 1982, and proposed that Ihe 1984 pledge be $31,000. This motion carried. A “Love Offering" was received by Mrs, Price, three- fourths of which will go to un­ designated m issions In honor of Ms. Ronda Robbins, and one-fourth will be kept in the d islrlLt ad­ ministrative fund. M rs. Johnnie Sigm on presented Ihe nominating committees report nf officers to serve 1983-84, and Mrs. Taft Lew is, parliam entarian, conducted the election of same. Recognition wilh special mission pins was given to out-going officers for Iheir devotion and faithfulness to Ihe district while serving either a Iwo or four year term. Those that were not returning in another capacity w ere: M rs. Johnnie Sigmon, M rs. Cindy M arlin, Mrs. Jane M endenhall, M rs. G ladys Johnson, Mrs. Peggy Everhart, Mrs. Edna Davis, and M rs. Gail Craver. Those returning were: Mrs. Barbara Price, M rs. Pansy M c­ Clamrock, and M rs. Vada Beck. M rs. Sue Cave, Co-ordinalor of Christian Personhood, gave a most inspiring Mem orial Service, after wliich Mrs. Margaret Shew, DistricI Vice-President, introduced the evening speaker, M s. Ronda Robbins of Lexington. Ms. Robbins has served as W N C U M W Con­ ference, Vice-President, C o­ ordinator of Christian Personhood, and will be completing her fourlh year as President in June. Ms. Robbins theme was, "D o All To The Glory of God”. A s she lold of work that had been done in the Thom asville D islricI during Ihe pasi year, fourteen audience par­ ticipants carried posters about Ihe Sanctuary proclaim ing Ihose ac­ complishments. One person from each of Ihe five areas high lighted some of the mission work in their area during 1982-83. Am ong those were work with: The Children’s Home Youth Shelter, Triad Home, Brooks-H ow ell, Rest Hom es, O peralion Santa Claus, U M W Reading Program , Social Services etc. Ms. Robbins incorperaled in her speech the insi.nllation of In­ coming officers, temiiiding each to "Please Be Patient, God Is Not Finished With You Yel.” Prior lo the program, M s. Rob- bln’s local U M W of Trinity U M C presented her with a vase of red roses, and al the conclusion, Mrs. M y e rs presenter her with a presidents pin on behalf of the District. Benediction was given by Dr. Nesbitt. Gospel Singing Gospel Singing services will be held every third Sunday nlghl in each month at Society Baptist Church, which is located in Iredell County. Featured singers for M a y 15th program will include, “The Gospel Light” Quartet, and local groups. The puWic is invited to attend. These clucks look as if they are ready to take a^ooling dip in the pond on a w arm spring afternoon. C o rn atzer N ew s m T E R § .Sfi/7 Stvn a n ls h il) U W'A* - M a y /WJ See h o w m a n y w o r d s y o u can fin d in th is p u zzle w h ic h relate to w ate r (in c lu d e s sp o rts, o th e r fo rm s o f w ale r, u se s fo r w ate r The spoon, as we know it today, with its spatulate handle, dates only from the 1Sth century. w T S N О w T J В A A G S L E E т А T К S W I M С в Р E ,E К H К в О А Т R J D N S R о Т I T F I S H A к Н S L R J Y w 1 с Е м 1 ^P R .A I N S Е А I.AKH .SWIM HOAT BAPTISM HATH COOK WATER DRINK FISH S1.1-ET SNOW ICE RAIN SEA WASH Davie Soil and Water Conservation District D a v ie C o u n ty O ffic e B u ild in g S. M a in S tre e t M o c k s v ille , N .C Robert Ellis Is critically ill in the Baptist Hospilal in Winslon-Salem. Monroe Keaton entered Forsylh Hospital Tuesday for lest and ob­ servation. Helen, Clement, and Lori Jones were luncheon guests of M r. and M rs. Bud Jones in Lexington Sunday. M r. and M rs. G ray Jones and Jeffrey of Lexington and Shirley Jacobs and children, Bryan and Jennifer of Cooleemee attended church services with their molher, Bessie Jones, at Cornatzer Baptist Church Sunday and then they all enjoyed lunch at M rs. Jones’ home. Mr. and M rs. Larry Crom er and Kristen of Rural Hall were recenl supper guests of M r. and M rs. Cecil W illiam s and Lisa. Also visiting were M r. and M rs. Virgil Freedle of Lexington. Robaii "J a c k ” Nail is slowly im proving after undergoing surgery on his leg at Forsyth Hospilal several weeks ago. M r. and M rs. Jack Jones were Sunday luncheon guests of Jean Bingliam and family. Helen Jones visiled Hazel Klm - nier In Davie County Hospital last week. M rs. Kim m er returned lo her home Sunday. Revival Senfices At Local Churcii Revival services will be held at ’ Mocksville Interdenominational ■ Church W ednesday, M a y 1 1,' through Sunday, M ay 15. Services ; will be held at 7 p.m. and 11 a.m. on ; Sunday. Guest speaker w ill be the Reverend R oy W illiam s of 'Trout-- man, N. C. - The public is invited lo allend. • Eanes Family Reunion: The annual E a n e s Fam ily. ■ Reunion will be held Sunday, M ay', ! ' at 1 p.m. at Oak Grove U nited’ Meihodist Church fellowship ball,! Fam ily and friends are invited to attend and bring with them a picnic lunch. . i- W h e e l H o i s e S te p E S liP^SALE Ш S t e p U p t o W h e e l H o r s e ^ q u a lit y a n d s a v e u p t o * 8 0 0 ! [ On our most popular models: 1 the Wheel Horse C-Series lown | and garden tractors Our Rates Are Lowejr... Ask Your Neighbor! FARMERS lUIUTUAL FIRE INSURANCE ASSOCIATION Serving Iredell, Alexander and Davie County Rural Property Owners Tor The Past 76 Years! A LOCAL. NON-PROFIT COMPANY OWNED BY ITS POLICYHOLDERS m ALSO PROVIDE HOME OWNERS 3 AND PERSONAL PROPERTY REPLACEMENT COVERAGE ------WE OFFER-------------- * S tandard Fire, W ind and IHail Insurance * H om e P rotecter Policy * Farm P rotecter Policy While we have principally Insured rural property owners In the past, we welcome Inquiries from any property owners In our three county area (Iredell, Alexander and Davle) Farmers' Mutual Fire Insurance Assoclatl’on Iredell, Alexander and Davie County Branch 301 Harrill Street / Statesville, N.C. 28677 P.O. Box 5 0^/ Phone 873-7461 (collect)Homeowner, Wc can provide a $30,000 AAAHO-2 for a cost as low as $ 114.70 a year. A A A Hom eowners’ Policy $ 40 ,0 0 0 -$ 146.60 50.000- $ 175.50 60 .0 0 0 -$ 204.40 70.000- $ 2 3 3 .3 0 80 .0 0 0 -$ 262.20 90,000- $ 219.10 100,000-^320.00 CALL COLLECT FOR COMPARISON •THESE ARE OUR DIRECTORS A A A Standard Fire Policy $ 4 0 ,0 0 0 -$ 74Л 0 50 .0 0 0 -$ 93.50 6 0 .0 0 0 -$ 1 1 2^0 7 0 .0 0 0 -$ 130.90 8 0 .0 0 0 -$ 149.60 9 0 .0 0 0 -$ 168.30 $ 100^)00-$ 187.00 DAVIE ALEXAND ER ' R obert G. Allen W. Solon Mitchell R .L. Seaford Russell O xford Jam es A. E aton J. W oodrow Payne K enneth G oodm an IRED ELL Jo h n G. Biackwelder J.W . Page Richard A. C artner A .Y . Neel Hugh A. Craw ford William M. Pressly Our Rates ARE LOW Lower... Ask Your Neighbor! FARMERS MUTUAL FIRE INSURANCE ASSOCIATION 301 Harrill Street, SUtesville, N.C. Telephone 873-7461 FROM OHLY 1898S i^ ^ S 5tt*s offachm enis. fre ig h t a nd d ea le r p re p e x t r a ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ W h e e l H o r s e Q u a l i t y r ^ t r a c t o r s s i n c e 1 9 4 6 \ Q a V FINANCING AVAILABLE \ SALE ENDS MAY 31st, 1983 \ 3 ^ 0 6 For soles and service see: . \ JOHN N. McDANIEL & SONS, Inc. Hw y. 6 0 1 -S. M ocksville, N.C. Phone 634-3531 O pen til 7 PM llllinieeiHoise Distributed by Wheel Horse Sales, Inc., South Bend, IN 1982 Unpaid County Taxes N O R T H C A R O L IN A D A V IE C O U N T Y U n d e r and b y v irtu e o i Ih e a u th o rity vested In m e b y S ection 10S-3ft9 of th e G en eral S tatutes of N o rth C a ro lin a and p u rs u a n t to a n o rd e r of the B oard o l C o m m lM lo n e r» , O a vie C ounty. I w ill o ffe r lo r sate a n d w ill sell a t p u b lic a u c tio n fo r cash to the h igh est b id d e r a t the c ourthouse d o o r. In M o c k s v ille , N o rth C a ro lin a , a t 12 o ’c lo c k noon on June A. 1983 lie n s upon Ih e re a l estate d e s crib e d b elo w fo r the non p a y m e n t o f taxes o w ing fo r the y e a r 1W2. T he a m o u n t a d v e rtise d w ill be Increased b y In te re s t and costs and o m issio n o l In te re s t and cost fro m the am ount a d v e rtise d w ill n ot c o n s titu te a w a iv e r of the ta xin g u n it's c la im fo r Ihese ite m s . P a u lln e H . W agner D a v le C ountv T a x C o lle cto r IOB - DAVIE COUNTY l£NTIiRl>RISI£ A M itro m , C la re n ce W . a n d AAary S. «ВаК A ib c rty , R aym ond D . a nd M a ry D . • .99A • B al. U.S4 A ib e rty , R a ym ond F. ..99A - B a l. »1.01 A le x a n d e r, S y lvia L . . IL - »А.1Э A lle n , A lfre d and A lh a • 1 L '-tlS 6.93 A lle n ,C h e rlIe H e irs and V . A lle n .t.50A .U.OO A lle n , G eorge W . H e irs -5.13A-(42.94 A lle n , G ra d y W . a n d P a tric ia O .seA -S146.44 A lle n , Joh n n y R ay -250 A - s i,2 9 i.s 2 A lle n , K a th y В -1L.S109.95 A lle n , Rosa H e irs -1A Л12.50 A lle n , R oy G . S r. and AAargie W . 4 L .S1Z7.94 A lle n , V io la . 1.90A . S11.40 A lle n , w m ia rn F re d and C a ro l -l.SOA -1198.20 A lle n , W illia m J r. and A A argaret K . -lA -SB6.52 A llis o n . C h ris tin e C. -2A .$181.07 A llis o n , E d w a rd a n d S arah • .90A -S109.57 A llre d , Joseph D . •1.30A-S70.52 A ls p a u g h , R o b e rl W . J r. and K a th y O L- S130.86 A n d e rso n , A rn o ld G ra y and A nna H . O L S164.16 A rn e rs o n , C u rtis D ean and P e rrl P. -.ЗВА • S40.1S A n d erson, ЛДагу E lla -2.10A -B a l. S7.78 A n d re w s , Sam D. H e irs -1L-S9.79 A rn o ld , C harles S. 4 J u d y L . 48.42A -B a l. S10.13 A rn o ld , W illia m P e rry H e irs . 3.40A- S33.75 A rrlr» g to n , D a vid A n th o n y >11.15 A . -B a l. S7.30 A s h le y , R o b e rl M . a nd V irg in ia - IL -1132.64 A v ila , A U la n d ro A . and A A arliyn W . - IL -$&5.25 B a ile y . C reola V a s h ll -.ЭОА -U 4.45 B a k e r. D a lla s and B onnie -IL -S72.71 B a k e r, R o b e rt N . a n d B e tly Jean -4.20A -$60.00 B a rb e r. C lyde M . and P a ts y -IL -S172.il B a rk e r, P elm a C. a n d A lic e H . • IL -$39.77 B a rk e r. P in k ie M rs . -IL -B a l. $47.53 B a rk e r. R o b e rl L . and B renda S. -2A $160.05 B a rnes, B obby J. a n d L y n d a S. • 2A $25.15 B a rn e y , N oel and W anda -IL .$205.57 B eal, Lo u ie a nd M a ry R . -IL -$1.65 B eal, L o u ie J r. and June IL -$128.73 •. B e a m , L e s le r C. e n d B e c k y -IL -$11.25 B ean, B e rth a M rs . -IL .$25.32 B eaucham p. J.C . H e irs . 7.20A • $37.00. B e aucham p, J u n le N oah H e irs a n d Iv e y 0 4 A • $171.84 B e aucham p. L e s te r W . a n d M a rc ia > IS A • $368.77.B e aucham p, P h illip A . and H ild a .3.47A • $190.96B eck, N ath a n C. J r. a nd Jo yn ce P. -IL -B a l. $1.67B eck, R ic h a rd A . and B illie J e a n * 7.46A • $674.56B eck, R ic h a rd A . a n d B lllle Jean .1.40A -$6.13 B eck, R ic h a rd A . a nd R .R . F o s te r • 5.17A • $24.05B eck, W ade C a rlto n and R u lh -26.71A -B al. $229.69r B eck, W a rre n K e ith a nd AAallnda P . -.90A • $t06.22B e ll, D onna L y n n H o w a rd and C h a rle s -lA - $5.00 -B e n fie id , H a ro ld E ugene a nd M ild re d .21.60A.. • $245.64 • B e n n e lt, Joseph P . J r. a n d V e ra .28A .$01.10 B e n n e tt, R .D .H e lrs a nd M a ry S. -.80A .$09.24 B e nnett, R .D . H e ir* a n d M a ry S. .1 L -$6.50 r. B e n nett R .D . H e irs and M e ry S;*: 37.25A .$72.12 Benson, A n n ie H . ..25A -$17.92 • Benson, L e ro y - IL -1126.66B e rn a rd . W lllla n i R . a nd N a n c y - IL .$234.88 B e rry . G eoroe R . and V e m lc e - IL *$238.65 i B e rry , R uby M a e .Э.20А .B a l. $20.10 B la c kb u rn . G ene M . II and D e b ra L . - IL . I $130.79. B la c kb u rn , R ebecca V e s ta l .$1.50A .$22^.99 ^ B la c k w e ll, N o rm a Jean M o u itry « IL *$24.42 B la c k w e ll. W ilb u r C la y a n d P h y llis -IA *$115.65 B la ke . H u b e rt A . a nd P a u lin e ..52A .$30.07 B o o e r, B enny D ean a n d P a tti .4.17A .$559.39 4 B o g e r, B enny D ean a n d P a tti .3.50A *$8.75 r B09« r. C laude M . a nd O ne la S. *1L *$77.45 • B o g e r, G ilb e rt. L ee and M a x ln t -18A .$288.89 ^ B oger. J a n ie s L a rry a n d S h a ro n *L *$46.34 B o g e r, Ja m e s M . and P a n d o ra B. .1.40A *$96.3B B o g e r, Ja m e s W . .132.97A -$925.12 B o g e r. J o h n n y . IL -$10.24 t B o g e r, R oger G ra y and R u b y K . .1.01A .$61.15 B o g e r, R onald Lee and R obin 0 .$1.36A .$196.47 ‘ B o lin . L onnie G ra y r-84A -$60.55 ' B o lt P ro p e rtie s In c. - IL -$15.00 B o lt P ro p e rtie s In c. -IL .$15.00 , B o ll P ro p e rtie s Inu. .IL -$15.00 B o ll P ro p e rtie s In c. - IL .$15.00 B o ll P ro p e rtie s In c. >1L .$15.00 B o lt P ro p e rtie s in c . .IL .$15.00 B o lt P ro p e rtie s In c. - IL $15.00 B o lt P ro p e rtie s in c . .IL .$15.00 •' ' booe. E a rly V . end N e llie -IL -$64.98 Booe. S a ille R . - IL B a l. $54.61 B ow les. V elna M rs . -2.50A .$81.85 B oxw ood R eal E s ta te In c. - IL .$105.93 B ra ln a rd . R o b e rt J . and C a ro ly n .3.35A .$132.77 B re c h t, C a ri M . -2I.25A $38.00 ; B re w e r. H a ro ld D . and S andra + 8.07 A -$61.10 B rln d le . C h a rlie E . J r. a nd M a g g ie G . -IL . $64.44 B ro a d w a y , J u d y C. -0.49A -$212.91 B ro c k . A m b ro s e Lee and P e a rlle -12.25A • $100.31 B ro c k . A m b ro s e L ee and P e a rlle «2А ..$36.25 • B ro c k . A m b ro se Lee a n d P e a rlle -IA .$4.00 B ro c k . B u rr C. J r. a nd R u th -0.03A $226.36 ' B ro c k , B u rr C. J r. a nd R u th -5.24A *$26.20 • .B ro c k , G eo rge A m b ro s e and R achel *.62A . . $37.53 B ro c k . W illia m K ennen a nd A n n ie -12.12A • $106.60 B ro o ks, J e rry .1.33A $49.62 B ro o ks. R oble Jackson -11.29A *$100.49 B ro w n . D a le and G lenda B. .1.47A -$2&5.84 B ro w n , D avid C. and K im b e rly C. - IL -$1.15 B ro w n . H azel M rs . -50.13A $127.73 B ro w n . J .H . H e irs . 102.00A *$256.60 B ro w n . John H . H e irs . 280A • $492.93 B ro w n . K ris ty P o tts .IL $25.59 B ro w n , L a rry a nd B e lly *.93A $150.96 B ro w n . M a ry H e irs A lle n -IL -$4.67 B ro w n . P aul J r. and N o ra .1.Э8А -$124.63 B ro w n . P aul J r. and N o ra -1.83A $18.53 B ro w n . W ^ d a H . -.93A -1182.03 B u m g a rn e r, F re d A . J r. a nd J o h n n y W . -lA - $88.76B undy, E noch E d w a rd -6.09A -$32.64 B urgess. B .N . and P h y llis -14.BOA *$124.60 B urgess. Jesse a nd B e tty -6.51A $32.79 B u rk e . D a isy B llle E s ta te *1L -$44.45 B u rk h a rt. E d w a rd O. a nd M a rth a *1L -$144.52 B u rto n . Ja m e s E . and J u lia -6.45A -$30.20 B u rto n . S adie a nd D on -IL .$210.09 B u rto n . S adie a nd D on .IL .$11.12 B u rto n . W illia m C. and P a u le tte .1.46A -$182.52 B ye rs. S adie Ija m e s -10A -B a l. $1.69 C able. S am uel T u rn e r a nd P e g g y - 26.58A . $144.37 C ain, C.C. -33.69A -$60.48 C ain. C.C. -2A -U.OO C a llo w a y. Louise S. -IL -$55.37 C am p b e ll, C a rl J. J r. H e irs a n d E va -.60A • $3.00 C a m p b e ll. E va M a e -IL -$46.51 C a m p b e ll. H a rv e y L ee and C reola -42.60A . $299.49C a m p b e ll. H a rv e y Lee and C reola - IL $10.00 C a m p b e ll. J.D . -IL -$157.39 C a m p b e ll, Jam es H . a nd L o re lia M e .1B.30A * $104.59 C a m p b e ll. Jam es R o b e rl a n d S arah К *1(. - $591.05 C a m p b e ll. Jam es R o b e rlA S a ra h H .*1 L *$12.50 C a m p b e ll. K a th y D . • IL - $140.17 * C e m p b e ii. M a e E. -IL -$80.00 C a m p b e ll. P enny D IL $12.50 C a m p b e ll. R o b e rt J. a n d A n n B. -IL -$140.17 C a m p b e ll. R oger and L a u ra -6.10A -$126.88 C a m p b e ll, W illia m L a nd C onnie -1.60A -$47.61 C apel. E rn e s t S. -IL -$.40 C a rro ll, L a w re n c e W . -10.25A -$26.69 C arson. C ra yto n and L o rln e *1.O0A -S75.45 C arson. Johnnie A . -6.46A -$28.27 C arson, M a ry C. -2.30A -$79.38 C arson, R ic h a rd A a nd ExeM -.45A -$270.80 c a rre r. c a m e C. -»A -M1.23 C a rte r. C a llle C. -IL $74.71 C a rte r, C a llle C. •22.B9A -$43.49 C a rte r, D onnie E v e re tte and M e ta -27A -$68.55 C a rte r. Lew is c . ana C a ro le R . .65A -$113.58 C a rte r, L e w is D ean a nd C a ll D . .92A -$147.29 C a rte r. M . G ra y and R uby N e ll -57A -$456.29 C a rte r, M . G ra y and R u b y N etl -14.BOA -$91.61 C a rte r, R ic h a rd and F a ye C a in -lO A -$52.05 C a rie r. Sheila M . -IL -B a l. $68.75 C a rte r, V a rn e r S. *1L $8.50 . C a rie r. W illia m B. a nd Н о ь ё п -7.13A 126.74 C a rte r. W illie G ra y -IL B a i. $33.58 C a rte r, W m . n e rt a nd H o b e rt Lee -14.7SA - $217.29 C a u d ill, W illia m and A n ita J. -2.49A -$28.68 C audie J r. Joe E d w a rd and R uth O. -IL -$148,85 C h a m is, Cus W . -15.4SA $63,60 C hecks, AAarvIn E . a nd B ebora P. *1L -$158.20 C hunn. D pftum b -IA -$82.95 C hunn, D eaulah 2.50A $15.63 C hunn. C harles E d w in a nd Y vo n n e -21.B2A - $94.37 C hunn, C h a rle s E d w in a hd Y vo n n e -15.60A - $68.60 C hunn, C h a rle s E d w in and Y vo n n e *1L -$106.70 C hunn, R o bert and G la d ys -IL -$40.35 C hunn, R o bert and G la d y s -IL -$5.00 C hunn, R o b e rt and G la d ys -.46A -$4.03 C la rk , H e rb e rl-O z e n e r C la rk -20.40A -$75.40 C le a ry , K irk and M a ry F ra n ce s -0A *$177.68 C le a ry . T o m m y E ugene -6.05A -$21.15 C le m e n t, B e a tric e A rn o ld *1L *$25.31 C le m e n t. B e a tric e and W illia m E. -5.67A * $168.13 C le m e n t, D e lla B la c kw e ll -IL -B a l. $5.59 C le m e n t, G eo rge -3.47A -$143.83 C le m e n t, Ja m e s O de ll a nd O c ta v la W . *1L * $39.42 C le m e n t. John -IL -$6.00 C fe m e n t, R achel H e lri *IK -$2.48 C le m e n t, w illia m E . and B e a tric e -5.07A * $48.10 C le m e n t. W illie G ra y and B e tty K . IL -$126.63 C le m e n t. W illie G ra y a nd B e tty K . -IL -$9.00 C le ve la n d , H e n rv J u n io r *1L -$69.53 C lin e , Ja m e s W . J r. and G a il S. *1L *$159.97 C lontz. A lle n and D e lo ris *1.22 A -$74.62 C o c k e rh a m , A lic e F a y e *1L -$3.40 C ody, S am uel J . -IL B al. $100.47 C oley. M a ry L ou S. -1.18A -$124.96 C o llin s. E th e l -1.59A -$148.44 C ook. B obby G . and P a tric ia -7.25A *$230.07 C ook, O sca r B. and M y rtle -4.68A -$116.62 C ook, O scar B. and M y rtle -3.60A -$22.50 C ope. T o m m y E . and S andra -5A -$105.60 C o rn a tie r. C a rrie -19.44A -$55.46 C o rn a tie r. C ice ro W . J r. and G lenda -IL * $209.93 C o rn a tie r. C onnie G ra y -1.35A -$104.56 C o rn a tz e r D o n a ld G ra y a nd J e a n - IL -$52.61 C o rn a tz e r. E v e ly n -5.10A -B a l. $3.83 C o rn a tz e r. J eM ery S. and L in d a *2A -B a l. $163.31 C o rn a tz e r. M a dge C. -6A *$34.85 C o rre ll, D a n ie l F re d e ric k and M a rie *11.94A * $147.17C o rre li. H o w a rd J r. a nd T eresa -IL *$254.49 C o rre ll, P aul D a v id and AAarge *1L -$213.49 C o rre li. P aul D a v id and AAarge -1.59A -$11.93 C o ve r. D a v id A lle n and J o yce - IL -$115.39 C o vin g to n . Joseph A . and M a rth a *1L *B al. $14.57 C ra te r, B renda Seats *4.67A -$27.35 C ra te r, B re n d a Seats -1.02A -$8.93 C ric k m o re . G eo rge C. J r. and A A arlha *.70A - $5.25 C roH s. B illy A n g e li -7.37A *$27.86 'C ro tts . R ic h a rd H . and D ebra S. *2.75A -$229.49 C roH s. R onald Joe *1L -$65.13 C ro tts , R onald Joe -SA -$15.75 C ro tts . T o m m y S teven. IL -$63.64 C roM s. T o m m y S teven. 3A -$15.75 C u n n in g h a m . D e v o rla S. -3.04A *$8.47 C u lh re ll, C .F. -8 4 A -$7.35 C u lh re ll. L .A . *1L *$4.00 C u th re ll. W ilm a H . *1L $191.74 D a li, R o b e rl A . and M a ry T IL -B a l. $9.03 D a lto n , C h a rle s N . a nd H elen M . - IL *$86.21 D a lto n , C h a rle s N . a nd H elen M . *4.10A -$25.63 D a lto n , E lla H . *1L $87.72 D a lto n , H .M . a nd Jo sephine -7.21A .$36.05 D a lto n . H u b e rt M . a nd Josephine C. - 4.60A - $264.06 , D a lto n , H u b e rt M . a nd Jo sephine C. -2.46A * $69J2 D a lto n , M y rtle Lo u ise *.50A -B a l. $46.61 D a lto n . N e w m a n a n d E liz a b e th -4.90A *$123.59 D a lto n . O d e ll *5.60A *$64.93 D a n ie l, J a c k B . a n d A ld in e *1.50A -B a l. $65.91 D a vid so n . F re d H . -1.50A *$132.49 .D a v ie B u ild e rs *1L $48.91 D a v le T ru c k fi. A u to S ales In c. -IL *$10.00 D a v le T ru c k 8. A u to S ales In c. *1L -$9.00 ' D a v ie T ru c k & A u to SaleS Inc. *1L $17.50 D a v le T ru c k fi. A u to Sales In c. -IL -$15.00 D a v le T ru c k 8. A u to Sales Inc- IL -$15.00 D a v ie T ru c k fi. A u to Sales In c. *1L $15.00 D a v le T ru c k fi. A u to Sales In c. *1L *$15.00 D a v le T ru c k fi. A u to Sales In c. - IL .$7.50 D a v le T ru c k fi. A u to S ales In c. .IL *$15.00 D a v le T ru c k fi. A u to S ales In c. >1L *$15.00 D a vle T ru c k fi. A u to S ales In c. *1L .$15.00 D a vle T ru c k fi. A u to S ales Inc- *3.80A -$23.75 D a v is . B e tly H e irs -4.50A $16.88 D a v is . B illy R a y a nd V ic k ie *1L -$5.00 D a v is , G la d y s D . a nd R oy G a tlls *1L $52.45 D a v is . R oy .IL -$6.50 D a y , B obby E . and S y lvia ..70A *$229.75 ' D illa rd , C la re n c e C .'a n d Lo u ise -3.21 A -$111.48 D illa rd , C la re n ce S, a nd N oia - IL .$37.61 D illa rd . Ja m e s D . .IL -$12.50 D llla rc ). Joe W a yn e .IL .$19.38 D illa rd . T e rry W . a nd C a ro ly n W . . IL -$127.49 D illa rd , T im o th y G . -IL *$12.50 D ix o n . Zeno H . a nd A n n L . *33A *$138.38 D obson, Ja m e s F ra n k *1L -$145.62 D oby, B illy L . a n d B a rb a ra *1A $67.79 D o b y, D o n a ld B. a nd R ebecca *5A *$121.98 ' D oby, E a rl and G le n d a ..90A *$48.33 D oby, E a rl and G lenda >1L .$6.00 D oby, E a rl a nd G lenda -1.23A .$10.77 D oo le y. H e rb e rt E . a nd J e tty *123.68A .$493.11 D o u b . N a n c y S. >1L .$35.22 D o u lln , John C h a rle s a n d L illia n D . .1.87A • $134.69 D o w n in g . Jane P h y llis *1 L --$42.89 D ra u g h n . P a u l R andolph J r. a nd D e b ra *1L . $136.66 D ra u g h n . R ay and D o ro th y . I L . $100.25 D ra u g h n . W a y n e M . S r. *.eOA -$165.07 D riv e r. L e ro y and E le a n o r -IA ;$19.60 D ru m . S helba S. .10.55A .$74.65 D u lin . C h a rlie J r. a nd E lia AAae . IL .$9.00 D u lin . G eo rge W . and J u lia >1L *$40.99 D u lin , H e n ry W . a nd J e w e ll .11.70A .$273.40 D u lin . H e n ry W . a nd J e w e ll *5.35A *$32.10 D t/lin . Jasper H . a n d Zeim a *20A *$150.88 D u lin . J o h n W esley a nd A n n ie C. -IL .$29.12 D u lin , L a r ry D o n n ie .IL .$151.87 D u lin . L e ro y *1L *$28.11 D u lin . R o b e rt H e irs *7.72A -$23.16 ' D u ll, G a ry W a y n e a nd D eborah E . -1.50A *B al. $3.47 D unn. S h e rm a n L and L in d a U .55A -$42.88 D u rh a m , L o u ise C. *1.69A .$26.13 D u rh a m . M a n u e l W . a nd Ire n e .3.75A .