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01-JanuaryTax Burden Is $395 Per Capita Is the cost of local government greater or smaller, for residents of Davie County, than It fs for people in other areas? How much is it costing them in taxes, per i-.ipita, to operate their state apd local governments? As In every other section of the country, with the outlays for public services mounting, year after year, their lax burden grows bigger. Nearly every community has been put in a squeeze trying to maintain and, if possible, to expand the services that their people demand, such as better schooling, added police protection, improved health facilities, more roads and the like. According to a national survey, released recently by the Commerce Clearing House, an authority on government finances, Ain<’ricans paid an average of $577 in stale and local taxes last year, a jump of $55 per person over the previous year. The increase since 1870 was $150. . In Davie County, on the basis of its figures and data from other sources, such taxes amounted to approximately $;!i)5 per capita in the year. Klsewhere in the Stale of North Carolina, Iheuverage was $425 per person, which was $48 more than the year before. In the South Atlantic States it was $4B1. All communities have been faced with money problems because of rising payrolls and because of the inflated cost of sup­ plies, materials and capital financing. In some sections of the country the tax load in the year was much greater than in others, due to special local conditions such as heavier welfare costs, housing problems and the like. The range was from a low of $342 in Arkansas to a high of $894 in New York. It marks Ihe first lime that the $800 level has been exceeded. California, with a per capital burden of $7.19, was in the runner- up spot. The report shows that state and local taxes amounted to $121.1 billion, as against $108.8 billion in the prior year. It represented a jump of almonst 100 percent over the 1967 figure, $81.2 billion. In Davie County the tax burden amounted to approximately $7,703,000 in the year. D A V I E C O U N T Y $6.00 PER YEAR THURSDAY, JANUARY 2, 1975 SINGLE COPY IS CENTS Lot Purchased For New Town Hall The Town of Mocksville has purchased the lot on Waters Street, across from the Mocksville Postoffice, as the site for construction of a new Town Hall. The lot is bounded on the west by Salisbury Street; on the north by Sanford Motor Company property; on the east by Tax Listing Begins Here All property in Davie County, either real or personal, must be listed during the month of January, 1975. This year, for the first time, Davie taxpayers may list by mail. All taxpayers who have previously listed and whose name and address appear on the county tax records for the year 1974, have already been mailed tax listing forms with in­ structions to complete and return to the Davie County tax supervisor’s office prior to February 1, 1975. Taxpayers who did not own property in the county on January 1,1974 are not on the tax records, and must make arrangements to list in any township or contact the (ax supervisor’s office for the necessary forms. Taxpayers v,i;o persona! property held or used in connection with a business activity siich as inventories, machinery and equipmeiitj office furniture and fix­ tures, professjdhal equipment, etc. will also be required to complete the county’s business property statement. All businesses must list their property by mail or at the courthouse, township listers will not be able to do this. All property should be listtrf as of January 1, 1975 except in- (Continued On Page 4) aement Street; and on the south by Water Street. In making the announcement, Mayor Arlen DeVito said that "the use of revenue sharing funds has made possible the purchase of this lot and will largely cover the cost of the construction of a new town hall.” Mayor DeVito said that an architect would be employed to draw the plans for the proposed building and that con­ struction would be started just as soon as Police Report During the month of November, the Mocksville Police Department in­ vestigated 177 complaints, rendered services to the public in 170 Instances, and made 52 arrests. 1% Sales Tax A net collection of $24,232.95 in the local one percent sales and use tax collections were reported In Davie County for the month of November. Pauline Wagoner Appointed Davie County Tax Collector Mrs. Pauline Wagoner of Mocksville Rt. 7 has been appointed Davie County Tax Collector to fill out the unexpired term of Mrs. Veatrice Towell, who has retired. Mrs. Lucille Melton of Mocksville, Rt. 6 was named as deputy tax collector, the position formerly held by Mrs. Wagoner. Mrs. Wagoner has been employed by the County of Davie for almost five years. Prior to becoming deputy tax collector two years ago, she worked in the office of the Register of Deeds. The appointments were made by the Davie County Board of Commissioners at their meeting of December 23rd. In other business the commissioners instructed that no county employees receive overtime pay unless specifically authorized by County Manager Ron Vogler. This is due to the county being under the Fair Labor Standard Act. Mrs. Peggy Evans of the Center Com­ munity was appointed to the Davie County Recreation Commission. The commissioners adopted a resolution to reduce the hospital board of trustees from 11 to 9 members in order to comply with the state regulation. The next meeting of the commissioners will be January 6th. possible. The building will house the various town offices, the police department, an assembly room for meetings, etc. “The town has outgrown its present quarters and we lack the necessary space and facilities for the various governmental functions required of us” , said Mayor DeVito. "The new building will make the town offices more accessible to the public. There will also be more and easier parking space.” Sheriff’s Department To Request Funds The Davie County Sheriff’s Department is planning to meet with the Davie County Board of Commissioners on January 23rd and make a special request for funds for equipment. A representative p' the federal govem- mei.t will t^iib be , ifjcHl f.; tt;lHne the possibilities of federal participation with the courlty in providing these funds. Among the items said to be sought is a vehicle, equipped with the vital emergency equipment, for each deputy.Connie L. .Stafford New Director Named For Health Department Ms. Connie L. Stafford of Winston-Salem has been named Health Director for the Davie-Yadkin Health District. She fills the position former held by Alton Brown. A native of Canton, Illinois, Ms. Stafford rreeived an AA degree from Canton Community College; a BA degree from the University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky, graduating with honors; and a master’s degree in Public Health Ad­ ministration from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Since 1967 she has been employed by the Forsyth County Health Department in Winston-Salem. Ms. Stafford will assume her duties as director of the Davie-Vadkin Health District on January 2, 1975. New License Plates Are Now On Sale North Carolina’s 1975 motor vehicle license plates are now on sale across the state. The refiectorized plates will have red letters and numerals on a white background with the slogan “ First in Freedom" across the top to tie in the nation’s Bicentennial observance. More than 4 million tags are expected to be sold by mid February. The new tags are heavier this year with a more durable aluminium base. This apparently was done in the event the state decides lo move ahead with a five-year tag system. Should that system be adopted, metal tabs would be sold each year to be affixed to the plate. The cost of automobile tags remains at $14, with $1 earmarked for driver education. The Mocksville license plates for residents of the town will cost $1. Other lags will cost as follows: motor­ cycle $6, trailers $4, taxicabs,$76, and trucks $17 and up. Truck tags are based on weight. The deadline for displaying the 1975 tags (Continued Page 4) 8 A n old hay rake sits dormant shrouded in Monday morning's dense fog, backdropped by a com shock ______and a winter bare oak looming dimly in the uncertain light. (Photo by Jim Barringer)___________________ Breaklns, Robberies, Vandalism Mar Holiday Period In Davie m ' Breakins, robberies, vandalism, etc. appeared to be very prevalent through Davie County during the past two weeks. Sometime during the first two weeks of December a garden tiller, valued at il50, a gi^spline can and some oil wab'repurtedly stolen from Ray's Mobile Home on the Yadklnville Highway. A woman’s shoulder bag was reported stolen from a cart at Lowes. Mr. and Mrs. Albert Cronin were shopping and Mrs. Cronin had put her shoulder bag, con­ taining $60 in cash plus other valuable papers, in the shopping cart. The cart was pu.shed by someone to the front and the brown imitation leather bag and all the contents were taken. On December 21st, the residence of John Holleman on Avon Street was robbed. Entry was made through the back door. A shotgun and clothes were reported missing. A window was broken out of the car of Mrs. Nellie Marrs of Mocksville Rt. 7. The car vt’as left parked on North Main Street near the B.C. Brock Community Center. Sometime between 8 p.m. and midnight the left rear window was broken. On December 22nd, John S. Smith reported that a four-speed transmission was stolen from his 1964 Chevrolet Impala parked on US 601 behind his house. On December 24th, Andy’s Union 76 was reportedly robbed of $156 in cash. Two rings, valued at around $300, were reportedly taken from Wagner’s Jewelry Store in Cooleemee on December 27, around 11 a.m. Mr. Wagner said a man came in and asked to see rings. While he was looking at them Wagner was called to the back of the store. When he returned, the man was gone and so were the rings. Glass was shattered in the Davie Exxon Station on the Farmington and 1-40 Exit, Sunday, December 29th, around 1:30 p.m. Investigation showed that someone had shot through the double doors. Shattered Warning Issued On Shooting In The City Mocksville Chief of Police Alton Carter has issued a warning to citizens of Mocksville concerning the discharge of fire arms within the city limits. "There is an ordinance against the discharge of fire arms within the city limits of Mocksville. However, it is becoming a real and hazardous problem, especially with teenagers’’, said Chief Carter. "The Mocksville Police Department is going to crack down on these violators and expect to make several arrests and issue juvenile petitions to parents in the forth coming weeks. If you have been quilly or have children that are quilty of discharging firearms within the city limits, you should heed this warning” , said Chief Carter. Chief Carter said that anyone hearing shots within the city limits of Mocksville should contact the police department immediately. glass and pellets were found on the inside. On Saturday, December 28th, around 11:30 p.m. a window was broken out of a car belonging to Mark Ellis and parked on the Lexington Road, between Andy’s and US 64. On Sunday, December 29th, larceny of a 75 Mercury outboard motor was reported by Norman Boger, Mocksville Rt. 7, XjS 64 East. Mr. Boger reported that the motor was stolen off his boat by somebne cutting a chain around the boat. Serial No. was listed as 3732621; NIC-A 2260S9846. Op Sunday, December 29th, C.F. Seats of Mocksville Rt. 3, US 158, reported that between 10:30 p.m. and 9:30 a.m. someone shot BB pellets through his truck window, a 1974 Chevrolet. Monday, December 30th, a window was broken from a car parked on Depot Street near the Morrison-Studevent Funeral Home. The vehicle was owned by Sylvia Jeanne Robinson of Lexington. ’The broken window was discovered by Mocksville Policeman James Phipps while on routine patrol and he notified tJie owner. The breakage could have occurred anytime Saturday night. There were also three reports of house J windows being broken by guns, includii many windows in an unoccppled rental house, another residence, and one businesf establishment. Breakage was reportedl| caused by Pellet guns or rifle, resident on Park Avenue reported hear bullets hit house. The Police Department and Sheriff! Department ar^ investigating. Davie Suffers Outbreak Of "Flu-Like" Sickness by David Hoyle If your toast to the new year consisted of raising a glass of water to take two asprins for the flu, you weren’t alone in your misery. Nearly everyone in the county has either had the fiu or knows someone that has, but it is the Davie doctors who see it on a daily basis. Calls to local physicians were summed up by one doctor who said, "it's not epidemic but it certainly is rather frequent.” A combination of colds, fiu-like syndrom (consisting of aching and fever) and actual influenza have kept area doctor's waiting rooms full and “ drippy” as one office put it. It was estimated that probably half of the persons bitten by the bug will see their doctors with the rest staying home and depending on bed rest, aspirin and plenty of liquids. No doctor reported putting any influenza patients into the hospital. The wide variety of related illnesses of flu*like illnesses makes pinpointing exactly what is making everyone so miserable difficult. “There are so any different illnesses that a person can have," one doctor said, “making it difficult to call it simply the flu.” Also, the variety of flu-like illnesses as well as variances in an individual’s physical condition makes the recovery time vary from person to person. Davie's medical men agreed that there is not yet an epidemic of influenza in the county which is another reason they are hesitant to give the local bug a specific title. Should it reach epidemic proportion, then tests would be run to determine exactly what type of virus is going around. Nationwide, flu eases during the past few weeks have been confirmed as the Type A-Port Chalmers variety in states north, south and west of North Carolina. Outbreaks of flu have feen confirmed in northern Michigan, Hamburg, N. Y., north Georgia and west Tennessee as well as a variety of foreign countries. In general, health officials termed the current wave an outbreak rather than epidemic. County-Wide Mother's March Planned For Birth Defects Mrs. Pauline Wagoner Plans are underway in Davie County for the Mothers March on Birth Defects, held in association with the National Foun­ dation of the March of Dimes. This will be the first time in a number of years lhat Davie County has had a county- wide organized "Mother's March” . Mrs. Jenny Turner of Mocksville is serving as couniv chairman for this event. The 'Molher’s March” will be con­ ducted on Sunday afiernoon, January 12, 1975. "Everyone is encouraged to participate and do their part in the prevention of birth defects, whether it be as a volunteer to canvass a street or a family called on to contribute” , said Mrs. Turner. "We should all have vital concern for the 250,000 children each year with birth (Continued On Page 4) Fireman O f The Year! Kay K eller, Jr., of M ocksville has been selected Firem an of (he Y ear by (lie members of (he M ocK iville Fire Oepar(m ent. Lee Reel, personnel D irec(9f afi H eri(age FurnKure Company, presen(s (be award. HerKage sponsors (he award each year which Bresented to (he ou(s(anding firem an. (Pho(o by J| arringer) 2 - UAVlb CUUi'iii i-n 1 L.1V1 MRS. ROY ALLAN BARGER ....was Cande Lin Crawford Florida Ceremony Unites Mr. Barger, Miss Crawford Miss Cande Lin Crawford became the bride of Roy Allan Barger in a wedding ceremony held Saturday, December 28, at Trinity Episcopal Church in Vero Beach, Florida. Rev. G.P. Labare officiated the 7:30 p.m. ceremony. Mrs. James Young presented the musical program. The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Albert Crawford of 3735 Eagle Drive, Vero Beach, Florida. She is a graduate of Lenoir Rhyne College where she was a cheerleader and a member of Kappa Delta Sorority. She received her degree in early childhood and will be teaching in the Catawba County school system. The groom, son of Mr. and Mrs. Burton K. Barger of Route 3, Crestview Drive, Mocksville, is a graduate of Davie County High School and Fork Union M ilitary Academy in Fork Union, Virginia. He is a senior at Lenoir Rhyne College, a physical education major and captain of the 1974 Lenoir Rhyne football team. He was selected for Who’s Who In American Colleges and Universities. Upon graduation, he will be commissioned a 2nd lieutenant in the United States Marine Corps. The bride was given in marriage by her father. Miss Cathy Tedeson of