$73.07 D w ig g in s . M ic h a e l Lee .IL -$109.14 D yson. Leon a nd L e n o ra *2.76A $49.17 D yson, iy tn rly A . and C a th y D . *1L *B a l. $5.84 E a rn h a rd t, F ra n k D . and Sue -2.28A *$613.24 E a rn h a rd t. F ra n k D . a nd Sue *1L *$43.66 E a rn h a rd t, P ra n k D . a nd Sue - IL *$28.91 E a rn h a rd t, F ra n k D . a n d Sue *24.20A *$84.32 E a rn h a rd t, F ra n k O . a nd Sue *1L -$31J4 E a rn h a rd t, F ra n k D . a nd Sue -1.33A -$16.63 E a rn h a rd t, F ra n k D . a nd Sue -2A -$17.50 E a rn h a rd t. F ra n k D . a nd Sue - IL *$22.27 E a rn h a rd t. F ra n k D . a nd Sue *7.77A *$58.20 E a rn h a rd t. F ra n k O . a nd Sue *1L -$29.31 E a rn h a rd t. F ra n k 0 . and Sue *1.37A -$17.13 E a rn h a rd t. F ra n k D . a nd Sue *1L *$97.40 E a rn h a rd t. F ra n k D . a nd Sue - IL *$27.12 E a to n , A lta -21.60A *$46.74 E a to n . E v e re tte *45.46A -$!82.36 E a to n . E v e re tte -2.13A $6.39 E a to n . E v e re tte *4.30A -$12.90 E b to n . H e n ry R a y m o n d *8A *$28.00 E a to n . O d e ll a n d H e n ry *31A -$90.79 E b rlg h i. M ic h a e l L . and D ia n n a *1L -$114.71 E b rig h t. M ic h a e l L y n n *1L *$15.75 E c c le s . E th e l *.68A -$189.78 E c c le s . E th e l *1L *$64.06 E d w a rd s . Ik e A . *.12A *$18.54 E d w a rd s . R a n d y and E la in e H . - 1.40A - B al. $2.62 E llis , A usbon and D o ro lh y -43.63A -$522.01 E llis . F re d O . a nd AAarle C. -IL *$217.06 E llis . F re d O . a nd A la rle C. -1.16A -$60.62 E llis . F re d 0 . a nd M a rie C. -IL $41.02 E llis . W .A . J r. a nd F re d O. -2.10A $61.93 E llis W .A . J r. and F re d 0 . -IL -$698.23 E llis W .A . J r. -50.60A -$518.16 E llis . W .A . J r. .IL $1.47 E tc h is o n . B illy G a rla n d *1L -$7.50 E va n s. Joe H e n ry -5.32A -$60.84 F a m ily F a rm e rs F ound ol A m e ric a -69.37A • $597.99F e a s te r. " E d ith - .65A -$35.62 P e n w lc k , E liz a b e th L . -25.34A -B a l. $4.11 F Jfzo e ra ld , Ja m e s A . and L a u N e *5.45A *$4].90 F le m in g , E v e re tte A . *1L -$3.75 F le m in g , E v e re tte A . *1L -$3.98 F le m in g , Ja m e s B a x te r and J a n e t W . *1L * $116.61 F le m in g , Ja m e s B a x te r and J a n e t W . -IL • $10.13 F llp p ln . W anda B. AArs. -IL $120.99 Foote, c a rle l -IL -$10.89 F oote. C a rle l -IL -$1.11 F oote. C a rle l and G eneva F . *1L -$154,90 F oote. C a rle l and G eneva F . -1.43A -18.58 F ooie, C a rle l and G eneva F . -IL -$34.28 F o rre s t. C la re n c e a nd S adie E . -74.69A -$201.30 F o rtu n e . B a rry D a le -IL -$7.50 F o s le r. E u la H e irs *1L -$37.43 F o s te r. F re d a nd P a u lin e -IL -$27.69 F o s te r. G le n n M . a nd D o ris -1.06A *$3.45 F o s le r. G le n n M . a nd D o ris -3.06A -$19.71 F o s te r. G le n n M . a nd D o ris -25.10A $73.94 F o s te r. G lenn M . and D o ris -1.07A -$199.22 F o s te r. G le n n M . and D o ris -IL $5.57 F o s te r. G lenn M . and D o ris -IL $61.80 F o s te r. H .L . and B e tly -12.49A -173.14 F o s te r. H a ro ld F ra n k lin a nd AAary -IL -$48.02 F o s te r. J.G . H e irs 4 .4 0 A $29.40 F o s te r. Ja m e s M itc h e ll and K e n neth -10.19A * $20.38 RECORD, THURSDAY, MAY 12, 1983 F o ste r. John H e n ry J r. a nd N e llie T . -1.30A * $65.95F o s te r, J u lia E . H e irs -IL -$3.00 F o s te r. M a ry W . M rs . -IL -$76.28 F o s te r. R ic h a rd R . a nd C a ro ly n -.93A *$212.30 F o s te r, R o n a ld Ё ид епе and W an d a *1L *$205.15 F o s te r, T h o m a s 0 . J r. and H elen -IL -$162.99 F o s te r, T h o m a s G . J r. and H elen .IL *$27.96 F o s te r, T h o m a s G . J r. and H elen - IL -$23.73 F o ste r. T h o m a s G . J r. and H elen .IL -$27.74 F o w le r. D ew ey *1L ,17.97 F o w le r, E liz a -IL -$'l7.04 F o w le r, G eorge C a lv in and D ia n e *1L -$00.35 F o w le r. Jam es and V ic to ria В *1L -$58.71 F o w le r. Ja m e s O ils a nd C la ra -IL -B a l. $50.92 F o w le r. R oland R, H e irs *1L -$30.31 F o w le r, S bm uel O tis a nd W illie M a e - IL -$83.97 F o w le r. T hom as E . E ta l -IL -$3.37 F re e m e n . D ebbie D . *1L -$186.68 F re e m a n . O pal W . *1L -$26.42 F u n d e r A m e ric a In c. -lA -$381.11 F u n d e r A m e ric a In c. -25.76A -W ,980.90 F u rc h e s , P a m e la D ee -IL -$23.36 G ad dy L .G . a n d A n n a Jean -2.20A -$170.14 G a ith e r. C la y -8.50 A -B a l. $44.37 G a ith e r. F ra n c e s H . H e irs *1L -$3.70 G a ith e r. F ra n c e s H . H e irs *1L -$6.6B G a ith e r. G o rd a n a n d C oleen *2.97A -$80.86 G a ith e r. H ugh C. and L in d a F. *.73A -$213.61 G a ith e r. Jesse -IL $19.91 G a ith e r. John R . a nd M a rily n J . -5.66A -$34,64 G a ith e r. John R edm on *1L -$45.09 G a ith e r. Jot«n R edm on *1L -$5.00 G a ith e r, J u lie H e irs -2.25A .$9.45 G a rn e r, R o b e rt w. a nd LucIH e -IL -B a l. $6,84 G ibson, Joh n sie D a v is -IL -$90.42 G ibson. L o u is R . a nd Johnsie В -IL -$19.25 G lddens. John С -IL -$25.00 G iddens. John C. -IL -$25.00 G ln th e r. K a y M . a nd R o b e rt -5Э.50А *$259.13 G ln th e r. K a y M . and R o b e rt *1L *$41.84 G ln th e r, K a y M . and R o b e rt -9.29A -$58.07 G lass, B obby G ene and B e tty *4.34A -82.78.83 G lass, B obby G ene and B e tty .1.60A -$20.00 G odbey, A lic e N . a nd C u rtis -IL .$72.87 G odbey. A lic e N . and C u rtis .IL -$12.80 G o fo rth , G ra c e S. -3.04A .$16.86 G o fo rth . W illia m J. and M a rq u le tta .IL . $121.08 G olden. N e w m a n H e irs .IL .$10.00 G oo dlet. A n n ie R uth .1.20A -$132.33 G ordon, R oger L . and Susan -5.01A -$161.41 G ra n t. F re d ric k . S tanley a n d A n n ie -1.40A - $32.95 G ra n t, F re d ric k S ta n le y a n d A n n ie . fL -$39.59 G ra n t. F re d ric k . S ta n le y a nd A n n ie - IL *$16.34 • G ra n t. M o ze lla H e irs *1A -$51.91 G ra ve s. W illia m Lee and A A argaret -IL -$93.07 G re g o ry . J a n e C. 1.22A -$50.38 G re g o ry . P a u l AAelvin -1A $274.30 G re g o ry . R e g in a ld S. and Joann-1L*$115.39 G riffin . John D . a nd T a m e la C. *.81A *$87.28 G rin d e . L e w is A . a nd F re d a F . *1L -$77JO G ru b b . G a ry, R a n d a ll and K a th y *.80A *$199.11 G ru b b . Ja m e s C. a nd J u a n ita K . -.75A *$8.44 G ru b b , R o b e rt C la y and M ic k e y -IL -$23.04 G ru b b , W ade D ennis and J u d y -4.24A *$252.74 G ru b b . W ade D . E t A l -IA *122.24 G u n te r. C h a rle s and L u la M a e *28.68A *$332.40 G u n te r. L h a rle s and L u la M a e -.50A *$29.03 H a g e r. J e rry L . and P h y lis s *1L -$9.00 H a g e r. J e rry L a nd P h y lis s *1L -$10.00 H a irs to n , A lb e rt and C a th e rin e ..60A .$74.15 H a irs to n , C la ra E s ta te -5.40A *$18.90 H a irs to n , F ra n k H e irs -2A .$11.75 H a ll. E lb e rt M . and N a n cy C. - IL *$11.25 H a ll. L o c k s le y S. and M a rie -70A *$167.63 H a ll. S avannah, M rs . *1L *$3.03 H anes, C h a rlie F ra n k lin *5.58A *$54.73 H anes, R a lp h M a rlin a n d D ia n n e -1.46A • $12S.08 H anes, R a lp h M a rtin a n d D ia n n e .4.54A -$18.16 H a rd ie B e v e rly Y . - IL .$97.44 H a rd in , D o n a ld M . a nd V irg in ia .1.42A .$119.34 H a rd in g , G a ry L a nd E rn e s tin e .IL .$54.30, H a rd in g , S A . a nd C lyde Y o u n g *1L *$344.56 H a rd y W a y m o u n t a nd D a isy M . *1L .$1430 H a rris , BoD by J . a nd B e tty .IL .$15.38 H a rris , H e n ry F . and F a ith - IL -$108.70 H a rris . H o yle B. J r. a nd M a ry J o *1L .$187.09 H a rt. D a v id J r. a n d M ira n d a A n n .3.11 A . $98.45 H a rlm a n , H azel S. -25.06A *$206.81 H ayes, Ja m e s E . J r. a nd P a u la D . - IL *$170.29 H ead. B obby Lee a nd C a ro l C. *1L *$167J 5 H ead. B re n d a F. - IL *$118.61 H ead, W illia m F . a n d M a rlh a F . -IL *$131.69 H e a ly. L o u is J . J r. and J a n e ll - IL .$521.31 H e a ly. L o u is J . J r. a nd -Je nell O L -$75.00 H e lla rd L e o n a rd ..BOA *$70.62 H e lm s , J a c k C . and D a g n e y A *1L *$56.25 H enderson. P eggy C. a n d K e nneth -.68A * $131.25 H e n d rix . C larence L . .2 0 A .$55.00 H e n d rix . T hom as S pencer H e irs .IL *$9.34 H e n d rix T h o m a s S pencer H e irs *1L -$6.42 H e p le r B ro th e rs D a iry -144.50A *$952.57 H e p le r B ro th e rs D a iry In c . 15A *$130.75 H e p le r. Ja m e s M . a nd T eresa A n n . IL -$237.84 H ic k o ry H ill D e v. C orp. IL .$24.00 H ic k o ry H ill D e v. C orp. .IL .$40.00 H ic k o ry H ill D ev. C orp. .IL *$30.00 H ic k o ry H ill D ev. C orp. .IL *$30.00 H ic k o ry H ill D e v. C orp. - IL .$30.00 H ic k o ry HIM D e v. C orp. - IL .$30.00 H ic k o ry HIM D e v. C o rp . - IL *$32.50 H ic k o ry HIM D e v. C orp. *1L -$32.50 H ic k o ry HIM D e v. C o rp . -IL *$32.50 H ic k o ry H ill D e v. C orp. *1L -$35.00 H ic k o ry H ill D e v. C orp. *1L -$35.00 H ic k o ry H ill D e v. C orp. - IL -$35.00 H ic k o ry H ill D e v. C orp. - IL -$35.00 H ic k o ry H ill D ev. C orp. -IL .$32.50. H ic k o ry HIM D ev. C o rp . -IL * $32.50 H ic k o ry HMI D ev. C o rp .*lL *$32.50 H ic k o ry H ill D ev. C orp. *1L *$40.00 H ic k o ry HIM D ev. C orp. - IL $19.50 H ic k o ry H ill D ev. C o rp . -IL -$19.50 H ic k o ry HIM D ev. C orp. - IL *$30.00 H ic k o ry H ill D ev. C orp. .IL *$30.00 H ic k o ry H ill D ev. C orp. *1L -$30.00 H ic k o ry H ill D ev. C orp. *1L -$40.00 H ic k o ry H ill D ev. C o rp . *1L *$40.00 H ic k o ry H ill D ev. C orp. *1L *$40.00 H ic k o ry HMI D ev. C o rp ...lL .$40.00 H ic k o ry H ill D ev. C orp. .IL .$40.00 H ic k o ry H ill D ev. C orp. - IL .$30.00 H ic k o ry HIM D ev. C orp. *1L *$24.00 H ic k o ry HIM D ev. C orp. *1L -$24.00 H ic k o ry HIM D ev. C o rp . *1L *$24.00 H ic k o ry HIM D ev. C o rp . *1L *$24.00 H ic k o ry H ill D ev. C orp. *1L *$24.00 H ic k o ry H ill D ev. C orp. -IL -$24.00 H ic k o ry H ill D ev. C orp. -L -$24.00 H ic k o ry H ill D ev. C o rp . .IL -$24.00 H ill. D o n a ld and C a rrie B. IL $63.58 H ines. W ilsor« H a rris and V e ro n th a -2.37A * $81.80 H inson. J im m y D a rre ll S r. and M a rg a re t - IL . B al. $10.51 H o lco m b . M ic h a e l R . and P a m e la - IL *B al. $174.68 H o lla n d , Ja m e s E. -1.03A -$79.2B H o llifle ld G u y E. .IL -$12.50 H o llo w a y M ic h a e l T . and R honda .IL -$152-26 H o lm a n . C le m e n tin e H e in .IL -$2.42 H o lm a n . H e n rie tta J . -IL -$79.77 H o lm a n . T hom as S. a nd P e co lla E . *1L -$73.15 H o lm a n . T h o m a s S. a nd P e co lla E . *1 L * $20.82 H o lm a n . T h o m a s S. and P e co lla E. - IL -$20.61 H ope B ro th e rs B u ild in g In c . *1L -$9.00 H ope B ro th e rs B u ild in g In c. *1L -$3.60 H ope B ro th e rs B u ild in g In c. *1L -$3.60 H ope B ro th e rs B u ild in g In c. *1L -$3.60 H ope B ro th e rs B u ild in g In c. -IL -$5.40 H ope B ro th e rs B u ild in g In c. *1L -$5.40 H ope B ro th e rs B u ild in g In c. .1 L ‘-$5-40 H ope B ro th e rs B u ild in g In c. *1L -$5.40 H ope B ro th e rs B u ild in g In c. -IL -$4.50 H ope B ro th e rs B u ild in g In c. -IL -$4.50 H ope B ro th e rs B u ild in g In c. *1L -$6.30 H ope B ro th e rs B u ild in g In c. -IL -$6.30 H ope B ro th e rs B u ild in g In c. -IL -$6.30 H ope B ro th e rs B u ild in g In c. *1L -$6.00 H ope B ro th e rs B u ild in g In c. -34.56A *$179.05 Hope B ro th e rs B u ild e rs in c . *1L *$10.00 Hope B ro th e rs B u ild e rs In c. -IL -$10.00 H ope B ro th e rs B u ild e rs in c . *1L -$12.00 Hope B ro th e rs B u ild e rs in c . *1L -$11.00 H ope B ro th e rs B u ild e rs In c. *1L -$9.90. Hope B ro th e rs B u ild e rs Inc. *1L -$12.50 H o rn C a llle -2.79A -$13.16 H orne Ja m e s and E lia -lA -$52-31 H o w a rd , C h a rlie W h itlo c k *1L $34.38 H o w a rd . C M lford W . and K e fin e th -11.68A * $55.22 H o w a rd , D o ro lh y iL $181.6? Howard, P cro th y *)L -S13.74 H o w a rd , K e n neth a n d C liffo rd W -lA -$69.70 H o w a rd , K enneth W eldon .lA -$182.86 H o w a rd ,K e n n e th W eldon -1.50A -$4.50 ____ H o w a rd , W ayne -IL -$99.96 H o w e ll, E th e l M rs . -17.60A -$53.77 H o w e ll. M a zie H e irs *2A -$11.75 H o w e ll, O tis Lee -2A -$11.75 H o w e ll. R onald Lee -.77A -$209.60 ■ H o w e il. R onald Lee a nd S helia -1.40A -$17.50 H o w e ll. R onald Lee a nd S heila -1.60A -$61.33 H o w e ll. R onald Lee and S helia -IL -$17.01 H o w e ll. R onald Lee and S heila -1.38A -$17.25 H o w e ll. R uth -2A -$17.50 H o w e ll, T u rn e r O lando a n d AAarsha L -IL • $34 4 5 H udson, M a n u e l -IL -116.46 H udson, T om H e irs -IL -$36.67 H u e H n e r, P e te r K . -IL -$94.39 H ughes, R ic h a rd C. a nd P a m e la C. *1L -$483.91 H ughes. R ic h a rd K en n e lh and D eborah D -.75A $75.42 H u m b le , Joan H elen and G a ll 0 . - IL -$125.14 H u rl. R o y E d w a rd a nd L u la R . -3.40A -$99.50 H u tc h in s . G eorge E . -20.32A -$63.95 H u tc h in s . T ony R. and B re n d a -IL $106.29 na m e s , Jam es E . a nd Josephine H . - IL -$154.39 l|a m e s . Ja m e s E . a n d Josephine H . * IL -t-M n a m e s , Jam es L . and O dessk -IL -$91.12 ija m e s , J a s p e r P. -1L -$69.38 ija m e s , J a s p e r P. *1L -$1.70 lla m e s , John C a lv in a nd A A argaret -1.23A • $38.39 M am es. John L . a nd L iz z ie R . -5.25A *$109.20 lla m e s . S m ith H e irs -16.20A -$63.15 M am es T .R . a nd Q ueen -1L -$39.32 issa a c. M u rie l *1A -$95.32 J a m e s, J im m y R ogers and B e tty T . *10.20A * $259.15Jam e s. S teven G ra y a nd S haron T . -5.70A - $245.71 '■Johnson. C h ris tin e A . and P a u l E . -IL *156.94 Johnson, D a v id A lb e rt a nd E d ith -.84A -B al. $90.30Johnson. G eo rge -7.50A -$62.48 Jones. A llo n and AAadeline W . -14A $117.99 Jones, C o rn e ll a nd S adie B. *1L -$103,03 Jones, C o rn e ll and S adie B. *1L -$1.94 Jones, E ugene J r. and D e lla -11.50A -$164,87 Jones, Ire n e C . and J o h n R . .47A -$5.88 Jones. M a m ie P . H e irs *1L *$38.23 Jones. M e lv in -89.50A -$312.46 Jones. M e lv in *1L -B a l. $101.93 Jones. N a n cy R . a nd R oscoe J r. 2.13A *$202.21 Jones. N a n c y R . and R oscoe J r. ..76A *$9.50 Jones. S adie D u lin *1L -$26.91 J o rd a n . T ro n ia B. *1L -B a l. $1.51 K e a ton, C h a rle s A n th o n y and S h e rry *.84A • $25.67 K e a ton, F lo y Louise -IL -$15.05 K e a ton, P a m e la W a rn e r -.06A -B a l. $25.30 K e lle r. G e rtru d e H e irs *1L *$40.00 K e lle r. R a y m o n d A . S r. a nd J a n ie F . *1L . $193.50 K e lle r, R a ym o n d A . Sr. and J a n ie F . -IL -$14.07 K e s le r. C .C . and E liz a b e th H e irs .2.B0A .$8.40 K e s le r, C.C . a nd E liz a b e th H e irs - IL .$6.44 K ib lln g e r E d w a rd L ee *1L -$38.62 K lu ttz . R a y B. and Joyce H . *1L *$76.30 K n ig h t, B ill and W illie P. *.80A *$38.35 K n ig h t, L a rry D ean and AAarla A n n - IL .$129.70 K n ig h t. W .L . .IL .$49.77 K oontz. M a ry LOU a n d W ilb o rn B . -49A .$195.87 K oontz, w ilb o rn B a lly a nd J a c k ie .lA *$95.63 L a g le . H e n ry H . and A n n ie O . -6.70A *$61.88 L a g le , H o m e r and T a m s le S. -IL *$41.35 L a g le . H o m e r E . and T a m s le S. ..42A *$5.25 L a g le H o m e r E . a nd T a m s le .IL -$54.00 L a m b , E m m a F ry e *3A *$51.05 L a m b . Joe C. I l l and W anda H . -4.85A -$111.43 L a m b . John T hom as *1L *$12.62 L a m b le , Ja m e s T . and D eborah T . - iL -$287.06 L a n ie r, S a ra h G . a n d D o n a id -9.56 A -$209.28 L a n k fo rd . D ouglas M ic h a e l .8.74A $42.71 L a n k fo rd . M .G . J r. - IL .$36.63 L a n n in g . H a ro ld D a v id a nd S h irle y ..75A . $89.41 L a n n in g , H a ro ld D a v id a nd S h irle y .1.30A . $3.90 L a n n in g . L a v a d a C ro tts .16.11A -B a l. $36.10 Lan n o n . Stephen E . -IL -$32.50 Lan n o n . Stephen E . *1L -$60.00 L a q u in ta C orp. *1L *$10.00 * L a u e r. H a rry G eo rge *5A -$102.43 L a w re n c e . D a n ie l C a rl a nd P a tty -24.39A • $134.56 L a w s . T o m m y R a y -6A -$15.75 L a z a rls , G eo rge and P .G . C hrysson *1L *$177.74 L e o n a rd . H a rry L . and L o is .3.29A .$138.97 L e o n a rd . H e rb e rt L . and N a n cy Y . *1L .$9.00 L e o n a rd . H e'rbert L . and N a n c y Y . >1L *$10.00 • L e o n a rd . H e rb e rt L . and N a n cy Y . *1L *$9.00 L e o n a rd . N e llie J u n e *S.87A -$12.58 Le o n a rd . R a lp h H . a nd H ope .2.66A *$64.38 Le o n a rd . R a lp h H . a nd H ope *.64A -$8.00 L e v is . John W illia m and K a re n - IL .$ iw .2 7 L e w is . C arson a nd M a rg a re t D . - iL -$57 76 L e w is . H a y w a rd fi. D o ris - 5A- $11.00 L e w is , H a y w a rd V . and D o ris M . *1L *$17.50 L e w is . Ja m e s M ic h a e l >1L *B al. $54.32 L e w is . M a g g ie H . -2.40A -$40.09 L e w is . M e lv in G . a nd C h a rle n e C. *1L .$112.81 L in d s a y . H a rv e y , B o yd a nd J e ltle .2A .B a l. $54.88 L in k , C la re n c e W . a n d C a ro ly n *1.13A *$114.86 U n k . E ugene .IL -$7.28 L o flin , B a rb a ra .1-B3A *$104.81 L o lltn , B a rb a ra -6A -$24.00 L o flin . B a rb a ra .12.81A *$57.65 L o flin . J .H . and M in n ie .1L .$6.00 L o flln . Joseph H . J r. a n d A A erllne - IL *$47.93 Lon g . Brer>da *1L - B jl. $1.25 L o w d e r, J e rry C . and E va H . *1L - $199.36. L o w e . D a v id A . a nd E lla *1L -$45.00 L u c k y 's G a ra g e a nd Speed Shop *1L .$160.37 L u d w lc k , W illia m R . and G lenda P. *1L .$137.21 L u H m a n , R o b y L a nd S y lvia M . - IL *$15.00 L y le s . R o b e rt L . a nd F e rn R . *.59A *$68.77 L y o n s . M a rg a re t S. *.95A $200.51 Lyo n s . N e llie C. *4A *$18.88 AAack, R ic h a rd D . H e irs and F lo ra - IL .$19.33 AAarlon, C h ris tin e C . O L .$104.7B AA arkland, M a ry H . >1L .$99.65 AA arkland, R ic h a rd J . and C a ro ly n .3.14A . $205.95 AA arkland. R ic h a rd J . a n d C a ro ly n ..BOA .$5.00 AA artln. A lic e F o w le r E s ta te >1L *$27.81 AA artln. M a rv in C oy *1L .$128.12 AA artln. M ic h a e l a nd S arah - IL .$568.71 AAason, B la n ch L u c ille .10.40A .$63.02 M a son , Joseph a n d M in n ie L e e *8.20A *$198.28 AAason. P a u l H . a nd A u b u rn L -6.07A *B a l. $8.64 M a son P a u l H . J r. H e irs and D o ro th y S m ith . lг 9 1 A $163.67 AAason P a u l H a rris o n ll .IL *$58.74 M asura-. D o n a ld W illia m a nd S a ndra *1L * $476.68A Aatttiew s B u ild e rs o f W in s to n .S a ie m .IL .$6.00 M a tth e w s B u ild e rs o f W in sto n -S a le m .IL . $120.40 .V \atthew s L illia n «1.75A .$24.67 A A ayberry. B u rle y R o b e rt .IL $9.14 M a y fie ld . J a m e s A lb e rt and B e rn ic e . IL .B a l. $54.16M a y n a rd , M a rk D a v id a nd B e rlta G ale *.85A • $66.66 M c B rid e . D o n a ld W . a nd N in a S -12.49A .$76.29 M c B rid e , R a y m o n d R and R u b y ..50A .$8.05 M c C a rty , D o n a ld J . a nd J u n e .IL *B a l. $106.27 M c C Ia m ro c k , A rth u r T h o m a s J r. *5A *$31.57 M c C la n n o n , B illy W a yn e *1O.30A'*$67.68 M cC la n n o n , E ugene 01.20A -$31.30 M c C la n n o n . P e g g y S. o L -$li3.oi M c C o y , D onald R a y a nd C olene W . *1L -$84.48 M cC o y, D o n a ld R a y a n d C olene V/>. - IL *$14.50 A A cC rary, B ru c e C . a n d C a ro ly n O L .$36.52 M c C ra ry , B ru c e C. and C a ro ly n U .83A .$99.83 M c C u llo h , J o h n W a lle r and K a th y T . .IL *. $85.47 ' M c C u llo u g h , J .W . .IL -$7.50 M c C u llo u g h , L a rry a n d A n n -37.19A .$223.05 M c D a n ie l. B obby a nd K a th ry n .IL *$31.02 M c D a n ie l. B obby a nd K a th ry n *1L -$12.75 M c D a n ie l, H o w a rd C. and AAargie *1L -$239.83 M c D a n ie l, H o w a rd C . and AAargie - IL *$5.39 M c D a n ie l, T o n y R . a nd B a rb a ra *.96A *$57.05 M c D a n ie l, W a lle r F lo y d and M a rg ie *3.71A * B_al. $106.14 M c M a h a n . A n ita *5.10A -$25.50 M c M a h a n . H ugh G lenn -5.44A -$27.20 M c M a h a n , L illia n *4.65A -$23.25 M c M a h a n , AAam Ie 4 .5 0 A *$12.50 M c M a h a n . M a n d y Louise *5A *$28.00 M c M illa n . M ic h a e l C. S r. a nd A n n O L -$397.85 M cN eU , T h o m a s L ee and D onna *1L -$255.58 M e lto n . T hom as M . -4.32A $63.07 M e ro n e y . John S ta n le y -3.54A *$384.85 M e ss ic k . C h a rlie W . a n d H elen C. *1L *$216.36 AAesslck.G lenn A ld e n a n d W illla M a e *1L *$46.60 M ic h a e l P a u l £ . a n d P h y llli *}L S777.43 M ille r, H ild a C a in *.31A *$39.57 M ille r, Ja m e s L o o n a rd a nd R ebecca *1L -$5.25 M ille r, Ja m e s P . a nd P a tric ia D . .2A -$64.37 M ille r, M ic h a e l L in n a nd D ix ie T . .IL -$160.04 M ille r. R a n d y E . a nd R egina H . -20.48A . $229.63 M in o r, G ra d y and P a tric ia -1.20A *$82.78 M ilc h e ll. P a u l B. J r. and G e ra ld in e .1.64A . $51.27 AAonsees. H a rry A . a nd B e lly -1 L ‘-$184.69 M o n tg o m e ry . R alph a n d Jo sle B . -IL -$58.83 M o o d y . W ade D . a nd D elores *58.20A *$533.78 AAoody. W ade D . a n d D elores O L $11.60 AAoon. L u lh e r D . a nd Inez B . *1L $79-30 M o o re . H o w a rd and A n g e la IL -$40.00 M o o re . R a c k a rd L . a nd B re n d a W . -5.69A .B a l. $161.42, \ AAorgan. H a rris o n B. J r. a nd L a u lle C. -IL . $20.00 \ M y e rs , C a rl K. and P h y llis .7A -$158.42 M y e rs . C a rl L and Jean *1A *$147.17 M y e rs , G a rla n d L . a n d A A argaret B. - IIA . $101.42 ' M y e rs , G a rla n d L . a n d M a rg a re t B. -8.75Á . $25.09 M y e rs . J im m y Lee a nd P a u lin e -.51A $52.71 M y e rs . W illia m A lto n a nd G ra ce D L .1L'-$62.81 N ance. G eneva H . 24A $74.77 _ N ance. G eneva H . -23A $45.72 N a y lo r. D o n a ld Lee and 7 1 ^ .^ L .$135.71 'N a y lo r, E liz a b e th *1L -$47.68 N a y lo r, R u dolph and B e tty F ..44A .$59.73 N e e ly, G lenda F a y and G enesta -IL $34.16 N e e ly, J .F . and E liz a b e th .IL .$10.46 N e e ly, M ic h a e l A u s tin a n d K a lh -IL .$109.66 N ew so m e. S le d m a n L and L o a l .IL $114.44 N ich o ls, L a rry T h o m a s H e irs -84A -$195.36 N ich o ls. R oble J r. and D o re lh a S. -IL -$26.58 N oble, A le x H e irs -IL -$10.35 N o ko vlch , M ilto n C. and M e lle ra *78A -$222-93 O 'M a ra T h u rm a n E ugene'-21.eO A $275.26' ” _ p rre ll. K e n neth H . a nd M a ro u ita *1L -$196(U O w ln g s. D a v id Lee *5A $245.48 O w ln g s, J .R . T eague a nd P a rk e r *1L *$157.95 O w ln g s, W ils o n H e irs a nd S arah G . -202.89A . $831.29 O w ln g s. W ils o n H e irs a n d S arah 0 . .IL .$33.28 P -H A g ri-E n te rp ris e s In c. .lA $55.79 P age S heron ..29A -U1.7B P a ig e . J a c k D a n d J u d y D . -8A -B a l. $108.10 P a lm e r. S y lve s te r -IL $5.49 P a rk e r. G alena -4A -$120.93 P a rk e r. H enderson H e ir« -1L -$3.75 P a rk s . D ew ey (sh op) IL -$1.55 P a rk s , O ew ey (sh o p ) IL -$t7.50 P a rk s . D ew ey (sh op) IL 4154.34 P a rk s . D ew ey ( shop) IL -$2.43 P a rk s . D ew ey (shop) IL -$1.55 . p a rk s . D ew ey (sh op) I L $122.55 P a rk s . D ew ey S r. 09.11A -$201.59 P a rk s , D ew ey S r. -2A -$8.00 P a rk s . D ew ey S r. .3.90A $122.27 P a rk s . O ew ey H . a nd J u a n ita -1L .$14.19 P a rk s . E m ogene M . O L -$41.38 P a rk s . S a ra h T O L $158.83 P a rk s . T ouloup Y vo n n e *1L -$136.38 I P a rris . B u m lc e L e ro y a nd J u n e -1.69A -$352.54 P a te lla N ic h o la s P. and V irg in ia -IL -B a l. $1.73 P a yn e . Ja m e s Leon and S y lvia O L -$63.39 P a yn e . Ja m e s Leon and S y lvia O L -$4,43 P eebles, C h a rlo tte -5.20A *$18.20 P eebles, C lifto n *3.20A -B a l. $8.34 P eebles. E rn e s t G . *2.50A -$88.3B P eebles, F ra n k AAadlson a nd N a n cy *.50A * $62.91 P eebles. F ra n k M . a nd N a n c y -6A *$43.75 P eebles. Ja m e s E . *1L $44.25 P e e b ln . Ja m e s E . J r. and C ora -lO A -$35.50 P e n n ln g e r. Leon F . a n d J a n ic e M . -l.B IA * $251.63 P e n ry . John F . and N a n c y M . -5.81A *$62.14 P eoples. F lo y d H e rm a n -IL -$.50 P eoples. L illia n C. -4.20A -$21.00 P eoples. W llb u rd and M a ry P . *.32A -$2.00 peoples. W llb u rd and R odger D . *9.90A *$164.55 Peques, Bessie *1L -$6.27 Р еггуу R a y m o n d T . a nd Ire n e *1L *$210.10 P fa ff, R .K . *7.30A -B a l. $44.35 PM cher, G e ra ld in e H o w a rd *.81A -$122.08 P lo tt, A rtis t Lee a nd O liv ia *1.68A -$203.81 P lo w m a n . D llly G. and W anda *1A -$39.87 P lu m m e r. F ra n k lin L . and B e tty S. -1.50A * $282.73 P lu m m e r, F ra n k lin L . J r. a nd Susan *1L • $105.61 P o in d e x te r, Joe F . .70A -$129.77 P o in d e x te r. W .D . -22.74A -$12B.48 P oole. J .L . a nd K a th le e n *1L *$31.50 P oole. V e rn o n G . and K a th ry n F - IL *B a l. $7.97 P o p lin , T h o m a s C. a n d P a m e la C. -4.17A * $29.60 P o rte r, F a y e A n n *1L $21.95 P o rte r. R o b e rt L . and B e cky *1L $7.50 P o tts , BM Iy Joe 0 .4 8 A -$23.18 P o tts , G a ry R a y *7.80A *$101.37 P o tts , G ra y A . and R oy L . -41.59A $124.77 P o tts. P a u l A . and M a ry M . -5.40A -$63.00 P o tts, V e s ta l W . -3.46A -$35.75 P o w e ll, B obby J . and S andra P *6.15A -$109.36 P o w e ll. H a rre ll J r. >1L $461.49 P ra te r, J e rry Lee and S arah *2.93A -$32.39 P ric e . M a ry 0 .1 6 A *$14.01 P ric e , S a n d ra В -IA -$155.96 P ru itt. L .V . *1L .$191.08 P ru itt. L.V .-21.2 5A $78.73 P ru itt, L .V . .29.24A -$111.02 P ru in , L e v a n d e r L e v i ..80A $9.00 P ru itt, L iv in g s to n e a nd E th e l -.52A -$57.66 P n iltt. L o n e ll ..80A .$9.00 P u llia m , H a rv e y Lee a nd L illia n C. .IL $127.93 P u llia m L ila M a e a nd T a lm a d g e T . «1А .$130.89 P u rk e y . R o b e rt G . a n d L a rra ln e C. - IL .$11.25 R a ln tre e A ssociates .IL .B a l. 9.07 R a lle d g e . J e rry L . a nd P a ts y - IL .$90.53 R atle d g e . AAaude W . -6.08A .$38.29 R e a vis, A n d re w W . J r. and AAary .ЗА $137.17 R e a v is , A n d re w W . J r. a nd AAary *3A *$6.75 R e a v is , T h o m a s H o w a rd -4.71A *$11.19 R edland C hurch o f C h ris t - IL *$92.93 R edm on. M a ry *1L $90.60 R edm on. R a lp h a nd AAary *5.66 A *$57.90 R edm on. R a lp h a nd M a ry *1L *$34.54 R e id , N aom e .2.70A -$48.61 R evels. W illia m J r. .3.36A *$66.90 R evels. W illia m J r. *8.64A -$139.80 R h y n e h a rd t E a rle n e -.4AA 49.65 R ic h a rd s o n . T hom as A la n and A n n lc e *12.60A ■ $268.82R Ic h le , C h a rlie D . 2.50 A .$158.31 R Ig g a n , C olum bus F . J r. a nd B onnie C. .5.13A • $254.41 R lp p y S te lla R . O L .B a l. $106.76 R iv e rs , P a u l E.> and K a th y S. .2.40 A .$103.ju R pad R a m s In c. .1.13A .$37.31 R obbins D o n n ie G ene a nd J a n ic e S, ..91A < $51.48 R obbins, Ja m e s D . a n d F rie d a M . *1L -$111.81 R obbins. J o h n E d w a rd and J u d y *1L .$101.43 R ob e rtso n . T e d Johnson .2.30A .$119.20 R ob e rtso n . T ed Johnson .2.45 A *$18.38 R ob e rtso n , T ed Johnson .32.36A .$78.77 R ob e rtso n , T e d Johnson *1L $84.15 ' R ob e rtso n . T e d J . -7.97A *$39.85 R ob e rtso n . T im o th y M a rk *3A -$19.70 R ogers, G eo rge a nd AAary O L *$8.44 R ogers. G eo rge W a rd O L *$35.75 R o llin s. H a ro ld a nd S h irle y -Ю .ЗЗА -$331.93 R oop, J o h n n y D . a nd B a rb a ra *1L $13.50 R o per. K e n n e th R . and E l A ls *98.60 *$85.12 R ose, G la d ys E .3.17A 4193.61 R ose, M a rlin L and AAary G .50A *$49.62 R ouse, J o h n F . a n d B e tty *1.0)A 4178.66 R o y a ll, R onnie a nd M e rle .10.27A *$65.33 R unge, S am S. a nd L in d a *1L *Ва1. $17.29 R y c ro ft.. B obby G . and AAarle C. *1L *$113.21 S a g ra ve s. H . R eed and D o ro lh y .19.34A *$140.14 S ^ln. W illia m L e s te r a n d L u c ille P . -35.19A . $203.54 S anders. H a ro ld O L 4138.65 S a n fo rd , G a ith e r A Aarshall E t A ls . IL -$12.43 S a n fo rd , L .G . a n d R .B . J r. H e irs O L *$7.80 S a n fo rd , L .G . a n d R .B . J r.H e lrs .IL *$7.80 S anford L .G . a nd R .B . J r. H e irs O L *$23.80 S a n fo rd , L .F .M .C . a nd R .B . J r. H e irs *107.10A • $336.06 S a n fo rd M o to r Co. O L 48.03 S a n fo rd . R .B . H e irs .1.90A 411.99 S a n fo rd , R .B . H e irs .IL .$16.20 S cott, A rth u r a nd B eulah W . -2A .$36.99 S cott, C lyde E . a nd D ew ey P a rk s .2.20A .$18.24 S cott. D w ig h I a n d H ild a *8A *$40.00 S cott. L e s le r C . S r. a n d AAary -9.60A .$127.71 S cott R o b e rt L .a n d M y rn a L ..i l *$87.83 S eam on. C u rtis D ou g la s - IL *$91.06 S eats, M ln to ra W . -14.56A $87.00 S eats. W illia m H . a nd O la M a e -6.27A *$60.70 Seats, W illia m H . a nd O la M a e *1.50A *$5.25 S eavw lght. P e rry a nd B a rb a ra P. . l. l lA . $222.31Sensel M a ry 0 .5 3 A 4114.58 S exton. L llla r d R o b e rt and N o rm a J . .1.43A . $103.06 'S exton, L llla r d R o b e rt a nd N o rm a J . .IL . $10.70S exton. L llla r d R o b e rt and N o rm a J. .75.60A . $138.92S h a ffe r. G ale V . and Jean R 4 A .191.48 S hanks, G a ry *1L *$75.83 S hanks. W illia m J r. a nd V io la *1A .$97.30 S hannon. L y m u s E s ta te .IL 419.Э0 S h arpe. W .B . J r. .IL -$314.56 S h aver, R onald W . a n d R honda S. *1L -B al. $73.85 . . Sheets, K eith' V . and D a rle n e *1L 4176.33 ShelfohTJoH nH ugfT -73.03A -$201.20 S helton. S adie M rs . *31A -$104.49 S herrM I, P ric e E . J r. O L *$31.19 S hields, Joe R . *.45A *$92.92 S hoaf. H e n ry AAonroe and E dna -4.81A *B al. $54.60 S h o ffn e r, AAargaret J . -13.60A $49.18 Shore. C la re n c e C . -IA -$64.98 Shore. G la d y s C. .18.99A -$38.73 Shore. Ja m e s O de ll and G la d y s C. -2.70A . $244.26S hore. MCchaet W . a n d K e re th a C. *34.9tA . $369.73 Shore. T h o m a s R ay a nd B u rlle .3.14A -$61.95 Shouse. S h irle y D . O L $303.72 Shue, G e ra ld in e *1L -$41.87 S im m o n s. T e rry L . a nd C a ro l . IL -$12-50 S im pson. J e rry and K a th e rin e 8 . - IL *$190.43 S izem ore, Ja m e s S a nford *3.11A *$123.99 S la te r, T e rry G . >1L 417.20 S m ile y, M ic h a e l D . *1L $65.32 S m ith , B ob L . a nd A d a -9.32A -B a l. $132.12 S m ith . B ob L and A d a *1L -$21.30 S m ith . C h a rle s L . and L a u ra *11.90A *$39.95 S m ith , G eorge M . a n d S herree .2.56A -$60.90 S m ith . H e n ry C a r and A n n e tte M . .1.40A • $149.93 S m ith , L a rry C a rl a nd A n n e L .1.17A .$93.00 S m ith . LM lie AAae .88A 41.00 S m ith . AAartha M . -20.50A *$245.40 S m ith , M ic h a e l K . a n d A n n N . *1L -B al. $22.40 \ S m ith . N a th a n F ra n k lin a nd M a ry G . -44.7IA * B a l. $138.23 S m ith . N o ra C .O . and A .R . W illia m s -54.96A . $194.58 S m ith , P e a rl M rs . .1.74A $3.32 , S m ith . R o b e rt H e n ry a nd B renda -1.15A . $130.14 S m ith , R o b e rt and B renda *.25A $28.48 S m ith , R osa J . AArs. H e irs -13.16A -B a l. $84.96 S m ith , S a ndra G . 1.94A 4178.63 S m ith , S ta n le y Leon and C a rrie *1L -$338.65 S m ith , S ta n le y Leon and C a rrie O L $33.50 S m ith , S ta n le y Leon and C a rrie -IL -$24.00 S m ith , S ta n le y Leon a nd C a rrie *1L -$18.45 S m ith , S teve W illia m a n d G e o rg ia -IL -$125.68 S m ith , S teve W illia m and G eo rgia -1.25A . $18.75 S m ith , T h o m a s E. a nd AAary *1L -$35.00 S m ith , W e n d e ll a nd G o ld ie -2.04A 430.00 S m ith , W illia m B. and B a rb a ra D -122A -B al. $259.75 S m ith . W illia m B. and B a rb a ra D . UOA $75.04 S m ith , W m . D ouglas a n d P eggy p . -Ю .99А - $64.63 S m oot, C onrad and W lllle AAae *1L -$82.20 S m oot. M y rlle Ja c q u e lin e *.65A -$74.24 S m oot, R ow an H e irs *11A -$23.13 S m oot, W ade V . and H a rv e y L -1.88A $9.40 S r)lder, R o b e rt W ayne a nd J u d y -2.04A -$1B5.47 S nyder. J o a n S. -IL $39.85 S p a rks. B obby G ene and N a n n ie Lou -IL * $155.05 S p a rk s . B obby G ene a nd N a n n ie P . 4.87A - __________________- -........................................... S parks. T h o m a s J. and AAary S. -6.80A -$48.50 S paugh, Ja m e s H . a nd V irg in ia -.99A -$26.15 S paugh. AAarvIn E ugene and Jo -IL -$39.91 S paugh. R o bert a nd L in d a F. 0 .3 3 A 4101.76 S p illm a n . H e rm a n E . and M a ry -115.92A * $539.53 S p illm a n , Joseph A S r. and B a rb a ra - IL 476.78 SolM m an. J04<*p‘'A Sr and О а гЬ л 'ч *’ 174.29 S p illm a n , N ic k -2A -$20.00 \S p illm a n . R ay and E m m a L O5.B0A •$79.0o* S p ry , D anny and S haron S. -3.01A -$9A 47 . S p ry. J u d ith H . O L -$163.31 S p ry. J u d ith H -IL 412.50 S p ry, J u d ith H . -2.30A 414.38 S ta ffo rd , Joe L . a n d B a rb a ra -.93A -$201.34 S la le y D ean A . and L in d a -.61A -$60.55 S ta le y, D ean A . a nd L in d a -IL -$29.23 S ta n le y C a lv in C oolldge -40.30A -B a l. $253.00 S tanley C a lv in C oolldge -24.50A -$40.73 S ta n le y C a lv in C oolldge *40.B3A *$84.41 S ta n le y . K enneth L e ro y a nd D ia n n e M . -1.09A - $115.72 S ta n le y . Stephen C. and G ay . IL -$141.12 S teele. D a v id L e w is -IL 477.74 S teele. John 0 ., J r. and J o y c e . I L -$124.12 S teele, M a rs h a ll A . and P a tric ia -.77A -$107.03 Steele. R ic ke y L . and A n n e tte -IL -$97.62 S te e lm a n , D a v id L ee and D onna R . -1.10A . $103.45 S te e lm a n . W a sh in g to n H . a nd M a ry R . .1L . $251.16 S te e lm a n . W a sh in g to n H . and M a ry R. .1L . $27.50 Stephenson, Ja m e s a nd S andra -2.32A -$63.05 Stevenson, A tla s D . and E m m a L . - IL .$130.08 Stevenson. M oses D a v id and E m m a L. -IL - $36.23 S teve's A u to m o tiv e *1L -$6.27 S to ckto n , H o w a rd J . and A z a lle -.B5A -$239.88 S tra in , E ls ie C leo O L *$21.40 S tro u d . A . R . M rs . *1L *$99.44 S tro u d , R o b e rt D ouglas E s ta te .11.71A *$84.71 S tro u d . R o b e rl D ouglas E ^ t e *3.25A 413.00 S lu d e v a n t. A A argaret -28.25A -$85.82 S tudevent. P e rry E t A l -IL *$9.30 S tu d e ve n t. P e rry J . a n d M a x lle n e S. - iL - $182.53 S upple. J e re m ia h M . and B e v e rly A . *1L * $108.01 T a tu m . D a n ie l W . a nd T o n i D . .IL 4115.89 T a y lo r, D a v id P a u l and P a tric ia F . .IL .$201.17 T a y lo r. D onald H . and J a n ie C. -IL .$79.95 T a y lo r, D onald H . and J a n ie C. .IL -$10.70 T eague. S idney C. and K . S. P a rk e r *1L .$74.62 T e e te r, C a ro l L . *1L *$612,31 T e m p le E q u ip m e n t Co.. In c. -9.57A *$2.503.32 T e n o r, P e rc y R . and AAary A . -.94A *B a l. $10.92 T h le s. L a r ry and B e lly R . *.46A -$83.90 T h o m a s , B a rb a ra W . a nd R uben . IL 412.09 Tho m p so n , J im m ie L . a nd R osetta . IL *$87.05 T hom pson. M ilto n T . and AAary S. ..47A .$5.88 T ho m p so n . R o g e r Lee O L -$48.« T h o rn e , G e ra ld B. and S haron D . -2A -$143.22 T ln c h e r. R o g e r L . and AAary C. - IL -$143.42 T ittle . C h a rle s W . .IL .$124.16 T ittle , C h a rle s W . O L -$9.51 T o lb e rt, J a c k and J o yce *1L .$129.62 T o m lin s o n . R oy E ., J r. a nd C h e ry l .IL .$27.73 T o m s, ^ .m m e t W ilson-Leased L a n d *$477.29 ' T riv e tte . D a ^ d G ra d y a nd L in d a *1L *$113.33 T riv e tte . E d g a r L . a nd F ra n c e s E . *4A *$307.82 T riv e tte , J u lia P ears -2.73A *$61.55 T riv e tte , R ic h a rd G ra y a nd J e rry L . *2.36A * $40.93T ro u tm a n , E d g a r C. and S heron *30.70A .B a l. $6.09 T u c k e r, C onrad W o rth a nd E liz a b e th .IL .$6.30 T u c k e r. C onrad W o rth a nd E liz a b e th >1L • $10.00 T u c k e r. C onrad W o rth a n d E liz a b e lh -IL .$9.00 T u c k e r. C onrad W o rth a n d E liz a b e th .IL . $10.00 T u c k e r. C onrad W o rth a nd E liz a b e th .IL .$9.M T u c k e r. C onrad W o rth a nd E liz a b e th *1L *$6.30 T u c k e r, C onrad W o rth a nd E liz a b e th O L .$6.30 T u c k e r. C onrad W o rth a nd E liz a b e th *1L .$6.30 T u c k e r. C o nrad W o rth and E liz a b e th .1.90A . $69.31 T u c k e r. C o nrad W o rth a nd E liz a b e th 01.21A . $496.87 T u c k e r. C onrad W o rth a nd E liz a b e lh .IL .$5.00 T u g g le , T h o m a s ..45A 4194.30 T u rk . C lyde P. and D a le B. .Л .5 9 А 4188.44 T u rn e r, D a n ie l ..50A -$4.38 T u rn e r, M a ry A n n H e irs O L 410.35 T u tte ro w , A lfre d and T h e lm a U .36A *$33.34 T u tte ro w , B obby R a y and P eggy .1.40A . $108.28 T u tte ro w . D . B. H e irs *1.23A 4109.82 T u tte ro w , D a v id E ugene o r J u d y R . ..85A . $238.22 T u tte ro w , L a rry G ene and L in d a -6.25A -$68.78 T w in C edars G o lf C ourse .178.23A .$1.766.70 T w in C ity P a c k in g C o m pany .343.90A .$308.81 T w in L a ke s A v ia tio n . In c. .75.14A 41.041.99 T y s ln g e r. M ic h a e l W . and B a rb a ra .3.ЗЗА • $107.04 U n ite d S tates o f A m e ric a .IL -$145.09 U n ite d S tates ot A m e ric a .)L .B a l. $38.4)' U n kn o w n O w n e r - IL .$12.50 V a n ce . T heon H a rris . J r. a nd S a n d ra T . ..79A . $47.07 V a n ce . T heon H a rris J r. a nd S a n d ra T . .lO A . $44.00 V e a ch . R a y A . a nd C. S. D ro ke .IL .$8.75 V e a ch . R a y A . and C. S. D ro ke *1L *$8.7S V e a ch . R ay A . a nd C. S. D ro k e *1L *$8.75 V e a ch . R a y A . a nd C. S. D ro k e O L *$8.75 V e a ch . R a y A . a nd C. S. D ro k e *1L .$8.75 V e a c h . R a y A . and C. S. D ro ke .IL .$8.75 V e a ch , R a y A . a nd C. S. D ro ke .IL *$8.75 V e a ch . R a y A . a nd C. S. D ro ke O L 417.50 V e a ch . R a y A . and F ra n c e s *3 2 .» A *$44.19 V est. R onnie LaW r№ ce a nd B onnie *1L *$259.02 V e s ta l. W esley T h o m a s a n d D ia n n e -5 .П А * $148.62 V in e s, R ic h a rd and E liz a b e th .1.78A .$130.28 v o g le r, W . L . a nd T . L . H ill a nd T . R . A n th o n y • I L -$10.50 W a g n e r, J o h n T o n y a nd J o y c e .2.66A *$113.24 W a lk e r, C h a rle s W illia m J r. and B e v e rly .IL . $191.47 W a lk e r, P e a rl C . M rs . H e irs .IL 418.69 W a lk e r, R o b s rt AA. and D la n n L . .1.56A .$3.90 W a lk e r, W . S. H e irs .IL *$5.70 W e», C le m e n t W ayne a n d M a rfo rle с .IL • $149.05 W a ll, John H ugh -5.03A *$61.34 W a ls e r, L . J . -1.17A .$8.19 W a rd , G ra d y N . E s ta te -11.75A .B a l. $5.87 W a tk in s, B oyd >1L .B a l. $33.81 W a tk in s. John H . and H elen .IL .$119.69 W atson. G e ra ld .IL 414.00 W ebb. D . B. a n d F a ye B. -4.50A *$95.46 W e n s ll. A u b re y B osi *1L -$45.84 W e u e l. P e te r a n d AAarlene G . *1L -$301.72 W est. L e s te r a n d E va R ebecca *1L 460.23 W h ise n h u n t. R oy W e b ste r a n a L in d a -5.33A * $131.70 W M ta k e r. B ru c e a nd J a n ic e -3.90A -$141.83 W h ita k e r. C. L . .IL 47.50 W h ita k e r. D o rs e tte a nd E liz a b e th .3.54A . $83.50 W h ita k e r. J a c k H . .IL -$76.93 W h ita k e r, J a c k H . and C a ro ly n -5.04A -$154.68 W h ita k e r. Ja m e s F . a nd D onna N . ..BSA *$77.99 W h ita k e r. R o b e rt E . and E rn e s tin e K. .1.25A • $104.89 W h ita k e r. R oy H e irs .9.90A 4205.72 W h ite , C h a rlie H a rtm o n J r. .12.55A .$130.93 W h ite . G ra c e H . .IL .$7.50 ' W h ite . H e n ry W . a nd Rosa Lee ..24A V $i.20 W h ile . Jessie L . .IL -$58.78 W h ite . AAary C le m e n t - IL -$100.63 W h ite , R o b e rt -IL -$64.28 W h itle y . Я я ггу W . and M y rn a -3.65A -$327.37 W ilk e s . J a n ie M . M rs . *1L *$2.94 W illia m s , B o o ke r N . a nd D e lla L . - IL 4123.97 W illia m s . E lg in V . a nd AAary *4.70A *$109.73 W illia m s , F ra n k lin E d w a rd -5.80A 4153.90 W illia m s . F ra n k lin E d w a rd -13A -$29.75 W illia m s . H a rv e y L ee and J a n ic e B. 4 A * $108.53 W illia m s . H a rv e y Lee and J a n ic e B. 0 .0 3 A . $10.30 W illia m s . H a rv e y Lee a nd J a n ic e B . -4.25A . $!2.75 W illia m s . H o lla n d G. -56.47A *$329.48 W illia m s . H o lla n d G . -19A -$41.3B W illia m s . J . F ra n k M rs . E s ta te -5-50A *$37.19 W illia m s . Ja m e s F ra n k lin >4.05A 4100.07 W illia m s , J o h n n ie F . a nd F ra n c e s W . *2A * $93.06 W illia m s . K a re n F . -3.35A $37.50 W illia m s . L o n n ie F . and N e llie O L -$53.28 W illia m s , M a ry F . -IL -$48.97 W illia m s . W . A . and T ru d y S. *.82A 4106.77 ' W ilso n . W ede e n d C eoie *3A -$65.65 W ince. A n n ie M . *7.45A $17.70 W in te rs , John a nd E th e l H . -IL 411.25 W ise m a n . S a ra h *1A 4137.45 W ishon. D o ro th y B. *1.70A -$48.65 W ood, R om an D . and D o ris R . - IL $1350 W o o d ru ff, R o n a ld J. a nd D e b ra P. *1L $83.99 W o o d va lle H om es. In c. -IL -$7.50 W o o d va lle H om es. Inc- -IL -$10.00 w o o d v a lle H om es. In c . -IL 410.00 W o o d va lle H om es. In c. -IL *$10.00 W o o d va lle H om es, In c . -IL -$10.00 W o o d va lle H om es, In c. -IL 410.00 W o o d va lle H om es. In c. -IL 410.00 w o o d v a lle H om es, IN C . * i l 410.00 W oodvaM e H om es. In c. tL -$10.00 W o o d va lle H om es, IN C .-IL 410.00 W oodvaM e H om es. In c. -IL -$10.00 W o o d va lle H om es. In c. *1L -$10.00 W o o d va lle H om es, In c. -IL -$10.00 W oodvalle H om es, In c. -IL $11.35 W o o d va lle H om es. In c. -1L 411.35 W o o d va lle H om es. In c. -IL $11.35 W oodvaM e H om es, In c . -IL -$11.25 W o o d va lle H om es. In c. -IL -$11.35 (continued on page 5D) P u b lic N o tic e S ' D AVII- C O U N TV I-NTERI’ RISE R liC O R P . T H U R SD A Y . M AY 12. 1483 I IB G reen M ead o w s S T A T E O F N O R T H C A R O L IN A D A V IE C O U N T Y IN T H E G E N E R A L C O U R T O F J U S T IC E S U P E R IO R C O U R T D IV IS IO N B E F O R E T H E C L E R K F ile N o. a i SP 113 N O T IC E O F R E S A L E G A R R Y W . F R A N K , A d m in is tr a to r c .t.a . o f th e E s ta te o t W IL F R E D G U Y F R IT T S , D eceased, a nd K E IT H P O P E . .In d iv id u a lly , a n d w ife , L Y N N L . P O P E , P e titio n e rs vs. A B N E R B. H A R R IN G T O N . S R ., G u a rd ia n o f E U N IC E H. F R IT T S . A R L O N A F . P O P E and h u sb a n d . C L A R E N C E A. P O P E , L A R R Y K E IT H P O P E , J R ., K R IS T A L L Y N N P O P E , H A V A D A W N K IS E R , C H R IS T O P H E R T E D K IS E R , a nd M IC H A E L B R IA N K IS E R , D e fe n d a n ts W H E R E A S , th e u n d e rs ig n e d A d m in is tr a to r c .t.a o f th e E sta te o f W ilfriK l G u y F ritts d id p u rs u a n t to O rd e rs o f th e C o u rt' in th e ab o ve s p e c ia l pro ce e d in g o ffe r fo r se ll tw o s e p a ra te tra c ts Of la n d w h ic h sale w as re p o rte d to th is C o u rt; and W H E R E A S , w ith in th e tim e a llo w e d b y la w upset b id s w e re tile d w ith th e C le rk of S u p e rio r C o u rt fo r D a v ie C o u n ty on each o f s a id tw o s e p a ra te tra c ts ot la n d a n d a n o r d e r Iss u e d d ir e c tin g G a r r y W . F ra n k , A d m in is tr a to r c .t.a o f th e E s ta te o f W ilfre d G uy F r itts to re s e ll s a id tw o tra c ts , s p e c ific a lly T R A C T TW O a nd T R A C T E IG H T ; as h e re in a fte r d e s c rib e d ; and N O W T H E R E F O R E , u n d e r and b y v irtu e o f a C onsent O rd e r e n te re d b y a Ju d g e o t S u p e rio r C o u rt and a n o rd e r o f fh e C le rk o f S u p e rio r C o u rt o f D a v ie C o u n ly . N o rth C a ro lin a , m a d e In th e a b o v e p ro c e e d in g , Ihe u n d e rs ig n e d A d m in is tr a to r c .t.a . o f th e E s ta te W ilfre d G u y F ritts w ill on the 13th d a y of AAay. 1983, a t 12:00 noon at th a enh’ence o f th e D a v ie C o u n ty C o u rth o u s e In M o c k s v ille . N o r fh C a ro lin a , O ffe r fo r sa ie to th e h ig h e st b id d e r, the fo llo w in g s e p a ra te tra c ts o f land ly in g In F u lto n T o w n s h ip , D a v ie C o u n ty . N o rth C a ro lin a , a n d m o re p a rtic u la rly d e s c rib e d m fo llo w s : T R A C T T W O : B E G IN N IN G a t an e x is tin g Iro n p ip e , sa id . iro n p ip e b e in g a c o rn e r to E . Z im m e rm a n a nd b e in g lo c a te d a t th e n o rth w e s t c o rn e r of T R A C T T H R E E and b e in g the . n o rth e a s t c o m e r o f th is T R A C T T W O ; th e n ce w ith th e lin e of T R A C T T H R E E S outh 07 deg. 39^ SO" W est 1.W 1.54 fe e t to a n e w Iro n p ip e In th e c e n te r of a 60 fo o t ro a d r ig h t o f w a y , the s o u th w e st c o rn e r o f T R A C T T H R E E , a c o rn e r to T R A C T S E V E N a nd b e in g th e s o utheast c o rn e r o f th is T R A C T T W O ; th e n c e w ith th e lin e o f T R A C T S E V E N » n d c e n te rlin e o f a «0 fo o t ro a d rig h t o f w a y the fo llo w in g e ig h t lin e s a s fo llo w s . N o rth 39 d e g . 27' 0 0 " W est 64.50 fe e t to a p o in t; th e n c e N o rth 11 deg, 4 2' 0 0 " W est 1&S.50 fe e t to a p o in t, th ence N o rth 29 d e g . 34' 0 0 " W est 1 7 2 ^ fe e t to a p o in t In th e D u k e P o w e r rig h t of w a y . th e n c e N o rth 03 d e g . 35' 0 0 " W est 147.50 fe e t to a p o in t, th e n c e N o rth 24 d e g . 33' 0 0 " W est 185.00 fe e t to a p o in t, th e n c e N o rth 40 d e g . 0 7 ' 0 0 " W est 230.00 fe e t to a p o in t, th e n c e N o rfh 62 d e g . 4 7 ' 0 0 " W est 244JO fe e t to a p o in t, th e n c e N o rth 44 d e g . 3 0' 0 0 " W est 153.00 fe e t to a n e w Iro n p ip e in th e c e n te r o f a 40 fo o t ro a d rig h t o f w a y and th e c e n te r o f a b ra n c h , a nd b e in g th e n o rth w e s t c o rn e r o f T R A C T S E V E N a n d b e in g In th e tin e o f T R A C T O N E ; th e n ce w ith th e lin e o f T R A C T O N E a n d th e c e n te rlin e o f a 40 fo o t ro a d rig h t o f w a y N o rth 29 deg. 48' 0 0 " W est 112.50 fe e t fo a p o in t a f the end o f th e roc.d rig h t o f w a y ; th e n ce w ith th e lin e o f T R A C T O N E th e fo llo w in g th re e lin e s . N o rth 19 d e g . 23* 0 0 " E a s t 525.00 fe e t to a p o in t, th ence N o rth 34 deg. 30' 0 0 " E a s t 224.50 fe e t to a p o in t, th ence N o rth 44 d e g . 28' 0 0 " E a s t 225.95 fe e t to a n e w iro n p ip e ; th e n c e w ith th e lin e o f T R A C T O N E S outh 85 d e g . 57' 4 0 " E a s t 455.54 fe e t to th e .p o in t and p la c e o f b e g in n in g , and b e in g 27.27 A c re s , m o re o r less, as s u rve y e d O c to b e r 4th. 19G2 b y M a rtin F . H e n n lg a n , R . L . S. L - 2735. F o r re fe re n c e see D eed B ook 74. page 32. a n d D eed B ook 38, page 418. T h e op e n in g b id o n th is tra c t w ili be U .9 3 6 J 8 . T R A C T E I G H T : B E G IN N IN G a t a n e x is tin g 4 0 " p o p la r w ith e x is tin g m a rk s a t a fe n ce c o m e r, sa id 4 0 " P o p la r b e in g lo c a te d a t th e s o u th w e st c o rn e r o f C . B a ile y 's tra c t, th e n o rth w e s t c o rn e r o f L . A n d e rs o n 's tr a c t ar^d th e sou th e a st c o m e r of T R A C T S IX , and b e in g the n o rth e a s t c o m e r o f th is T R A C T E IG H T ; th e n ce w ith L . A n d e rs o n ’s lin e S outh 05 deg.’ 04' 3 0 " W est 2.987.44 fe e t to a n e w Iro n p ip e on th e e a s t b a n k of D u tc h m a n s C re e k ; th e n ce w ith th e E a s t b a n k o f D u tc h m a n s C re e k a s It m e a n d e rs the fo llo w in a ' fo rty lin e s h a v in g c o u rs e s a n d d is ta n c e s m o re o r le s s a s fo llo w s . N o rth 47 deg. 14' 00'^ W est 145.00 fe e t to a p o in t, thence N o rth 44 deg. 44' 0 0 " W est 75.00 fe e t to « p o in t, fh e n ce N o rfh 07 deg. 23' 0 0 " E a s t 100.00 fe e t to a p o in t, th ence N o rth 25 deg. 49' 0 0 " W est 135.00 fe e t to a p o in t, th ence N o rth 54 deg. 51' 4 5 " W e s t 194.70 fe e t to a p o in t, thence N o rth 29 deg. 25' 15" W est 110.30 fe e t to a p o in t, thence N o rth 13 d e g . 32' 3 0 " E a s t 210J0 fe e l to a p o in t, ttie n ce N o rfh 19 d e g . 48' 3 0 " W est 345.50 fe e t to a p o in t, thence N o rth 42. deg. 04' 0 0 " W est 95.00feet to a p o in t, th ence South 74 deg. 08' 0 0 " W est 40.00 fe e t to a p o in t, thence S outh 40 deg. 59' 0 0 " W est 120.00 fe e t to a p o in t, th e n c e S outh 41 deg. 43' 0 0 " W est 90.00 fe e t to a p o in t, thence N o rth 23 deg. 25' 0 0 " W est 47.00 fe e t to a p o in t, thence N o rth 24 deg. 44' 0 0 " E a s t 94.40 fe e t to a p o in t, th ence N o rth 04 deg, 33' 0 0 " W est 198.80 fe e t to a p o in t, thence N o rth 01 deg. 14' 0 0 " E a s t 48.90 fe e t to a p o in t, th ence N o rth 43 deg. 05' 0 0 " E a s t 145.00 fe e t to a p o in t, thence N o rth 54 deg. 47* 0 0 " E a s t 355.00 feet to a p o in t, thence N o rth 30 deg. 55' 0 0 " W est 95.00 fe e t to a p o in t, th ence N o rth 48 deg. 47' 0 0 " W est 110.00 feet to a p o in t, thence N o rth 37 deg. 31' 0 0 " W est 512.80 fe e t to a p o in t, m e n ce N o rth 87 d e g . 45' 0 0 " W est 215.00 fe e f fo a p o ln f. ttie n ce N o rth 07 deg. 30' 0 0 " W est 140.00 fe e t to a p o in t, fhence N orth OJ deg. 50' 0 0 " E a ft 275.00 fe e t to a p o in t, thence N o rth 74 deg. 28' 0 0 " W est 67.50fe e t to a p o in t; th ence South 45 deg. 44' 0 0 " W est 140.00 fe e t to a p o in t, thence S outh 49 deg. i r 0 0 " W est 292.50 fe e t to a p o in t, th e n ce S outh 77 deg. 17' 0 0 " W est 2)8.50 fe e t to a p o in t, th e n ce S o u tti 88 deo. 29' m " W est 4S.0Ofeet to a p o in t, th ence South 44 deg. 15' 0 0 " W est 395.00 fe e l fo a p o in t, th e n ce S outh 41 deg. 55' 0 0 " W est 104.00 fe e t to a p o in t, th e n ce S outh 11 d e g . 02' 00" E a s t 150.00 fe e t to a p o in t, th e n ce S outh 55 deg.’ 09' 0 0 " W est 92.50feet to a p o in t, th e n c e N o rth 44 d e g . 20' 0 0 " W est 84.50 fe e t to a p o in t, th ence N o rth 39 deg. 22' 0 0 " W est 475.00 fe e t to a p o in t, th ence N o rth 75 d e g . 47' 0 0 " W e s t 170.00 fe e t to a p o in t, thence N o rth 4 i deg. 14' 0 0 " W est 395.00 fe e l to a p o in t, th ence N o rfh 17 d e g . 27' 0 0 " W est 450.00 fe e t to a p o in t, thence N o rth 58 deg. 30' 0 0 " E a s t 812.50 fe e t to a p oln l th e n ce N o rth 25 d e g . 33' 0 0 " E a s t 445.00 fe e t to a n e w iro n p ip e o n th e east b a n k o f D u tc h m a n s C re e k, the s o u th w e st c o rn e r o f T R A C T S E V E N ; thence w ith th e lin e of T R A C T S E V E N S outh 44 deg. 14' 4 5 " E a s t 495.Ю fe e t to a n e w Iro n p ip e In th e c e n te r o f th e «0 to o t ro a d rig h t o f w a y . th e sou th e a st c o m e r o f T R A C T S E V E N a n d Ih e s o u th w e s t СОГГЛГ o f T R A C T S IX ; th e n ce w ith fh e lin e o f T R A C T S IX S outh 46 deg. 14' 4 5 " E a s t - 2,435.12 fe e t to th e p o in t a nd p la c e o f b e g in n in g , a n d b e in g 125.52 A c re s , m o re o r less, as s u rve y e d O c to b e r 4th. 1982, b y M a rtin F . H e n n lg a n , R . L . S. L - 2735. F o r re fe re n c e see D eed B ook 38, page 418, D eed B ook 38, page 348 a n d D eed B ook 41, p a g e 80. T he op e n in g b id on th is tra c t w ill be $39,588.80. A li tra c ts a re s o ld s u b ie c t to a n y r ig h ts o f w a y a n d e asem ents a n d e n c u m b ra n c e s of re c o rd a n d a re a ls o s o ld s u b le c t to th a t 40 fo o t ro a d rig h t o f w a y as s p e c ific a lly d e s c rib e d and show n on th a t m a p d ra w n by M a rtin F . H e n n lg a n d a te d O cto b e r 4 th , 1982 W h ic h Is h e re b y In c o rp o ra te d h e re in by re fe re n ce . A ll tra c ts a re so ld s u b le c t .to p ro p e rty ta x e s a n d assessm ents fo r y e a rs s u b se q u e n t to 1982. T he la s t a n d h ig h e s t b ld d e ^ fo r each tra c t a t s a id s a le w ill be re q u ire d to g iv e e cash d e p o s it In th e a m o u n t o f 10 p e rc e n t o f th e b id p e n d in g f in a l c o n firm a tio n o r r e ie c tlo n th e re o f. S a id s a le o f each tra c t is s u b je c t to c o n firm a tio n b y th e C o u rf. T h is th e 27th da’y o f A p ril, 1983. G a rry W . F ra n k A d m in is tra to r c .t.a . o f the E s ta te o f W ilfre d G u y F ritts P .O . B o x 1295 L e x in g to n . N C 27292 (704) 244.2203 5 - 5.