Vero Beach was maid of honor. Bridesmaids were Miss Bar­ bara Bogosian and Miss Lisa Gideon of Vero Beach; Miss Mary Ellen Barger of Mocksville, sister of the groom; Mrs. Era Holland, Miss Judi Downing and Miss Liz Froneberger of Hickory; and Miss Mena Wooters of Winston- Salem. Mr. Barger was his son’s best man. Ushers were Buddy Lowery of East Spencer, Bob Pendleton of Salisbury, Tim Thick of Hickory, Brown Londeree of Lynchburg, Virginia, Bill Carter of Rich­ mond, Va., Andrew McSwain of Albermarle, and Jim Radic of Asheboro. The bride’s parents en­ tertained at a reception at the Riomar Bay Yacht Club in Vero Bridal Courtesies Are Shown Miss Linda Bowden and Jon Hale, who will be united in marriage Saturday, January 4, were honored at pre-nuptial events recently. On Thursday, December 12, the couple was entertained at a steak dinner at Jordan’s Le Charlois in Winston-Salem. Hosts for the dinner were Dr. and Mrs. Vic Andrews and Dr. and Mrs. Bob Foster. Among the guests were the bride-elect’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. Sheek Bowden, Jr. Gifts of crystal were presented to the honorees. The couple was also en­ tertained at dinner at the Steak House on Saturday, December 21st, when the hostess was Miss Lu Young. Among the guests were the Bowdens, Dr. and Mrs. C. W. Young and Jimmy Tolson of Henderson, N. C. 124 South Main Street MocksviUe. N.C. 27028 Published every Thursday by the DAVIE PUBLISHING COMPANY MOCKSVILLE ENTERPRISE 1916-1958 DAVIE RECORD 1899-1958 COOLEEMEE JOURNAI 1906- 1971 Gordon Tomlinson.................Editor-Publisher Sue Short..............................Associate Editor Second Class Postage paid at MocksviUe, N.C. SUBSCRIPTION RATES $6.00 per year in North Carolin*; $8.00 per year out of itite Single Copy 16 centt Beach immediately following the wedding ceremony. Imm ediately following the reception, the couple left for a wedding trip to Freeport, Grand Bahama Islands. Beck Infant Is Christened Jennifer Leigh Beck, infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Nathan C. Beck, Jr. of Route 1, Hamptonville, N. C. was christened by Rev. W. Ray Thomas in ceremonies held Saturday, December 21, at 3 p. m. at Holly Springs Baptist Church. Among those attending the ceremonies were her grand­ parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Phipps, Sr. of Mocksville and Mr. and Mrs. Nathan C. Beck, Sr. of Route 1, Harmony; her Godparents, Dr. and Mrs. Ramey F. Kemp of Mocksville; and, Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Lawrence, Jim and Brad, of Swan Quarter, N. C.; Miss Jane Phipps, Jeff Phipps, Walter Phipps and Mr. and Mrs. Jimmy Phipps and Jamey of Mocksville; Rev. and Mrs. Carl Parks; Rev. and Mrs. Robert Taylor of Mocksville; Mrs. Ray Thomas and Craig and Eric; Mrs. Doris Murph and Michelle of Mouth of Wilson, N. C.; and, Jennifer’s great grandfather, Charlie W. Phipps. The Becks entertained at their home at a buffet dinner immediately following the christening ceremony. Assisting in serving were Mrs. W. E. Lawrence, Miss Jane Phipps, Miss Karen Pollard and Mrs. Jimmy Phipps. Ridenhour Reunion On Sunday, December 29, the family of Mrs. M. H. Ridenhour and the late Mr. Ridenhour gathered at her home for their annual Christmas Dinner. A grand time of fellowship and feasting was enjoyed by the six grandchildren and their families, 13 grandchildren and 4 great grandchildren. Those in attendance were Mrs. Ridenhour, Tom Ridenhour of Cooleemee; Mr. and Mrs. Harold Boger, Mr. and Mrs. Norman Boger, Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Hall and Lori of M o c k s v ille ; T o m m ie Ridenhour, Miss Pebble Kirk- man, Mr. and Mrs. M. H. Ridenhour, Jr. and Dick, M.H. Ridenhour, III, Page and Craig of Charlotte; Mr. and Mrs. H.I. Ridenhour of Pilot Mountain; Mr. and Mrs. Eddie Woody and Patty of Rockwell; Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Cunningham of Cullowhee; Mr. and Mrs. Norman Ridenhour, Kent and Betsy of Greensboro; Mr. and Mrs. Joe Covington of Virginia Beach, Va.; Mr. and Mrs. Calvin Ridenhour of Auburn, Alabama; Mr. and Mrs. Cor­ nelius A, Boon, Henry a / nd Linda Stone Mountain, Georgia. Only one granddaughter-in- law, who was ill, and one gr­ andchild, Tony Boon, who is studying in Marburg, West Germany, were not present for the occasion. M R S . S m O N W IL F O R D B R O W N , JR. .......was Rebecca Shoaf Harris Ceremony Is Held In Holy Cross Lutheran Church green bows. Larry B. Thomas of Sanford was his brother-in-law’s best man. Ushers were Rhober Philmore Martin III and Earl Duane Whitaker, both of Mocksville. Miss Lynn Shoaf of Spencer, sister of the bride, presided at the register and Mrs. Rhober P. Martin directed the wedding. The mother of the bride wore a pink polyester dress with Mrs. Rebecca Shoaf Harris and Simon Wilford Brown Jr. of Mocksville were united in marriage Saturday, December 22, in Holy Cross Lutheran Church. The Rev. Garold Carter officiated at the 3:30 p.m. contemporary ceremony. Mrs. Kenneth Waller of Woodleaf, presented the wedding music. David McBride was cruificer and Lee Webb was acolite, both of Mocksville. The bride is the daughter of Mrs. H.W. Shoaf of Spencer and the late Mr. Shoaf. She is a graduate of Davie County High School and attended Salisbury Business College. She is em­ ployed by S.W. Brown and Son Inc. The bridegroom, son of Mr. and Mrs. S.W. Brown of Yadkinville Road, Mocksville, is a graduate of Boonville High School and Oak Ridge Military Institute. He is president of S.W. Brown and Son Inc. The bride wore a formal fitted gown of beige polyester with lace trim styled with an oval neckline, bell sleeves and an A- MRS. RICHARD BOWDEN NAYLOR ....was Deborah Lynnette James Turrentine Baptist Church Ceremony Unites Couple Deborah Lynnette Lynn McCullon, Jeannie Seamon, Vanessa Smith, Cindy MRS. ROBERT DEL DAVIS .....was Julia Patricia Anderson South Carolina Wedding O f Interest Here matching petal hat and a cor­ sage of white carnations. A church reception was held following the ceremony. The bride’s table was covered with a green cloth overlaid with lace. The centerpiece was an arrangement of holly, mistletoe and ivy flanked by yellow candles in silver holders. Mrs. Rhober P. Martin, Miss Doris Davidson of Mocksville and Miss Lynn Shoaf of Spencer served orange punch, wedding cake, mints and nuts to the guests present. After a short honeymoon, Mr. and Mrs. Brown will live on Route 6, Mocksville. Miss James and Richard Bowden Naylor were united in marriage Saturday, December 28, at 6 p.m. at Turrentine Baptist Church. Rev. E. M. James officiated. Mrs. Fred Smith, organist, and Steve Seamon, guitarist, presented music. The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Carol Dean James of Route 4, Mocksville. She is a senior at Davie High School. The groom, son of Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Benson Naylor of 690 Gwyn Street, Mocksville, is a graduate of Davie High School and is employed by J. P. Green Milling Company. Given in marriage by her father, the bride wore a formal gown of candlelight satin and lace. The dress was fashioned with a wide berth collar of lace and long lace sleeves with a deep ruffle of lace on the skirt and train. Her headpiece of illusion was trimmed in lace and attached to a large flat bow. She carried a bouquet of red and white carnations. Sharon James was matron of honor. Bridesmaids were Joy lineskirt with matching picture A H O S '•*’® bride; hat .QhA /«arrioH a nf ^ Betty Denton, TeresB Sparks, and Nanette Naylor and Beth hat. She carried a bouquet of cymbidium orchids. The bride's sister, Mrs. Larry B. Thomas of Sanford was matron-of-honor. She wore a green formal gown of peau de soi with a lace cumberband and carried a bouquet of yellow mums. Flower girls were the bride’s daughters, Miss Susan Dawn Harris and Miss Renee Carol Harris. Their dresses were long green polyester and they carried white baskets with The Republican Wqjftwt’s Club held their final meeting of the year . with a Christmas dinner Thursday night December 19 at the Jericho- Hardison Ruritan Building. Entertainment was provided by the choir of the Cooleemee First United Methodist Churcli. After the dinner, gifts were exchanged and games enjoyed. There were approximately 75 present including club mem­ bers and their guests. Naylor, sisters of the groom. The attendants wore formal dresses of red and green velvet trimmed in lace. They wore crocheted hats trimmed with velvet ribbon. Each carried red and white carnation bouquets centered with candles. Elizabeth Crenshaw and Michael Draughn were child attendants. Honorary bridesmaids were Barbara Jones, Sally Ellis, Gordon T omlinson presents Mrs. LeOrand with her photograph at the conclusion of her retirem ent flinner. A farewell dinner was held Friday, December 20th at 6:30 p.m. at the Enterprise-Record office in honor of the newspaper’s recently retired social editor, Mrs. Margaret A. LeGrand. Employees of the Enterprise and the Clemmons Courier attended the dinner. Special guests were Mrs. LeGrand's sister and sister-in-law, Miss Ossie Allison and Mrs. Gladys Allison. Prior to the meal, egg nog and punch were served to the nineteen attending. The menu consisted of ham, turkey, chicken casserole, potato salad, asparagus casserole, green beans, congealed salads, relish tray and cole slaw, hot bread, iced tea, coconut cake and chocolate cake. The buffet-style covered dish dinner was served by can­ dlelight in an extra office room that had been decorated in a Christmas motif. On the wall behind the head table was a large personalized sign that read, "M argaret, We Love You." Gordon Tomlinson, editor, on behalf of the company, presented Mrs. LeGrand with a gold watch pendant and an appropriate photograph of the honoree sealed behind her desk and typewriter. She was also given the personalized sign. Shelton, Bettina Barnhardt, Sharon Nichols, Paula Lagle and Stephanie Foster. Mr. Naylor was his son’s best man. Ushers were Ralph Naylor, Ronnie James, Robert Ridge, Bill Cozart and Danny Whitaker. For their wedding trip to Beech Mountain, the bride changed to a green polyester dress with jacket and her corsage was lifted from her bridal bouquet. Upon their return the couple will live in Mocksville. CAKE-CUTTING The bride’s parents en­ tertained Friday night following the rehearsal at a cake-cutting at the church fellowship building. A three-tiered cake centered with a miniature fountain was served. Mints, nuts and punch were also served. A red and white color scheme motif was carried out in the decorations. EGGS Only two states produce more eggs than , North Carolina. They are Cali­ fornia and Georgia. Miss Julia Patricia Anderson became the bride of Robert Del Davis in a ceremony at Fern- wood Church in Spartanburg, South Carolina Saturday, December 21, at 7:30 p.m. Dr. William Ball officiated. The bride is the daughter of Dr. and Mrs. Henry Shaw Anderson of 1 Beech Hill, Spartanburg. She is the grand­ daughter of J.H. Markham and Mr. and Mrs. C.S. Anderson of Mocksville. Mr. Davis is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Sam H. Davis, Jr. of Sheboygan, Wisconsin. Mrs. Davis, a graduate of Spartanburg High School, received a B.A. degree in music from Hollins College and plans to teach music in the Charleston schools system. Also a graduate of Spartanburg, High School, Mr. Davis received a B.S. degree in textiles from Georgia BAKING COSTS Ingredients used fo r home baking determine whether a product is low or high in cost. For the price of a basic cookie changes considerably once you add nuts, dried fruit, coconut or other ingredi­ ents, reminds Mrs. Rachel Kinlaw^ extension food specialist, North Carolina State University. Mr. and Mrs. Clay Eaton of Bahama, N.C. announce the birth of a son, Matthew Brian, born Wednesday, December 25th, at Watts Hospital in Durham, N.C. The baby weighed 7 lbs and 9 ozs. Maternal grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Mustyan of Alexandria, Virginia and maternal great grandparents arc Mr. and Mrs. R.C. Grose of Harmony. Parternal grand­ parents are Mrs. and Mrs. Wayne Eaton of Mocksville and paternal great grandparents are Mrs. Rena Marklin and Mr. and Mrs. Carl Eaton, also of Mocksville. Mr. and Mrs. Darrell Joe Harpe of Route 1, Mocksville announce the birth of their first child, a son, born December 21 at Forsyth Memorial Hospital. Brett Holt weighed seven pounds and fourteen ounces. Maternal grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. William Ward Ferebee of Route 1, Mocksville. Paternal grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. Joe Carr Harpe of Route 2, Mocksville. Birth Announced As Special Gift Paula Michelle Green, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Tony Green of 711 Grey Street, Mocksville, celebrated her 3rd birthday Monday, December 30. As a special birthday present, she welcomed a new baby brother, Jason Sanford, born Sunday, December 29, at 10:24 p.m. at Rowan Memorial Hospital in Salisbury. The baby weighed 8 lbs. Grandparents of the children are Mr. and Mrs. J.S. Green of Route 1, Mocksville, and Mr. and Mrs. James E. Gough, Jr. of Route 2, Mocksville. Mrs. M argaret LeGrand holds the gold pen____ watch she received upon retirhig after 26 years as Soiial Editor of the Enterprise-Record. N O T IC E Due to the slow market for new home, we are now soliciting remodelling and repair jobs. This is an excellent time to get those small jobs done-porches, carports, finish basements, panelling installed, rooms add­ ed, etc. Our staff of these skilled carpenters now have the time to take such work im- Ben Childers Charlie Cozart David Cozart Call us today for a free estimate for your pet project We are scheduling work to begin in early January. LAREW-WOOD, INC. 634-S933 Tech and is enrolled in the graduate program in anatomy at Medical University of South Carolina. He also is a member of the Army Reserves. Given in marriage by her father, the bride wore a formal gown of white sheer trimmed in Veniselace. Her French illusion veil, trimmed with lace and organza flowers, was attached to a matching headdress. Miss Cynthia Jane Anderson, aster of tlv bride, was maid of honor. Bridesmaids were Miss Deborah Carol Brown of Boone, N.C., a cousin of the bride; Mrs. John Belton White, Jr. of Columbia, S.C.; Miss Lucy Margaret Heddon of Greenville, S.C.; Miss Sara Catherine Turpin of Myrtle Beach, S.C., Miss Lucy Lewis Fokes of Atlanta, Georgia; Miss Susan Leslie Florence of Brookline, Mass and Miss Hope Fitchett Hall of New York City. The groom’s father was his son’s best man. Ushers were Henry Kyle Anderson, brother of the bride; Milton Christmas Smith of Columbia, S.C.; William Jones Ledbetter of Morilton, Ark.; Joseph James Blake, Jr. of Atlanta, Ga.; Peter Stack of Bristol, Tenn.; Jerry Lane of Millen, Ga.; Vincent Caggiano III of Cowpens, S.C. and Paul Dupre Davis. A reception was held at the Country Club of Spartanburg following the ceremony. After a trip to the North Carolina mountains, the couple will live at , lO-A Amelia Ave., C h a r l e s t o n , S . C . OUT OF TOWN GUESTS Among the guests attending were Mr. and Mrs. C.S. An­ derson, Mrs. Anderson Brown, Charles Brown, Elizabeth Brown, Betsy Clark, J.H. Markham, Miss Hilda Markham, Mr. and Mrs. Leo Cozart, Mr. and Mrs. Wayne Eaton, Mrs. Worth Hendricks, Mrs. Paul Grubbs and Mrs. Virginia Waters, all of Mocksville; Dr. L.R. Shaw and Mr. and Mrs. Paul Hennedy, Jr. of Statesville; Miss Carolyn Shaw and Bill Goodwin of Charlotte. PRE-NUPTIAL PARTIES A rehearsal party was given Friday night by Mr. and Mrs. Sam Davis. The bridesmaids and out-of- town guests luncheon was given Saturday by Mrs. Sam Fleming, Mrs. Clyde Hedden, Mrs. Charles Moore and Mrs. C.B. Lesesne. Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Erwin hosted a men’s luncheon on Saturday. Start The New Year Off Right... Take Your Prescription To Foster Drug Complete Tax Service We Will File All Insurance Forms PSTER DRUG CO. If we cant save ijou money then we don’t Jeserve your businemi!! A ro u n d o,n^hho\ii w ith ..... Betsy Pennin^on ATTENDS FUNERAL IN CLAYTON Mr. and Mrs. Prentice Campbell spent Sunday and Monday, Dec. 22 and 23 in Clayton with relatives; going especially to attend the funeral of Mrs. Campbell's sister-in- law, Mrs. J. B. Jones. CHRISTMAS GATHERINGS Visiting Karl and Jody Osborne for Christmas gatherings at their home on Maple Avenue on Friday night were Bob-0 and Sonya Whitaker and daughter of Prison Camp Road. On Saturday night their guests were Jerry and Janie Dunn of Sanford Avenue. On Monday night their guests were Jody’s mother, Marie Jones, her sister and brother-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. John Butero and sons, Johnny and Michael of Maple Avenue, and John’s mother, Mrs. John Butero, Sr., of Mocksvilla Apts. On Thursday night their guests were Eric and Mary Ann Moore of Salisbury, BUTERO’S ENTERTAIN WITH DINNER Mr. and Mrs. John Butero entertained with a family Christmas dinner at their home on Maple Avenue. Those attending were the Butero’s and their two sons, Johnny and Michael, Mrs. Butero’s mother, Marie Jones, her sister, and brother-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Karl Osborne all of Maple Avenue, and John's mother, Mrs. John Butero, Sr., of Mocksvilla Apts. HAMILTON'S VISIT IN TENNESSEE The Reverend and Mrs. D. A. Hamilton spent Christmas Day in Elizabethton, Tennessee with their daughter and grandson, Mrs. Fay Nixon and Chris. Spending three days with the Hamilton's at their home on Church Street recently was their son and daughter-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. D. A. Hamilton, Jr., and son, Tripp, from Virginia Beach, Va. HERE FOR THE HOLIDAYS Spending the Christmas holidays with Martha Pennington and her family of North Main Street was John Cowan of Mt. Holly, New Jersey. Martha and John are students at Greensboro College. ATTENDS THE SUN BOWL Miss Janie Moore, a senior at UNC-CH, and a member of the Pep Band there, went with the band to El Paso, Texas to play for the Sun Bowl. EVERETTS ENTERTAIN GUESTS Spending Christmas with Mr. and Mrs. Joe Everett and Jody of Cherry Street were Mrs. Everett’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Savage of Henderson. Guests for Christmas breakfast were Mr. and Mrs. Pete Forrest, Mr. and Mrs. Glenn Hammer and the Savages. SMITH’S HOST FAM ILY DINNER Mr. and Mrs. Kermit Smith entertained their family with a Christmas dinner at C’s Restaurant on Dec. 21. Attending were Mr. and Mrs. Larry Smith and son Erran of Pageland, S.C., Mr. and Mrs. Dale Smith of Clemmons, Darlene Smith and Bill Case. SPENDS HOLIDAYS WITH MOTHER Mr. and Mrs. Charles H. Pitts of Alexandria, Va., spent Christmas holidays at their home on Rt. 1 and especially with her mother, Mrs. Ida B. Tutterow. Mrs. Tutterow’s son and daughter-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. David Tutterow, of Alexandria, spent the holidays with her, also. MRS. RIKE WILSON HAS COMPANY Mr. and Mrs. Clyde Leach of Miami, Fla., spent Christmas with his mother, Mrs. Hike Wilson, at her home on Naylor Street. SPENDS CHRISTMAS IN ATLANTA Mr. and Mrs. Pete Tutterow, Rt. 1, spent the holidays in Atlanta, Ga., with their sons David and Curtis and their families. rtOLIDAY ACTIVITIES Mr. and Mrs. W. L. Moore, Jr., Miss Janie Moore, and Miss Janie Martin of North Main Street and Mr. and Mrs. W. L. Moore III of Concord were Sunday luncheon guests of the Paul Donnellys of Salisbury. Christmas house guests of the W. L. Moores were Mr. and Mrs. Walter E. Martin and Walter, Jr., of Denmark, N.C. and Mr. and Mrs. W. L. Moore III and Virginia. Joining them for Christmas day dinner were Mr. and Mrs. Paul Donnelly of Salisbury. SISTER VISITS Mrs. C. A. Burrus of Shelby spent the past week visiting her sister. Miss Flossie Martin of North Main Street. VISITOR FROM KARACHI, PAKISTAN Miss Nina Dubash of Karachi, Pakistan is spending a week with friends. Dr. and Mrs. Sarah Minwalla at their home on Raymond Street. ATTEND PROGRAM AT CHAPEL HILL Mrs. J. C. Collette and daughter, Mrs. W. Grady Dunn and Mrs. Henry Van Hoy spent last Thursday in Chapel Hill. While there they attended the Christmas program at the Morehead Planetarium. The children of Mrs. J. C. Collette were all home for Christmas. HERE FOR CHRISTMAS Mr. and Mrs. J. K. Sheek, III, and sons Kim and Michael, of Doraville, Ga., spent a week visiting their parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. K. Sheek, Jr., and Mr. and Mrs. Dudley Collins, both of North Main Street. SPENDS CHRISTMAS IN MOORESVILLE Miss Margaret Call spent Christmas day in Mooresville with her daughter and son-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Robert Howard. HOLIDAY CELEBRATIONS Mr. and Mrs. Harry G. Coleman, Jr., of Milling Rd. entertained Dec. 23 with a candlelight dinner in honor of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph B. Saunders of Houston, Texas. Those attending were Miss Mary E. Saunders, Mr. Saunder's Mother and Mr. and Mrs. Avery 0. Harris of Rt. 4. Mrs. Coleman and Mrs. Harris are sisters of Mr. Saunders. Mr. and Mrs. Avery O. Harris held their traditional family reunion and gift exchange at their home on Christmas Eve. A turkey dinner was served Christmas to the family at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Avery Harris. HARTMAN’S HOST DINNER Mr. and Mrs. G. A. Hartman were hosts to Mr. and Mrs. Guy Hartman and family of Charlotte and Mrs. R. B. Bunch of Statesville and John Hartman and family of Farmington for Christmas Day dinner. On Saturday, Mr. and Mrs. G. A. Hartman were the dinner guests of Mr. and Mrs. R. B. Bunch, afterwhich they attended Masonic St. John's Day Dinner at Farmington. HOME FOR CHRISTMAS Miss Jill Slate, a nursing student at Florida Hospital in Orlando, Fla., and Miss Moira Slate, a senior at Mt. Pisgah Academy in Candler, N.C., are spending the Christmas holidays at home with their parents. Dr. and Mrs. Francis Slate of North Main Street. LUCKY ON CARROUSEL Mike Register, 11 year old son of Mr. and Mrs. F. B.' Register of Route 2, Mocksville, was the lucky recipient of the $100 Cash Carrousel prize given by the Mocksville-Davie Chamber of Commerce Christmas promotion, ON HONOR ROLL Miss Belh Hoyie, daughter of Mr, and Mfs. E. D, Hoyle of Emerald Isle, N, C, and formerly of Cooleemee, was included on the Honor Roll at East Carolina University for the 1st quarter. To be included, a student must maintain a 3,0 average with no grade under C and an average of B or above, VISITORS HERE Joiin Davis of Auburn, Alabama visited his uncle and aunl. Dr. and Mrs. Clyde Young during the holidays. Also a visitor of tlie Youngs was Jimmy Tolson of Henderson, N.C. CHILDREN AT HOME Visitors in the home of Mr, and Mrs. Ralph Call for the holidays were their children: Mrs. Janet Whitcher of Lake Park, Florida, and son Shane; Mr. and Mrs. Jerry James, Robert and Kevin, of Anderson, S. C.; and Mr. and Mrs. Michael Surratt of Salisbury. WEDDING ATTENDANT Miss Margaret Ann Daniel was maid of honor in the wedding of Miss Pam Carter and Robert Foy at St. Leo's Catholic Chiu-ch in Winston-Salem Saturday, December 28th. Miss Daniel and Miss Carter were roommates at Catawba College. Also attending from Mocksville were Bill Daniel, Miss Barbara Daniel and Mr. and Mrs. T. J. Caudell. WALKERS HERE FOR CHRISTMAS Mr, and Mrs, David Walker and son, John, of Richmond, Va, spent the holidays visiting their parents, Mrs. John Smoot of Raymond Street and Mr. and Mrs. Johnny Walker on Kelly Street. VISITS OVER CHRISTMAS Mrs. Mary Chandler of Asheville, N. C. spent a week visiting her sister, Mrs. Frances Pennington at her home on North Main Street. HERE FOR CHRISTMAS Mr. and Mrs. Brooks Wilkins of Chapel Hill spent a few days over the Christmas holidays with Mrs. Wilkin’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. W. Whitaker on Rt. 2, Mocksville. Mrs. Whitaker's sister, Mrs. James Couch and her husband are visiting their son on the Sain Road and friends. BROWNS VISIT IN ROCKINGHAM Mr. and Mrs. Roy Brown of Sanford Avenue and daughters, Sandi and Teresa spent Christmas Day with Mrs. Brown’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. R. L. Pryce in Rockingham. HOLIDAY VISITOR Mrs. Frank Miller of Phillipsburg, N.J. is visiting her son and daughter-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Glenn Miller and children at their home on Magnolia Avenue. She will return home Saturday. VISITS IN NORTH WILKESBORO Mrs. Era Murph visited her daughter and son-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Phil Southern, and daughter LuAnn, during the holidays at their home in North Wilkesboro. HERE FOR CHRISTMAS Sgt. 1st Class Everette G. Sain and family of Ft. Devens, Mass. spent last week with their parents, Mrs. Elizabeth Sain and Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Daniels. While here they also attended the funeral of Sgt. Sain’s grandfather, W.A. Sain. HOLIDAY GUESTS Mr. and Mrs. Sam Austin, Sr. and Miss Louise Austin of Asheville were the holiday guests of Mr. and Mrs. Sam Austin, Jr., and family of Woodland Development. ATTEND CHARLOTTE WEDDING Mrs. Charles F. Bahnson and Mr. and Mrs. Rocky Johnson went to Charlotte December 20th to attend a buffet dinner party in honor of Martha Bagby and Rick Bahnson prior to their wedding on the 21st. The dUnner party was given in the home of Mr. and Mrs. R.B. Laine in River Hills Plantation. DEVITO’S HOST HOLIDAY DINNER Mr. and Mrs. Arlen Devito hosted a dinner Christmas Day at their home on Church Street. Guests included Mr. and Mrs. Gordon Tomlinson, Mr. and Mrs, Cole Tomlinson, Mrs. C,H. Tomlinson, Mr, and Mrs, Eddie Tomlinson and daughter, Jennifer, of High Point, and Finch Avett of Virginia Beach, Va. SPEND CHRISTMAS HERE Mr. and Mrs. Eddie Martin and boys, Tracey and Lloyd, of Winchester, Term., spent the holidays here with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Tom Rice of Rt. 3, Mocksville. KEMPS ENTERTAIN HOUSEGUESTS Dr. and Mrs. Wesley Barta of Greensboro were weekend houseguests of Dr. and Mrs. R. F. Kemp at their home on Halander Drive during the weekend before Christmas. Joining them for dinner on December 21 were Dr. and Mrs. Marvin Bonzo of Salisbury and Mr. and Mrs. Gordon Tomlinson, neighbors of the Kemps, The Kemp’s son Ramey, Jr„ and his family from Qaleigh spent Friday night with his parents en route to Arkansas to spend Christmas with Mrs. Kemp’s parents. Dr. and Mrs. Lile Hill and also her sister and brother-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Harry Heidelberg. The Heidelbergs are former residents of Mocksville. KIMBROUGHS VISIT Capt, and Mrs, Kim Kimbrough of Las Vegas, Nevada spent a week in Mocksville visiting his aunt and uncle, Mr. and Mrs. Harry Osborne on Lexington Road. The Kimbroughs left Thursday for Dallas, Texas to visit relatives there. Couple Married December 27 Mr. and Mrs. John Henry Champ, Jr. are shown above following their w eddii^ cerem ony held Fridav, Decem ber 27, at Turrentine Baptist Church. R ev. Bill Creason officiated the 6 p.m. cerem ony. H ie bride, the form er Toni Dianne Johnson, is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. M ax Johnson of Route 7. MocKsviiie. The groom , son of M r. and Mrs. John Henry Champ, Sr., also is of Route 7. The bride was given in m arriage by her father. The coupie w iil live on Route after you see your doctor. bring your prescription to ‘H o l t Plione 634-2111 Mocksville, N.C Center Methodist Church Is Scene O f Wedding the couple. Sandwiches, cookies, candies DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, THURSDAY, JANUARY 2, 197.S - 3 Monica Jean York, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. David York of Route fi, Mocksville, celebrated her llrd birthday on Thursday, January 2,1!)75. Monica was Davie County's New Year’s Baby for 1972. MRS. RANDY KEITH EMILSON Celebrates Birthday Master Danny Rumple, son of Mr. and Mrs. Dan Rumple celebrated his third birthday Tuesday, Dec. 12th. Helping him celebrate his afternoon party were all of the boys and girls at Mertie Jorie’s nursery. Served were cup cakes, ice cream, coke, peanuts, and chewing gum. Favors given to all eleven children were baseballs. Then, in the evening, Danny had a party at his house. At­ tending were his cousins, Chad Blackwelder, Sandy and Tim Potts, and a special friend, J. B. Turner. Served were the same sweets and goodies as at Mrs. Jones. Danny gave favors of candy cane pencils with an elf head to top off the 14 inch cane. Brian McDaniel, son of Mr. and Mrs. Eddie Mc­ Daniel of Sheffield Road, Mocksville. celebrated his 1st birthday December 20. Miss Rita Jean Boger and Randy Keith Emilson were united in marriage Friday, December 27, at Center United Methodist Church. Rev. Benny Bearden of Welcome, a former pastor, performed the 8 p.m. double ring ceremony. Mike Hendrix, organist, of Mocksville, and Hilda McKnight of Clemmons, soloist, presented the musical program. The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Clay Boger of Route 1, Mocksville. She is a 1970 graduate of Davie County High School and a 1974 graduate of the University of North Carolina at Charlotte with a B. S. degree in nursing. She is employed at Forsyth Memorial Hospital in Winston-Salem. The groom, son of Mr. and Mrs. Fredrick H. Emilson of Southwood Acres, Mocksville, is a 1969 graduate of Corning Painted Post East High School in Corning, New York. He is also a 1973 graduate of Catawba College in Salisbury with a B. A. degree in music. He teaches band and chorus at Southwest Junior High in Clemmons. Given in marriage by her father, the bride wore a formal long sleeved gown with empire waist. The gown was fashioned of white satin appliqued with lace and seed pearls flowing with a cathedral train. The matching headpiece was a full length veil of illusion and lace attached to a Juliet cap. She carried a cascade bouquet of red and white carnations, mums and centered with an orchid. Mrs. Norma Robertson was matron of honor. Bridesmaids were Mrs. Sharon Boger, Miss Terri Emilson, Miss Debbie Emilson and Miss Teresa Boger. The attendants wore formal gowns of red velvet fashioned with a v-shaped neckline trimmed with em­ broidered lace. They carried The Calico Cat’s SECOND SALE AND YOU ARE INVITED You will want to take advantage of these savings. EVERY ITEM WILL BE REDUCED 25% SOME ITEMS WILL BE REDUCED AS MUCH AS 50% We Accept Master Charge ....was Rita Jean Boger nosegays of white carnations and mums. Holly Harpe and Scott Boger were child attendants. Dale Emilson of Salisbury was his brother’s best man. Ushers were Randy Boger, of Mocksville, brother of the bride; John Munday of Cooleemee; Mark Bailey of Advance; and Mitchell Good­ man of Woodleaf. RECEPTION The bride’s parents en­ tertained at the Center Com­ munity Building immediately following the ceremony. The bridal table was covered with a red cloth with a white lace overlay. The centerpiece was of white mums, and red carnations with white candles used also. Refreshments consisted of wedding cake, mints, nuts, petite sandwiches, ham biscuits, cheese straws and punch. Assisting at the reception were Miss Faye Dyson, Mrs. Jerry Blackwell, Mrs. Dale Emilson and Mrs. Ronnie James. Mrs. Bryant Smith presided at the guest register. After a wedding trip to Washington, D. C., the coule will live on Route 2, Winston- Salem. AFTER-REHEARSAL PARTY Mr. and Mrs. Fredrick Emilson entertained with a candlelight after-rehearsal party Thursday for their son, Randy, and his bride-elect, Miss Rita Boger. The party was held at the Emilson’s home in Southwood Acres. Attending were mem­ bers of the wedding party, and the Reverend Benny Bearden, who offered a special prayer for and punch were served. WEDDING BRUNCH A wedding brunch on December 26 given by Miss Faye Dyson and Mrs. Marlene Blackwell at the Dyson home on Route 1 honored the couple. Members of the wedding party and immediate families were present. Guests were greeted by Miss Dyson and directed to the dining room where fruit juices, am­ brosia, cheese ball with assorted crackers, ham biscuits, sausage pineapple kabobs and assorted cookies were served with Russian tea and coffee. The dining room table was centered with candelabra flanked by cone shaped arrangements of sausage pineapple kabobs stuck in with tooth-picks. The group enjoyed a social hour following the meal. Goodbyes were said to Mr. and Mrs, Wade Dyson. PRE-NUPTIAL PARTIES Mrs. Bill Ferebee and Mrs. Bryant Smith entertained with a dinner on December 7 honoring the bride-elect. Mrs. Ferebee’s home was decorated for the Christmas season and the guests were served chicken salad, green pea pastry tarts, sweet potatoes, fruit cake and tea by can- I dielight. The honoree was presented a | gift of linens. ? The guests included Mrs. Clay Boger, mother of the honoree; Miss Teresa Boger, sister; Mrs. Fredrick Emilson, Miss Debbid' Emilson, Miss Terri Emilson| mother and sisters of the groom, and Mrs. Pres^ Robertson, the bride’s matroq of honor. On Saturday night, Decemb 14, a supper was held at^ th(j home of Mr. and Mrs. Williams honoring the couplei Guests included the honore their parents, Mr. and Mrsl Clay Boger and Mr. and Mrs| Fred Emilson, Miss Debbie; Emilson, Dale Emilson, Miss Teresa Boger, John Williams and Regina Williams. Rick Bahnson Marries In Charlotte Myers Park Baptist Church in Charlotte was the setting for the 4 p.m. wedding ceremony held Saturday, December 21, uniting Martha McNeal Bagby and Charles Frederick Bahnson, Ji*. in marriage. A reception followed at the bride’s parents home. The bride, of 4024 Providence. Road, Charlotte, is the daughter; of Mr. and Mrs. H. Mark Mc-j neal of 2415 Beretania Circle. J She is a graduate of Myers Park: High School and is a senior at. the University of Nortii Carolina at Charlotte. I The bridegroom, of 2501 Tanglewood Lane, Charlotte, is the son of Mrs. C. F. Bahnson of Mocksville, and the late Mr. Bahnson. He is a graduate of North Carolina State University and is employed with Blythe Brothers Co. The couple will live at thei bridegroom’s address. SALE DATES Duiing The Calico Cat’s Regular Hours Beginning January J, 197S and Ending January 11, 1975 TEN DAYS ONLY U OUPS: Daily Tues. thru Sat. 1- 5 p.in. Open Friday night till 9 p.m. Closed >'ondays SHOP EARLY FOR BEST SELECTIONS THANK YOU For Shopping At The Calico Cat. HAPPY NEW YEAR! Gift Wrapping Extra During Sale LO C A TIO N : In the Red P-am at the com er o f North ? 'ain and Greenwood Avenue, >'ocl;sville, S.C. Phone 634-3414 4 - UAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, THUKSUAY, JANUARY 2, 1975 Burlington To Sell Cooleemee Property; Excluding Plant And Executive Houses Burlington Industries announced Tuesday the sale of all their property in Cooleemee with the exception of the plant and warehouse and five residential facilities. “They expressed no interest in selling their plant which they expect to continue to operate,” said Jerry Swicegood, president of Swicegood Real Estate of Mocksville, Inc., which will be handling the sale. The five residential properties not in­ cluded in the sale are located on Marginal Street and were formerly used by ex- cutives of the Cooleemee plant. Burlington is actively interested in selling its Cooleemee property, which consists of* approximately 75 parcels ranging from lots to acreasge tracks, to the residents of Cooleemee, Swicegood said. “ They are interested in the future of Cooleemee,” he continued, “and they are presently working to secure a water using industry for the town." Swicegood Realty finished appraisal of the property in late October of 1974 and the land was appraised at approximately $400,000 excluding close to 120 acres in Rowan County which will also be sold. “ This is the most extensive appraisal we’ve ever done,” Swicegood said of the Burlington sale. Swicegood Realty has the exclusive sales agreement to represent Burlington Industries. Each lot will be sold on an individual basis according to its appraised value. Boundary disputes may necessitate a survey in some cases. For Sale signs will be posted on the properties to be sold and the land will go on sale Friday, January 3. The land will be sold based on county records which differed slightly form Burlington’s records. County records are reevaluated every seven years. Persons interested in purchasing property or acreage belonging to Burlington should contact Swicegood Realty. Freewood Petition To Be Heard Again Monday, January 6th On Monday, January 6th, the Davie County Zoning Board of Adjustment will again take up what many consider to be the issue of nudity in Davie County. In effect, the zoning board will begin all over in considreing a petition by Freewood Associates of Winston-Salem for a special use permit to operate a private family campground in northwest Davie County. The issue before the board will still be land use but many Icoal residents, in­ cluding a church-oriented group called “Citizens of Davie County,” are concerned that the campground will in fact be a nudist colony. The proposed campground is not specifically designated as a retreat where clothing is optional. However, the owners of the 60-acre tract of land hold a charter number from the American Sunbathers Association. A new hearing on the Freewood issue was made necessary after an appeal of the zoning board’s denial of the special use permit was remanded back to the board by Superior Court Judge J. W. Jackson. The Rev. Bill Shoaf, vice-chairman of the “ Citizens of Davie County,” said the group does have definite plans for the upcoming hearing but declined to give details that he said may be countered by Freewood attorneys should the plans be announced. “Our citizens committee met on the 10th of December and sent notices to churches, pastors and interested people requesting that they announce in their churches and communities when the meeting will be held,” Shoaf said. Shoaf also said the group was soliciting a lawyer and the final details would be worked out before the Monday meeting. Their previous lawyer, Roddy Ligons, may have a schedule conflict but Ligons or an associate may still be able to attend the meeting. “ The leadership committee (of “Citiznes of Davie County” ) is urging interested people in Davie County to come for the zoning meeting,” Shoaf said. “ A very strong moral decision is involved and if the citizens of the county cannot prevent an undesirable association or condition from coming to Davie County, then the citizens of Davie County have absolutely no protection through zoning.” Shoaf said the executive committee is very appreciative to churches and in­ dividuals who have contributed through freewill solicitations toward the legal expenses in representing the committee in the hearings so far. A list of 900 signatures against the issuance of a permit allowing a nudist .colony in the county will be resubmitted at the meeting, Shoaf said, stressing the committee was not against a family Reward Offered The home of Johnny Foster on Hwy. 64 in the Fork Community was broken into last weekend and between $8,000 and $10,000 in money, guns, a safe and jewelry were taken. Foster is offering a $500 reward for in­ formation leading to the arrest and con­ viction of person or persons responsible for the larceny. Escapee James E. Lewis, 25, of Cox Avenue in Thomasville, escaped from the Davie County prison unit around 5:45 p.m. Christmas Day. Described as a white male, 150 pounds, five feet nine inches tall with brown hair and gray eyes, Lewis was serving a four to five year sentence for assault on a police officer. His sentence began May 12,1972. Fires The Davie County Fire Control Center reported the following calls: December 25th the William R. Davie Fite Department answered a call around 11:15 to the home of Jerry Boger on US 601 North. There was damage from a faulty flu. December 25th around 6:30 p.m. the Jerusalem Fire Department answered a call to a mobile home across from the Little Curb Market when a fuse box became overheated. There was no damage. December 27th around 8:45 a.m., the William R. Davie Fire Department an­ swered a call to a house fire on US 601 North, across from Buster Phillips Trailer Court. Clubs Disband The Cooleemee Jaycees and Jaycettes have officially disbanded the clubs and the balance of funds in the treasure (totaling $455.49) has been contributed to the Davie CountyAssocialion for Retarded Children, a long-time and worth while project and one which the Jaycees and Jaycettes have supported in the past. campground but against a nudist colony. Since the Freewood petition was refiled on November 27, the zoning board has changed a few procedures hoping to eliminate the irregularities which resulting in the petition being sent back to the board. Recording equipment will be used at the hearing to record the entire process to help in keeping accurate records of testimony. The chairman of the zoning board will also exercise his power to swear in witnesses in the case. Monday’s meeting, which is a public hearing and open to any interested citizens, is slated for 7:30 p.m. in the court of the Davie County Courthouse. Wrong Tax Forms Some Davie County Taxpayer may receive the wrong instruction sheet with the tax forms mailed this week from the Davie County Tax Office. Those receiving forms entitled “ Instructions For Listing Business Personal Property” should telephone or contact the office of David Hendrix, 634-3416, and the proper instructions will be sent. Davie Has 8 Highway Fatalities During The Year Of 1974 Lemon Tree Mrs. Bobby Phillips lemon tree is quite sm all but bears unusually large fruit. The dw arf tree was ordered two years ago from a seed catalogue by their son, Tony, The tiny seedling arrived in a small two-inch pot and po one thought it would ever bear fruit. The tree not oi^l;' has fruit, but one lemon was sufficient to make a full pitcher of lemonade for Christmas. Mrs. Phillips says she got a full cup of juice from one lenion. There is one more lemon ready Tor harvest and two sm aller green ones on th,e little tree. The lemons are larger than most lemons and thus far, have been more the size of a “ temple orange” . (Photo by Jim Barringer) Davie County had eight traffic fatalities during 1974, which was double the 1973 toll of four. The eight were: Dana Lee Penninger, 19, of Rt. 1, Woodleaf. killed in a motorcycle accident on Church Street in Mocksville on February 12. Bertha M. Miller, 22, of Rt. 4, Mocksville, died as a result of injuries sustained in a three-car accident on US 601 six miles south of Mocksville on April 10. Frederick Robert Brown, 35, of Rt. 2, Advance, killed in a motorcycle accident on NC801 at the intersection of Bailey’s Chapel Road on May 28. James Edward Connor, 42, of Mooresviile, killed when his tractor-trailer rig ran into the rear of a motorized crane and burned on 1-40 about six miles east of Mocksville on June 27. Robert Leroy Freedle, 36, of Rt. 2, M«cksville, killed in a one car accident at the intersection of Country Lane and US 158 on July 13. Knox Johnstone, 7, son of Mr. and Mrs. John Johnstone of South Main Street in Mocksville, died of injuries after being struck by a car in front of his home on July 16. Michael Ray Brown, 7, of Maupin Masonic Officers To Be Installed The public is invited to attend a special session of Mocksville Masonic Lodge No. 134 on Friday night, January 3rd, in the new Masonic Temple. New officers of the lodge will be installed at this program, beginning at 7:30 p.m. House Robbed Chief Deputy W.W. Wilson is in­ vestigating a breaking and entering of a home near Four Corners during Christ­ mas. The home of Helen Trivette, Vadkinville Rt. 4 (Davie County) was broken into sometime between 2 p.m. December 25th and 6 p.m. December 26th. Reported taken was two portable radios, a 6-qt. iron kettle, framed picture of cat, a guitar, electric clock, all valued at approximately $50, The residence is an old two room house. Avenue in Salisbury, killed in a car-truck crash on US 601 one and a half miles south of Mocksville on September 3. Carrolle Kluttz Brown, 32, died as a result of injuries sustained in the same accident that took the life of her son, Michael Ray Brown. She died a week after the September 3 accident. Mother’s March (Continued From Page 1) defects. This is why the “ Mother’s March” is so important and why volun­ teers throughout Davie County will be ringing doorbells and asking for your contribution on January 12(ii” , said Mrs. Turner. Mrs. Turner announced that area chairwomen have been selected for each area in the county. They are as follows: Phyllis Cartner, Jewel Jordan, Kathy Harpe, Peggy Shelton, Judy Anderson, Janice Severt, Brenda Jones, Grace An­ derson, Francis Jackson, Nancy Colbert, Kay West, Linda Strader, Ruth Hockaday, Helen Boon, Jeanette Cornatzer, Judy Grubb, Pat Cope, Chiquita Guglielmi, Ann Wands and Julia Howell. "Remember, birth defects are forever— unless you help” , said Mrs. Turner. Tax Listing Residents Can Help Foil Area Breakins Saw Is Stolen A Skil saw was reported stolen December 26th, between 1 p.m. and 1:30 p.m. from the new Delano MCullough house under construction on what is known as the “Puiich Daniel Road” . The saw was valued at approximately WO. The Davie County Sheriff’s Department IS investigating. Rotarians View Film Mocksville Rotarians were shown a film relative to highway safety and drinking drivers at their meeting, Tuesday. Sgt. Marshall Varner, public in­ formation officer for Troop E of the State Highway Patrol, presented the program. In discussing his job, Sgt. Varner told the Rotarians that "State Highway Patrolmen are public servants. We are out to help you, not hurt you.” The Rev. Avery Ferguson had charge of the program and intr^uced Sgt. Varner. President Ed Goodwin presided. Better Business Bureau Phone Service Offered Free telephone service is now available to the Better Business Bureau for those in the Cooleemee and Ijames exchanges of Davie County. Prior to December 31st, this service was not available to the patrons of these ex­ changes. as it was to the other exhcanges of Davie County. This free telephone service, now available to all areas of Davie County, is being made available by the Mocksville- Davie Chamber of Commerce. The service enables a resident to call the Better Business Bureau in Winston- Salem free of charge concerning any consumer question or problem. Davie Social Services Expresses Appreciation Julius E. Suiter, chairman of the Davie County Social Services Board said he wished to thank the citizens of Davie County and the County Commissioners for giving the Social Services Board the resources to help Davie’s needy and less fortunate citizens. Speaking for the Social Services Board and the department staff in a letter to the editor. Suiter said, “ We thank each and every one of you who made this Christmas helping experience possible.” “ To our knowledge,” Suiter said, “ All who applied and were eligible for food stamps received them before Christmas, and many were helped with urgent need purchases of fuel and other items through county emergency general assistance funds.” Suiter said the gifts of toys and canned foods given by the Jaycees, Lions Club, Davie High School, and many other civic clubs, churches, and individuals were especially appreciated. “ Such gifts brought joy and hope to many needy parents, "Suiter said. "Through your help they were able to fuirili their rightful parenting roles. These gifts gladdened the hearts of many children, as ‘Santa did come to their homes after all!” The Davie Social Services Board is composed of Julius Suiter, chairman, Mrs. Alice Hoyle, Charles Alexander, Dr. H. R. Hartness, Mrs. Louise Smith and George Martin. Jr.. ex-officio. by David Hoyle Breaking and enterings in Mocksville and Davie County have been keeping town and county law enforcement officers busy during the last few weeks. Mocksville Police Chief Alton Carter and Chief Deputy Sheriff Woodrow Wilson both agreed that their biggest worry at the present time was with breaking and en­ terings, especially in the daylight hours. “ Daytime seems to be the worst,” Chief Carter said. “ People don’t notice a truck working around in the daytime. During the day, you can drive up to anybody’s house like you own the place and walk out with a truck load of furniture.” To help combat this rise in Dgvie breakins, the lawmen offered a •■iTew suggestions to local residents that could deter entry crimes or help to apprehend the thieves after the crime is committed. “ People need to get some kind of “ buddy system” worked out with their neighbors,” Chief Carter said. “ If you see something going on, go ahead and call the law. That’s what we are paid for.” Deputy Wilson stressed that residents should take down the license number of any suspicious vehicles. “ That’s the world’s biggest help,” he said. The men stressed that the license number of a suspicious vehicle should be written down even if the resident does not plan to report it to the police. That way; if a breakin did occur, the law officers will at least have a license number to consider. When leaving your home, a radio should be left playing so as to sound as if someone is in the house. Also, an inside light should be left burning and if possible, inexpensive timers are available to turn lights on and off to look as if someone is moving around the house. “ Be sure to lock all windows and doors,” Chief Carter said. “That’s not going to stop anyone wanting to break in but it will slow them down.” If you are leaving for the weekend or longer, have a neighbor pick up your daily paper. It is a sure sign nobody is home when two or three newspapers lay on the doorstep or driveway. Also, persons leaving for extended lengths of time should contact the police department if living in town or the sheriff’s department if the residence is located out in the county. That way, law enforcements can keep an eye out on the property and investigate