*2tnp N O R T H C A R O L IN A D A V IE C O U N T Y N O T IC E T O D E B T O R S A N D C R E D IT O R S T h e u n d e rs ig n e d h a v in g q u a lifie d as E x e c u to r o i the E s ta te o f J a c k s o n H e rm a n M cC u Is to n , a k a J a c k s o n H . M c C u ls to n . D eceased, la te of O a v ie County, N o rth C a ro lin a , th is Is to n o tify a ll p e rsons, firm s a n d c o rp o ra tio n s h a v in g c la im s a g a in s t th e e s ta te to e x h ib it to th « m to th e u n d e rs ig n e d a t th e o ffic e of D a v is a n d B r e v ^ r A tto rn e y s , 2419 L e w is v ille -C le m m o n s R o a d . C le m m o n s . N o rth C a ro lin a , 27012. o n o r b e fo re the 7 fh d a y o f N o v e m b e r, 1983; o r th is N o tic e w ill be. p le a d e d in b a r o f th e ir re c o v e ry . A ll persons In d e b te d to th e e s ta te w ill p le a se m a k e Im m e d ia te p a y m e n t. T h is th e Sth d a y o f M a y, 1983. E s th e r G . M c C u is to n , E x e c u to r o f th e E s ta te o f J a c k s o n H e rm a n M c C u is to n . B y : E d w a rd Y . B re w e r D a v is & B re w e r A tto rn e y s P .O . D ra w e r 784 2419 L e w Is v iile .C le m m o n s R oad C le m m o n s . N .C . 27012-0784 5 .5 - 4tn N O R T H C A R O L IN A D A V IE C O U N T Y E X E C U T R IX N O T IC E H a v in g q u a lifie d as E x e c u trix o f th e e s ta te o f M a rtin F ra n k lin P o tts , la te o f D a v ie C o u n ty , th is Is to n o tify a ll pe rso n s h a v in g c la im s a g a in s t s a id e s ta te to p re s e n t th e m to th e u n d e rs ig n e d o n o r b e fo re th e S th d a y o f N o v e m b e r. 1983. b e in g s ix m o n th s fro m th e fir s t d a y of p u b lic a tio n o r th is rw tic e w ilt i>e p le a d e d In b a r o f th e ir re c o v e ry . A ll pe rso n s In d e b te d to sa id e s ta te w ill p le a s e m a k e im m e d ia te p a y m e n t to th e u n d e rs ig n e d . T h is th e S th d a y of M a y, 1983. E d ith P o tts R e id , e x e c u trix of the e sta te o f M a rtin F ra n k lin P o tts, deceased. M a rtin & V a n H oy. A tto rn e y s B ox 404 A A ocksvllle, N .C . 27028 5-5 4tnp N O R T H C A R O L IN A D A V IE C O U N T Y N O T IC E T O C R E D IT O R S A N D D E B T O R S O F R O Y N O R AAA N R U M M A G E H a v in g q u a lifie d as E x e c u trix o f the E s ta te o f R o y N o rm a n R u m m a g e , la te o f D a v ie C ounty, N .C .. th e u n d e rs ig n e d h e re b y n o tifie s a il p e rs o n s h a v in g c la im s a g a in s t s a id e s ta te to e x h ib it th e m to E d ith B . R u m m a g e , E x e c u trix , ot R oute 4, B ox 312, A A ocksvllle, N .C . o n o r b e fo re N o v e m b e r 25, 1983, o r th is n o tic e w ili be p le a d e d in b a r of th e ir re c o v e ry . A ll pe rso n s in d e b te d to the dece d e n t a re a ske d to m a ke Im m e d ia te p a y m e n t to th e above n a m e d e x e c u to r. T h is the 4 fh d a y o f A ^ay. 1983. E d ith B. R u m m a g e , E x e c u to r o f the E s ta te o f R oy N o rm a n R u m m a g e . 5-12 4tn, N O R T H C A R O L IN A D A V IE C O U N T Y A D V E R T IS E M E N T F O R B ID S T he C o u n ty of D a v Ie w ill open b id s p u rs u a n t to G e n e ra l S ta tu te 143-129 on AAay 23, 1983. a l 3 :3 0 ' p .m . in th e C o m m is s io n e r's R o o m o f the C o urtho use fo r th e p u rp o s e of c o n s id e rin g th e le a s e o r p u rc h a s e o f c o m p u te r h a rd w a re and sofh w are. B ids m a y be s u b m itte d to the C o u n ty A ^ n o g e r's O ffic e p rio r to th e op e n in g of b id s . F u rth e r, s p e c ific a tio n s a re a v a ila b le A ^onday ttiro u g h F rid a y in th e C ounty M a n a g e r's O ffic e of the C o urtno use fro m 8 :X a .m . u n til 5:00 p .m . T he C o u n ty o f D a v ie re s e rv e s the rig h l to re |e c t o r re fu s e a ny and a tl b id p ro p o s a ls . C h a rle s S. AAashburn C o u n ty M a n a g e r .. '• 5 12 Itn p N O R T H C A R O L IN A D A V IE C O U N T Y N O T IC E U N D E R A N D B Y V IR T U E Ot a p o w e r of sale c o n ta in e d in a c e rta in deed o f tru s t d a te d O cto b e r 28, 1981, exe cu te d b y R ic h a rd A . B eck a n d w ife , B lllle J . B e c k to G e o rg e W . M a rtin , S u b s titu te T ru s te e , a n d re c o rd e d in B ook 117. page 484, D a v ie C o u n ly R e g is try ; and u n d e r a nd b y v irtu e ot the a u th o rity v e s te d In th e u n d e rs ig n e d as T ru s te e a nd an o rd e r exe cu te d b y D e lo re s C. J o rd a n . C le rk of S u p e rio r C ourt o f D a v ie C o u n ty, o n th e 18th d ay o f A p ril. 1983, th e d e fa u lt h a v in g been m a d e In the p a y m e n t of the Indebtedness th e re b y secure d, th e sa id deed o t tru s t b e in g b y the te rm s th e re o f s u b le c t to fo re c lo su re and th e h o ld e r o t the Indebtedness th e re b y secure d h a v in g de m a n d e d a fo re c lo su re th e re o f fo r th e pu rp o se of s a tis fy in g s a id In d e b te d n e s s and the s a m e h a v in g been o rd e re d a n d a p p ro v e d b y sa id o rd e r o t C le rk o t S u p e rio r C o u rt o f D a v ie C o u n ty , th e u n d e rs ig n e d G eo rge W . A ^a rtln . S u b s titu te T ru s te e w ill o ffe r fo r sa le a t p u b lic a u c tio n to the h ig h e st b id d e r fo r cash a t the C o u rth o u s e D o o r In D a v ie C o unty. N o rth C a ro lin a , a t 11:00 o 'c lo c k a .m ., on th e 19th d a y of A^ay, 1983. the la n d con ve ye d In sa id deed o f tru s t, th e sam e ly in g a n d b e in g in O a v ie C o unty. N o rth C a ro lin a , and bein g d e s crib e d as fo llo w s : B E G IN N IN G a t a n iro n p in a t the N o rth e ast c o m e r o f th e w ith in d e s c rib e d tra c t a t the In te rs e c tio n o f th e S outhern rig h t o f w a y m a rg in o t SR 1100 w ith the W e s te rn rig h t o f w a y m a rg in o f U S 401; th e n c e fro m the b e g in n in g Sou^h 14 degs. 06 m ln . 27 sec. E a s t 442.24 fe e t to a n Iro n p in a t th e S outh E a st c o m e r o f sa id tra c t N o rth east c o m e r Of E . C . T a tu m , (DB.BO , page 242); th e n c e S outh 84 degs. 40 m in . 19 sec. W e s t 485.74 feet to a n Iro n p in in th e E a s te rn rig h t o f w a y m a rg in o f SR 1100 S outheast c o rn e r o f s a id tra c t; th ence w ith th e rig h t o f w a y m a rg in o f SR 1100 th e fo llo w in g course s and d is ta n c e s : N o rth 06 degs. 57 m ln . 44 sec. W est 63.49 ft. to a p o in t; N o rth 07 degs. 44 m in . 29 sec. W est 110.05 fe e t to a p o in t; N o rth 01 deg. 33 m ln . 34 sec. W est 90.85 fe e t to a p o in t; N o rth 11 d e g . 03 m in . 25 sec. E a s t 59.53 ff. fo a p o in t; N o rfh 32 d eg. 08 m ln . 04 sec. E a s t 90.54 fe e t to a p o in t, N o rth 52 d e g . 53 m ln . 29 sec. E a s f 99.25 fe e t to a p o in t; N o rth 40 degs. 35 m ln . 37 sec. E ast 133.34 ft. to a p o in t; N o rth 41 deg. 11 m in . 15 sec. E a st 338.24 fe e t o t a p o in t. c o n ta ln Ir.g 7.449 a c re s as show n on a s u rv e y b y F ra n c is B. G reene, d a te d F e b ru a ry 26, 1980. "T h is p ro p e rty w ill be sold s u b je c t fo a ll fa x e s , e n c o m b ra n c e s a n d lie n s o f re c o rd ." T h is th e 18th d a y of A p ril, 1983. G e o rg e W . A A artln. S u b s titu te T ru s te e 4.21-4tnp N O R T H C A R O L IN A D A V IE C O U N T Y E X E C U T O R 'S N O T IC E H a v in g q u a lifie d as E x e c u to r o f the e sta te o f N o rm a n E . C ook, S r.. deceased, la te of D a v ie C ounty, th is Is to n o tify a il persons n a v in g c la im s a g a in st s a id e s ta te to p re s e n t th e m to th e u n d e rs lg n e d o n o r b e fo re th e 28th d a y o f O c to b e r. 1983, o r th is n o tic e w ill be p le a d e d in b a r o f th e ir re c o v e ry . A ll persons Indebted to s a id e s ta te w ill p le a s e m a k e im m e d ia te p a y m e n t to th e u n d e rs ig n e d . T h is th e 28th d a y o f A p rK . 1963. N o rm a n E . C o o k , J r. E x e c u to r o f th e e s ta te o f N o rm a n E . C ook. S r.. deceased. 4.28 4tnp N O R T H C A R O L IN A D A V IE C O U N T YE X E C U T O R N O T IC E H a v in g q u a lifie d as e x e c u to r o f the e s ta te o f L in d a G ra y C le m e n f. d eceased . la te of D a vie C o u n ty, th is Is to n o tify a ll p e rs o n s h a v in g c la im s a g a in st s a id e s ta te to pre se n t th e m to the u n d e rs ig n e d o n ,o r b e fo re th e 2 ls t d a y o f N o v e m b e r 1983, o r ttils n o tic e w ill be pleaded In b a r of th e ir re c o v e ry . A ll persons Indebted to said e s ta te w ill p le a s e m a k e Im m e d ia te p a y m e n t to th e un d e rsig n e d . T h is ::ie 15th da y o f A p ril 1983, Ja m e s K . S heek J r., e x e c u to r, o f the e s ta te o f L in d a G ra y C le m e n t deceased.829 N . A ^aln St, M o cksvU le , N.C . 4-21-4m p n r A h m H A L L O F 7 C H I E V E M E № N O R T H C A R O L IN A F O R S Y T H C O U N T Y IN T H E G E N E R A L C O U R T O F J U S T IC E D is tric t C o u rt D iv is io n 81 C V D 5304 H IL D A M . D IZ E (N o w M ila m ) VS. D A V ID T . D IZ E N O T IC E U n d e r a nd b y v irtu e o f a n e x e c u tio n d ire c te d to th e u n d e rs ig n e d s h e riff fro m fh e S u p e rio r C o u rt o f F o r s y th C o unty. In the a b o v e e n title d a c tio n , I w ill o n th e 20th d a y o f AAay. 1983, a t 2:00 o 'c lo c k p .m .. a l the d o o r o f th e D a v ie C o u n ty C o u rth o u se In A A ocksvllle, N o rth C a ro lin a , o ffe r fo r s a le to th e h ig h e st b id d e r to r c a s h , to s a tis fy s a id e x e c u tio n , a ll r ig h t, title , a n d In te re s t w h ic h th e d e fe n d a n t n o w has o r a t a n y tim e a t o r a fte r th e d o c k e tin g o f the J u d g m e n t (n s a id a c tio n h a d In and to the fo llo w in g d e s c rib e d re a l e s ta te , ly in g and b e in g In C a la h a in T o w n s h ip , ' O a v ie C ounty, N o rth C a ro lin a . B E G IN N IN G a t a p o in t In th e centf^r o f C a la h a in R o a d (N .C . R oad 1314), s o u th e a st c o rn e r o f W h ite , a n d ru n n in g th e n c e w ith th e c e n te r o f s a id ro a d S o u th 7 de g re e s E a s t 495 fe e t to a p o in t. F re e m a n n o rth e a s t c o r n e r ; th e n ce S outh 87 d e g re e s 30 m in u te s W est w ith P re e m a n lin e 1275 fe e t to a n Iro n in W . W . S m ith lin e ; th e n c e N o rth 7 - de g re e s E a s t375 fe e t to a n Iro n , M a c k W h ite c o rn e r In G ra d y ija m e s lin e , th e n ce N o rth 80 d e g re e s 25 m in u te s E a s t 1184 fe e t T O T H E P O IN T A N O P L A C E O F B E G IN N IN G , c o n ta in in g 12.5 a c re s, m o re o r less a n d b e in g th e n o rth e rn p o rtio n o f a tra c t d e s c rib e d In B ook 81 a t p a g e 54, D a v ie C o u n ty R e g is try , as s u rv e y e d b y S. L . T a lb e rt. R e g is te re d S u rv e y s r, N o v e m b e r 19. 1966. T h is 19th d a y of A p ril, 1983. G e o rg e S m ith S h e riff o f D a v ie C o u n ty 4*21 4 tn p N O R T H C A R O L IN A D A V IE C O U N T Y IN T H E G E N E R A L C O U R T O F J U S T IC E D IS T R IC T C O U R T D IV IS IO N N O T IC E O F S A L E O F R E A L P R O P E R T Y A ffilia te d ’ B ro a d c a s tin g . In c . W A IV R adio P la in t if f vs. Jo e C h ild e rs , B o d y to n e o f J a c k s o n v ille D e fe n d a n t U n d e r a nd b y v ir tu e o f a n E x e c u tio n d ir e c te d to th e u n d e rs ig n e d S h e riff o f D a v ie C o u n ty . In th e a b o v e e n title d a c tio n , I w ill o ffe r fo r s a le a n d se ll a t p u b lic a u c tio n to th e h ig h e s t b id d e r, fo r c a s h , o n th e 10th d a y o f Ju n e , 1963. a t 12:00 N oon, a t th e C o u rth o u se d o o r In M o c k s v ille . D a v ie C o u n ty . N o rth C a ro lin a , to s a tis fy s a id E x e c u tio n , . le v y h a v in g h e rto fo re been m a d e , a ll r ig h t , title a n d In te re s t w h ic h th e d e fe n d a n t Joe C h ild e rs n o w h a s . o r a t a n y tim e a fte r th e d o c k e tin g o f th e J u d g e m e n t in th is a c tio n h a d In a n d to th e fo llo w in g d e s c rib e d r e a l p ro p e rty ly in g a n d b e in g In M o c k s v ille T o w n s h ip . D a v ie C o u n ty . N o rth C a ro lin a , to w it: B eing a ll o f those c e r ta in fiv e (5) tra c ts o f p a rc e ls o f r e a l p ro p e rty d e s c rib e d In a d e e d d a te d O c to b e r 5r 1977, fr o m G . F e lix H a rd in g , A tto rn e y * ln -fa c t fo r S a ra h W . H a rd in o , to J oseph R . C h ild e rs a n d H a r o ld E . S teele, re c o rd e d In D e e d B o o k 103, a t page 17, D a v ie C o u n ty R e g is try , to w h ic h s a id deed re fe re n c e Is h e re b y m a d e fo r m o re p o rtic u ia r d e s c rip tio n o f s a id re a l p ro p e rty . S aid p ro p e rty Is s itu a te d o n N . M a in S tre e t a n d Is s itu a te d In M o c k s v ille , N o rth C a ro K n o . S aid p ro p e rty s h a ll re m a in o p e n fo r up se t b id s a s b y la w p ro v id e d a n d is b e in g s o ld in a c c o rd a n c e w ith th e p ro v is io n s o f A rtic le 29B o f C h a p te r 1 o f th e G e n e ra l S ta fv te s o f N o r th C a ro lin a a n d is b e in g s o ld s u b le c t to a ll o u ts ta n d in g lie n s a n d e n c u m b ra n c e s . In c lu d in g - a d v a lo re m ta xe s. T h is 10th d a y o f M a y , 1963. S H E R IF F O P D A V IE -C O B y : G le n n C o rn a tz e r. D e p u ty 5 .1 2 -4 tn N O R T H C A R O L IN A D A V IE C O U N T Y E X E C U T Q R N O T IC E H a v in g q u a lifie d a s e x e c u to r o f the e s ta te o f N o fle C h u n n . d ecebsed, la te of D a v ie C o u n ty , th is Is to n o tify a ll p e rs o n s h a v in g c la im s a g a in s t s a id e s ta te to p re s e n t th e m to th e ur>dersigned on o r b e fo re th e S th d a y o f N o v e m b e r, 1983, o r th is n o tic e w ill be p le a d e d In b a r o f th e ir r e c o v e ry . A il p e r s o n s in d e b te d to s a id e s ta te w ill p le a s e m a k e I m m e d ia te p a y m e n t to th e u n d e rs ig n e d . T h is th e Sth d a y o f A A ay, 1983. R o b e rt H . C hunn, R f. 4, B o x 256, M o c k s v ille . N .C .. e x e c u to r o f the e s ta te of N o tle C h u n n . deceased. S-S 4 tn N O R T H C A R O L IN A D A V IE C O U N T Y N O T IC E U N D E R A N D B Y V IR T U E o f a p o w e r o f s a ie c o n ta in e d In a c e rta in d e e d o f tru s t d a te d S e p te m b e r 30. 1980. e x e c u te d b y G e o rg e E . W e e k s , I I I a n d w ife . D ap h n e C . W e e k s to G e o rg e W . M a rtin T ru s te e , a n d r e c o rd e d In B ook 113, p a g e AS2, D a v Ie C o u n ty R e g is tr y ; a n d u n d e r a n d b y v irtu e o f fh e a u th o r ity v e s te d In th e u n d e rs ig n e d a s T ru s te e a nd a n o r d e r e x e c u te d b y D e lo re s C. J o r d o n . C le rk o f S u p e rio r C o u rt o f D a v lc C o u n ty , o n fhe Sth d a y o f AAay, 1983, th e d e fa u lt h a v in g b e e n m a d e in th e p a y m e n t o f th e In d e b te d n e s s th e re b y s e c u re d , th e s a id d e e d o f tru s t b e in g b y th e te rm s th e re o f s u b je c t to fo re c lo s u re a n d th e h o ld e r o f th e iryJebtedn ess th e re b y s e c u re d h a v in g d e m a n d e d a fo re c fo s u re th e re o f fo r th e p u rp o s e o f s a tis fy in g s a id in d e b te d n e s s e n d th e s a m e h a v in g b e e n o rd e re d a n d a p p ro v e d b y s a id o rd e r o f C le rk o f S u p e rio r C o u rt o f D a v ie C o u n ty , th e u n d e rs ig n e d G e o rg e W . A A a rtln T ru s te e w ill o ffe r fo r s a le A t p u b lic a u c tio n to th e h ig h e s t b id d e r f o r c a s h a t th e C o u rth o u s e D o o r In D a v ie C o u n ty , N o rth C a ro lin a , a t 11:00 o 'c lo c k a .m . o n th e 6 th d a y o f J u n e , 1983. th e la n d c o n v e y e d in s a id d e e d o f tru s t, th e s a m e iy in g a n d b e in g in O a v ie C o u n ty , N o rth C a ro lin a , a n d t>eing d e s c rib e d a s fo llo w s : B E G IN N IN G a t a n lr o n In th e w e s te rn r ig h t o f w o y m a rg in o f a n u n n a m e d s tr e e t th e N o rth e a s t c o r n e r o f th a t 9.95 a c re tra c t c o n v e y e d to A lb e rt W llilo m S to n e e t и х b y d e e d re c o rd e d In D e e d B o o k 96, a t page 85 a n d r u n n in g th e n c e w ith th e w e s te rn r ig h t o f w a y m a rg in o t s a id u n n a m e d s tre e t N o r th 0 d e g re e s П m in u te s E o s t 280 fe e t to a n Iro n ; th e n c e N o r th 61 d e g re e s 54 m in u te s W e s t 1004.11 fe e t to a n ir o n in T illm a n D u ll lin e ; th e n c e w ith T illm a n D u ll ' lin e S outh 5 d e g re e s ^4 m in u te s W est 280 fe e t to a n Iro n . A lb e rt W illia m S to n e N o r th w e s t c o rn e r; th e n c e w ith S to n e lin e S outh 82 d e g re e s 02 m in u te s E a s t 1030.3 fe e t to th e B E G IN N IN G c o n ta in in g 4.50 a c re s , m o re o r le s s . " T h is p r o p e r ty w ill b e s o ld s u b je c t t o a ll ta x e s , e n c u m b ra n c e s a n d lie n s o f re c o rd ." T h is th e S th d a y o f A A ay. 1963. G e o rg e W . A A a rtln . T ru s te e 5-13 4 tn N O R T H C A R O L IN A D A V IE C O U N T Y N O T jC E W H E R E A S th e u n d e rs ig n e d T ru s te e In a c e r ta in D e e d o f T ru s t e x e c u te d b y C A R L M . B R E C H T a n d r e c o rd e d in B o o k 109. p a g e 667. D a v ie C o u n ty R e g is try fo re c lo s e d a n d o ffe r e d fo r s a le th e la n d h e r e in a fte r d e s c rib e d a n d w h e re a s w ith in the tim e a llo w e d b y la w a n a d v a n c e d b id w a s file d w lth 'th e C le rk o f S u p e rio r C o u rt a n d b y O rd e r. Is s u e d d ir e c tin g th e T ru s te e to re s a le th e s a id la n d u p o n a n o p e n in g b id o f F O U R T E E N T H O U S A N D E IG H T H U N D R E D N IN E T E E N A N O 78-.100 (514,819.76) D O L L A R S . NO W » T H E R E F O R E , u n d e r and by v ir tu e o f s a id o r d e r o f th e C le rk o f S u p e rio r C o u rt o t D a v ie C o u n ty a n d th e p o w e r o f s a le c o n ta in e d in s a id D e e d o f T r u s t, Ihe u n d e rs ig n e d T ru s te e w ilt o ffe r fo r s a le u p o n s a id o p e n in g b id a t p u b lic a u c tio n to th e h ig h e s t b id d e r f o r c a s h a t th e C o u rth o u s e d o o r In D a v ie C o u n ty, N o r th C a ro lin a a t 11:00 o 'c lo c k a .m . o n th e 2S th d a y o f M a y , 1 9 83. fh e fo fio w in g d e s c rib e d p r o p e rty lo c a te d In D a v ie C o u n ty , N o r th C a r o lin a : B E G IN N IN G a t 9 sto n e In o r ig in a l lin e r u n s S o u th 3 deg re e s v a r ia tio n 10 c h a in s to a s to n e ; th e n c e W e s t Э v a r ia tio n s 20 c h a in s to a s to n e ; th e n c e N o r th 3 v a r ia tio n s 1 0 c h a in s t o a s to n e ; th e n c e E a s t 22.40 c h a in s to th e B E G IN N IN G c o n ta in in g 21H<t a c re s , m o re o r le s s . T O G E T H E R W IT H A P E R M A N E N T e a s e m e n t o f in g re s s a n d e g re s s 30 fe e t in w id th b e g in n in g o n th e N o rth e rn rig h t-o f-w a y m a rg in o f N C S R 1414, a t th e S o u th w e s t c o r n e r o f th e S h a d y G r o v e S c h o o l P ro p e rty , fh e s a m e b e in g t; э S o u th e a s te r c o rn e r o f th a t 14 a c re tra c t b e lo n g in g to W . J . Z im m e rm a n a n d d e s ig n a te d a s T ra c t 13 o n th e a p p r o p ria te ta x m o p o f D o v ie C o u n ty a n d ru n n in g th e n c e p a r a lle lin g th e E a s te rn a n d a p p r o p r ia te S o u th e rn b o u n d a rie s o f s o ld T ra c t 13 to о p o in t a t th e N o rth w e s te rn c o r n e r o f s a id T ra c t 13. th e s o m e b e in g th e S o u th w e s te rn c o rn e r o f H a rv e y Z im m e rm a n 's 18.13 a c re tra c t. s a id e a s e m e n t to b e a p p u rte n o n t to s o ld la n d s a n d to ru n w ith th e s o m e In th e h a n d s o f a il p e rs o n s w h o m s o e v e r. T h is p r o p e r ty w ill b e s o ld s u b je c t t o o il to x e s , e n ­ c u m b r a n c e s . a n d lie n s o f re c o rd . T h is 9 th d a y o f A A ay, 1983.' G e o rg e W . A A o rtin . T ru s te e S -12-2tn ABSOLUTE A U CTIO N Complete Liquidation OfSmith’s Shoe Store Court Sq. Mocksville, N.Ci Sat. May 21st.. 1983 10:00 A.M. Old National Cash Register 630347 106-6E With Oak Base S-. 6 Drawers Pat. Oct. 4, 1 9 0 4 10 Ft. Glass Show Case, 1 Federal Cash Reg., Manual, 1 N ational Cash Reg., Elec., Old .10 Coke Machine, O k l D B L . D oor F lo o r M o d e l Safe, 4 Drawer Metal File Cabinet, 2 & 3 Sectio n Chairs, D isp la y T ables & Cabinets, Clothing Display Racks (Closet B ar Type), D ressing Mirrors, Som e Beveled Edge, Oak & Glass S h irt Display, 21 D raw er Sliding Glass Display With Shelves, O ld Solid W ood Tables w /Shelves Revolving Clothes Rack w/Bevei Glass, K n ife Displays O r Case 1. Universal, Old Brass Fire E& T , 2& S Section Pull Out C loth es R acks, Oval End Glass Showcase, 5 Ft. Oak D esk, O a k Swivel C h air 2 D o o r Locking Metal Cabinet, Sm all Desk, Old D rafting Table O r D e sk, l-1and Truck, Wail Shelves, Base Shelves, D isplay T ab le Inserts, tnsartable Drawer Section, OW Tredle Sewing^ M achine, Old Pine T o p C utting Table, Old Wall Shelving, Old Turned Leg Table, M isc. O ld H ardw are items, Inventory of S tock, C onsisting of S h o es, B elts, Socks, Hose ft O th er M isc. Item s. Sale Conducted for Smith's Store Im T E R M S : C A S H O R A P P I^ O V E D C H E C K S A L E C O N D U C T E D B Y : J I M S H E E K A U C T I O N & R E A L T Y C O . Jim-Sheek, A uctioneer Lie. and Bonded, N C A L 924 a P.O. Box 903 - Highway 15 8 East MocksviUe, N.C. 27028 Phone gr^7998-3350 ' N O R T H C A R O L IN A D A V IE C O U N T Y C p .e X E C U T O R 'S N O T IC E H a v in g q u a lif ie d a s C o- E x e c u t o r o f th e e s ta te o f F r a n c e s H o lm e s F e im s te r . d e c e a s e d io fe o t O a v ie C o u n ty , th is is to n o t if y e ll p e rs o n s h a v in g c la im s a g a in s t s a id e s ta te to p re s e n t ttie m to th e u n d e rs ig n e d o n o r b e f o r e th e 1 2 th d a y o f f^ o v e m b e r, 1983, o r th is n o tic e w ill b e p le a d e d in b a r o t th e ir r e c o v e r y . A tl p e rs o n s In d e b te d to s a id e s ta te w ill p le a s e m a k e I m m e d ia t e p a y m e n t to th e u n d e rs ig n e d . T h is th e 1 2 th d a y o f M a y ,, 1983 V ic to r ia F . R a tc h fo r d , a n d K a y F . A lle n , C o -E x e c u to rs o f the e s ta te o f F r a n c e s H o lm e s F e lm s te r , d e c e a s e d . 5-12-4tp N O R T H C A R O L IN A D A V 1 6 C O U N T Y A D M IN IS T R A T O T 'S С ТА N O T IC E H a v in g q u a lif ie d as A d m in is t r a to r o f th e e s ta te of G la d y s A le x a n d e r W a g n e r, d e c e a s e d , la te o f D a v ie C o u n ty , th is Is to n o t if y a ll p e rs o n s h o v in o c la im s a g a in s t s o ld e s ta te to p re s e n t th e m to th e u r> d e rs lg n e d o n o r b e fo re th e 2 8 th d a y o f O c to b e r, 1963, o r th is n o tic e w ill t>e p le a d e d in b a r of t h e ir r e c o v e r y . A ll p e rs o n s in d e b te d to s a id e s ta te w ill p le a s e m a k e Im m e d ia te p a y m e n t to th e u n d e rs ig n e d . T h is th e 2 6 th d a y o f A p ril, 1983. B u d d ie R . z ■ W a g n e r. A d m in is t r a to r C .T .A . o f the e s ta te o f G io d y s A le x a n d e r W a g n e r, c fe c e a s e d . 4-28 4 tn p Ic c C re a m Ггсегег. N a n c y Johnson, an -A m e ric a n , invented Ihe fir s t m e c h a n ic a l ice c r e a m fre e z e r; a w ooden bucket filled w ith ice a n d salt, fitted w ith a m etal can and eq u ip p ed w ith beaters p ow ered b y a crank. Ic e cre a m soon became b ig b u sin e ss, b ul un- fo rlu n a le ly, Johnson d id n ’t p a te n t her creation. /M um inum , A f t e r the first a lu m in u m w a s su c ­ ce ssfu lly sm elted from its ore in 1825, it was tre a te d a s p re ciou s m etal. H onored guests at the c o u rt of N a p o le o n I I I dined with a lu m in u m flatware, w h ile o rd in a ry guests u se d the gold and silver ute nsils. B la c k F a m ily Incom e T h e m e d ia n black fa m ily ’s in com e w as 59 p erce nt of the m edian w h ite fa m ily in 1960. It ro se to 62 percent in 197S, but dropped back lo 56 percent of (he le v e l for w hite fam ilies in 1981. Tliosc honored on Mother’s D ay at Green Meadows Church were Mrs. Larry Ciiilds mollier wilh oldest ciiild and M rs. Ronda Wislion with Ihc yc'.ingesl child. The Green M eadow s Baptist Women held tiieir M ay meeting on Monday niglil wilh Mrs. Virginia W alker al her home on Yadkin Valley Road. Law rence R iddle rem ains a patient of the M edical P a rk Hospital. He c.xpecls lo undergo a second surgery there on Wed­ nesday. Mr. and Mrs. Johnny Sparks announce the arrival on Sunday of a granddaughter. Her parents are Mr. and M rs. John Phiier. Mrs. Piiifer the former Teresa Sparks, live in Monroe, N.C. Little daughler Dana is spending a few days with iier grandparents and aunl. M rs. Effie Marshall and Mrs. Ruby McKnight visited M rs. Sallie Riddle at Ihe Clemmons Nursing Home on Sunday evening. Mrs. Riddle’s condition remains about Ihe same. All eleven of Mrs. Nannie E llis’ children and mosi of Ihe grand­ children gathered at the homo of her daughler, Palsy Sheets, on Sunday and shared a Mother’s D ay lun­ cheon with her. M rs. Ellis formerly lived in this community. She is now aged 8G and has not been well the pasl few years and is m aking her home wilh her daughter’s family on Rl. 8, just off Chinquapin Road in Yadkin Counly. Mr. and M rs. C. W. Balls of Thom asville were afternoon visitors of ihe Mitchell Wheelers on Sunday. Green M eadow s Church w as pleased (o welcome several visitors on Sunday. Am ong them were Rev. I.awrence Childs and fam ily of 4 - H —a family affair Charlolle, Mr. and Mrs. J. K. Smitii and daughters, and also several olhers. Mem bers nf the Willing Workers Class of Green Meadows Churcii wish lo lhank everyone who helped in anyway in tiic auction on Saturday. A spccial thanks to all tlic non-members who donated ilems. Also lo Mr. Bill Seats and son and Roy Wrigiil for Ihe splendid job of auctioneering. 1982 Unpaid Taxes (continued from page 4D) W o o d va ile H om es, In c. -IL -511.25 W o o d va iie H om es, In c. -IL -$12.50 W o o d va ile Ito riie s . In c. -IL -S12.50 W o o d va iie H om es, In c. -IL -512.50 W o o d va ile H om es, In c. -IL -511.25 W o o d va iie H om es, in c . IL -511.25 W o o d va ile H om es, In c. -IL -511.35 W o o d va iie H om es, Inc. -IL I1J.25 W o o d va iie H om es. In c. -IL -511.25 W o o d va ile H om es, in c . -IL -511.25 W o o d va ile H om es, In c . .IL *511.25 W o o d v a ile H om es, In c. -IL -512.50 W o o d va iie H om es, In c . -IL -512.50 W o o d v a ile H om es, in c . -IL -512.50 W o o d va iie H om es, In c. -IL -112.50 W o o d v a ile H om es. In c. *1L -510.00 W o o d va ile H om es, In c . -IL -510.00 W o o d va ile H om es. In c. -IL -510.00 W o o d va ile H om es, In c . -IL -510.00 W o o d va ile H om es. In c. - IL <57.50 W o o d va iie H om es, In c. -IL -57.50 ' W o o d va ile H om es, in c . -IL -57.50 W o o d va iie H om es, In c . O L -57.50 W o o d va ile H om es, In c. O L -57.50 W o o d va iie H om es, in c . O L -*9.00 , ' W o o d va ile H om es. In c. - IL -511.00 W o o d va ile H om es, In c. O L -57.50 W o o d va ile H om es, In c. O L -58.25 W o o d va ile H om es, In c . O L -57.50 W o o d va ile H om es, in c . O .lO A -527.50 W o o d va ile H om es, in c . -1.08A -527.00 W o o d va ile H om es, in c . -IL -512.50 W o o d va ile H om es, In c. O L -512.50 W ooten. K a th y M y e rs -IL - G al. 5139.92.. W y a tt. V a le ria O . -.40A -522.22 Y o u n g . C h a rle s R . and June -IL -5290.22 .. Y oung, W a yn e C e cil a n d K a th ry n O L '-5216.35 Z a la ciK o w s k I S ta n le y J. -4.08A -549.37 Z im m e rm a n , Ja m e s S. J r. a nd L in d a -8.95A • 5491.17 Z im m e rm a n , Ja m e s S. J r. and L in d a O L • 518.00 Z im m e rm a n , Ja m e s S. J r. a nd L in d a O.L • 514.00 > Z im m e rm a n . Ja m e s S. J r. and L in d a O L- • 514.00 ■ , Z im m e rm a n , Ja m e s S. J r. a nd L in d a -IL • 510.00Z im m e rm a n , Ja m e s S. J r. and L in d a O L' • 514.00 Z im m e rm a n , Ja m e s S. J r. and L in d a OL* • 514.00 Z im m e rm a n , Ja m e s S. J r. and L in d a O L • 514.00 Z Im m o rm o n , Jo m e s S. J r. a nd L in d a O L O L • 518.00Z im m e rm a n , Ja m e s S. J r. a n d L in d a 0.7S A • 518.80Z im m e rm a n . Ja m e s S. J r. a nd L in d a O L -SitSO Z im m e rm a n , Jam es S. and L in d a L . O L -113.12 We Love You, Wanda McDaniel & Jeff Paid For Bv Wanda’ McDaniel & Jeff AUCTION SALESat. May 14th, 1983 10:00 A.M. Inventory & Fixtures Of R.L. Ward Groc. & Service Rt. 1 Woodieaf, N.C. (formerly W.E. Griffin & Son) Ijocation Woodieaf, N .cT ljnile off Hw y. 801 on Cooispring Road No. 204t ITEM S FO R SALE l^'CLU D E Grocery Items (Entire Stock), Sewing Supplies, Nails, Shoes & Footwear, Headwear, School Supplies, Paper Goods, Electrical Supi^ies, Drug Items, Hardware Items, O il & Oil Filters, Autom otive Supplies, Galvanized Tubs, Yard & Garden Tools, Candles, Misc. Bolts & Bolt Bins MANY OTHER MISC. ITEMS FIX TU R ES TO BE SOLD AT 12:00 O'CLOCK Hobart Meat Siicer, Marl<eteer Upright Cooler, Evans Upright Cooler, R.C. Allen Cash Register, Seed Scales, Schafer Freezer (6 ft.). Old Beer Cooler, Dany Cooler, Electric Adding Machine, Manual Adding .Maj^ine. 2 Coice Boxes, Hussman Cooler i(12 ft.), Gun"Furnace, Ice Cream Box, Daytona Hobart Scales, Misc. Shelves & '■Ixtures S A L E C O N D U C T E D F O R M R . R .L .W A R D T E R M S : C A SH O R A P P R O V E D C H E C K S A L E C O N D U C T E D B Y : J I M S H E E K A U C T I O N & R E A L T Y C O . Jim-Shccic. Auctioneer __.htnen Lie. and Bonded, NCAL 924 ff P.O. Box 903 - Highway 158 East A 'l» "*'” Mocksvill6,N.C. 27028 Phone 919/998-3350 Not Responsible In Case Of Injury Or Loss O f A n y Type 'O r "re O r CATTLE AUCTION YÄDKIN COUNTY 10 A.M .Thursday M AY 12th O W N E R : M iche l Bourauin is leaving the U.S. to g o to college in Switzerland, He has been ra isin g these cattle as a hobby. A ll are very gentle. 7 R e g iste re d Hereford Cows with Calves 5 R e giste re d Hereford Springers 1 R e g iste re d 4->t . Old Herd Bull 1 B re e d in g age Hereford Bull 12 Y e a rlin g Hereford 1 S te e r 1 B .W .F . Cow with Calt 2 J V o n j | e g i s t e r c d ^ H c r c f o r ^ p r ^ ^ Auction on P r e m it c s ^ ii^ B F r o m Yad kin ville : Intersection 601 and 421 at fo rm e r Chevrolet dealership take service ro a d N o. 1742, go 2.6 m iles to service road 1741. take right, down to auction. From W inston-Salem , off U.S. 421 expressway take Shacktow n Rd. Exit. Turn left, go to se rv ic e road 1742, take right, go 1\4 miles to state road 1741, watch lo r signs. ■ Auctions Conducted B y . Pierce Auction Seniice & Real Estate 1900 B ra n U e y St. Winston-Salem, N.C. 27103 P H O N E 723-5338 Auctioneers; K e ith J. Pierce No. 154, Terry Ireland No. 295 .\uction w ill last approxim ately 2 hours, B r in g trucks, be ready to load immediately after Auction Sale, Ji«CATTLE 'AUCTION A U C Y I O HSaturday, May 14th at 1:00 P.M. (Please Note Starting Time) Hub Cleaty - Estate Locationiln Davie County From Moclcsville, Taiie U.S. 64 West. I Mile Past 140 Bridge. Then Tal<e Sheffield Rd. No.1306 N.W. 2.5 Miles. Sale Is On 1/2 Mile On Private Drive. ------------Partial Listing------------- '72 Custom Chevrolet Truck '51 Dodge 2 Ton Trucl< Saw Mill (worl<abIe) Case 400 Power Unit (gas) A.C. Tractor (WD) A.C. 60 Combine A.C. Mowing Machine 1-H Hay Ral<e 16 Disc Bogg (pull type) 1-H 12 Disc Drill (on rubber) Manure Spreader Harrow P.T.O. Feed Grinder Road Blade Anvil McCullock Pro-Mac 10-10 power saw Hand & Garden Tools Log Chains Horse Drawn Equipment (cole corn planter) Tobacco Lister,Cult.,etc. Old Shot Gun Cured Hams Cured Shoulders M A N Y O T H E R IT E M S / Rain Or Shine ' SALE CONDUCTED BY YORK -= r T - AUCTION S ï .'îf i. «.REALTY SERVINO THE AUCTION PROFESSION SINCE 1935 H. BUrORD YORK (704) 546-2595 HORACE YORK (9)9) 765-5500 BILL YORK (704) 546-2696 I2U - DAVII- COUN TY l-NTUUl’ RISE RUCOUD. THURSDAY. MAY 12. 1983 C ooleem ee N ew s Mrs. Mnrgiircl Myer.s returned homo Friday after spending (wo weeks undergoint; treatment in Forsyth Memorial Kosptial and a week recuperating at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Miekey Dalton. Radio D ispatched Trucks Ъ . P ^ S ^ С О tf r R О RESIDENTIAL & COIV1IVTERCIAL ^ VA & FHA Inspeclon EXTERMINATING Day 634-5720 ^'IG H T 634-3237 Yadklnvllle Road . Mocksville, N.C of Winston-Salem. She is improving. Mrs. Ann Kaiieock returned home Friday after a week of Ircalmen] in Davie Hospital. She is much im ­ proved and expects lo return to work Ihis week. The Cooleemee Senior Citizens met Monday in the fellowship hall of Ihe First Baptist Church with 40 persons attending. There was one visitor, Helen Bean of Mocksville and two new members, Elsie Beck and Noah Plott. Im m ediately follow ing Ihe meeting, M members went as a group to Lexinglon for lunch at Ihe restaurant al Oak G rove Restoration, a restored village of the 19th century. They were pleasantly surprised to be served by Mrs. Karen Chandler Smith, for­ m erly of Cooleemee, who is em ­ ployed there. .Ml Davie Senior Citizens will participate in the annual “Fun D a y " Saturday, M ay 21, which will be held this year at the Jerusalem Fire Departmenl beginning at 10 a.m. Everyone is asked to bring a picnic lunch which will be served. The next meeting will be Monday, M ay 2.1, al Ihe Ridenhour Arbor on Center Street Ext., Cooleemee. Members are asked to bring a covered dish and an inexpensive "B in g o " prize. The Right Reverend Frederick Putnam w ill celebrate the E u e h arisI and w ill adm inister confirmation al the Church of the Good Shepherd Episcopal Church in Cooleemee Sunday, M ay 15, at II a.m. This service will replace the regular 9:30 a.m. service. Bishop and M rs. Putnam will be guests at 1 p.m. at a covered dish luncheon al Ihe Jerusalem Fire Departmenl. The luncheon will honor the newly confirmed persons and also commemorate tne 40th anniversary of (he ordination of (he Reverend W illis M . Rosenthal, rector of the Church of the Good Shepherd. All parish members are invited to attend. The Liberty A .M .E . Zion Missionaries will be sponsoring a Bake Sale Saturday, M ay 14, at Ihe Cooleemee Super Market beginning at 10 a.m. S o il S lo in irils h il) WtH'k ~ М ч у .4-n . /ЗД ? ‘ People who don't clean up campsites are crazier than a jay bird ! " ЕОВЖЕ •NEW LISTINGS 410 Tot St. 3 bedroom, IV2 bath, energy efficient home with large lot. Less than one year old and priced at only ’42,500“ Southwood Acres Home in the pines. 4 bedroom, 3 bath, brick veneer home ideal for the large family. Let us show you the many additional features. *82,000“ Beautiful Lot In Woodland Development Plenty Of Hardwood Trees And Sloping Just Right For A Basement *8,900“ Sheffield Park-Convenient To 1-40 3 bedroom home with 1V2 baths, kitchen-dining comb.. If; ‘living room, den with woodstove, utility room, patio, fenced back Iyard, storage building...... Many extras included. *39,800 Summer home in the Mountains. Beautiful view of the New River. Large lot. Located in Ashe County close to Elk Stioals Methodist Camp *28,000 136 Cartner Street, Mocksville... IJ two bedrooms, 1 living Ijroom, dining rg^'^^rtitchen, I ' screened »jorch, partial baser-vj^?, seperate garage, paved drive, nice lot. Center Community Approximately 41 acres located off of Tutterow Rd. anid Hwy. 64. Land bordets on interstate 40 Right of Way ‘44,000 478 Avon St. Beautifully Decorated Ranch-Style r Brick Veneer Home~Cbnvenient To Hospital, Doctors And Shopping I.V Area. Home Has 3 Bedrooms, I ' 1^ Baths, Kitchen-Dining Comb., ^ Living Rnom, Carport & Storage : Room. Nice Lot *58,000 Country Lane Estates 2 Very Nice Lots. May Be Bought Seperate Or TogeTITei Garden Valley Brick_Home With Plenty Of RoonT. 5 Bedrooms, 3 Ceramic Tile Baths~ And Many Additional Features. Only 79,000 Southwood Acres Many lots available. LAREW-WOOD- JOHNSON,lnc. Phone 634-6281 FOR SALE ’2 0 , 0 0 0 Located On Main St.-Cooleemee 1 1 % % Financing Available With Approved .Credit And Terms Contact Dianne E. Snipes 284-2542 Carolina Energy Efficient Hom^ And Realty 34 Court Square Mocksville, N.C. Buy Now We have fixed rates available at 10%! LISTINGS New, 4 bedroom^j..|iaths, IV2 story County - *45,000.” Six lots in Iredell County Three lots in Hickory Hill Mocksville- Available lots, with water and sewer in Willow Run -Mocksville One lot in Hickory Tree- Mocksville Six wooded lots near Advance One lot in Southwood Acres Two acres of land near Advance 2.3 acres near Clemmons House, and five acres - Beautiful, wooded, very private location in Rural Hall - *29,900“ 100 Acres near Winston Salem Possible Sub-division of property available New, 3 bedroorij^pvC-^. baths in Iredell CoM^i.co''j 9,500.“ 100% l^^dflcing Possible. New homes under construction in several counties. Pre-construction condominium sales available -North Myrtle Beach, S.C. For help with all your building, buying, and selling needs call ; Sandra Anderson, Shelby Walker, Broker Sales (704) 634-2252 O R (919) 998-2969 Soybeans How oflen do you use soybeans in your kit­ chen? Most people use soybean oil every week. SoJ'oil is the main ingredient in 80 pcrcent of the salad and cooking oils, 83 pcrceni of the margarines, G3 percent of Ihe solid shortenings and 90 percent of the salad dressings sold in A m e r ic a n s u p e r ­ markets. [t is also in cake mixes, candies, m a y o n n a is e , T V dinners, soups, frozen fried foods and m any other items. Sloring Elcclrif Illankcl C h e c k the m anufacturer’s in ­ stru c tio n s b efore cleaning and storing an electric blanket. Some cannot be washed. Never fold Ihe blanket sharp ly; doing so might break the wires. Cover (he blanket with a protective cover and don’l store other linens or objects on top of i(. Ham A pound of ham makes 2',i to 3 ser­ vings. FOR SALE * 3 7 , 0 0 0 Located On Highway 601 South Of Mocksville 1 1 % % Financing Available With Approved Credit And Terms Contact Frank Bahnson 634-6261 H o w a r d R e a l t y & I n s . A g e n c y I n c . 330 Salisbury street Mocksville, N.C. PHONE 6 3 4 -3 5 3 8 The percent m ortgages now available through FH A-VA. Now is the time to buy a home. Call for more information ---------------------N EW U S T IN G S ------------------------- W EST W O O D V IL L A G E -S U G A R M TN.- Tim e-sharing Condo. 800 sq. rt. $8,100. D A V IE A C A D E M Y R D - Brick Veneer, 3 bedroom, 2 bath. 1692 sq. ft. »54,000. C E D A R F O R E S T - 3 bedroom. 2 bath, brick home with 1344 sq. ft. »63,900. H O L ID A Y A C R E S- Brick Veneer home with 3 bedrooms and 1V4 baths. 1434 sq. ft. »47,500.00 C E M E T E R Y S T R E E T - A real doll house. IV t story fram e with new siding. 3 bedroom, 1 bath. Remodeled. Excellent condition. »52,000. 10 percent mortgages now available - Call for more information ED G E W O O D C IR C L E ;'2400 Sq. F L on abeautifui wooded, corner lot. 3 bedrooms, 2V4 baths Form al living room, dining room, den with fireplace, marble foyer, thermopane windows, central heat and air, loan assumption. »69,500. S H E F F IE L D P A R K : Extra nice3 bedroom, 1V4 bathrooms, attractive decor, large storage building, fenced backyard. Some furniture and appliances. » 3 6 ,^ . ilW Y. 601 S.: A little elbow grease will do wonders. 3 bedroom, brick- veneer home. Living room has fireplace, oil heat, partial basement. »40,000. C O U N n iY L A N E : Recently remodeled, new carpet throughout. Very nice and an excellent location. U iis home offers 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, form al living room, dining room and den. Plus a full basement. »55,000. 863 N O R T H M A IN ST.: Needs no repairs present owner has taken carc of all of these. Close in to town, churches, grocery store-all within walking distance. New siding, cement drive, nice yard, 3 bedrooms. C O U N T R Y L A N E : Good starter home, 2 bedroom 14i bath, Excellent renter property. Owner financing. »26,000. 109 B IN G H A M S T R E E T : N E W L IS T IN G Perfect starter home, great location, living room, 2 bedrooms, extra nice kitchen. Nice lot. O N L Y »22,500. G W Y N S T R E E T : Need som elhing real close to hospital? Very nice neighborhood. Recently remodeled. Electric heat, 2 or 3 bedrooms, ilvingroom with fireplace, extra nice kitchen. Owner financing. »28,500.----------------------— L A N D --------------------- HW Y. 801 and R IV E R V IE W R D - 2Vi acres with well and septic lank, 2- slall barn. Beautiful lot, H IC K O R Y H IL U O n e lot 100 X 200 »6,500. H IG H W A V 601.- Boxwood Acres 5 lots »6,600.00. 3-ACUE T R A C T ON M ain С S O L D »8100.00. 23 acres on the Turrentine l..<au with 150-(- feet of road frontage. Wooded with county water available. Owner financing »1200, per acre. 5 acres on the Davie Academ y Rd. Good road frontage, lots of trees and a stream. »15,000. 100 acres located in southern Davie County, approximately half cleared and half wooded, water on three sides »1400.00 per acre. 200 acres on the Ridge К<'”р л \ 0 '- >200 feet of frontage, some marketable timber. Owner fin. S'-.,,g. Priccd at »1,000.00 per acre. 48 acres located on the M ain Church Rd. »2100. per acre. WUI sub- divice Into 10 acre tracts. Woodland-heavliy wooded 2 acrcs »6300.00 . IIW Y 64 West - 4 miles from Mocksville. 10 acres »27,500. Lots of road frontage. Excellent location. Parker Road: 3 tracts (1) 4 acres »14,000. (2) 18 acrcs »25,200.12 acres with barn, airstrip hangar, pasture, water »30,000.00 ----------------------H O M E P H O N E S -------------------- Mocksville Discount Drug \24 N. Vain Si. >VìcKh'’ìUo, N.C. Coke Diet Coke Tab 2 . U t e , ' 9 4 f (while they last) Julia Howard Ann F. Wands Mike Hendrix 634-3754 634-3229 284-2366 C.C. Chapman Myrtle Grim es Calvin Ijam es Doris Short - 634-2534 998-3990 492-5198 998-5194 & Insurance TELEPHO N E: (71MI 634.ei1t P e a l R fI.m , — tiisnriiiicc — A ll Typc.s H O M E S O LD H W Y . 158 - 25.S7A land, part pasture, part wooded. Beautiful area. AVO N ST.-Good starter home. 2BR, IB, ccntral heat and nice lot. IIW Y. 601 S.- 3B R , IB, L R with fpl, large den with wood stove, 4.998A, fenced. Ideal for horses. H IC K O R Y H ILL-V ery attractive, immaculate and spacious home. Living room with fpl, D R, 3 large B R ’s, playroom with wood stove, den with fpl., study, 3Mi baths. Relax by a 20x40 pool. This and much more at a price less than you would expect. J )A V IE A C A D E M Y R D -3 B R . 2B, full busenient, heat pump, C. Port and .94-A.Newly Redecorated __ BR O O K D R IV E -Lo vely 3BR, l^ B , den with fpl., on acre-plus lot. E x c e ll^ t location. D E A D M O N Rb.~t3A and 3B R house. Beautiful setting. Large English Boxwoods and maple trees. IV4 acre la k e ^ lr^ trlp . CaUJor showing. 001 s. 2-bedroom. 1 bath, garden space. Like country living, quietness? This is it! Hickory Hill II. I.oveIyA-frame with cedar and stone exterior on lake. Im m aculate 4BR, 2 B. 2- car garage, top grade building material, wrape around deck, boat dock, innumerable extras. Truly a showplace! _______ C R E E K W O O D E S T A T E S '-"¡B R , 2 B, Heat Pump, Deck. Very attractive home. S. M A IN ST.-Attractive Starter Home. 3Br, 23, reasonably priced. -W.1VIAIN ST.- 6 BR, 2^4 fi, very attractive and spacious old home. Reasonably priced. G W Y N ST. 3 B R brick house, central heat, carport and nice lot. All for »31,000. Owner financing. C E D A R F O R R E S T LA N B-4BR , 2B ttanch- style. Farm ington Comm. Excellent condition, quiet area. No wasted space. W IL K E S B O R O ST.-5BR, 2B brick home. This is an excellent property, large lot. Reduced to »44,500. F A R M IN G T O N R O A D -B rlc F rTncluir, "SB R , 2B, den w-fpl. playroom w-fpl., carport, garage, approx. 2A, wooded, f. basement. C R E S C E N T B E A C H — C o n d o m in iu m s »52,900.00 or »5,950.00 for 4 weeks per_year. N E A R 1-40 at first 64 exit, 3 BR, 2^4 B. den-fpl. basement-fpl.. air cond., 2-ear garage, approx. 2A. G A H N E il ST.-3BR, brick rancher, H 4B. heat pump, basement, deck. F A R M L A N D A C R E S-2 ii yr. old log home on 4.48 A., 3BR, 2 B, full basement, 2016 sq. ft. heated. G O D B E Y RD.-Neat house on A., 2 or 3 bedroom, IB. Beautiful trees. Reasonab»» priced. W IL L B O O N E R D - 3 homes to be built. Energy efficient, 3 B R homes with monthly payments as low as »150.00 it you qualify. _ C O O LliEM EE-W estview Avenue off Glad­ stone Rd.. Well preserved 5 room house and 3 room apartment on 4-(- acres wooded land. LA N D W IL L O W R U N New House under construction, l> A sto ry,2o r4 B R , lc r2 B , great room, deck, city water & sewer, paved st., farm stylo. Pick out your colors and carpet. O A K L A N D H EIG H T S-Lot approx. % acre, zoned for mobile home. Reasonably priccd. H O W AR D ST.-Lot 100x140, city water and .sower. Quiet location. T W IN C E D A R S RD.-Two A lots. Bordering Twin Cedars Golf Course. O F F EA T O N C H U R C H RD.- 80.5 acres, ap­ prox. 311A open. Some pine hardwood timber. Some buildings. Approx. 7 acres waterfront. $11150. per acre. ' M any lots-RoIling Hills Lane a i^ M llllng Road. H IG H W A Y 801 - ISA - part open, hardwood and long road fr^toge, H U N T E R S ’ PO IN T , Davidson County-5A, mostly wooded, beautiful land. F A R M IN G T O N - 11.5 A. on lake & Cedar Creek. Beautiful home site. C A R O W O O D S Sub d iv.-Lots 35 and 36. Reasonable price. 60A, fenced, part grassed and part wooded. Stream and paved roads. W ill subdivide. HW V. 04 near Hickory H iil.“l4A. Will sub­ divide. ........... C L O SE IN-Approx. 12 A, 10 open, long road frontage, good building sites. B O XW O O D ACRES-3.7 A. mostly wooded FA R M l.V G T O N AREA-5-acre tracts - W.S. No N E A R M 0 C K S V IL L E -5 A . wooded, paved rd C. water. M IL L IN G RD.-35 A. fenced, stream, W.S. No. pond. B A Y V IE W E S T A T E S -L a k e N orm an, Mooresvllle area, deeded lot, waterfront ac­ cess, good building lot.»7800. 80 ACRES-Beautiful land, 50 under cultivation, rest wooded, D a vie A cadem y area. Reasonably priced. . Eugene Bennett 998-4727 Holland Chaffin 634-5186 Louise FrosI Daigle 634-2846 Sam Howell Connie Kow alske Graham Madison Luther Polls Henry Shore Kathi W all 634-2060 634-6343 634-5176 998-S420634-5846 492-7631 EQUAL HOUSim: ■RHU’’ 6 3 4 - 0 1 1 1 О Г 6 П 2 PAVIECOUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD. T.IIURSDAY. MAY 12, 1983 I3D Ф ) О ю М М Л Л MUSICAL ABORTION A B O R T IO N : F re e P re o n a n cv T e s tin g . F o r a p p o in tm e n t c a ll c o lle c t • W in sto n -S a le m (»19) 7 2 M 6 3 0 . A rc a d ia W o m e n ’s M c d ic a l C lin ic . 11.26 tfn A C AUCTION W E C O N D U C T A L U T Y P E S O F A U C T IO N S A LE S . W e ere n o w c o n tra c tin o sa le s lo r S p rin g o f C a ll: J im• S tteek, A u c tio n R e a lty a> 998- 33S0. N C A L 92i. 7-9 tfnS B O B B Y L E A lE R -.C o m p le te A u c tlo n e e rlo q S e rvice . N C A L 2065. R easonable R ates C all P IA N O T U N IN G : R e p a irin g a n d R e b u ild in g , 22 y e a rs' e x p e rie n c e . A ll w o rk g u a r a n t e e d . P I A N O T E C H N IC IA N S G U IL D C R A F T S M A N . C a ll W a lla ce B a rfo rd a t 2S4-2447. 5 5 tfn B AIR FA PE T .V . SERV ICE M c C L O U D T V & A P P L IA N C E . S e rv ic in g a ll m a jo r b ra n a s . T . V .'s , a p p lia n ce s a nd M ic ro W aves, C a ll: 99B.2B51 o r (7(M) 6338426. 11.4.tfnM AUTOM OBILE CLEAN UP ' B O O E R 'S K A R K L E E N , R l. 7, M o c k iv llle , N .C ., 55 v e « rs ol In te rio rs , W ax o r P o lls ti and dye v in y l fops. C a ll 998.318? o r 998-3159 fo r a n a p p o in tm e n t. F O R T H E S A M E A IR F A R E ...A n d fo r tt>e tim e It ta ke s you to d riv e to G re e n ­ s b o ro , N . C .. S U N O IR D A IR L IN E S p ro p J e t S e rvice can have you on y o u r w a y fro m S m ith R eynoids A irp o rt to a ll P ie d m o n t d e s tin a tio n s 3 tim e s d a ily . F o r a n In ­ tro d u c to ry p e riod w h e n you fly S u n b ird Iro m S m ith R eynolds, p a rk fo r one h a ll ttie n o rm a l p a rk in g ra te . F o r re s e rv a tio n s a nd In fo rm a tio n , c a ll: T o ll F re e 1-800-222-9456. 2.10-tlnA C '"P R 'iV A T E INVESTIGA TOR P R IV A T E iN V E S T iO A T IO N S : W ill be s tric tly c o n fid e n tia l. Lice n se N o. 320. Telephone: S a lis b u ry (704) 636-7533. 3-24 tfn J L EM PLOYM ENT H E L P W A N T E D ...E x c e lle n t In co m e fo r p a rt tim e hom e a s s e m b ly w o rk . F o r In fo rm a tio n c a ll (504) 641-8003 e x t. 8645. 5-5-3tpG C A H E L P W A N T E D : E xp e rie n ce d C o n c re te fin is h e rs a n d la b o re rs . C e ll 998-82)2 a fte r 4 p .m . 5-12-3tnpRZ V EH ICLES M ISCELLAr.'EOUS AVON You Can Earn $6 to $10 Per H our. We Will Teach You How. CALL CO LLECT 873-0917 I - - CHILD CARE A nn and J a c k B o g e r. O w ners and O pe ra to rs. 2-25 H n B K ANIM ALS DO G G R O O M IN G ..A II B reeds. B y a p p o in tm e n t. C a ll 998-3322. 5 -5 ^t p-CJ REPA IRS A ll a g e s a c c e p te d . A p p ro x im a te ly 1*л m ile s fro m c o oleem ee School. C a ll 284- 2742 and a sk fo r L y n n . F irs t and second s h ift» p re fe rre d . 5-5-3tp-LB C H IL D C A R E ....6 w eeks to 2 ye a rs. F irs t S h llt. L o ts of ro o m fo p la y , c o n s ta n t a ffe n ffo n , cfea n fa c ilitie s . C a ll 634.2796 fro m 7 a .m . u n til 5 p .m . R eferen ces a v a ila b le . L o c a te d a t G a rn e r S t. M o c k s v ille . A fte r h o u rs, c a ll 492-7214. 5-12.2tnpP D CA RPEN TRY E x p e rie n c e d p a in te r w ill do house p a in tin g , ro o f p a in tin g o r w h a te v e r. W o rk g u a ra n te e d . C a li (704 ) 492- - -------------------— 7657. H O M E 5-5-tfn-C S IM P R O V E M E N T ..C a rp e n te r W o rk , 33 y e a rs e xp e rie n c e . AM .C A R D O F THANKS: K .iro u ^ c a b i n e t s . Q u a l i t y w o rk m a n s h ip . C a ll 634-3329. 