any suspicious activity when the owner is known to be out of the area. Deputy Wilson also warned against leaving the porch light on with the rest of the house dark when leaving for the evening. A single porch light burning is a good indication that no one is at home. Serial numbers on any items that can be easily carried off should be written down and filed away. That is especially true for televisions and guns. If the serial number is known, then it can be put on the Police Information Network and the fact that it is stolen and who the owner is will be im­ mediately known if it is recovered anywhere in the United States. Ladders should not be left leaning up License Plate (Continued From Page 1) is midnight February 15, but it probably will be extended since it falls on a Saturday when most tag offices are closed. The license bureau in Mocksville will be open for the sale of tags from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., weekdays and from 9 a.m. to i p.m. on Saturdays. Sam W. Howell, local license agent, said to renew a plate you must have a renewal card or present title as evidence of ownership and cautioned against misplacing the renewal card after it has been received. He is also asking persons renewing license plates, in the interest of time and to keep long lines from forming, to fill out renewal cards before going to l)uy plates. Motor vehicle owners who haven't gotten their license application cards by now should notify the Department of Motor Vehicles in Raleigh. "11 will take from 10 to two weeks to get one and you should therefore act promp­ tly". said Mr. Howell. against a house or easily available to a person wishing to break into a house. People will often lock up the downstairs area while leaving the upper story open to anyone who can find a way to reach an upstairs window. People owning property on which they do not reside should try to frequent it as often as possible. Deputy Wilson said. He reported that there had been many cases in the county of lawn mowers and other such items being missing'from property on which the owner does not reside. “ We’re going to have to start watching out for each other,” Chief Carter con­ cluded. “ Law enforcement officers can’t be on watch everywhere at once.” (Continued From Page I) ventory. This should be listed as of the last fiscal year inventory. Taxlisters have been appointed as follows: Calahaln Township: Mrs. Dale Chaffin (J. C. Stroud Grocery, Center Community Building). Clarksville Township: Mr. L. S. Driver (William R. Davie Fire Department building). Jerusalem Township: Mrs. Margaret Cope (Jerusalem Fire Department, Cooleemee School Gymnasium). Shady Grove Township: Mrs. Jane Carter (Advance Fire Department, Robertson’s Grocery, Bixby). Farmington Township: \ks. Jack Boger (Bogers Kar Kleen Service, Bates Grocery-across from Old Smith Grove School). Fulton Township: Mrs. Floyd Munday (Fork Fire Department). Mocksville Township: Mrs. Marjorie Green (County Court House). The schedule for these tax listers, along with other special instructions, appears on Page 9-B of this issue. The failure to properly list property during the listing period in January will subject taxpayers to a penalty equal to ten percent of the tax involved. Ford Motor Co. Wbn’t Do Anything... The Government Won’t Help... But.. Reovis Ford Has Done Something K ? *400" !S ,S '*2 0 0 " ™ * M “ *6 0 0 “ ^ ^ ^ * 4 9 5 ” Qonada^PriMSgQQOG Thunderbird Reduced *8401 Pick-Up Tmcks hS S»500“ If You Are Smart You Will Check With Us Before Buying Limited Time Only-January-February Units In Stock Or You May Order F O R D Phone Toll FREE from yVinstonSalem 722-2386 ReavIs Ford & Camper iSales Phone 634-2161 Highway 601 North Mocksville, N.C. N.C. Dealer License No. 2416 DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, THURSDAY, JANUARY 2, 1975 - 5 Your Hppy Shopping Store OPiN FRIDAYNIGHT TIL 9:<0P.M. AFTER INVENTORY SALE PLUS STARTS FRIDAY MORNING 9:30 A.M TREMENDOUS SAVINGS FOR THE ENTIRE FAMILY special purchase! 100% OTTON TERRY TOWELS 1.46 22 X 42" bath towels Wide selectiolncluding stripes, versatile solid | colors, even versible jacquard flower designs. }■•>' Al'l the colorsiat are on the decorating scene right ^ now. Come e|ly for best choice. 15 X 25" har towels 960 .. . Washcloths 560 ONE GROUP Springmald* ‘Eyelet’ and print no-lron sheets made with Kodel* Super-smooth 50% Koder polyester, 50% cotton per­ cale. The print Is a scatter of wtilte-lrosted branches with dainty roses on tints of pinl< or blue. Old-world scalloped eyelet embroidery on deep hems. TWIN FLAT OR FIHED FULL FLAT OR FIHED. .. SALE* 3 .9 7 Usually $7^9 [pillow cases 42X36 U.u.lly$4.99pr. . . S A L E « 4 .9 7 SA LE * 3 .4 7 pr. SPRIlbMMD ''PRELUDE’’ : NO IRON MUSUN IRAL SHEETS CiirON UND POLVESTER BLENDS TWIN Sat OR Flko. .SALE * 2 .6 7 fU L L lA T OR FFED . . SALE * 3 .6 7 QUEE FLAT OR FFED. .SALE * 5 .2 7 STAND to PILLOWCASES SALE *2.57 pr. KING UOW CASES u.u.iiy$4!59 SALE *2.97 pr. STAT PRIDE FOAM LATEX )ED PILLOWS 100% FOAM LATEX PINCORE CONSTRUCTION ZIPPERED COnON COVER STAND ID . . SALE 2 for *10.77 Uillv S7.00_____________________ QUEEW. . . . . SALE 2 for *15.77 KING. iiv $10.00 Illy $14JoqSALE 2 for *21.77 FITTED QUILTED MATTRESS PADS FILLED WITH DACRON® 88 FIBER Long-lasting 100% polyester fiberflll. Nylon tricot stretch-on fitted skirt. Ma­ chine washable. Saves your bedding. twin size, usually $ 8 .........sale 6.44 full size, usually 9 .5 0 ... . sale 7.44 queen size, usually $14. . sale 11.44 king size, usually 17.50. sale 14.44 LADIES SPORTSWEAR • AILEEN • QUEEN • CENTER STAGE JACKETS - SKIRTS - SUCKS - BLOUSES Regular *13.00 to *28.00 to * 2 1 .0 0 ONE GROUP LADIES SWEATERS CARDIGANS AND PULLOVERS »i- M r a a a DARK COLORS tO ^ 1 2 ,0 0 _________Reflular $7.00 to $16.00__________ CLEARANCE LADIES DRESSES BROKEN SIZES Regular *10.00 to *26.00 *6 . 0 0 to *15.60 CLEARANCE LADIES PANT COATS ASSORTED FABRICS Regular *32.00 To *50.00 *22.90 '•’3Z90 ONE GROUP JUNIOR TOPS *4.12 SHORT AND LONG SLEEVES tO ASSORTED FABRICS SIZES S-M L $ Q 71% Regular *5.50 To *13.00 CLEARANCE ‘Site Pride’ Noblesse For afelegant look, choose this tone on toe regal motif cotton sheared terryw Martex. Light-and-dark rever- siblen ivy. gold, oatmeal, pink. State Pride' Ascot II She ed cotton In luscious solid col­ ors ' Martex. Perk up your bath with ivy seen, gold, white, blue or shock­ ing nk. Mix with gay printed towels. State Pride’ Florence A l^ch of towel elegance that is new, dilf low rent. Frosty tones of green, yel- plnk or blue. In woven-thru me- dailbh motif. Fringed hems. BATH TOWELS *2.66 HAND TOWELS......................................*1.66 WASHCLOTHS...............................................76« 2'PIECE BATH MAT SETS; CHOICE OF 2 SIZES! 100% nylonsl Polyester and rayon blendtl Floor- hugging treated backs for safe footingl Machine care, quick-drying. Choice of 20 x 34" or 21 x 36" rug size: elasticized lid covers. This season's colors. 3.88 usually 5.50 JUNIOR JEANS BRUSHED DENIM COHON CORDUROY SIZES 5 To 13 M n n n Regular *10.00 To *15.00____________ ENTIRE STOCK LADIES HANDBAGS 25% OFF ASSORTED STYLES Regular *4.00 To *16.00 ONE GROUP LADIES SHOES DRESS AND CASUAL Regular *9.00 To *18.00 5 “to ONE GROUP •HOUSEWARES •HOME FURNISHINGS •GIFT ITEMS Values to 46.00 sW tT O 4 0 % ENTIRE STOCK MEN’S SUITS POLYESTER DOUBLEKNITS WOVEN POLYESTERS Regular *60.00 Regular *75.00 Regular *80.00 SALE SALE SALE *39.88 *49.88 *54.88 Regular *90.00 $ £ 7 Q Q to *115.00 SALE 9 / . 0 0 CLEARANCE MEN’S SPORTCOATS • POLYESTER DOUBLEKNITS • COHON CORDUROY Regular *40.00...................................SALE • 2 7 « Values to *60.00 SALE *34" ONE GROUP MEN'S SHIRTS ™ CASUAL AND DRESS SALE Values To *6.00 W Values To *10.00 SALE ONE GROUP MEN’S POLYESTER SLACKS SOLIDS AND FANCIES Values To *12.00 SALE Values To ‘16.00 SALE SJtt *10“ ONE GROUP BOYS SHIRTS SOLIDS AND FANCIES ASSORTED STYLES »i> *2.44 Values To *4.00 ENTIRE STOCK m BOrS DRESS SLACKS POLYESTER DOUBLEKNIT Regular TEXTURIZED POLYESTER *8.00 To *12.00 0 « V V SALE MEN'S SWEATERS PULLOVERS AND CARDIGANS yW GjL Regular *9.00 To *14.00 f c W /O OFF ENTIRE STOCK GIRLS COATS ASSORTED STYLES Regular *15.00 To *25.00 $ g o o to n s t « r o o SALE SALE GIRLS SLEEPWEAR *3.37 PAJAMAS AND GOWNS tO *4.87Regular *4.50 To *6.50 ONE GROUP GIRLS SPORTSWEAR JACKETS-SKIRTS KNIT TOPS PLUS OTHER ITEMS -------WaluBg To *10.00— -------25% » 40%OFF 6 - DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORI^ H URSDAY, JANUARY 2, 1975 FANCY WESTERN CENTER CUT TENDER BONELESS HORMEL'S FLAVORFUL FRANKS LB. FANCY WESTERN C H U C K 9 mFANCY WESTERN ROUND BONE SHOULDER ROAST 12 OZ. PKG. LB. HORMEL'S PURE PORK LINK SAUSAGE UTTLE SIZZLE RS EXTRA LEAN FLAVORFUL ■ V 12 OZ. PKG.STEW BEEF HORMEL'S DINTY MOORE VEGETABLE; STEW LB. 24 OZ.J CAN lotal Shopping Value 1 No Limit SpeciH ? Valuable Ttadin Stamps 3'Discoiint Piices SICKEN OF THE SEA] WHITE TUNA? 7 OZ. / y it SAVE 4*CAN SEATANG HEFFNER'S PRICES ★ SAVE 14^ MINIPOP POPCORN Regular Alcoa Foil For Dishes Calgonlte 25 Foot Roll 33 Oz. Size Discount Price 73* Regular - Lemon Pledge Wax 14 Oz. Size *1.29 Daytime Pampeis 30 Count *2.19 Daytime Pampers 15 Count U.15 EXTRA STAMPS I Umtt of ont Food (onul Coupon with nch oiitci. Good Only. At Hrffner’i January 8,1976 NOTt EXTRA STAfM^ With Uiii Coupon •ntffurchnt ol^| 1 • 5 Lb. Bag Dixie Xtel Sugar .Good Only \t HtffiMr'. Tliroi«h January 4,1975 Newborn Pampers Overnight Pampers Toddlers Pampeis Kotex- Regular or Super Sanitary Napkins p^g ofiz [ Dry Bleach Clorox 2 40 0 Z.BOX 30 Count 12 Coimt 12 Coimt »1.15 2 ^ 5 85< Laundry Detergent Tide Giant Size *1.13 Right Reierved Td Limit Qwinity NONE SOI.D TO DEALERS Laundry Bleach Clorox 49' YOU SAVE 24' SARDINES 30^ 1 0 ^ FLAT CAN ★ SAVE 7' LAUNDRY DETERGENT SUPER SUDS £ 1 * 18'lounl 1 2 * GIANT BOX BOUNTY P A P E R ★ SAVE 20* 6 'TOWELS INSTA 6 OZ. JAR ★ SAVE 10< H Fner'i Land Of Food WITH THIS CO YOU BUY A SAfE 20* ON WHEN .LB. CAN OP NEW IMPRWED MAXWEII HOUSE* Without Coupon AT______Heffner'i 237 COFFEE Of Food. 4550-5 I WITH 2 LB. CAN ONLY 8-47 COUPON ONE COUPON PER FAMiM OFFER EXPIRE^. HEFFNER'S miCES Jack in the Beanstalk i Com nor Whole Ke 303 Can Jack in the Beanstalk Cut Green Beans 303 Can J-F-G Coffee Wyler’s Onion Soup Hormel’s Corned Beef Lb. Bags tkg.of2 I'lOz. Can Martindale Sweet Potatoes Quaker Quick Grits Green Giant Garden Peas t Size 21). Bag 30| Cans .! Assorted Colors Kleenex 20q|count [ Beveriy , Breakfast Sausage i(|‘^oz.oJ F r i s i d e s T i v e T E I s h i " " ! ^ Cat Food 4 ^b. ^ S B e s ^ E s o r t e ^ l a v o ^ ^ " * Dog Food 15 Oz. Cai( MILD TASTY YELLOW ONIONS 2 5 « 3 LB. BAG JUMBO ROLLS MOCKSVILLE - CLEMMONS - YADKINVILLE - LEXINGTON ★ SAVE 36 CLEAN-CRISP-COLCXFULI CARROTS DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, THURSDAY. JANUARY 2, 1975 - 7 MRS. FILBERT'S MARGARINE 1 LB. QUARTERS SAVE 20* fELL HOUSE COREE f iO O S S £ S S / . EET10 UID [^ N E R ★ SAVE 20* INSTANT CHOCOLATE DRINK SWISS MISS CHOCOLATE 12 ENVELOPE PACK MAXIM INSTANT COFFEE 8 02. Jar $ 2 7 5 "KmuncMX*;, COFFEE CREAMER COFFEE MATE 16 OZ. JAR ^ SAVE 20 MAXWELL HOUSE COFFEE 1 LB. BAG 99 r 4, 1975 ★ SAVE 10* KEEBLER'S VANILLA WAFERS 12 OZ. BOX 5 7 ^ ★ SAVE 10* KEEBLER'S COOKIES DANISH WEDDING BAG 83* ★ SAVE 18 6 BIG QUARTS DR. PEPPER i^nt ifini :) s* YOU ■ ■ ■ ■ 4‘ 4* i lO* 6 * k . 1 0 * ! 1 8 * E 8 * 6 * 6 ‘ r 39 30* y Plus Bottle Deposit ir SAVE 40* 4 FLAVORS TABBY CAT FOOD NO. 1 ALL PURPOSE COBBLER HEFFNER'S PR/CES Discount YOU^SAJ^ Assorted Flavors Hi-C Drinks 46 Oz. cans 47*1 2 * Kotex Regular Sanitary Napkins Pkg.of4o *1.39 *1 . 1 0 Peter Pan Smooth-Crunchy Peanut Butter is oz. size 89*1 0 * Kotex Tampons 40 count box *1.59 30* Calo Cat Food 5 /* l 35* Jif Regular-Crunchy Peanut Butter 12 oz. size 61‘4 . Hunt’s Tomato Catsup 14 oz. size 39*4* Kraft’s Mayonnaise Quart ’ 1.39 18* Friskies - Assorted Flavors Cat Food 15 0z.Can 2/39*8 ‘ ^Orange or Grapefruit Juice 71*y [P i ' White House Apple Sauce 303 can 31*4* INiMetCani 2/69*1 0 ' 8 _ DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, THURSDAY, JANUARY 2, 1975 (ioltien AnnIversary Mr. and Mrs. Joseph F. Burgess of Route 5, M ock svillc, celeb rated th eir 50th w eddin g anniversary Sunday, Decem ber 22, with a reception at their home. Attending were their children, Richard Burgess of the home and Mrs. Marion Matthews of Corona, California. Many friends and relatives called during the appointed hours. The couple received many gifts. They have four grandchildren and 1 great grandchild. The Old Log Cabin Stages A Comeback The log cabin, once a symbol of the rugged frontier, has becomc a sign of affluence. The building that withstood Indian arrows and sheltered shivering miners is bacit in vogue as a second home. Some companies offer do-it-yourself leisure homes that can-easily be assembled from numbered pre­ cut logs and partitions. Not long ago more than 600 people signed up for a class in log-cabin building offered by the Department of Agriculture Extension Service in An­ chorage, Alaska. Amazed by the response, the expert who taught the course cautioned the prospective home builders that “ logs are not the perfect solution for all people ... some have learned that log cabins have their limitations as well as their places.” Nobody learned that quicker ■ than the pioneers who settled the American wilderness, the National Geographic Society says. The one-room log dwelling where the family worked, ate, and slept was stuffy and smelly. Sparks from the fireplace were a constant hazard. The thick logs did, however, stop fint-tipped arrows and lead bullets. Protected by the heavy wood, a small group of settlers defended a log building from a much larger force of Indians in 1778. The Kentucky fron­ tiersmen picked up more that 125 pounds of deflected lead bullets after the battle plus many more embedded in the logs of their fort. About the same time, the structures were saving George Washington’s ragtag army from the cruel winter at Valley Forge. Washington ordered 900 log cabins “ made tight with Re-Emphasis On Basics Of Agriculture Is Urged A news article by Congressman L. H. Fountain of Tarboro was applauded today by Jesse L. Hicks of Raleigh, who heads the Soil Conservation Service in North Carolina, as “ the common sense approach to easing the world food crisis.” In his article, published in several North Carolina newspapers, the Second District Congressman calls for “ getting back to basics during today’s economic turmoil...” and ad(&: . “What the world (and our country) needs now is a reemphasis on the basics of agriculture; for example, more attention paid to soil and water conservation.” Congressman Fountain continues; "Not enough em­ phasis has been placed in recent years by our country as a whole upon the necessity of conserving our soil and water, not only for the production of food but also for the sake of cleaning up the environment where we live. “ Thirty-eight years ago, during the depths of the depression, a soil conservation program was begun in order to save the topsoil which makes ■ the difference between plenty to eat and starvation. “ An impressive list of ac­ complishments has been compiled since that time. In­ terest in better land use and in erosion and sediment control has spread from coast to coast. So has technical know-how. This is one of the reasons for the marvelous increase in American farm productivity during the last 20 years. "Clearly, we now have the technical knowledge to do the job and we have dedicated people hard at work in 2,962 c on serva tio n d is tric ts throughout the country. As a matter of fact, no less than 602 million acres of non-federal land are now covered by con­ servation plans which help protect our soil and our water. "However, despite our ac­ complishments of the past, much remains to be done and we just can’t take conservation for granted. We need to rekindle the flame of widespread public concern for preserving and improving the resources which are absolutely required for producing the food we need to survive. “ For instance, I’m told that half our cropland still needs conservation treatment, and the same holds true for pastureland and private woodland. Remember, somebody pays for conservation whether it is done or not done. “ If the abundant know-how we have is not put to work—if the job is not done— then everyone, consumers as well as farmers, pays the bill in crop shortages, higher food costs, a degraded environment, dying lakes and rivers, and the loss of wildlife.” Congressm an Fountain emphsized bad weather in the past two years “ has made the world’s crops-to put it mildly- less than adequate. This fact, together with vastly increased numbers of