5-S-2tp-JB M OTORCYCLE FO R S A L E ; 19S0 V s m o h « . m o to rc y c le , ,00 cc, E x c e lle n l 'W X IIIo n C o ll 998- R esort Property FOR REN T R E S O R T R E N T A L ..B e a c h C ottage a t S outh M y rtle , 2 b e droom s a n d b u n k s , sofabed. 2 b a th s , a ir c o n d itio n , co lo r C able T .V . n e a r ocean. D a lly o r w e e k ly . C a li 634-3875 o r 634- 3650.4 -)4 4 fn W L l a n o f o r s a l e FO R S A L E : 1980 C ita tio n In E X C E L L E N T c o n d itio n . O rig in a l o w n e r. M u st sell q u ic k ly . S3,500.00 D a n D esN o yers a t 634-2517, h om e; and 634.3546 w o rk . 5-12-2tnpDN FO R S A L E : 1973 In te rn a tio n a l S cout II, H a lf C ab. 4x4. ro ll b o r. b ru st) g u a rd , ch ro m e w t)eels w ith 10x15 tire s . C a ll (704 ) 492-5393 a fte r 4 p.m . • f 5-12-1tpRS ■ F O R S A L E : 1979 M a z d a ■ R X 7 ...L 0 W M ila g e . In • E x c e lle n t C on d itio n . C all 284- : 2405 o r 2e4-?J10. • 5-12-ltpE R ■ ----------------------------------------------------------- ■ FO R S A L E ; S P IN E T P IA N O p C o n s o l e . . . W a n t e d a ■ re sp o n sib le p a rty to ta ke o ve r • lo w m o n th ly p a ym e n ts on • sp in e t pian o. Can be seen ■ lo c a lly . W rite : C re d it . M a n a g e r. P .O . B ox 537, I S h e lb y v ille . In d . 46176. ; ______________________S-12-5tpM M C I F O R S A L E : 2 • 14x7. 2 - 14x8 a P olished C h ro m e A m e ric a n t W heels w ith 2 GR -50, 2-ER-70 y B .F . G o o d rich R a d la ls . A ll in • G O O D c o n d lflo n . F Ifs G M . C all 998-3403 b e fo re 5 p .m . and . a lte r 5. 634-2239. 5-12-2tp FO R S A L E : 1966 C a m a ro . M u st S ell. B est O ffe r. C all 634-3257. 5-12-ltpR S F O R S A L E : A T A R I P R O D U C T S ... P a c M a n . F ro g g e r, D onkey K ong. E .T ... S ta r W a rs . E T C ; A L S O R adios. S tereos. C B R adios and T a p e p la y e rs . See a t : R A Y B U C K S . R t. 1, R edland R oad. A d va n ce . N .C . P hone 998-4216. 12-30 tfn R T E L E P H O N E R E P A IR C E N T E R : A ll w o rk g u a r a n te e d . T e le p h o n e s a le s ...K e y S y s te m s ... 'in ­ s ta lla tio n s ... C ordless phones, loud b e lls, long c o rd s, ja c k s , w ire and m a n y o th e r c o m ­ m u n ic a tio n n e e d s . T H E P H O N E P L A C E . M o c k s v ille . N .C . P tw n e : 634-2626. 2-18-82 PP D O N 'T T H R O W IT A W A Y . . . . W i l l c 'le a n o u tb u ild in g s a nd b a ie m e n ti. C a ll 284 4280 5-5-tln-B LF O R S A L E ...B E E S A N D d E E S U P P L IE S ...F a c to ry m a de w ooden w a re . C o m plete lin e . C o m plete H iv e . $25.00. B rood F o u n d a tio n . 65 c e n ts p e r sheet. C a ll fo r o th e r p ric e s . Cool S p rin g s ariea. (704) 872- 8488.5-5-2tp.C D N E W C A M P U S R ID G E M E A L R E P L A C E M E N T D IE T P L A N ...In th re e d e lic io u s fla v o rs , c o m p a ra b le to C a m b rM g e . C am pus R idge a t D a v ie D is c o u n t D ru g s , C ooleem ee, N.C. 5-5-2tp MOBILE HOM ES FOR SALE F O R S A L E ; M O B IL E H O M E ...L o a n A ssu m p tio n . F o r d e ta ils , c a ll: (704) 492- 5249 a lte r 5:30 p .m . 4-21-4tnp-R A F O R S A L E ...1980 O a k w o o d M o b ile H om e on v, a cre lo t. T ra ile r is u n d e rp in n e d , po rch and g a rd e n space. C a ll 204. 2513 a t a n y tim e .5-5-4tnp.JW FO R S A L E : 3 B edroom . B ath. 12x65 M o b ile H nm p G ood C0n d lti0n .E A R N H A R D - R E A L E S T A T E . P hone 284- 2405 o r 284-2110. 5-12-1tpER F *'R S A L E O R R EN T...1981 S kylin e M o b ile H om e, set up on p riv a te lo t, 2 b e droom , la rg e liv in g ro o m , d in in g ro o m and k itc h e n . C a ll 998- 8051 a lte r 5 p.m . 5-t2-2fpD W T R A IL E R F O R S A L E O R R E N T ...C a ll 998-3902 o r 998- 3291.5 -12-tfnJL HOM ES FOR RENT FO R R E N T - 2 R e iro o m house In M o c k s v ille l? 0 0 p e r m o nth d e p o s it a n d re fe re n c e s re q u ire d . C a ll 492-5553. 5-12.1tpPB HOM ES FO R SALE D A V IE C O U N T Y ..M O C K S V IL L E A R E A ...40 acres a p p r o x im a te ly , r e c e n tly re m o d e le d 3 be d ro o m , b ric k hom e. b a rn , to o l shed, shop. Ideal fo r s m a ll c a ttle o r horse farm. MOCKSVILLE INSUR ANCE AND R E A L T Y ...(7 0 4 ) 634.5917, n ig h ts a n d w eekends (919) 998- 4541 o r (704 ) 634-5128. 5-5-3t p -M l A F F O R D A B L E H O M E ..M O C K S V IL L E ...T w o b e d ro o m , la rg e d e n w ith h e a tlla to r, u tility b id g ., la rg e c o rn e r lo t. $29.000.00 M O C K S V IL L E IN S U R A N C E A N D R E A L T Y . (704) 634-5917. n ig h ts and w eekends (919)-998- 4541 o r (704 ) 634-5128. 5-5-3t .p-M l FO R S A L E : 3 B e d ro o m , 1 bath F ra m e h o u s e . C o m p le te ly re m o d e le d . L ik e N e w . Cooleemee area. EARNHARDT REAL E S T A T E . P hone 284.2405 o r 284-2110. 5-12-ltpE R .FO R S A L E : H ouse, W o rkshop and S^/7 a cre s ju s t o ff H w y. 801. FERRELL R E A L T Y ...(9 1 9 ) 721-3000. C all .D o ro th y H a ll. 998-8996. 5-12-tlnD H C A R T E R T h e fa m ily o f th e la te E v a W . C a rte r w ^ ld lik e to e xpress th e ir th a n k s and a p p re c ia tio n lo r y o u r s u p p o rt and k indness show n us d u rin g ttte loss o f o u r b e lo v e d m o th e r. W e a p p re c ia te the flo w e rs , lo o d , a n d c a rd s . Y o u r th o u g h tfu ln e s s w ill a lw a y s be re m e m b e re d . M a y G od bless each o ne o f you is o u r p ra y e r. The F a m ily LOST and FOUMD T o sT : M a le P eklngnese on W o o d w a rd R oad. W ill g iv e $25.00 R E W A R D lo r re tu rn . C a ll 998-2073. S.12-2tpTP FO R 5A L E ....2 I A c re s o f la n d In D a vie C ounty. C ontact D oyle B ro w n a t 492-5160. 5-5-2tp-D B FO R S A L E : N ic e C orner L o t. 9 m ile s Iro m M o c k s v ille . O a kla n d H e ig h ts S u bdivision a t c o rn e r of D a v ie A ca d e m y I R d. and O a k la n d A ve . A p p ro x . </a a c re . 300* paved road lro ntage,B ccess to D eer. W e ll * site . N ic e a nd q u ie t c o u n try s e ttin g . W ill s e ll o r tra d e fo r a n y th in g o f c o m p a ra b le va lu e . C a ll 634-5211 and ask fo r W A Y N E 5-12-lfpW C APARTM ENT FO R R EN T F O R R E N T : 3 B e d ro o m A p a rtm e n t. N o C h ild re n . A ll u tilitie s p a id . C a ll 634-5270. 5-12-ltpD T M U S T SELL...1981 C hevette. G ood C o n d itio n . $4,000. C a ll 634 5267. 5-12-1tpSC FO R S A L E : '74 S uzuki 500 cc...L o o ks a nd ru n s G O D D . $350.00.'C a ll 634-3403. 5-12-2tpDS F O R S A L E 1976 C h ry s le r C o rd o b a ...E X T R A N IC E ... F u lly E q u ip p e d . Sun R oof. M u s t S ell. $1495.00 C a ll 998- . 3720. 5-12-ltJG FO R S A L E : 1973 C h e vro le t p ic k u p tru c k w ith long w h e e l base, a ir c o n d itio n , p o w e r s te e rin g , a u to m a tic , n e w p a in t and tire s . $1500. C a ll 284- 2202. 5-12-tfnB J FO R S A L E : L a rg e C hest ty p e Ir e e ie r In v e ry G O O D c o n d itio n . N ew ga ske ts a ll aro u n d . C a ll 634-2796. 5-12-1tnpPD FO R S A L E : 6 H .P . R id in g L a w n M o w e r b y W heel H orse. In G O O D c o n d itio n ; $175.00 c a ll 998-3607.5-12-1tnpHC F O R S A L E ; C H IC K E N L lT T E R ....C a ll 998-3076. 5-12.4tnpJH W ill S E W fo r C H IL D R E N ...D re ss e s , shorts, tops. ect. R easonable p ric e d job. C a ll: 492-5644 a t a n y tim e . 5 1 2 -ltp P B L i v i n g W A T E R S Soil Stewardship Week May 8-15, 1983 YARD SALES F L E A M A R K E T 8. Y A R D S A L E ...F irs t F r id a y and S a tu rd a y ot each m o n th . F ri.. 9 a .m . -7 p .m ., and S at., 7 a .m . . 7 p .m . $5.00 to set u p p e r d ay. M u s t fu rn is h o w n ta b le . M O C K S V IL L E D E A L E R S AUCTION, formerly P e n n in g to n C h e v r o le t c o m p a n y In M o c k s v ille . F o r In fo rm a tio n c a ll: L ib G ru b b at (704 ) 284-2566. 5-5-12tp.LG FORK RECREATION C E N T E R is s p o n s o rin g a Flea M a rk e t. S a tu rd a y . M a y 14. fro m 10 a .m . u n til 4 p .m . Spaces w ill be re n te d fo r $3.00 each. T o re s e rv e space c a ll 998-4338 o r 998-4078. 2 F A M IL Y Y A R D S A L E ....S a f. M a y 14. Iro m 8 a .m . u n til 4 p .m . A T : 320 Gvkryn S treet. E le c tric stove, bed, o il he a te r, e le c tric h e a te r, c h ild re n , m e n, w o m e n a nd b a b y clothes, som e shoes, le w e lry . toys, piece goods, w h a tn o t Ite m s, gla s s w e re , flo w e r pots, and O D D S a. E N D S . C ancelled If R a in in g . Y A R D S A L E ...S a t., M a y 14, 9 a .m . - 2 p .m . 8 m ile s n o rth on H w y 601.L e ft on L ib e rty C hurch R oad and rig h t on old 801 a t th e ho m e o f K enneth H a rp e . Boys clothes sizes 14- . 16. C h ild 's s iz e 0-4. s k a te b o a rd , fis h in g ro d . C onverse b a ll c le a ts size 4 & 51^. and M O R E ! W a tc h lo r signs. Y A R D S A L E .,.A ll th e fa m ily Is o a th e rin g fro m s ix counties fo r a g ig a n tic y a rd sa le a t L . G ra y M a tth e w s on h w y . 158. tw o m ile s w e s t o f 801 O avie C ounty n e a r B a ltim o re R d. S at., M a y 14, fro m 9 a .m . • 5 p .m . B ic y c le , c h ild re n , a d u lt & b a b y c lo th e s , u s e fu l household ite m s , c ra lts and d e lic io u s B a k e d G o o d s, bre a d s, p ies, cakes a nd ro lls . B IG Y A R D S A L E ....S a tu rd a y . M a y 14, O N L Y fro m 9 a .m . u n til 4 p .m . R e dland R oad betw een H w y. 158 a n d 801. W a tch fo r signs. M e n . W om en and c h ild re n 's clo th e s and LO T S O F M IS C E L L A N E O U S . C a n c e lle d If ra in in g . M O V IN G S A L E ...2 F a m ilie s a t 248 W ilk e s b o ro S tre e t near F a m ily D o lla r S to re . E V E R Y T H IN G F R O M T ra s h to T re a s u re ;! M a n y glass ite m s . A N T IQ U E S A N D M O R E . F rid a y a nd S a tu rd a y. M a y 13 S> 14, Iro m 9 a .m . u n til 5 p.m. GIRL SCOUTS ^ In ttd le d In Г м г Own Bodyord ii à lA U f Bffordeklt ^ |K PlUff pricil $20.000PerVear RaisinqCHINCHILLASFor Information write to; {please give name, age and phone number) RANCHERS P,0, Box 3566 Dolton. Georgia 30721 (404) 278^828 A P A R T M E N T FOR R E N T ...C o u n lrv L a n e ...2 B e d ro o .m s , a p p lia n c e s fu rn ish e d . C o n ta ct b y P hone (704) 663-1488 a n y tim e o r (919)723-9036, evenings. S-12.2tpVH SATELLITE SYSTEM SB> N'jlionjl Mitro*D)nimicv,lnr. CALL TODAY for a FREE home demo on your TV for the BRIGHTKT. CLCARtST PICTURE IMAGINABLE. FINANCING AVAIIABU HILKERT Ray's TV MOW o flo r ln g le r v le t lo O a v ie C ounty rw ld o n ti. W e » e rv lc e •11 m a io r W e o « e r p lc k ^ ip and d e llv « -v le rv lc e , p lu i In h o m e - itr v lc ln g . R e tk M n li on (704) n c h a n g a m a y c a ll a t n o a x tra coat. P hona; m 4 4 < n fo r iw v lc e o r •p p o ln tm a n ta . ( to p N o. I i ( t it ) 7 И 4 3 М . l.o c a ta d a t 1H7 J o n a tto w n R o a d , W ln tto n * S s la m , H .C , D 10J, b a tid a L im a L a«gu« b a il p a rk . DAVIE MOBILE HOME REPAIRS All Types of Repairs FREE PHONE ESTIMATES 634-3; Hondu. Yamuhu, Suzuki, Kawajaki Davie Cycle Center Sanford Ave. 1.4 Miles past lneersoll;Rand Register for FREE $100.00 Gift Certificate thru 6-1 All accessories and services NOW ,15% Off thru 6-1-83 Check our prices on new and used cycles- Hours- 9-6 Tues-FrIPhone:634-3929 NEW AND USED OFFICE FURNITURE ★ Safes ★ Files ★ Fire Proof Files -».„e 18tHaIn Street Sallibury, N.C. Phone 636-8022 EXPERT CARPET CLEANING by V on Schrader M ethod Call; Stanley Randall 634-5629 FOR SALE 12.000 Gallon A lum inum Chem ica Tank W ith 3 H.P. M otor, Pum p A nd Fittings., T o Be Moved. Call 919-272-2920 Charles H erbert 1RACT0R(^„, FOR 3 HRL YEARS! ONLY WITH NEW FORD TW SERIES TRACTORS! B uy a new TW -5, TVV-15, TW -25 or TW -35 tractor, and For(J will pay virtually all the costs of repairs an(3 m aintenance for three full years, or 2,500 hours of operation, whichever com es first. If anything should go wrong with your new T W Series tractor during that period, we'll fix it-Freel Plus, we'll give you all the oil, lubricants, filters and other m aintenance items like belts and hoses you’ll need. About all you buy is fuel! S o stop in today and we'll give you the information on exactly what you w o n ’t be paying for for the next three years with a new T W Series tractor! Davie Tractor & implement Co. Highway 601 South Mocksvilie, N.C. Phone: 634-5969 Y A R D S A L E ...S a t., M a y 14, 9 a .m . . 5 p .m . 980 N o rth M a in S tre e t. V ideo ta p e re c o rd e r, tille rs , lo ve seat, a n tiq u e spool c a b in e t, fru it ]a rs , w e ig h t bench w ith leg lilt & w e ig h ts, co ffe e ta b le desk, o ffic e c h a ir a nd o th e r good b a rg a in s ! R ain o r Shine. S U P E R Y A R D S A L E ...S a tu rd a y , AAay 14. 9 a .m . u n til 2 p .m . O N L Y . B ic yc le s , books, a p p lia n ce s, c lo th in g , shoes, 4 '^ a n d 5 In la d le s. W ill Boone R oad n ext to H e lla rd b a llfle ld . C ancelled II ra in in g . S A . Y A R D S A L E ...S a tu rd a y , M a y 14, fro m 10 a .m . u n til 4 p.m . A T : 176 P in e S tre e t, , M o c k s v ille . N .C . L a w n \ m o w e r, b ird houses, shot gun. to o ls a n d M O R E ! " A W H O P P E R O F A Y A R D S A L E " ...A C le a n -U p fro m s e ve ra l fa m ilie s F u rn itu re , .2 ro rk ln g c h a irs , d ra p e s , household ite m s , A n tiq u e s, and m a n y 10 and 25 cent b a rg a in s . A t 559 W ilke sb o ro St. M o c k s v ille . F rid a y and S a tu rd a y. M a y 13 and 14. 6 F A M IL Y Y A R D S A L E ...F rl. & S at.. M a y 13 a nd 14. Iro m 0 a .m . u n til ?7? N o rth . Ju n c tio n of 801. W a tc h lo r signs. B aby clothes, a d u lt clo th e s and LO T S O F M IS C . IT E M S I H Good B a rg a in s . Y A R D S A L E ...F ri.. M a y 13. 1 p .m . -6 p .m .; a n d S at. M a y 14. 8 a .m . • 2 p .m . Boys and g irls c lo th e s , lo ts o f J e a n s , fu rn itu re , toys. P .A . s yste m and M a n y M O R E Ite m s. T ake H w y . 64 W e s t, tu rn on S h e ffie ld R d . g o . a p p ro x im a te ly 3 m ile s , firs t • d ir t ro a d to rig h t. N e xt to J e r ry 's M e a t P ro c e s s in g . R a in o r S h in e . 7 F A M IL Y Y A R D S A L E ...S a t.. ! M a y )4, 8 ■ 2 p .m . hom e of W eldon A lle n , 4th house on le ft of H w y. 64 on C o rn a tz e r R d. B ic y c le s , la w n m o w e rs , e le c tric a l s u p p lie s , b a b y - . fu rn itu re , c h ild re n 's cloth e « ,'. ' (sizes in fa n ts th ru 8 ). la d ie s ' ' c lothes, sizes 8-16, som e m e n 's clothes a nd odds and ends. C a n c e lle d II ra in in g . ' B IG Y A R D S A L E ...S e v e ra l ■ fa m ilie s p a rtic ip a tin g . L a rg e s ize to iu n lo r size c lo th in g ,, m e ns a n d c h ild re n 's clo th in g * 2 b e a u tifu l fo rm a ! gow ns, one w h ite a nd one p in k . O dds and ends. S om ething fo r e v eryo ne. 8 a .m .. 5 p .m . A t th e hom e of M rs . E tta H . E llis , firs t house on le ft o f R edland R oad Iro m H w y. 158. C ancelled II ra in in g . 5 F A M IL Y Y A R D S A L E a t the H om e o f B u tc h W est on Ihe C o rn a tz e r R oad across fro m - the H anes P a in t on S a tu rd a y , AAay 14, 8 a .m . u n til 2 p.m . C a n c e lle d If r a in in g .. Y A R D S A L E ...S a tu rd a y , M a y i 14, 9 a .m . u n til 3 p .m . o n ; . C o rn a tz e r R oad. Vt m ile ,fro m ^ - C o rn a tz e r F ire D e p a rtm e n t.. T .V ., s o la , c a m e rfl/- m ls c e lla n e o u s h o u s e h o ld g o o d s a n d s o m e a d u lt' c lo th in g . ■ 4 F A M IL Y Y A R D S A L E ...A t’ ^ the residence o f D onna D yson, . 518 C h u rc h S tre e t E x t . ', M o c k s v ille . S m a ll c h ild 's . c lo th e s, o il h e a te r, g la s s w a re ,- ' b a r sto o ls, m e n 's c lo th in g . . ta p e p la y e r, som e m a te rn ity ‘ clo th e s, to ys a nd o lh e r O D D S • A N D E N D S . 3 F A M IL Y Y A R D S A L E ...S a tu rd a y , AAay 14. 9. a .m . u n til 2 p .m . M illin g R oad/ C ra fh v o o d D e v e lo p m e n t. Lo ts- of m is c e lla n e o u s Ite m s ,' m a te r n ity c lo th e s , b a b y ; ■ c lo th e s a n d d ir t b ik e . Y A R D S A L E ...R a in o r S hine, ,\ F rid a y 8i S a tu rd a y. AAay 13 & ' 1/ Iro m 9 a .m . u n til 5 p .m .! B _ W agon w he e ls, console stereo. ^ » A v o n d o ll c o lle c tio n , c lo th e s ,- e tc . Y a d k in V a lle y R o a d • ‘ be hind c h u rch . F o llo w s lg n s l* . SOON TO OPEN "The (k)rner Craftsman ” (CRAFTS OirXDJfSlGNMENT) Looking for Quality Handcrafted Items • Wooden Toys • Macramè • Baby Items • Ceramics Wood Products « Dolls • Quiits/Afgans • Knitted/Croche^ted Items To Be Located On Main St. -Next To Merle Norman Call: 634-5267 8 A.M. til 1 P.M. WANTED Livestock Beck Livestock & Co., Inc. Wholesale Meats Thomasville, N.C. WILL BUY 1 or 100 COWS...al50 Bulls, Veals, Feeders, Calves We Pay Cash For All Cattle When Picked .Up WE WILL Pick up-KIII- Process Your Locker Beef A.L Beclt. Jr. Rt. 1 Thomasville Call Collect Anytime Winston-Salem 919-788-9008 or 788-7524 Phone After 6 P,M. or Early A.M. 919-476-6895 REBUILT STARTERS& ALTERNATORS For American Cars ‘24.95 With Trade In S34.95 with Internal Regulator Boger Texaco Service 185 N. Main Street Mocksville, N.C. B B Earle’s Office Supplies 120 North Church Street Salisbury. N.C.Phone 636-2341 Office Supplies Furniture, Systems A rt Suppl ies Your Mocksville Representative is: Ieff Heard DIAMOND SPECIALIST * Setting * Re-mounting * Worn prongs repaired Lost stones replaced FOR SALE downtown, Mocksville 634-5216 mastercharge/visa * 9 0 0 PER A C R E 37.4 acres located on Hwy. 601 near the South Yadkin River 1 1 % % F I N A N C I N G Available IWith Approved Credit And Terms Contact Frank Bahnson 634-6261 S U B S C R IB E to the Davic County Enterprise Record Juit,fMI In and mall to irculation D epartm ent P.O. Box 525 M ocksville, N.C. 27028 (Check applicable boxes,) North Carolina. S 10.00_____ Out of State SI5.00_ Please Enclose Payment Name. Address - City.State.Zip. Telephone. D A V I B C O U N T Y О ш в т Ош Н т т L-------------J i 14D-DAVIECOUNTY ENTl-RPRISU RECORD,THURSDAY.MAY 12, 1983 ® iil(P ® G !l SPECIALS THESE PRICES GOOD MAY 12, 13 ar.d 14, 1983 ONLY •CROWN ORUG COUPON ^ 4 TIER CART ' W h e e l m ounted. Vinyl coated. E a sy fo store. E a sy to use. Regular Price $13.98 $999 > CROWN DRUG COUPON ■ - - - ■ PEPTO BISMOL P e p to - 10 OZ.SIZE B ism orronunCTtlCMCH Coupon Expires r/lay 14,1983 | i" “ “ CROWiy? y d COUPON I -i — — ^ SOFT & DRI SOLID ALL SCENTS $ J 88 — «CROWN DRUG COUPON' TYLENOL SINUS MEDICATION TABLETS Regular Price $3.49 24 COUNT $2^7 ------- ■ »I Coupon Expires May 14, 1983 j Coupon Expires May 14, 1083 Coupon Expires May 14.1983 ^ ‘ CROWN DRUG COUPON" —— ■ ■ - « I. CROWN DRUG COUPON ■ - — — - ^ DI-GEL LIQUID WIRELESS ! CLOSET LIGHT Regular Price $2.99 12 OZ.SIZE ■ — CROWN DRUG COUPON “ — ” “ ^ ALKA SELTZER cUanR TABLETS_______^ Q c r o lIM T96 COUNT Regular Price $2.87 YOUR CHOICE A lk a - S eltzer ^ i^on Expires May 14,1983 I *M r-'"—'-—■ , . Coupon Expires May 14, 1983 36 COUNT SIZE $ p 9 Massaigin MASSENGIL TWIN PACK $ J 2 8 Coupon Expires M ay 14,1983 ■ 'CROWN DRUG COUPON' ' BEAN BAG ASH TRAYS 3 FOR 9 9 * !Regular 69^each ^ W | I Coupon Expires May 14, 1983 * ■CROWN DRUG COUPON - ^ DIET SCALES $ 1 2 8 ■ CROWN DRUG COUPON — B.C. POWDERS 50 COUNT ICoupbn Expires May 14, 1983| ■“ ■•■■-■CROWN DRUG C O U P O N ---' 1 - - - --CROW N DRUG COUPON- - - - - - ■ COMTREX LIQUID or ' MTREX NIGHTIMEI 6 oz. SIZE Regular Price $3 61 Coupon Expires May 14,1983 | »— — — — <■ CROWN DRUG COUPON^ »1 — — — ■ I A M E R IC A 'S # 1 P O W D E R FASTEETH DENTURE ! _________ ADHESIVE 33 OZ.SIZE $238 Coupon Expires May 14, 1983 I’S T T c s o W r T D R U G 'c O U P O ^ * '^ ^ ™ FLEX SHAMPOO or CONDITIONER z as FLEX PLAYTEX DEODORANT REGULAR OR SUPER - 28 COUNT SUPER PLUS »3“ Coupon Expires May. 14, ¡983 CROWN DRUG COUPON' PLAYTEX BOHLES z a FLEX m s fiisssss 16 OZ.SIZE 8 « Regular Price $3.57 125 COUNT $2^7 Coupon Expires May 14., 1983 ■ CROWN DRUG COUPON ■ COLGATE TOOTHPASTE F R E E 2 0 % M O R E S Coupon Expires May 14,1983 j JCROWN DRUG COUPON • - - - - ^ITEM N0.9139 4.6 OZ. GEL ■ 5 OZ. ■ REGULAR I WITH 20% < MORE FREE I c * — — — — — CROWN DRUG COUPON — — — — — CURAD BANDAGES p w y t e K BabyNuraefTridKit Bettor For BJby... McBtLM Mother. UNDERSHELF RACK 99 Coupon Expires May 14,198^ I 60 COUNT Regular Pr;ce$139 9 9 * oupon Expires May 14,1983 ■ CROWN DRUG COUPON ■ PLAYTEX BABY NURSER TRIAL KIT Coupon Expires May 14, 1983 ' CROWN DRUG COUPON m Raid Regular Price $2.99I Coupon Expires May 14, 1983 ■ CROWN DRUG COUPON “ — ITEM N0.9872 PLASTIC RAINCOAT WITH HOOD Su p e r light, full length. C a rry in y o u r car o r purse. C o m e s with snap closing plastic carrying pouch. ioKsGanliO BuCHli* RAID HOUSE & GARDEN , BUG k iller ; Regular Price $3.57 7 3 ' ^ Coupon Expires May 14, 1983 - - - -C rown drUg COUPON • ■ CROWN drug COUPON JOHNSON’S BABY LOTION 9 OZ.SIZE Regular Price $2.77 Coupon Expires May 14, 1983 • — CROWN DRUG,C0UP0N ' ■ JOHNSON’S BABY OIL oil 4 OZ.SIZE $ J 2 8 Coupon Expires M ay 14f1983 ^Coupon Expires May 14,1983 j ^r o w n T r TJg T o B p o n * * ^ ITEM N0.7150 CROWN WARM STEAM V A P O R IZ E R S ^2 gallon $ 0 8 8 10 hour operation ^ I Coupon Expires May 14,1983 . _ CLAIROL'" _ FROSraTlP I J Coupon Expires May 14,1983 Jj | ---- ------------- -------- ' '------ Everything You N e ed for Frosting Your H air $599 Coupon Expires May 14.1983 ^ CROWN DRUG C^SoF LADIES; CLOSING I UMBRELLA $ p 9 Regular Price $2.99 Coupon Expires May 14, laoJ | ■ - - - - "CROWN DRUG COUPON “ ~ ** ~ “ 1 RAINY DAY SAVINGS BANK FOOT OPERi AIR PUMPi $ 0 9 9 J Regular Price $5.88 W Coupon Expires May 14,1983 Regular Price $2 39 $ J 6 7 - ■ CROWN DRUG COUPON ■ AIR POT HOT & COLD LIQUID DISPENSER Regular Price $5.99 Ì 3991.9 LITERS Coupon Expires May 14, 1983 TRAVEL IRON $ 0 9 9 Regular Price $8.99 liOCATIONS IN . WINSTON-SALEM: PARKVIEW, 3075 KERNERSVILLE RD. 788- 2032 ; 301 ACADIA AVENUE, 722-7145, 631 PETERS CREEK PARKWAY, 723-3501; HANES MALL, 768-9320; Ol2)TOWN, 3716 REYNOLDA RD., 924-9131; OLD HWY. 52 N. STANLEYVILLE, 377-2281; COLONY CENTRE, KING, 983-2186; HWY. 66 WALKERTOWN, 595-2137; WESTWOOD VILLAGE, CLEMMONS, 766-9156- HWY, 601, YADKINVILLE, 679-8844; HWY. 601, MOCKSVILLE, 634-6213; NEWCON SHOPPING CENTER, NEWTON. WESTGATE SHOPPING CENTER, TAYLOR. SVILLE, DAVIDSON PLAZA, LEXINGTON: OPTICAL SHOPS LOCATED AT HANES MALL, 768-9322; MOCKSVILLE, 634-6216 and LEXINGTON.THESE PRICES GOOD MAY 12, 13, and 14, 1983 ONLY Coupon Ex^ The Prescription People Open 365 Days A Year We Reserve the Right to Limit Quantities. Hospitals Sue For Insurance Hu ‘ ‘ J iii 'r - A é ^ é } 0 ’ ■ w r Thirlcen hospitals— -including Davie Couniy— are suing Ihc U. S. Deparlmenl- of Heallh and Hunian Services for reimbursement for malpractice insurance cosls under Ihe federal Medicare program. In a complaint filed last week in U. S. D islricI Court in Greensboro, the hospitals say thal a change in a federal rule has prevented Ihem from receiving enough federal m oney to pay the costs of malpractice insurance needed to cover claim s by Medicare patients. Forsyth. Mem orial Hospilal is asking for a reimbursement of S2B,fi01 and Medical Park Hospilal is asking for The complaint says lhat under the new federal rule cosls are reim ­ bursed according to the number of m alpractice claim s paid lo Medicare patients. If no such claims are paid lo Medicare patients, Ihe hospital isn’t reimbursed for any of its costs. If al leasl one claim is paid, Iho hospilal is reimbursed for 100 percent of its premiums. A 1976 sludy used by the Health and Hum an Services Department to iuslifv lower reimbursements is flawed, Ihe lawsuit says. II asks tlial Ihe court prevent the deparlmenl from enforcing Ihe new rule and lo reimburse the hospital for lost inoney. The other hospitals filing Ihe Jawsuit are: Alamance County, Blowing Rock, Cabarrus County, D avie County, H igh Poinl M em orial, Hoots M em orial in Yadkinville, H ugh Chatham M em orial in Elkin , M orehead M em orial in Eden, RiclTlnond Memorial in Rockingham, Scotland Memorial in Laurinburg andstanly Memorial in Albemarle. P.O. Box 525, Mocksville, N.C. 27028 (USPS 149-160) 40 PAGES $10.00 Per Year in North Carolina $15.00 Per Year Outside North C.arolina THURSDAY, MAY 19,1983 pingje Issue - 25 cents Local Prisoner Escapee Is Captured Tuesday ‘/ i ’s D - e - l - i - c - i - o - u - s ! ” M rs. B eth B ow den g iv es h e r d a u g h te r A shley one of th e d elicio u s stra w b e rrie s. L ike h e r m o m . L ittle A shley loves th em rig h t off th e v in e. See fe a tu re on P ag e IB . (P h o to by Jim B a rrin g e r) A two day search for an escaped prisoner ended about 9:40 a.m. Tuesday m orning when the fugitive was laken into custody along Cedar Creek between U S 158 and 1-40. Thom as L. Herbin, 32, surren­ dered lo law officials from bnish in which he was hiding along Cedar Creek. He still had a butcher knife in his possession, but offered no resistance. He was laken to Ihe Lula Conrad Hoots M e m o rial H ospital in Y ad k in ville (a prison security hospilal) for treatment, Herbin reportedly had buckshot in his face, Jeff Joyner-Taken Hostage On Birthday Even though it was his 24th bir­ thday, Jeff Joyner of Rt. 1, M o cksville (Center C om m u n ily) went lo work as usual Monday m orning in Stalesville. He was totally unaware lhal the previous nighl, Sunday around 7 p.m., a prisoner serving 20-years for armed robbery had cscaped from the not too distanced Davie Coiinly Prison Camp. Jeff, employed at the 1-40 Truck Center in Stalesville, usually works from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. However, because it was his birthday he took a half-day off. About 12:45 p.m. Monday, Jeff Joyner returned to his trailer localed behind the Center Texaco Station. All alone, he thought, he took off his shoes and stretched out on the sofa. Then he heard footsteps. Somelhine one shouldn’t hear all alone in your own abode. Raising himself to a silting position, he felt cold chills as he was visually greeted by a black man, advancing towards him carrying his (Jeff’s) own shotgun and a butcher knife tucked in his bell. “If you don’t do what I say I ’ll blow your head off,” said the 5-ft. 11- inch man, dressed in Jeff’s shirt, jeans and shoes. Jeff could see that his unwelcomed guest had been wounded— there was blood on the side of his face and also on his wrist. Sitting down on Ihe sofa the in­ truder began talking lo Jeff. “Did you hear about a prisoner escaping from the cam p last night?” he asked Jeff. Jeff shook his head, “no”. “Well, one did, and that’s me,” said the unwelcomed visitor thal Jeff was lo learn had completely ransackled his trailer while he was What’s Inside She riff's, Poiicc, H ighw ay Patrol Pg.2 Local Student Stale Winner In Mcdical Terminology Pg.:i Pinebrook Student Top Winner In I‘'ditorlal Cartoon Con­ test Pg.O Hospital Installs New Device For Deaf Medical Em ergen­ cies Pg.Il Strawberries...Pick’rni Vonrseir Pg.lB D avie H ospital H onors '¿'i Kinployees Pg.lH D avle Sym phony Iteaches Half uf Goal D riv e p g . s n Social . Pg.fiH Local Department of Tran­ sportation Holds Open House Sports District Court A ltu g M a ke r Church Listings Obituaries Public Notices Heal Kstate Classifieds Pg.lC pgs.ac & ;ic Pg.lOC Pg.lD Pg2D Pg.;iD Pg.51) Pg.fiD Pg.7D al work that morning. For the next two-and-one-half hours the escapee told Jeff of his plans. These plans included “laying low” in the trailer unlil Monday night and having Jeff drive him to Winslon-Salem. And Ihen, the escapee, later lo be identified as Thom as L. Herbin, age 32, told Jeff he was- hungry. “Fix me something lo eat,” he snapped. Jeff said lhat he looked in his cabinet and found a bag of oatmeal cookies which he gave his visitor along wilh a soda pop. He gobbled the cookies hungrily as if a feast were before him. Jeff said he told Herbin that he' didn't have much gasoline in his car. “If we are going anyplace in it, we need lo get a fillup before the -gasoline stations close. Sur- prisingly, he agreed lhat il was a good idea,” said Jeff. “Carrying the shotgun, a box of shells, and a butcher knife, he ex- corled me out to m y car (a blue Monie Carlo). II was about 3 p.m. when we drove inlo the Center Exxon station on U.S. 64 West. I told him 1 would write a check for the gasoline because I had no money— and I took m y checkbook wilh me.” “At Ihe Cenler Exxon Station he got down in the seat and allowed me to get out and go into Ihe building lo pay for Ihe gasoline. Once inside I told Walter Phipps lhal there was an escaped prisoner in m y car with a gun, and that I was running,” said Jeff. As Jeff ran to the Texaco station next door,Herbin look off in Jeff’s (Continued to page 8) bullocks, and a cut on the wrist. Herbin, serving a 20-year sen­ tence for armed robbery, escaped Sunday.nighl about 7:15 p.m. from the Davie County prison unit, by clim bing two 12-foot walls, topped with rolled up strips of thin, sharp metal. Prison guards fired guns at Herbin as he escaped. Bloodhounds from Ihe stale prison system were called in immediately after Ihe escape. However, Herbin avoided detection as he made his way lo the Cenler com m unily and hid oul behind the mobile home of Jeff Joyner. Monday, after Joyner went to work, Herbin ransacked Joyner’s mobile home finding a J2.-gauge shotgun, some shells and a butcher knife. On Joyner’s return about noon Monday, he was laken hostage by Herbin and ordered to drive him lo Winston-Salem. (See separate story.) Herbin is believed to have been shol in Ihe bullocks bv Deputy Roger Cole as he fled through a field after abandoning Joyner’s car at the Farm ington exit off 1-40. Beginning shortly after 3 p.m., Monday the manhunt for Herbin centered in Ihe area along Cedar Creek, bounded.by the Farm ington Road, 1-40 and U S 158. Beige vans from the prison unit and patrol cars cross-crossed county roads, directed by a m obile command post, while bloodhounds conlinued tracking. More than 40 officers and two sets of bloodhounds were used in Ihe hunl. In addition, the W F M Y helicopter, with local officers aboard, circled overhead assisting in thé search. In addition to escape, Herbin will probably face charges of k id ­ napping, aulo theft, breaking and entering and larceny. Herbin was sentenced in Guilford Couniy Superior Court lo 20 years in prison last July for armed robbery. He was convicted of using a .38- caliber pistol to rob a grocery store in Greensboro of more than $500. H ostage Je ff Jo y n e r tells of his frig^htening ex p erien ce w th e escap ed p riso n e r....n o t th e km d of b irfn d ay p re se n t ( u su ally ex p ects an d one Jo y n e r hopes w llf n ev er re p e a te d . (P h o to by Jim B a rrin g er) Annual Test Results During March, students in grades I, i, :i, II, and II par­ ticipated in the North Carolina Annual Testing Program. DavIc County Schools have received the resulls. The students in these grades will be bringing lest inforniatiun home Thur­ sday, M ay l!l. This information Hill consist of a parent letter and parent report. Parenis are being requested to sign and return Ihe form signifying Ihey received the test results. Parents may request a conference. The school will contact the parent to arrange a convenient time for the con­ ference. A S tate D e p a rtm e n t of C orrections officer lead s T hom as H erbin, h an d cu ffed an d sh ack led to a n aw aitin g p riso n van follow ing his c a p tu re T u esd ay m orning. H erbin e s c a w d fro m th e M ocksville b ased unit S unday n ig h t..^B efo re his c a p tu re , he k id n ap p ed a D avie C ounty m a n , holding him a t gun point for se v e ra l h o u rs. (P hoto by R obin F erg u sso n ) 2 - DAVIU COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD. THURSDAY. MAY 19^ 1983 Student Wins 1st Place In Conservation Speech Contest Clirislie Jones, sevenlli grade sludenl al North Dnvic Junior High School won first place honors in the Slale Conservation Speech Contest, 7lh Grade Level, held in Raleigh'on Friday, M ay 13. This contest was sponsored by the North Carolina Association of Soil and Water Conservation Districts. Christie received a $100 Savings Bond for being first place winner. All 12 of the contestants particating in the state competition received a letter of com m endation from Governor Jim Hunt and a framed .certificate of recognition. Topic of the speeches was “Soil and Water Conservation - Our Hope For The Future.” Christie was selected as local winner in the contest, sponsored by the Davie Soil and Water Conservation District on February 28. She was then eligible to participate in Ihc area contest. She won the Area 8 contest which was held on M arch 21, in Statesville, N.C. Winning this event made her eligible to enter the state com ­ petition. - Christie is the daughter of Ms. Peggy Jones of Route 8, Mocksville and (he granddaughter of M r. and M rs. Tom Gough. ; Attending the state contest from Davie District were Christie and her mother, M rs. Peggy Jones, Cokie •Jones, District Supervisor, Judy Sherrill, Educational Coordinator for the District, and Lib Bowles. C h ristie Jo n e s is show n w ith " C e rtific a te of A w a rd " fo r f irs t p la c e h o n o rs in th e S tate C o n serv atio n S peech C o n test held re c e n tly in R aleig h . District Secretary. Christie also received an award this week in Durham for the Talent Search for Mathem atically and Verbally Gifted seventh graders,- conducted by Ihe Talent Iden­ tification P ro gra m at D uke University. For this award, she was in competition with over 23,000 of Ihe ablest seventh graders in 16 stales and scored higher than SO percent of the college-bound twelfth-graders on the m athematics or verbal sections of the College Board’s Scholastic Aptitude Test. Sheriff’s Department ■ Gladys M. Cope, Rt. 2, Advance, -reported breaking and entering and '.larceny M ay 15. Approximately $700 ,-in household goods was stolen. : Hazel S. Hartman, Rt. 3, Ad- ■-vance, reported larceny of money ;estimated to be approximately $75 -M ay 15. - D eanna Cody, 18, Rt. 8, ■ IMocksville, reporled assault on a >fem ale M a y 14. > Law rence P. Sm ith, Rt. 7, ; -Mocksville, reported larceny of an ■ ;antique thermometer valued at $75 :-M ay 15. :; Tom Reynolds, Rt. 3, Mocksville, reported attempted breaking and entering M a y 15. Jerry Lee Dalton, 45, Rt. 7, : Mocksville, was arrested M a y 16 /Bnd held on an order. Joyce Ann Hollingsworth, 25, Rt. 2, Mocksville, was arrested M ay 16 : and held on an order. ; Kenneth L. Martin, Rt. 4, Ad­ vance, reported attem pted breaking and entering M ay 10. Approximately $100 dam ages was ::done. I B rya n D ou glas Thom as, 17, •Mocksville, was arrested April 24, and charged with three counts of •auto larceny and two .counts of breaking and entering-larceny. : David Jonathan Frank, 20, Jef­ fe rso n . St., K e rn ersville , w as ;arrested M ay 15 and charged with one count of D U L : Michael Dalton, 31, Hem lock St., ■Mocksville, was arrested M a y 14, : and charged with assault with a ■ :deadly weapon. - John Calvin Ijames, 27, Rt. 1, : Woodleaf was arrested M ay 10 and . charged with one count of D U I and ’ one count of failure to heed to a blue lieht and siren. "Bradford Kenneth Johnson, ' Mocksville, reported a fight at Cooleemee dance hall M ay 14. C O R R E C T IO N In last week’s issue under the : Sheriff’s Department news, the ■ paper incorrectly listed Randall Dean Johnson, 23, Rt. 8, Mocksville, ■charged with writing worthless checks M ay 4. The charge should have read violation of probation. C o m m itte e P lan s F arm -C ity W e ek The steering committee for the 1983 Farm -City Week observance is busy with several events Including Farm -City D ay and industrial and farm tours already established. The steering com m ittee is comprisied of Peggy Angell, Jim McBride, Will Hym an Medford Foster and Bill Mainous. Mainous explains the Farm -City “D ay Downtown” has been set for Nov. 5 complete with industrial and farm related exhibits and live perform ers. Fa rm -C ity D a y committee m em bers follow: Henry Shore, and the steering committee- overall coordination; Jeff Johnson, Fran Venable, Bud Hauser and Margaret Foster, merchant par­ ticipation; M a u rice Anderson, Nancy Shanks, Dot Chaplin, Ostine Wesl - concessions; M ark Corriher, Jim Wall, decorations; Will Hym an -displays and events; Hank VanHoy - entertainment. Local businessm en and agriculture leaders will be treated lo a breakfast Nov. 1, an event which will kick-9ff local Farm -City Week observa’nces. Com m ittee mem bers assigned to the breakfast • are Medford Foster, G ail Kelly, Will H ym an, B ill M ain ou s, P e g gy Angell, Jim McBride, D avid Plott, Ronnie Thompson, D ave Updike and A.M. Kiser.. . In d u stry tours have been scheduled for Nov. 3. Committee m em bers include W ill H ym an, Terry Bralley, H ank VanHoy, Jim McBride, A.M . Kiser, Bill Mainous, M a u rice Anderson, G ail K elly, Peggy Angell, E d gar Cartner and Hank VanHoy. Rep. Lambeth To Vote Against Lottery Bill Rep. Jam es Lambeth of the 37th House District announced Tuesday that he is voting against the state lottery currently under discussion in the N.C. Senate should the bill come before the State House of Representatives. “I can understand the lottery supporters desire to raise revenue for needed services without raising taxes (but this lotterj’) bill is too much, too soon,” Lambeth said. “Obviously we in the General Assem bly must insure that money is available to equitably reward our teachers and other state employees. Fortunately, however, the economic picture of North Carolina seem s to be brightening. That, coupled with the extensive budget cutting now underw ay in the variou s ap-1*1 I underw ay in m e variou s ap- W r P r k f i n N l . X n i propriation subcom m ittees should I I I c u n y i l i l U U v l ¡¡eip us ayoid being forced lo take such a drastic and controversial revenue step as the state sponsored lottery,” he said. The' lottery bill directs that a state-wide referendum should be held in November, 1983, municipal elections. If accepted by the voters Ihe legislation would then create a state lottery agency and governing com m ittee appointed by the governor to oversee the sale and subsequent d ra w in g of lottery tickets. The com m ission would also oversee the awarding of lottery winnings. The current legislation would prohibit drawings more oflen lhan once a week. Estim ates are that usable annual income for Ihe state could reach upwards to $100-million. "There are very real moral argum ents against the lottery by a large constituency of N orth Carolina voters lhal cannot be ignored,” Lam beth said. “Furlher I am nol convinced that Ihe state’s involvement in a gam e of chance would not foster illegal gam bling activities.” “We can’t close the door on some day being forced lo accept in­ novalive w ays of raising slale revenues. Still the current enhanced revenue picture and valid argum ent against Ihe lottery should at least put this controversial legislation on hold,” Lam beth concluded. A Mocksville woman escaped with m inor injury followir.j an accident on N C 801 M ay 13. ■ According to the Highway Palrol .'report,Shirley Head Branch, 31, Rt. 7, Mocksville, was traveling north on N C 801 when she lost control of her 1979 Toyota afler running off the road on the right. She then crossed the road and proceeded into the ditch and overturned. Mocltsville School Menu, May 23-27 The m enu for M o cksville Elem entary School for the week of M ay 23-27 IS as follows; M O N D A Y : Sloppy Joes or Bar-b- que, french fries, slaw, peanut bulter bar, bun T U E S D A Y : Turkey Pic, rice, green peas, dill pickles, canned fruit, biscuit W E D N E S D A Y : Spaghetti, tossed salad, corn, Jello & cookies, loas T H U R S D A Y : Hot dog & chillie, slaw, pork and beans, cherry pie, buns F R ID A Y : Fish, cream ed potatoes, slaw, cake square, corn oread D avie C o u n ty F ire Log M o cksville F ire Deprtm ent responded to a car fire on Wilkes St. at approximately 5:30 p.m. M ay 10. Center F ire D ep arlm en I responded to a brush fire al the Hodges residence at approximately 8:30 p.m. M ay 10. Jerusalem F ire Departm ent responded to a fire al ap­ proximately 8:30 p.m. M ay 11. Cooleemee served as a back-up. Fork Fire Department responded lo a personal injury on U S 801 at approximately 12:00 p.m. M ay 13. A d van ce F ire Departm ent responded to a woods fire on U n­ derpass Road at approximately 8:22 p.m. M ay 16. Jerusalem F ire Departm ent responded to a personal injury on N C 801 M ay 13 al approximately 4:00 p.m. Cooleem ee F ire D epartm ent responded to a barn fire on Daniels Road M ay 14 at approxim ately 2:25 a.m. Je ru salem firem en were called for a back-up. Wm. R. Davie Fire Department responded lo a brush fire on 6(11 North al Ijam es Church M ay 14 al 9:58 a.m. Wm. R. Davie firemen responded to a tractor fire on M ain Church Rd. at approximately 3:40 p.m. M ay 14. Jerusalem F ire D epartm ent responded to a car fire on 601 Soulh on River Dale Rd. al approximately 6:25 p.m. M ay 14. Smith Grove Fire Department responded to a reported truck fire at 1-40 and N C 801 M ay 16. S ta te A tto rn ey G en eral To S p ea k H ere M o n d a y Attorney General Rufus L. Ed- niisten will speak at Ihe Davic Counly Public Library on M ay 23 al 6:00 p.m. His visit will be one of several slops across the state to announce the publication of a new text book by the I^ rth Carolina D epartm ent of Justice. W anda Edw ards of Mocksville and Edw ard C arr of Ihe North Carolina Justice Academ y wrote the text. Attorney G eneral Ed m iste n wrote the foreword and chapter introductions. The title of (he text. Learning the Law, was suggested by five Davie Counly students who participated in a spccial law-related education survey at North Davie Junior High last year. T hey are Deborah G lasscock, T ina M ille r, Jackie Doub, Gayla Bullard and Rita Barnes. Learning (he Law has been ap­ proved by the Department of Public Instruction as a social studies text for ninth grade. It deals with laws affecting young people, with a special em phasis on the juvenile court system in North Carolina. The public is invited lo attend the Rufus Edminston ^ reception in honor of the publication, its authors, and others in Davie Counly who contributed to ils development. Davie County E d u c a tio n a l U p d a te ’8 3 ( Kd ilor's N ote; This is a regular m onthly article concerning the D a v ic County School Systeni written by Dr. Joe Sinclair, School Superintendent. The series, entitled “ Educational Update ’83” brings light to the m any opportunities provided by our school system and problems plus legislation affecting public schools in N orth Carolina. The third in this series follows.) E D U C A T IO N A L U P D A T E '83 In order to effectively operate a good school syslem for our children, it is necessary to have a very conscientious and dedicated group of employees. I believe that we, in Davie County, have a staff that ranks with the very best in this slate and nation. Molding togelhei a successful staff takes m any hours of preparation and research by (he Principal or Departrrint Head and Director of Personnel. The Davie County School Syslem em ploys over 500 personnel in various capacities. Included in this lotal are 20 adm inistrators (central office, principals, assistant prin­ cipals), 250 leachers, 24 secretaries and clerical personnel, 100 clerical and instructional aides, 15 full-time custodians, 37 full-time food service em ployees, 8 m aintenance em ­ ployees, and 5 transportation em ­ ployees. We have additional per­ sonnel em ployed in part-tim e positions, including over 60 bus drivers. M r. Stan Morgan, Direclor of Personnel, is responsible for coordinating the em ploym ent process with other administrators. The four general areas of respon­ sibility in this area are: (1) determ ining personnel needs, recruitm ent, references, and assisting with the selection of personnel; (2) organizing personnel files and determining the salary and benefits for new employees; (3) assisting with personnel evaluation and staff development; and (4) coordinating the process of resignations, retirements, and other personnel areas. For those leachers inlerested in applying for instructional positions within the Davie Counly School, System, the following information should be helpful: (1) Applications for teacher employment m ay be obtained al the central ad ­ m inistrative offices. Teacher ap­ plications have been recenlly revised and are m ore com ­ prehensive lhan the old forms; (2) When the application process is complete, it will be placed in an active file, and at the lime of a vacancy, will be considered with the olher applications: (3) When there is a vacancy, these steps will be followed: (a) The Personnel Director will review all applications to determine those which best fulfill the requirements of the vacant position; (b) A s a result of the screening of applications, the Personnel Direclor will select three lo five candidates for an interview; (c) After the interview with ihe Personnel Director, applicants will be asked to go to the school where the vacancy exists for an interview with the principal; (d) After in­ terviews are completed, the P er­ sonnel Director will submit the selected applicant’s name along wilh all related m alerials lo the Superintendent; (e) The Superin­ tendent and Board of Education shall approve (or reject) the ap­ plicant for employment. (4) Ap-; plications w ill'be kept on active file for one year. If after one year-an applicant has not been appointed and he-she wishes to continue to be considered for an appointment, a request for the application lo be reactivated for one additional year should be in writing. For those interested in clerical, teacher aide, food service, custodial, transportation, ■ or maintenance positions, application form s must be obtained in the central adm inistrative offices on Cherry Street. The Direclor of Personnel and P rin c ip a l or D epartm ent Head w ill w ork together in filling these positions. Applicants interested in driving a school bus should contact the principal of the school’ nearest lo their residence or the central ad­ m inistrative office. At the presenl time, the em ­ ployment outlook for the beginning of Ihe 1983-84 school year is nol optimistic. The State Department of P ub lic Instruction projects a decrease of Ihree teaching positions for the system and a decrease of two ■teacher aide positions. Other per­ sonnel allocations should rem ain essentially the sam e as for the 1982- 83 school year. Although the projected allocations indicate a slight decrease in total positionc for the system, there will continue lo be resignations, retirem ents, and leaves of absence throughout the school year. If you are interested in em ­ ployment wilh the Davie Counly School System or have a friend or relative who is interested, I hope this inform ation has been of valuable assistance. "tVtost people judge m en only b y succcss or by fo rtu n e ." La Rochefoucauld Mitchell College Offers Local Courses M itch ell C om m unity College C^irriculum course for the sum m er quarter will be held at Davie Counly Hospital classroom June 7, 14, 28, July 5,12, 19, 26, and A ugusI 2, 9,16, 23, each of these days from 3:30 p.m. until 8:30 p.m. The course includes eleven sessions and will be taught by Wanda Rushing E d ­ wards, M.A. in Sociology. A fee of $16.25 will be charged for the course. Registration will be handled on an individual basis by M rs. Janice M cDaniel at D avie Counly Hospital. M rs. M cDaniel asks that those inlerested should call now and regisler to reserve a space. The course is titled Soc 261 C ourtship, M a rria g e and the Fam ily. This course first deals with the nature of self w hich is preparatory for a discussion of courtship. The emotional and down- to-earth problems of m arriage are examined in considerable detail. Such problems as m arital ad­ justment, divorces, re-marriages, careers and in-laws are considered. The developing fam ily is traced, and the necessity for maturity before m arriage is considered. For credits, the students will receive 5 quarter hoars and 3 semester hours. DAVIE COUNTY , № in i№ i> ia E ciw > (USPJi 149-160) 127 South Main Street MocksviUc^N.C. Published every l^hursday by the DAVIE PUBLISHING COMPANY m o cksvillE Oa v ie ENTERPRISE REtORD 1916-19S8 1899-1958 COOLEEMEE JOURNAL 1901-1971 Gordon Tomlinson..'........................................Editor Publisher Kathy Tomlinson ,' Robin Firgusson Becky Snyder........................................Oirectcjr of Advertising Second Qass Postage Paid in MocksviUe, N.C. 27028 SUBSCRIPTION RATES single Copy 25 Cents $10.00 per year In North Carolina $15.00 per year outside North.Carolina Postmaster: Send address changes to Davie County Enterprise Record P.O. Box 525, MocKsvllle, N.C. 27028 DAVIE COUNTY ENTER1?RISU RECORD. THURSUAY. MAY 19. 