people, has brought about the world food crisis we’re hearing so much about.” State Conservationist Hicks, commenting on the article, said: “ We are very pleased to see factual information like this coming from a respected member of North Carolina’s congressional delegation, since it faces facts about the problems he is discussing. "We in the Soil Conservation Service face such problems daily in our field offices wherever they serve the p6ople, and we are certainly ready to help those concerned over the points of conservation and food production Congressman Fountain is discussing.” Mr. Hicks added that "completion of modern soil surveys for every North Carolina county, which we are working toward, will help provide the type of vital in­ formation that can help to solve these problems. "SCS is giving great em­ phasis to the need for soil surveys, and employing a variety of cooperative agreements-including provision o f. local money-to expedite this vital program." New Year's Day Has Been Celebrated in Many Different Ways The new year has been celebrated in many ways - boisterous and gala parties are the earmark of modern ob­ servances of the march of time from the old to the new year. But how was the new year marked a century ago? It is of interest to go back in time and read newspaper ac­ counts of the coming of another year. The Raleigh Kpgister for Jan. 2, 1856, carried an article en­ titled “ A New Year.” Though several words in the first paragraph are obliterated in the microfilm copy of this issue, which is located in the Search Room of the Division of Ar­ chives and History in Raleigh, the article begins by notingihe passage of the year 1855. It continues:. “ There is matter for joyous aspiration - these (sic) is cause for than- fulness. A kind hand, though unseen, has guided us all in security amid the trials and vicissitudes of the past. Our pathway, though it may have been besel with danger, and may have led even amid disaster and death, has been to us one of safety. The Ocean of Eternity has engulphed (sic) thousands of life’s voyagers, but our bark still floats upon the stream of lime. True, the joys - the sorrows - the duties - and the cares of life - are still our heritage: but the trials, the temptations,the sufferings and calamities of the past are no more to be encountered. Their remembrances alone remain as lights to encourage or beacons to warn us, while we enter upon a new period of existence, and fulfil (sic) its allotments, still cherishing the hope that when another year shall close, the sweet accounts of friendship and love may again, as now. softly whisper the heart-felti prayer - A HAPPY NEW YE AR !" On Jan. 1, 1878, the Observer, another paper published in Kaleigh, noted: “ When the clock struck twelve this morning even our work was checked for a moment to hoed the warning that we had passed another of the land­ marks which stand between us and the grave: that another year had come, another year ASCS News Wool Incrntive Payments Producers who sold any wool or unshorn lambs in 1974 and wish to apply for the incentive payment must submit their applications by January 31, 1975. Cotton Production Evidence Producers need to file producing records for each cotton allotment farm each year where cotton is planted. The importance of identifying all cotton harvested with the farm on which it was grown is stressed. The producer who is operating more than one farm should take care not to com­ mingle the cotton from his farm. Separate production evidence is required from each farm in order to establish future payment yields. It’s also needed in determining eligibility for and amount of disaster payments. Cotton farmers are asked to file their production records with the county ASCS office as soon as possible after they have completed a farm ’s cotton harvest. Clay" for winter warmth. Until his men got shelter, the general slept in a canvas tent. “ I was there when the Army began to build huts ... like a family of beavers,” wrote Thomas Paine. Log cabins were closely associated with many other Pi-esidents, including Lincoln, Jackson, Garfield, and Tyler. But nobody owed more to the humble dwelling than William Henry Harrison, a ruddy faced out-doorsman who ran as the Whig candidate for President in 1839. A Democratic newspaper correspondent foolishly gibed: “Give him a barrel of hard cider and settle a pension of two thousand a year on him, and my word for it, he will' sit the ramainder of his days in his log cabin by the side of a ‘sea coal’ fire, and study moral philosophy.” The Whigs seized upon the description and presented their candidate as a simple, straightforward man of the people, an Indian fighter living in a log cabin and drinking hard cider, in contrast to the aristocratic Van Buren allegedly dabbing himself with cologne and sipping cham­ pagne from a silver cooler. The log cabin and cider theme started rolling at the big parade that kicked off the Whig con­ vention in Baltimore when several state delegations pulled real log cabins down the streets. The momentum carried Harrison to victory. To write his inaugural ad­ dress, the log-cabin candidate returned to his actual brith- place-Berkeley, a handsome brick plantation house in the heart of Virginia’s aristocratic planter country. had gone, making ‘more figures in the lengthening sum of recollection that we work and work at to our torment, till Death idly jumbles all together and rubs all out.' But only for a moment: in this work-day world there is little time to give more than a smile of cheerful heart and willing hand and undying hope to (he work which the New Year finds for us to do. That there have been occurrences in the past year for which all readers of The Observer have reason to be thankful, and which they can recollect with pleasure, we have no doubt. To all of them we wish a Happy New Year." But all was not serious philosophizing at tKe beginning of 1878. The newspaper reported on the Jan. 1 dinner, prepared at the Yarborough House by the new steward, E.F. Powers, late of the Grand Central Hotel and the Astor House in New York. Raleigh's leading hotel had had, that day, its bill of fare printed in gold. The paper predicted that there would be no more popular place than the Yarborough if the dinner was any sample of what was to come. And the service was good: “ Grey Washington, so well known to the guests of the hotel, as head waiter, was ns prompt as ever in attending to the wants of all," The National, on the same daV, opened with “ one of the old time New Year dinners which so many have read of but so few have had the good fortune to enjoy." The pastry was par­ ticularly “ well prepared and the viands were of the first qualitv. All who participated in demol’ishing the maRnificently arranged tables of the Nationa yesterday will long remember I as one of the most enjoyable] dinners of their life.” It is unfortunate that th menus of the two meals wer not recorded. But it is obviou that many of Raleigh's citize began the year 1878 full of goo food and fellowship - as wij| those living in the capital city i 1975. Barn Theatre Opens New Comedy On January 3, 1974, Conley Jones BARN DINNER THEATRE will open a hilarious new comedy for the entire fam ily, “ M Y DAUGHTER'S RATED “ X ", by Robert Fisher & Arthur Marx, which will play through January 26th. Tired of struggling in vain with the generation gap? Laugh your troubles away with this hit farce. Staid film censor Ralph Stevens and chic wife, Elizabeth, find the serene order of their lives disrupted when th eir re c e n tly -m a rrie d daughter, lovely Barbara Thornton, comes home to Mama, baby and distraught husband in tow. Seems the confines of a steady relationship were too much for this eman­ cipated Ms., and she’s returned to palm the baby off on Grand­ ma so she can meditate and be ej 'free woman.’ The struggles of her parent) and in-laws to cope with he unique lifestyle and shocking ideas make for an evening non-stop hilarity. Davie County Rainfall . Last Week: .75 Sunday S a tisfa ctio n G u aran teed • R ep lacem en t or M on ey R efu n d ed ______________ —SIG N A L H IL L M A LL— 1619 E . BROAD STR EET, STA TESVILLE HOURS: 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Monday thru Thursday 10 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday 1 to 6 p.m. Sunday Prices Good TIitu lanuaty 5th O / M lT f IN ALl THE COLORS OF A RAINBOW Toss color and comfort anywhere with decorative slump pillows ike these HARVEST HOUSE SPECIAL IT'S NEW! A MEAL SIZE SANDWICH I -'NO baa" / j I / S.0, I i ^ ”1%: / IJWl SATISFACTION GUARANTEED-REPLACEMENT OR MONEY REFUNDED 60 count Stock up and save now IMANR TOU HJkWwolu'ai-lK ^1 DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, THURSDAY, JANUARY 2, 1975 - 9 STARIS THURS., JANUARY 2 Ultra special money-saving prices on qualify housewares! "P R E L U D E ” s h e e ts a n d c a s e s in A A A R V E LA IR E n o -iro n m u s lin b y S P R IN G A A A ID * T W IN flat or fitted Q U E E N flat or fitted STA N D AR D CASES 2 9 2 5 9 2 2 i? F U L L flat or fitted K IN G flat or fitted K IN G SIZE CASES 3 6 2 7 5 2 2 92 Pr. Other sheets in white and solid colors are also sale priced! a s s o rte d th ro w p illo w s 27usually 1.99 1 There’s a variety of sizes, shapes, and colors to choose from. lu x u rio u s D U N D E E to w e l e n s e m b le s 1 7 4 ^ 4 8 ^ BATH TO W E L R eg. 1.49 HAND TO W E L Reg. 1.00 WASH CLOTH R eg. 59c 100 percent cotton in your choice of colorful solids and stripes. save 2 .11 on machine washable b la n k e ts Regularly To 7.99 72*90 5 8 8 Print or fancies in soft decorator colors. Nylon binding. machine washable K o d e r2 3 3 - p o ly e s te r b e d p illo w s STAND ARD SIZE r/35 R E G U LA R 4.99 3 QUEEN SIZE R E G U LA R 6.99 4 2 5 automatic e le c tr ic b la n k e ts R E G U LA R LY 15.99 13 88 excepfional White Sale buy! t ie r a n d v a la n c e c a fe c u rta in s 97R E G U L A R L Y 3.99 1 Polyester-cotton and 100 percent cotton styles in solid colors & prints. SAVE 3.02 ON OUR '14ERITAGE" m a c h in e w a s h a b le b e d s p re a d s 97R E G U L A R L Y 10.99 7 No-iron woven spread is of 73 percent polyester and 27 percent rayon. Full and twins. Single control model features nine warmth settings. 2 year guarantee. Washable. U L Approved. Full Size. Quiltra-sonic®mattress pads 94 g 9 4 y 9 4 T W IN SIZE R EG . 5.99 F U L L SIZE R E G . 6.99 Q U E E N SIZE R EG . 9.09 Fitted pads of 100 percent polypropelene, white only. G R E A T BU YS FOR M EN ! W rangler Jackets, reg. 12.99 ...................10.88 knitsuits, reg. 69.95.........................................44.88 Assorted sweaters .........................................‘ 4 off knitsport coats, reg. 49.95..............................24.88 dress pants, reg. 14.00-23.00 9.88 & 12.88 casual pants, reg. to 12.99...............................7.88 coveralls, reg. 13.99..........................................10.88 Arrow shirts, reg, to 12.00 ..................5.88 to 7.88 ..visit each of our departments for show-stopping bargains! S U PE R V A LU E FOR BOYS! knit pullovers, values Io7.00 25 percent off SAVE ON LA D IE S ’ W E A R ! assorted sportswear ........................................\ io fl fall dresses, values to 35.00 16.00 fall dresses, values to 15.99 8.00 special group coats, val. to 38.00.....................24.88 IM PR E S S IV E SAVIN G S FOR G IR LS ! pretty fall coats, reg. 18.00-32.50............................now 13.88to21.66 all weather coats, 16.88 and 18.88 sportswear group, now 1-3 off 100 percent polyester fabrics 1.47 yd. SHOES FO R TH E F A M IL Y men's oxfords and slip ons, reg. to 12.99.........5.87 men's oxfords and slip ons, reg. to 18.99.........8,s7 ladies' dress casuals and sport oxfords, reg. to 8.99.........................................................................4,87 reg. to 12.99 ..........................................................6.87 special sale group boy's and girls' oxfords, reg. to 8.99.....................................................................4.87 / 10 - DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, THURSDAY, JANUARY 2, I97S Senator Sam Ervin Says: Truth Is The Basis Of Liberty! Christmas Calf! This little black angus calf feels much safer close to hiama. The little calf was born Christmas Day on the Bobby Phillips farm on Ifoute 7, M ocksville. Phillips says m atter of factly that they also had a calf born on fa s te r of last year. For some reason, it looks as if the cows on the Phillip!^ farm are partial to holidays. John, 9, is shown on the tractor. (Photo by Jim Barringer) Love Sheltons Honored ♦ \On Anniversary Mr. and Mrs. L. S. Shelton, Sr., were honored December 22 at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Joe White on their Golden Wedding Anniversary. Hosts were their seven children: Mrs. Joe White, Mrs. Bettie Potts, Mrs. Grady Beck, of Route 5; Billy Shelton of Route 6; Leonard Shelton of Mocksville; L. S. Shelton, Jr., of Statesville; and, Mrs. Robert Craft of Winston-Salem. Approximately 250 guests called during the afternoon. The couple received many gifts. The refreshments table was centered with an arrangement of gold mums, snapdragons and greenery. A four tiered cake was served with accompanying delicacies.____________________ Vets Corner I was honorably discharged last month after three years of military duty, none of it in Vietnam. Am I eligible for the GI Bill? Yes. Veterans separated after Jan. 31, 1955, with an other than dishonorable discharge after at least 181 days of active duty, have eligibility for 10 years or until May 31, 1976, whichever is later. Geographic location of service has no bearing on eligibility. Our Father, be patient with us. When we are well and have plenty with no need, we shun you. When we are in need and everything goes wrong, we call on you. Help us to be more humble never confusing humility with servility. Help us to walk a simple life and count our blessings and have courage and hold our head high and know that thou art God! May we be grateful for vic­ tory and peace. Engrave on our minds the divine truth of mankind. Remove from us this con­ fusion - that we have proved in a measure - to be worthy of sacrifice in big things. Now let us be worth)' in little things. Grant us a sense of humour, the serenity to accept things that we cannot change; the courage to change things that need changing. Grant us a blessing of a gracious year. Bless this earth, not only this land of ours, but this earth of yours, and teach us the meaning of love, and remove us the burden of hate. May 1975 be filled with work and love. So please. Father, teach us the meaning of love. Amen. Happy New Year! It is sweet to feel by what fine spun threads our affections are drawn together Sterne I wish to devote my last two newslellers to the everlasting things. This week 1 shall discuss truth as a bulwark of our civilization. It is impossible to over­ magnify the importance of seeking truth. This is so because truth alone can make us free. The men who established constitutional government in America knew this. They knew the verity which Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes subsequently stated when he said that “ the best test of truth is the power of the thought to gel itself ac­ cepted in the competition of the market." They knew that false opinions cannot possibly be dangerous to a country if truth is left free to combat error. They wrote into the Bill of Rights the great freedoms which secure to each American the right to think and speak his Uioughts concerning all things under the sun. Their ultimate purpose in so doing was to create the only king of society in which individual personality can develop and survive. We discover truth in fragments and must piece it together like a picture puzzle. As a consequence, the search for truth requires much study and observation ^nd meditation. It requires an at­ titude of mind which makes us wish to be on the side of truth as v«U as to have truth on our side. We can best achieve this at­ titude by taking and keeping the ' oath phrased by Thomas Jef­ ferson in these challenging words: “ I have sworn upon the altar of God eternal hostility against every form of tyranny over the mind of man." The path to truth is knowledge of the fundamental things which give us the vision to sec life steady and whole. We must acquire knowledge of those things, cost what it may in effort and time. The soolhpnyers of ancient India exalted an unending search for knowledge with this cryptic phrase: When thou attaincst a hundred years, cease to learn. I entreat you to let nothing on this side of the grave put an end to your pur­ suit of knowledge. Let books be your friends, for, by so doing, you can summon to your fire.side the choice .spirits of nil the ages, Study mankind, for, by so doing, you will discover anew the oft forgotten fact that earth is peopled with many gallant souls. Observe nature, and walk at times in solitude beneath the starry heavens, for, by so doing, you will absorb the great lesson that God is infinite and that your life is just a little beat with the heart of time. Cling to the ancient land­ marks of truth, but be ever ready to test the soundness of new ideas. Accept whatever your mind finds to be true, and whatever your conscience determines to be right, and whatever your heart declares to be noble, even though your act in so doing may topple an old belief from its throne. Seek knowledge of fundamental things with such constancy that you will be able to say in modesty and in truth at sunset each day: I am wiser today than I was yesterday. Wisdom may bring to you out of its humbleness the grace which one of the earth’s wisest sons, Judge Learned Hand, calls the spirit of liberty, when he said: . “The spirit of liberty is the Center Community Development Group Has Christmas Party The Center Community Development met Monday Night December 16 for its regular monthly meeting and Christmas Party. A covered dish supper was enjoyed by the group before the meeting. Larry Harpe, President presided over the business session. He gave a report on the tennis court. All the equipment including the fence has been ordered and should e installed in the next few weeks. Duke Tutterow, Chairman of the Board of Directors of the Center Volunteer Fire Department gave a report on the department. He said there were several things that needed to be taken care of including replacing items that are worn out and ask the cooperation of the club in helping to finance them. The club voted to have four barbecues in 1975 and set the following dates for these barbecues: Saturday March i, 1975. Saturday April 26, 1975 Saturday September 13, 1975 Saturday November 22, 1975 After the business session bingo was played by the group with prizes going to Norman Forrest, Paul Forrest, Dewey Klmmer and Mrs. Martin Latham. Christmas presents were exchanged at the end of the meeting. The next meeting will be January 20, 1975 at the Com­ munity Building with a bar­ becue supper. Heroism Every man is a hero and an oracle to somebody, and to that person, whatever he says, has an enhanced value. Emerson f a it h And Conrage^ spirit which is not too sure th it is right; the spirit of liberty | the spirit which seeks to derstand the minds of oth| men and women; the spirit liberty is the spirit whiJ weighs their interests alongsiJ its own without bias; the spitj of liberty remembers that even a sparrow falls to ear unheeded; the spirit of llberl is the spirit of Him who, near| two thousand years ago, tau mankind that lesson it hJ never learned, but has nevl quite forgotten, that there mq be a kingdom where the lea shall be heard and consid side by side with the greatest.! By Senator Sam Ervin The canny Scotsman, Thomas Carlyle, made a profound observation when he said, "Man lives by believing something; not by debating and arguing many things.." Faith and courage constitute two of our most basic needs. So it is fitting that I devote this last nesletter to the fundamentals which have made and will continue to make this country great. Faith, which is the evidence of things not seen, proves to men and women the reality of the positive beliefs by which live and for which we are willing to die. Faith is not a storm cellar to which men and women can flee for refuge from the storms of life. It is, instead, an inner force which gives them the strength to face those storms and their consequences with serenity of spirit. In times of greatest stress, faith has the miraculous power to lift ordinary men and women to greatness. Faith is exhibited at its best in the lives of those men and women who trust the promises of God. At a time when her physical eyes were failing, Annie Johnson Flint saw these promises with the eyes of faith, and described them for us in her inspiring little ptome entitled, “ What God Hath Prom ised.” “ God hath not promised Skies always blue. Flower-strewn pathways All our lives through; Sun without rain, Joy without sorrow. Peace without pain. "But God hath promised Strength for the day. Rest for the labor. Light for the way, Grace for the trials. Help from above. Unfailing sympathy Undying love. Fear has been the devastating enemy of mankind in all generations. We must distinguish between fear, which is foolish, and anxiety, which is wise. Anxiety causes one concern about future events likely to occur and induces one to take provident steps to prepare for them, whereas fear fills one with dread of dangers which are imaginary or dangers which cannot be avoided. People are probably more fearful today than they were at any time in the past. They are assailed on all sides by the old fears, such as fear of economic insecurity, fear of unemployment, fear of loss of status, fear of sickness, and fear of death. But, if we are to overcome the fears which beset us, we must have courage. Joanna Balllie described courage aright In this verse; “The brave man is not he who feels no fear. For that were stupid and irrational; But he, whose noble soul its fear subdues. And bravely dares the danger nature shrinks from." Courage falls into two categories. These are physical courage, which enables one to brave physical dangers, and moral courage, which empowers one to carry the burdens and take the heavy blows of life without losing heart. One way to scorn dangers which are imaginary and defy dangers which cannot be avoided is to live a day at a time. As Robert Louis Stevenson said; “ Anyone can carry his burden, however hard, until nightfall. Anyone can do his work, however hard, for one day. Anyone can live sweetly, patiently, lovingly, purely, till the sun goes down. And this is all that life really means." Another way is to make duty the supreme obligation of life. Robert E. Lee wrote to his son, Custis Lee; “ Duty then is the sublimest word in our language. Do your duty in all things. You cannot do more. You should never wish to do less." Courage often comes through the realization that the alternative to the impending danger is more dreadful than the danger itself. Elmer Davis had this in mind whenhesaid: “ Atomic warfare is bad enough; biological warfare would worse; but there is something that is worse than either. . .It is subjection to an alien oppressor.” Finally, courage results from having faith In ourselves, faith in righteousness of our cause, and faith In the promises of God. If we will seek truth, keep faith, and have courage, I have no fear that this nation can overcome all challenges from within and without. ATTENTIONI All People Not Covered By A Qualified Pension Or Keogh. Effective January 1, 1975, the Federal Government now allows anyone not covered under a qualified pension or keogh plan the right to take out their own retirement plan under the I. R.A. (Individual Retirement Account) Don’t hesitate! Act now and set aside some money for a good retirement income for life by letting it accumulate at a high interest rate TAX FREE! Contact.... Chuck Tomlinson Mocksville, N.C. Phone 634-5522 O Metropolitan Life Where the future is now Fluted edges. Slender gt>Iden bands. Daisies by the bunch. Niirthwestem brings it all to yi>ii in Summertime English Ironstone dinnerware. Save $25 or more . ., ;ind we’ll give you your first place setting free. We’ll also gi\ e you the highest legal interest rates on your sa\’ings. Additional place settings and matching accessor^' pieces are available for purchase each time yjiu add S25 or more to your account. You’ll find the complete collection of this lovely dinnerware on display at your Northwestern office. Stop by, see it, and start sa\ ing right away! M atchini; Accessory Picccs 4'Fri)it Dishes S5.S0 I'Sujjar Creamer S5.50 4'Si)up Dishes S4.95 1-12" Platter SS.TS 4'Saliid Dislies S4.25 M 4 ” Pliitter S7.50 l-Open W gctiihlf Disli S5.95 l»Qi\ ered Casserole S9.50 I'Cir.iv V S5.2S 4*Piece Place Settinu S3.95 I*lu> Norih Carolina Saic» Ta*. THE NORTHIMTEIIN BANK Linm i>nc frci- place wltioi; jvr fainiiv* Frvt* plact.* kcttiny offer cxpircrk February 28,1975. FDIC iu^urancc hat Kt-vn incrcawd to S+0,000- Intersection Hwys. 158 and 801 in Davie County and Cteminoiu. N.C. District Court Cases Are Noi Prossed Witli Leave The State of North Carolina took a Nol Pros with leave on December 18, 1974 on the I ■ following cases which involved I defendants that could not be I located but may be placed back on the calendar at the request of 1 the State. Robert W. Johnson, Presiding Judge and Carroll C. Wall, III, Solicitor. Danny Ray Martin, speeding 100 mph in 55 mph zone and operating motor vehicle while under the influence of in­ toxicating liquor. Kenneth Wayne Rathbone, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone. Michael Eugene Coe, failure to see safe movement. Oscar Skinner, public drunkenness. John Taylor Campbell, in­ juring livestock, larceny, breaking and entering. Ford Dennis Gragg, speeding 65 mph in 55 mph zone. Robert White, trespass. Dear Editor: r* Representing the Davie County Social Services Board and Department Staff, I wish to express our thanks to the citizens of Davie County and County Commissioners for giving us the resources with which to help our needy and less fortunate citizens. To our knowledge all who applied and were eligible for food stamps received them before Christmas, and many were helped with urgent need purchases of fuel and other items through county emergency general assistance funds. Especially did we appreciate the gifts of toys and canned I ,/oods given by the Jaycees, Lions Club, Davie High School, and many other civic clubs, churches, and individuals. Such gifts brought joy and hope to many needy parents. Through . your help they were able to fulfill their rightful parenting roles. These gifts gladdened the hearts of many children, as “Santa did come to their homes thank each and every one Typu who made this Christmas iJping experience possible. • « Sincerly yours Julius E. Suiter, Chairmar rs, rman Davie Social Services Board Alvin Edward ’ Walker, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone. William Clyde Morrison, speeding 68 mph in 55 mph zone. Brenda Wilson, assault. Ernest Leonard Dancy, speeding 65 mph in 55 mph zone. Donald Mickey Hardin, speeding 50 mph in 35 mph zone. James Don Smith, failure to see safe movement. Pennie Snow Matthews, speeding 79 mph in 55 mph zone. John Lindsay White, driving with license revoked and operating motor vehicle while under the influence of in­ toxicating liquor. John W. Green, speeding 68 mph in 55 mph zone and no operators license. Franklin David Short, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone. Richard Crawford, public drunkenness. James J. Durham, trespass. Jimmie Harold Atkins, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone. Charlie McNeill, Jr., speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone. Ronnie Lee Holmes, improper mufflers. Ruby Christine Howell, speeding 50 mph in 35 mph zone. Grady Lee Carter, driving while license revoked. Martin Lee Medlin, speeding 67 mph in 55 mph zone. Jamie Gray, worthless check. Richard Lee Jones, speeding 65 mph in 55 mph zone. Elwin Neill Shaffer, speeding 65 mph in 55 mph zone and crossing median. William James Barnette, possession of marijuana. Vehicles Collide Two vehicles collided December 20th around 3:55 p.m. on Wilkesboro St., 150-ft. east of Hospital Street in Mocksville. Involved was a 1967 Ford operated by Jerry Lynn ,Frye, 21, of Carthage Rt. 4 and a 1973 Toyota truck operated by William Edward Garner, 21, of Bennett Rt. 2. Mocksville Policeman J.W. Phipps said his investigation showed that both vehicles were traveling east on Wilkesboro Street. The Frye vehicle had stopped for a car making a turn. The Bennett vehicle could not stop in time and struck the Frye vehicle in the rear. Damage to the Frye vehicle was estimated at $150 and $325 to the Toyota. There were no charges and no injuries. Linda Todd Chisholm, speeding 66 mph in 55 mph zone. William Curtis Goforth, speeding 67 mph in 55 mph zone. Stacy Dale Hobbs, larceny. William Andrew Little, speeding 69 mph in 55 mph zone. Massey Bunyan Whitesides, speeding 65 mph in 55 mph zone. George Danie Hardin, speeding 50 mph in 35 mph zone. Mary Alice Curry, failure to comply with license restric­ tions. Edward Charlie Smith, public drunkenness. George Randall Brooks, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone. Correction In the last issue in the court record this newspaper in­ correctly listed Stephen Byron Nicholson as having been charged with larceny. It should have read as follows: Stephen Byron Nicholson, charged witti breaking and entering, entered a plea of ■guilty to trespass which was accepted by the court. Defen­ dant was sentenced to 90-days, suspended for two years on the following conditions: Pay a sum of $100 into the office of clerk of court for the use and benefit of William S, Turner for damages infl i cted to his property; be of good behavior and violate no law as of city, state or nation during period of supension. Pay court cost. DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, THURSDAY, JANUARY 2, 1975 - II Cari bou Th rive I nSu b-ZeroWeather Big Stocking! Paula Bolln, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Paul Bolin of Avon Street, Mocksville, is shown above with the huge " ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ MocksviUeChristmas Furniture stocking she won at the and Appliance Store. The. stocking Nothing suits a caribou belter than a sub-zero winter. The stalely members of the deer family fare best when tomporatures plummet to minus 60F. or lower. “Then they are no longer bothered by summer pests: mosquitoes, blackflies, and botflies," points out Jim Rearden in the December National Geographic. "And as fall arrives, they become prepared for the cold. Their coats grow dense and long, and they are at their handsomest. Their trim, rich cinnamon- brown sides contrast with white necks and snowy ventral manes.” Consisting of long-brittle guard hairs and short, fine, curly underfur, the caribou’s coat is its greatest asset for keeping warm. While the body temperature remains at about 103 degrees, the temperature of the legs and hoofs may drop to about 50 degrees in winter to further conserve heat. Large snoWshoe-like feet carry caribou over frozen arctic tundra. During winter, hoof edges grown long and the fool pads shrink and become horny. The hoofs' thin cresent rims provide traction on hard snow and ice. “ Trails worn into arctic or subarctic soil by thousands of sharp hoofs ramatn visible for decades, prehaps centuries,” writes Mr. Rearden. “ I’ve spotted them in parts of Alaska where caribou haven’t t)epn seet) for half a century or more. A herd may follow the •same path for years; their repeated migrations have been known to cut trails two feel deep. Then, for no obvious reason, the animals may switcii to other routes.” About 400,000 caribou roam Alaska in herds that vary from 240,000 to 230. The largest, the Arctic herd, roves a range of some 140,000 square miles- roughly as large as North and- south Dakota combined-on the northern and southern slopes of the Brooks Range. Ten herds are found entirely within the slate: three wander from Alaska into Canada, where a closely related animal, the woodland caribou, is found. Both types of caribou are kin to the reindeer of Scandinavia and Russia. Caribou, however, are the only members of the deer family with antlers on both sexes. Numbers of the caribou fluctuate with the food supply, the seasons, and the depredations of man. Bui none of these poses as much of a threat as Alaska’s proposed 800- mile oil pipeline. The conduit, four feel in diameter, may create a fateful barrier. Caribou already have shunned experimental un­ derpasses and ramps designed to help them negotiate the man- made obstacle. As bison were important to Indians, explorers, and settlers of the Western United States, so caribou were vital to early Alaskans. Even today the people of many remote villages depend upon the caribou. They use them for food, and their hides for mattresses, foot gear, and other articles of clothing. Hunters caught in blizzards have staved off starvation by eating their caribou-hide sleeping bags. Vehicles Collide At Local Stoplight Two vehicles collided December 26th at the stoplight at North Main and Gaither Streets in