1983 - 3 Patsy and Bobby Pardue W ood C arving W orkshop S u n d ay At D avie Library A workshop featuring carvings by Bobby and Patsy Pardue of Elkin in scheduled for 2-5 p.m. Sunday at the Davie County Public Library. The event is sponsored by the Davie County A rls Council and is free of charge to any interested person. C a rvin g and painting demonstrations will be featured. Bobby and Patsy Pardue have made a career of carving. Patsy is a native of D avie County, the daughter of Allan A. Sofley and Naom i Rodden. " I ’ve been carving almost all m y life. M y grandfather carved and I picked it up from him ," explains Pardue, Elkin Post Office rural carrier, when asked how he started carving duck decoys. • After being in service Bobby This Is Mailbox Improvement Week : Each year the'U. S. Postal Ser­ vice designates a Mailbox Im ­ provement Week fcr cuslomers served by rural delivery routes. During that week cuslom ers on niral • routes are encouraged to exam ine and im prove, where necessary, the appearance of their ihailboxes. The third full week in M a y has been designated as Mailbox Improvement Week for this year. The purpose of Mailbox Im ­ provement Week is to call attention to the need for providing mail receptacles which are designed to proiect the mail from Ihe weather and are neat in appearance, con­ veniently located, and safé to use. Neat, attractive mailboxes m ake a significant contribution to the ap­ pearance of the countryside and Ihe streets in suburban areas. ■ Mailboxes that meet these four important requirements contribute ;lo a m ore efhcient delivery operalion, and the result is im ­ proved service lo the entire route. There are two approved styles: (l) Traditional design in three slandard sizes ■ and (2) contemporary design. . M ailb oxe s of the approved Iraditional or contemporary design are required whenever a mailbox is newly installed or an unsuitable receptacle is replaced. Exception: Custom built rural type mailboxes m ay be used if proper approval is given by Ihe postmaster. Where box numbers are assigned, Ihe box number must be shown on the side of the box visible lo Ihe approaching carrier, or on the door where boxes are grouped. Customers are encouraged to group boxes whenever this is practicable, especially at or near crossroads, al service lurnouls, or at other places hwere a considerable number of boxes are located. In areas where snow removal is a problem, the use of a semi-arch or extended arm type of support is suggested. This allows snowplows lo; sweep near or under boxes without damage lo supports and provides easy access to Ihe boxes by carrier and customers. ■ If Ihe use of sireel names and house numbers has been authorized, Ihe bouse number should be shown on' Ihe mailbox. If Ihc mailbox is located on a street other lhan Ihe ;one on which the customer resides, ■Ihe sireet name and house number .miisl be inscribed on the box. In all instances, placing Ihe owner’s name on Ihc box is optional. began.doing carpentry work in his shop and returned to carving after a customer requested he carve carve leaf decorations on a picture frame he was m aking for her. Bobby Ihen began carving tie lacks, and afler meeting Carolina arlist Bob Timberlake at a show. Bob encouraged h>m to try carving decoys. Since lhat time Bobby and his wife P alsy have collaborated on hundreds of decoys bolh life size and minaliire. P a lsy is the painter of the family. She teaches art twice a week at East Wilkes High School- through classes offered by Wilkes Com m unily College. Their decoys are displayed at Bob T im b e rlake’s gallery “ The y”, in L i D.A.V. To Sponsor Memorial Outing The Disabled American Veterans Chapter 75 and Auxiliary will sponsor an outing al Rich Pai-k, sheller No. 2, Sunday M ay 29 al 3 p.m. in observance of "M em orial Day.” Veterans of all branches of ser­ vice and Iheir families are cordially invited to bri.ig a covered dish and join in the fellowship. Serving will begin a I 4 p.m. Veterans from Davie Counly who are currenlly patients al Ihe VA Medical Center in Salisbury will be inviled lo Ihe picnic upon approval. Those wilh weekend passes are encouraged lo attend. For furiher information call 634- 5510 or 034-207C. Heritage Gallery”Lexington. Johnna Hobson Alanning, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John L. Hobson of Routes, Mocksville, N.C. graduated M a y 5, from E a st Carolina University, Greenville. N.C. with a Bachelor of Science degree in Nursing, and her pin. She is a l!)78 graduate of Davie High School. 4-H Karnes Committees For Special Riding Camp For Handicapped Local 4-H’ers held a meeting all Ihe 801 4-H aréna M ay It to appoint committees for a special riding camp for the handicapped. The camp is set for each Tuesday night from June 14-July 19. Five committees to assist in various phases of the camp were appointed. The entertainm ent committee will relax riders and get Ihem into the right frame of mind to '■ ride. The information committee was formed lo map out and explain Ihe responsibilities. They also are ■ required lo direct Ihe riders and volunteers Ihe refreshment com­ mittee will prepare snacks for Ihe, special riders. The mounters are responsible to assist Ihe special riders in mounting and dismounting Ihe horses. The side guards are to walk on each side of Ihe horse and rider and help maintain the balance of Ihe rider. The final committee is responsible to lead Ihe horse and keep conlrol of Ihe horse al all limes. This camp is Ihe first han­ dicapped riding camp in Ihe area. This is due lo the ma^or organizers Jeep Wilson, Ann Hildebrand and Marie Sagraves. Leaders commenled that they have had good cooperalion wilh the local R uritan clubs, and the T hunderbirds hockey team for donating Ihc use of spccial helmets for Ihe riders. Monnie Ellis, a 4-H leader, said "Currently our biggest challenge is fund raising. We want to be positive ' lhat all participants are fully in­ sured. O ur m ajor expenses however, are refreshm enls, eq uip m ent, a d v e rtise m e n ts, reimbursement of mileage, and funding recognition awards.” Leaders reported lhat Ihere will be six actual nighls of riding from Tuesday, June 14 lo July 19 from C;30 lo 9:00 p.m. on consecutive Tuesdays. The first American actor known to appear abroad was James Henry Hackett, who made his debut in April, 1827, at Covent Gar­ den in London. MOCKSVIUE, N.C. WHITE Save on State Pride® Berkley Stripe only from Belk OPEN FRIDAY NIGHT TIL 8:30 Berkley pin-strlped sheets, spreads and draperies are a sure cure all for the bedroom blahs. The clean, contem­ porary lines of the Berkley pattern are just the prescri­ ption your bedroom needs. You can expect quality In bed­ ding when you choose State Pride®. Sheets and pillow­ cases are polyester and cotton; bedspread and draperies are polyester and rayon. Navy, rust and brown on birch. Piped hem on plllowcase/flat sheet.JEasy machine care. Save oh Berkley sheets and pillowcases. Reg. Sale Standard cases 8.00 6.88 Twin flat or iltted 8.00.4.88Full flat or fitted 11.00 8.88 Qiieen flat or fitted 16.00 12.88 PERCAL SHEETS SOLID COLORS 65% POLYESTER 35% COHON TWIN............................*4.88 each FULL ........................* 8 . 8 8 each QUEEN.._____ ..*1 2 .8 8 each PILLOWCASES *4.88 pair Save 22% to 39% on State Pride® Paradise Quallofll of Dacron© polyester offers down-llke comfort. Reg. SaleStandard 16.00 10.88 Queen 18.00 13.88 King 26.00 16.88 STATE PRIDE MAIIBESS PADS QUILTED-SONIC CONTESSA STITCH DACRON 88 FILLING TW IN.. . Usually *16.50 . . ^ . .*10.88 FULL . . Usually ‘20.50.........................*13.88 QUEEN.. . Usually ’28.50......................*19.88 KING . . . Usually *35.50........................*23.88 WINDOW SHADES CANDACE 37V4’X6' WHITE - BEIGE Usually ’6.00..................*4.55 NEV-R-LITE 37V4'X6' WHITE ■ BEIGE Usually ‘8.00.....................*5.95 ___________________OTHER STYLES 2 5 % OFF_______________ ODD LOT HOIVIE F U R N IS H IN G S ASSORTED ITEMS 4 0 % ~ 7 0 % “' Reg.Sale 39.00 28.88 49.00 36.88 26.00 19.88 Save on matching bedspreads and draperies. Quilted to the floor style spread and matching thermal lined draperies help you conserve energy In your home. Twin bedspread Full bedspread Draperies 50" x 84" Save on Cannon® Royal Classic cotton towels Bath Hand Wash ONE GROUP BATH TOWELS SOLIDS AND FANCIES *2 .8 8 «»D »3.88 AURORA BEDSPREADS QUILTED TO THE FLOOR THROW STYLE . SOLID COLORS TWIN Usually ’28:00...............................* 2 0 . M FULL Usually ’34.00...............................*25.88 QUEEN Usually ’44.00. .........................*32.88 DRAPERIES 48X63.......................................................*14.88 48X84.......................................................»16.88 WINDOW CURTAINS • OLD SALEM RUFFLE PRISCILUS • CAFE • TAILORED NINON 3 0 % OFF 4 -DAVIECOUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, THURSDAY,MAY 19,1983 S tu d e n ts R eceive D egrees At N .C . S tate .G arró n B rannon a n d H ealth O ccu p atio n s in stru c to r K ate W ilson d isc u ss B ran n o n 's upcom ing trip to n atio n al H ealth O ccu p atio n s co m p etitio n in T ex as. B ran n o n , a D avie H igh se n io r, w a s n am ed sta te w in n er in th e H .O . sp o n so red n ri^ ic a l term in o lo g y te st. Advances T o N a t i n r m l F i n a b I n T e x a s Student State Winner In Medical Terminology A Davie High Health Occupations student has . been named state winner in medical terminology and will advance to national finals next month in Texas. Garren Brannon, a senior who plans on someday obtaining a medical degree, was named state medical terminology winner during competition M ay 6 in Winston- Salem. The event was sponsored by H ealth O ccupation Students of Am erica (HOSA) Clubs, of which the Davie Club is an affiliate. Brannon, son of Mr. and M rs. G ary Brannon of Route 3, Mocksville. completed against 24 students from 8 North Carolina H O SA districts for the title. Students were required to correctly define a broad list of medical terms relating to disease, body parts and body functions. Brannon was awarded a $100 check and a trophy as state champion. National competition is set for June 20 in San Antonio, Texas. Brannnn will compete against first. second and third place terminology winners from all 50 slates. Kale Wilson, Davie High Health Occupation instructor commends Brannon on the state championship. “He is a very intelligent student who used his own initiative to obtain a goal,” she said. “His hard work has won a state title. We wish him the best at nationals with the Davie Health O ccupations students cheering him to successs.” Anniversary Rings Farm Bureau Recommends Price Support For Tobacco Tha North Carolina Farm Bureau board of directors has recom ­ mended that the price support level for flue-cured tobacco for the 1984 and 1985 crop years be stabilized at ■ the 1983 level. .The board further recommended that price supports be stabilized for (he 1986 crop year, provided the F l e e t Financenter C U T Y O U R M O N T H L Y P A Y M E N T S B Y 5 0 % OR MORE L E T F L E E T F IN A N C E N T E R H E L P Y O U P A Y Y O U R C U R R E N T D E B T S W IT H A C O N S O L ID A T IO N LO A N O F «2000 To «25,000* FAMILY BUDGET PROBLEM CONSOUDATION- LOAN ACCOUNT. OWED рЖ мтв SOLiniON LOAN , *2100 AUTO LOArJ *2600 HOME REPAIR LOAN ‘1000 CHARGE CARDS STORES ' 600 •115 •226 • 65 ■ 50 • 40 »7800 '496 Amount of Loan •9,000 Amount Needed lo Pay Bills *7,600 Extra Cash for You *1,200 New Monthly Payment *162.17 10 yrs. 18.00 APR Tolal Payments 19,460.40' Mon№i!y savings of $333.83 Can you Imagine wtial you could do wilh an extra K O O ^ ^ r monlh? This Is only one example ol what Fteel Financenter can do Ju(t flgurs how much monay you'll nsed for Bverythlnff— THEN PHONE US! Our Policy: 1 3. * Suti»et to our Ubef9l CrocM Po/icy. Wt'ro In busln*M to find wayt to makt loMit.W» can't bUlld a buslneM by fuming «wav bualnata. Wa think Ilka a cua(om*r. F l e e t F i n a n c e n t e r I I U Yadkinvine Rd. Willow Oak Shopping Center MocksviHe, N.C. Phone: 634-3596 current price support form ula’s cost of production index shows no more than a five percent increase. (The index Is based on a three-year m oving average of prices paid by farmers, including wage rates, interest, taxes and other costs of production.) However, if the price formula cost index is 5.1 percent or more in 1986, lhat portion of the “No Net Cost Tobacco Program Act of 1982” that deals with the support formula would be re-implemented. This provides for an annual increase of 65 percent to 100 percent of the three-year average as determined under the regular formula. In other action, the Farm Bureau board recommended that the lease transfer program be phased out by crop year 1986. In the meantime, all allotment holders who lease off the farm would be provided an ample opportunity to share in the production or sell allotments within the county to active tobacco growers. The Farm Bureau board action w as based on recom m endations made earlier by the organization’s Flue-C ured Tobacco A d viso ry Committee, comprised of growers in all flue-cured producing areas in the state. John Sledge, president of the North Carolina Farm Bureau said, “ These legislative changes, beginning in 1984, are proposed as lositive and constructive efforts to improve and stabilize the current tobacco program by encouraging r; North Carolina State University conferred more than 3,500 degrees Salurdny M ay 14, during its 94th com m encem ent, setting a new annual record for num ber of degrees awarded. Acting on behalf of the faculty and trustees, N CSU Chancellor Bruce R. Poultoh awarded some 2,800 baccalaureate, 550 m asters’, 195 doctoral and 25 professional degrees before a crowd of nearly 10,000 parenis and friends attending Ihe early m orning ceremonies in Reynolds Coliseum. B ill M onroe, producer and moderator of N B C ’s “Meet The Press,” presented the principal address, and Craig Kellogg Utesch, an electrical engineering major from Matthews, spoke on behalf of (he Class of 1983. Honored as valedictorian was Edw ard Hardy Frazelle of Raleigh, an industrial engineering major who recived a 3.976 grade average out of a possible 4.0 for his four years’ work at the university. Victoria Lynn Godwin, a history m ajor from Burlington, w as recognized as salutatorian. Ms. Godwin achieved a 3.975 grade point average, just one-thousandth of a point behind Frazelle. Fifteen newly-elected members of Ihe N C SU Academ y of Outstanding Teachers were announced. Since N C S U holds only one commencement a year, degrees earned by those who completed requirements since last M ay were officially awarded Saturday. The following are the candidates for degrees from Davie County, (heir fields of s(udy, parents and addresses: M O C K S V IL L E B A C H E L O R S-R o b in Nannette Brock, animal science, M r. and M rs. John T. Brock; Lloyd Horace Brown Jr., animal science, M r. and M rs. Lloyd H. Brown, Rt. 6; Ben T hom as B ye rs, electrical engineering, M r. and M rs. Ben Byers; Danny W illiam Cartner, english, Mr. and M rs. Lawrence W. Cartner, Rt. 1; D ana Eugene Gaither, indusirial engineering, Mr. and M rs. Bill E. Gaither; Michael Scott Murphy, mathematics, Mr. and Mrs. Joe E. Murphy, Rt. 6; Sleven Kent Murphy, mdustrial engineering, Mr. and M rs. Joseph E. Murphy, Rt. 6; Patrick Aubrey Scamon, materials engineering, Mr. and M rs. Ernest T. Seamon, Rt. 7. C O O L E E M E E B A C H E L O R S - A m i M a u g e Jerome, textiles. M r. and M rs. John L. Jerome; Robert Lee Tucker, statistics, Mr. and Mrs. Jim m y L, Tucker. A D V A N C E B A C H E L O R S -R o b in Dennis Tutterow, aerospace engineering, Mr. and Mrs. Carl J. Tutterow, Rl. 2. Strawberries Hull fresh strawberries after washing or the berry will absorb some of the water. Use im ­ mediately. _________ H e r e ’S ■ . _ C h i r o p r o c t i c t r e a t s A r m P a in s Pains in the arms, wrists, fingers, elbows and shoulders are not to be taken lightly, whether they be related to injury or a disease condition. Many pains which may be felt in the arm are actually caused by structural prob­ lems which involve the spine and nervous system. Without proper treatment, degeneration can occur. If you suffer arm pains, it would be wise to visit a doctor of chiropractic for diagnosis and treatment. His modern meth­ ods of natural health care are designed to relieve pain and correct the cause without the use of drugs or medications. Dr. Ramey Kemp ' 501 Wilkesboro St. Mocksville, N.C.Presented in Ihc Interest ot better health by your doctor ol chltopracttc, _ ,, » » .the American Chiropractic Association. Dally OfflC6 HOUTS By AppOlntmSnt and the North Carolina Chiropractic Association . 63d.9C 1P~ Northwest Junior Livestock Show Scheduled For June I Prize winning steers and hogs raised by enterprising 4-H youths in Davie and six other area counties will be entered in this year’s N or­ thwest Junior Livestock Show and Sale scheduled for the Dixie Classic Fairgrounds in Winston-Salem on June 14 and 15. Approximately 45 steers and 175 hogs are being prepared for the annual event. Last year’s Grand Champion steer w as enteeed by D udley G entry, o t Stokes Counly, and was purchased by the North Carolina Farm Bureau. The Grand Cham ­ pion Invididual hog, entered by Danny Tillej;, of Surry, was bought by Iredell Livestock Market. Tickets for the big barbecue, held in conjunction with the Show and Sale, are available at the Davie County Exlension Office, but will also be sold at the fairgrounds on Ihe 15th. The program is sponsored by Ihe Ari-Business Council of the Greater Winston-Salem Cham ber of _Commerce. ________ W.O.W. Lodge 323 To Meet Monday W.O.W. Lodge 323 will meet Monday, M ay 23, 7:30 p.m. al the D avie A cadem y Com m unity Building. This will be a regular business meeting, and all members are urged to attend.MOCKSVILLE, N.C. Fdster-Rauek Prug Company Phone: 634-2141 Letters To E d ito r lot. This area is bordered by bushes on two sides, ^ees on a Dear Editor: A certain matter needs lo be broughl lo Ihe altcnllon of the people of Davie County. Since Ihe beginning of the school year, the student council of Davie High has been working toward providing some type of courtyard for our high school. Num erous fund­ raising projects have laken place with the support of our sludent body. The money raised was in- lended lo finance various projects approved by our student council. At Ihe council’s firsl meeting, in Seplember, Ihe concept of some type of courtyard was first in­ troduced and met wilh enthusiasm. Following months of planning and discussion, in Ihe April meeting Ihe council approved eleven hundred dollars for bur courtyard. This money would buy 15 round concrete tables, 45 semi-circular concrete benches tor the tables, and enough granite dust to be spread lo a depth of six inches over Ihe site of the project. Cross ties would be used lo retain Ihe granite dust. The site chosen for Ihis area was a never-used 4300 square foot area belween the cafeteria and the front parking I by bushe^ - third and a sidewalk on the fourth. Oul of sight and sound from classes, Ihis is the ideal place for students lo congregate during their lunch periods. How ever, the adm inistration exercised its veto power in this matter, citing such reasons as problem s with sup ervision and Irash. Ironically, m any faculty members said Ihey would be willing lo supervise the area on a rotating basis, and some expressed Ihe same desire for the tables as the students did. Even though sufficient funds were raised to fund Ihis project, and it w as approved by the student council, we have all been denied what would have been a welcome addition to our school. ^ Randy Ferguson Rt. 3 Advance '1982-83 Student Council President Chris Anderson ; j982-83 Student Council Secretary D ear Editor: ;0ne or more letters to Ihe Editor hâve appeared in your newspaper fr.ompurixjrtêd. supporters of Gilbert R o ge r’s cam paign for State Chairm an that m ake vicious and unsubstantiated charges against the party and ils present Chairman, Dave Flaherty. They contend that jyiV. Flaherty is somehow controlled by -the Congressional Club. -liiave been active for m any years iri ;the Republican Partj’, having sçrved on Ih e Beaufort County Republican Executive Corhmittee continuously since 1936, as well as running as G O P nom inee for Congress from the First District in 1936 and 1940 and for the U S Senate iri 1948. I served len years on the Slate Repbulican Central Com ­ mittee, and as delegate to the Republican National Convenlion of 1948, 1952, 1960, 1964, and 1976. :During that time I have seen m any parly leaders come and go. I have known Dave Flaherty and worked wilh him in the party for over 20 years, and I know first-hand that he is his own man. He has w orked diligently to b ring all elements of the party together and he is not in anyone's pocket. The parly needs a man of Dave Flaherty’s character, ability and experience as state chairman. Anyone active in the Republican Party knows the allegations about .“control” of the party either a ' the Couniy, District or Slate level by the Congressional Club are absolutely untrue. Unfortunately, these tactics by Mr. Boger’s purported supporters m ay confuse m any average voters who do not know the truth. John A. Wilkinson (919)-943-2049 Perr)'Wiile Friends Of Library Organized On Monday, M ay 9, Perry While, president of F rie n d s of N orth Carolina Libraries, spoke lo a group of interested persons aboul the form ing of a local Friends of Ihe Library Chapter in Davie Couniy. T h is organization would be responsible to set up committees lo assist Davie Library in m any areas. Included are organizing volunteers lo help with special program s on special days; helping w ilh decorations for holidays, spccial events; landscaping; fund raising and m any olher areas. “This organization can be very beneficial lo Davie County library and become a laision belween Ihe library and Ihc public which il serves,” said Ruth Hoyle, librarian. Another meeting has been sel for Monday, M ay 23 at 7:30. All in. terested people are urged lo allend. Dear Editor: Tlve General Assem bly will soon consider whether lo repeal legislation which allows local school districts lo shorten Ihe length of the school year on their own. Thai legislation, passed in Ihe 1982 session of Ihe General Assembly, was a response lo Ihe problems m any school system s have in m aking up days lost due lo in­ clement weather. Under Ihe law, school dislricis can decide not lo make up as m any as five days. In other words, in some of our school districts, the school year has been reduced from 180 lo 175 days. Our children are growing up in a complex and difficult w orld-far more complex and difficull lhan Ihe one we grew up in. When there is so much more to learn, il does not make sense lo reduce Ihe amount of time we provide for Ihe learning of our children. One of the argum ents pul forth in favor of allowing school districts lo waive five days is that m aking up days in Ihc heal of June is too hard. Working in hot weather is pari of being a human being. Certainly, hot w ealher m akes learning m ore difficult than fine spring wealher. When, however, did we arrive al Ihe nolion that conditions m usl be perfect for learning to happen ? I do not want m y own children thinking thal everything has lo be jusl right in order for them lo learn,' and I doubt thal most folks in Ihis slate feel any differently. We have a good state school system, one lhat I would pul up againsi any in the land. Our children, however, cannot compele well against children in olher areas if they do not learn as much as those other youngsters. O ur children need m ore education, not less. Reducing the amount of lime Ihey spend in school is a step backward. It is very important lhat the General A sse m b ly repeal the legislation which has resulted in less education for loo m any of our children. . Sincerely, C.D. Spangler, Jr., Chairm an N.C. Slate Bd. of Education DAVIECOUNTY ENTl-RPRlSi; IIBCORD.THURSDAY. MAY 19, 1983 5 North Carolina’s Beaches Are Ready For The Summer T he a u x ilia ry of th e C ounty Line V o lu n teer F ire D e p a rtm e n t h as p resen ted th e d e p a rtm e n t w ith a c h e c k in th e a m o u n t of $3,000 to be used a s a p a y m e n t on a new fire tru c k . In th e ab o v e photo, A nn C a rtn e r, p re sid e n t of th e a u x ilia ry , p re se n ts th e ch eck to M ark T h o rn e, tr e a s u r e r of th e C ounty L ine V F D . V North Carolina's beaches arc easier lo reach than ever. Thai's because there are more lhan 300 beach access sile s to serve residents and tourists alike. Seven are regional access siles w ilh parkin g, restroom s and showers w ailing for sun lovers along Ihe North Carolina coast. All access points are marked with bright orange and blue signs which show the way lo Ihe sun and sand. The signs help visitors find Iheir way through oceanfront develop- nienl along Ihe state’s coastline. While the land next lo the beach is private property, Ihe beach belongs lo everyone. The signs and olher im provem enls-dune crosswalks, parking areas and Irash recep- tacles-are steps lhal state and local governments have taken lo see thal Ihe beach is available for Ihe use and enjoyment of all. Som e .3.12 sites currently are m arked and Ihe number will in­ crease as Ihe sum m er progresses. Sign s m ark all access poinis, whether jusl a path across a dune or a regional access facility with complete services and parking. The signs show a seagull silhouette