Mocksville. Involved was a 1969 Chevrolet truck operated by Felix Clinton Berrier, 62, of Mocksville Rt. 7 and a 1966 Chevrolet operated by Vernon William Leonard, 16, of Mocksville Rt. 3. Mocksville Chief of Police G.A. Carter said his in­ vestigation showed that the Berrier vehicle had stopped for the traffic light and the Leonard vehicle ran into the rear of the truck. Damage to the truck was estimated at $10 and $150 to the Chevrolet. Opinions Predominant opinions are generally the opinions of the generation that is vanishing. Disraeli . . . OHfic, (lie SlUCHinK contained more than 252 toys, dolls, stuffed animals, candy, etc. (Photo by Buddy Williams) Agricultural Extension Service News Pesticide examination dates during 1975 have been established for those persons requiring licenses as ground or aerial pesticide applicators, pesticide dealers, and pesticide consultants under the North Carolina Pesticide Law of 1971. These examinations are given by appointment only on the following dates: January 22, February 12, March 12, April 16, May 21, June 18, July 16, August 20, September 17, October 15, November 19, and December 17. Persons licensed in 1974, who have passed the examination, are not required to take this examination. Please contact the Pest Control Division in Raleigh to make your appointment by telephone (919) 829-3556 or write to the Pest Control Division, N.C. Department of Agriculture, P. 0. Box 27647, Raleigh, North Carolina 27611. All exams will begin promptly at 1:00 p.m. in the Board Room (Room 359) of the N. C. Department of Agriculture Building located at the corner of Edenton and Halifax Streets (facing the Capitol Building) in Raleigh. Parents Parents wonder why the streams are bitter, when they themselves have poisoned the fountain. Vehicle Damaged In Single Car Wreck Damage to a 1967 Pontiac was estimated at $1400 after it wrecked on Rural Paved Road 1002, 8.2 miles north of Mocksville, December 21st around 1:30 a.m. The car was being operated by Sharon Camilla Hall, 16, of Mocksville Rt. 5. State Highway Patrolman W.D. Grooms said his in­ vestigation showed that the vehicle ran into the ditch on the right shoulder of the road, then up the embankment. The left front of the vehicle then struck the ditch and the car spun around and rolled over from its right side, coming to rest on its top in the ditch. There were no injuries or TH IC K E T of burnished antlers flows charges. across a river as a herd of caribou journeys to its winter range. Mating takes place en route. In ® NATIONAL QEOQRAPHIC SOCIETV spring caribou herds travel to their calving grounds in small bands, oiten guided by scent. Unlike other deer, antlers adorn both sexes. W e s t in g h o u s e Westinghouse Single-Speed Agitator Waslier witii Double Action Wastiing Model LA270P □ 10-lb. capacity □ Double-Action washing □ Heavy duty transmission and suspension system □ Powerful non-clog drain pump □ Porcelain enamel tub □ Lock 'n SpinTM Safety Lid □ Backed by Nationwide Sure Service Regular <219.95 CLEARANCE PRICE Regular *289.95 CLEARANCE PRICE Westinghouse 12.0 Cu. Ft. Capacity Refrigerator with Auto-Defrosting Refrigerator Section Model RT122R □ Freezer door shelf □ 2 quick-release ice trays □ Adjustable shelf □ Full-wldth vegetable crisper □ Butter server □ Built-in egg storage □ Full-width, full-depth shelves □ Deep door shelves □ Magnetic door gaskets □ Woodgrain handles □ Infinlte-position tempera­ ture control 4 6 9 “ EXTRA SPECIAL ALL WESTINGHOUSE AIR CONDITIONERS SOLD BEFORE JAN. 15TH 5 0 % O F F YES!!! 50%OFF Example 24,000 BTU Was ‘492“ J 2 4 6 “ All Sizes In All Sizes In Stock % SURFACE UNIT PIATTORMS eOMMWl Regular >179» ClfARANCE PRICE ^ 9 ” RANGE HOODS 25% OFF CLOTHES DRYERS AT FANTASTIC SAVINGS DISHWASHERS 20% OFF FULL SERVICE ON ALL BRANDS OF DPI IfiNCES You can be sureif it’s Westinghouse ZENITH COLOR TV NEEDS FEWEST REPAIRS In a recent nationwide survey, for tlie sec- ond consecutive year. Independent TV ser­ vice teclinicians named Zenith color TV by more ttian 2 to 1 over the next liest brand as needing fewest repair*. Survey details available on request. WINTER Clearance LOWEST PRICES EVER B&W 19” B&W ONLY* 1 2 7 “ Modular Stereos From 448 And Up Zenith AM-FM Radios From 45" And Up Console Stereos Fromn89»>AndUp COLOR TV'S 25” Color With Automatic Color AFC-Chromatnlor Tube < 5 8 8 0 0 23” Color With Automatic Cdor-AFC^hromacolor < 5 6 8 0 0 16" Color *278“ 19” Color *338“ M ocksville Furniture & Appliance Co. No. 2 Court Square 12 - DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, THURSDAY, JANUARY 2, 1975 Deaths And Funerals Ministerial Licensing Service Held At Fork linfltiainfl ear. Jnhncntl _____i___ non** SQtldrS Cflrlcr. A 1971 OT Men's Group Choses Officers MRS. ROSA SMITH Mrs. Rosa Meroncy Smith, 81, of Mocksvillc, died December 25tli night in a Salisbury nursing home. Funeral services were con­ ducted at 11 a.m. Friday at Eaton's Funeral Home Chapel by the Rev. Austin Hamilton. Burial was in Rose Cemetery. A native of Davie County, .she was a daughter o f the late Junius and Minnie Uellispie Meroney. Her husband was the late B.I. Smith. Survivors include a daughter, Mrs. John Waters of Mocksville; two sons, June and Eugene Smith of Mocksville; 10 grandchildren and nine great­ grandchildren. W.A. SAIN W illie Alvin Sain, 84, of Mocksville, Rt. 7, died December 25th at 10:30 a.m. Funeral services were con­ ducted Friday at 2 p.m. at Eaton’s Funeral Chapel in Mocksville. Burial was in Oak Grove United Methodist Church cemetery with the Rev. Jim Weekley officiating. Mr. Sain was a retired farmer and a member of Oak Grove United Methodist Church. Surviving are 2 daughters, Mrs. Hazel Boger of Mocksville, Rt. 7, and Mrs. Clara Angell of Mocksville, Rt. 6; 1 son, Oscar L. Sain of Salisbury, Rt. 9; 4 grandchildren; 7 great­ grandchildren; and 1 brother, Albert Sain of Mocksville, Rt. 3. LEROY RICHARDSON Leroy Richardson, 45, of Indianapolis, Ind., died December 2Sth. Funeral services were con­ ducted at 2 p.m. Saturday at Eaton’s Funeral Home Chapel by the Rev. Franklin Myers. Burial was in Ijames Crossroads Baptist cemetery. A native of Davie County, he was the son of Lettie Boyd Richardson of Statesville and the late Robert Richardson. Survivors include his mother; five sisters, Mrs. Frances Busby of Mocksville, Mrs. Louise Swisher of Statesville, Mrs. Dorothy Smith of Lexington, Mrs. Ann Schillar of Norfolk, Va. and Mrs. Elizabeth Call of Clemmons; seven brothers, Clyde of Indianapolis, Ind., Elmer of Greensboro, Alvin of Mocksville, William of Columbus, Ohio, Shirley of Mocksville, Bobby of Ft. Jackson, S.C. and Donald Richardson of Myrtle Beach, S.C. ROSS BARNEYCASTLE Ross H. Barneycastle, 49, of Pemberton, N.J., died December 25th in a Pemberton hospital. Funeral services were con­ ducted Saturday at 4:00 p.m. at Baton's Funeral Home Chapel. ■ Burial was in Center United Methodist Church cemetery. Mr. Barneycastle was born in Davie County to the late Harvey and Mattie Glasscock Bar­ neycastle, He was a member of Jericho Church of Christ in Davie County. Surviving are his wife, Mrs. Helen Welch Barneycastle; one son, Stephen Barneycastle of (he home; 5 sisters, Mrs. Clint Wilson of Mocksville, Rt. 7, Mrs. Paul Forrest of Mocksville, Rt. 1, Mrs. Roswell Matthews of East Bend, Mrs. Clarence Forrest of Mocksville, Rt. 1, and Mrs. Virgil Christine Wyatt of Lexington, Rt. 3. Memorials may be made to the American Cancer Society, ROBERT RUCKER Robert Rucker, 67, of Rt. 4, died Dec. I9th at his home. Funeral services were held December 2Ist at Boxwood Baptist Church. The Rev. M.L. Dillingham officiated. Burial was in the church cemetery. Mr. Rucker was born in Banks County, Ga., and had lived in Davie County for the past 30 years. Survivors include one son, Robert Rucker Jr., of the home; five brothers, Curtis, William, Preston and Sain Rucker, all of Commerce, Ga., and Fred Rucker of Lexington; one sister, Mrs. Estelle Gelaspy of Commerce, Ga.; three grand­ children. MR. JACOB VANEATON | Mr. Jacob Adam VanEaton, age 68, of Rt. 7, Mocksville, died Tuewday at Davie County Hospital following a short illness. Born in Davie County, and a member of Second Presbyterian Church, he is survived by one sister, Mrs. Florence Cody of Mocksville, three step­ daughters, Mrs. Sarah Allison, Miss Edna Wilson, and Mrs. Madgalene Cody, all of Mocksville. The funeral will be Friday at 3 p.m. at Second Presbyterian Church. The Reverend F.D. Johnson, Jr. will officiate. Burial will be in the church cemetery. RosEVELT suTZER Dlstrict ConfereRce Mr. Rosevelt Sutzer, age 66 of Rt. 5, Mocksville died Monday, Dec. 30 at Rowan Memorial Hospital following an extended illness. He was born in Davie County whece he was a lifetim e resident. Surviving are four sisters - Miss Martha Sutzer of \yinston-SaIem, Mrs. Lucy Tatum of Rt. 5, Mocksville, Mrs. Nora Etchison and Miss Katie Sutzer, both of Mocksville. Funeral services will be Thursday, 2 p.m. at Cedar Creek Baptist Church. The Revernd W.C. Hay will of- flciate. Burial will be in the church cemetery. Concord UMY The Junior UMY of Concord United Methodist Church visited the Fran-Ray Rest Home on Dec. 17. They went up and down the halls singing Christmas carols and giving everyone there the lifesaver dolls which they had made.'The Junior UM Y, with Mrs. Katherine Crotte, hopes that they ' helped to brighten Christmas for the people at To Meet Sunday The Thomasvllle District of the United Methodist Church will convene Sunday, January 5, at 2:30 p.m. at Denton Central United Methodist Church. Rev. George Wesley Rudisill, District Superintendent, will call the Conference to order and preside over the transactions of business. There will be a report on the ministry by Rev. John M. Rufty. Special recognition will be given to the newly elected Sub-District Council on Ministries leaders, Ed Short of Mocksville, Frank Austin of Soulhmont, Paul Smith of Arcadia and Wayne Loftin of Thomasvllle. The Youth Singers of Midway United Methodist Church will present a program of music. Dr. Robert A. Davis, president of Brevard College, will deliver the main address “ Teaching The Good News At Our Colleges.” Delegates and ministers from 95 United Methodist churches in Davie, Davidson, Randolph and Montgomery counties are ex­ pected to attend. Green Meadows Next Sunday Green Meadows Church will observe the Lords Supper at the worship hour, also the regular Church Conference will be held on Sunday night. A New Years eve service was conducted at Green Meadows Church on Tuesday night at 11:30. Edilh Bailey and Danny Smith accompanied the Davie High Bible Club, to a Camp in Rock Eagle, Georgia for a five day session of Religious training, including BiUe study Music and other facets of training, the group were ac­ companied by their leader Ronnie Riddle and other adults. Mr. and Mrs. John Jones and daughter, Yvonne returned to their home in Mableton Ga. on Sunday after spending the holidays with her parents Mr. and Mrs. J.K. Smith Sr. Mr. and Mrs. Allen Bailey and children attended the Mar- shburn family gathering on Christmas day in Greensboro N.C. The Marthbwns are Mr. Baileys maleinal relatives. Junior and Teresa McEwen are spendiug a few days with grandparents Mr. and Mrs. J.K. Smith Sr. Mrs. Clynese Smith and children Lisa and Chris spent the weekend in Mississippi witl) her parents Mr. and Mrs. Ar­ thur Gray Moote. Mrs. Bessie Smith and Mr. and Mrs. Joe Langston visited Mrs. Evelyn Smith at the home of her daughter Mrs. James White on Dulin Rd. Sunday afternoon, Mrs. Smith is recuperating from a heart A ministerial licensing ser vice was held Sunday, December 29th at the Fork Baptist Church for Roger Dean Foster and Tommy Eugene Cope. The Rev. Roger Cope, pastor of the Blackmon’s Grove Baptist Church and a brother of Tommy Cope, assisted in the service. His message was entitled: “ Why Be A Minister In Today’s World? The Rev. Yates Wilkinson, pastor of the Fork Baptist Church, then delivered the sermon; “ God Can Use You! The certificates were presented to Foster and Cope at the conclusion of the service by Deacon Chairman, P.M. Johnson. Dean Foster is a 1974 graduate of the Davie High School and Is currently a fresh­ man at Chowan College in Murfreesboro and is majoring in religion. Last fall he served as manager of the football team. At Chowan he is active in the BSU and has conducted the morning devotionals over the Murfressboro radio station. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Buddie Foster of Advance Rt. 2. Tommy Eugene Cope is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Charlie Cope of Mocksville Rt. 3. He is a member of Fork Baptist Church and is married to the former Cooleemee Methodist Sunday, December 29, was Student Recognition Day at Cooleemee United Methodist Church. Those recognized were Paula Shaver of UNC-G; Mike Alexander of Catawba; Frosty Prim of Catawba; Richard Bowen of Brevard; and Ann Barber of Appalachian State University. Sunday night, the C. W. Shepherd Sunday School class had Ladies Night at the Davie Fish Camp. Approximately 30 were present for the occasion. Sandra Carter. A 1971 graduate of the Davie High School, he served in the U.S. Army for 3 years (1971,1974) including more than two years in Bam­ berg, Germany. He was called into the ministry in June 1974. He is now attending the Davidson County Community College as a full time student taking pre-ministerial courses. Little Things The greatest things ever done on earth have been done by little and little - little agents, little persons, little things, by every one doing his own work, filling his own sphere, holding his own post, and saying, "Lord what wilt thou have me to do?" Guthrie The Hardison Methodist Men’s Breakfast Club met on Sunday, Dec. 22, In the church fellowship hall at 7:30 a.m. Following the ham and egg breakfast which was enjoyed by all, new officers for the coming year were installed. Rev. Charles Sisk conducted installation service with ne officers as follows: Preside Bill Brown; Vice Presid Jinx Woodward; Secretarl Mike Jordan; Treasurer, Ceq Lakey. The club will meet the fourl t morning of each montf^^undaytiornln^ The Veterans Corner 4- + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + ++ + + + + + + + ++ + + + + periods since enactment of I the Veteran's Housing Act of 1970. Little Things The million little things thal drop into our hands, the smal| opportunities each day bring He leaves us free to use or abus and goes unchansine alone Hid silent way. Helen Keller + + + + + + + + + + + + + -f + + -f + -f + + + +j+ + -f-i« I was discharged about 25 years ago after three years of military service. Is It too late to apply for a GI home loan from the Veterans Administration? No. There has been no deadline tor applying for this benefit which is available to veterans of World War I! and later attack and apparently doing fairly >vell. The adult ladies and mens classes will have a fellowship dinner at the Church fellowship center this Saturday evening, dinner to be served at 6 p.m. Come bring any food you wish also your families and house guests. Mr. W iley Smith and daughters of Winston-Salem visited Mrs. Mattie Smith and Mrs. Lola Etchison and Mrs. Willie Cook on Saturday. They are all Mr. Smith’s sister-in- law. This is Mr. Smith’s boyhood home. Church Activities TURRENTINE The Nationaires Quartet will present a program at Turrentine Baptist Church Sunday, January 5th, at U a.m. The public is cordially invited to attend. w/mTHo" A grejit way to give... March ot Dimes '’THERE IS A TIME FOR EVERYTHING . . Ecclesiasies 3 1, The Living Bihfe, Tyndale House Q O t ) ’s F i v e M i N U x e s + + + + + + + + + + -♦■ + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + ++ + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + C. A. SEAFORD LUMBER COMPANY Jericho Boad MocksviUe, N. C. Phone 634-6148 DAVIE FREEZER LOCKER, INC. 262 Salisbury Street Phone 634-2735 MARnN HARDWARE & GENERAL MERCHANDISE Feedli, Dry Goods, Groceries, Fertilizer Phone 634-2198 ++++++++++++++++++++++++ ATTEND CHURCH THIS WEEK ++++++++++++++++++++++++ LIFE'S RICHEST GIFT Giving of yourself to others is life's richest gift-and it is the hardest to give. We give driblets of our time to our children and oceans of our­ selves to our businesses. But when we withold ourselves from those around us, every other gift is hard to give. In helping in the United Fund Campaign in our city, I have watched pure agony and anger in purple tones on some men's laces. They hurriedly and insolently filled out the card for a pittance and flung it across the table to me. In every instance I have known like that, the giver didn't know how to give of hiMself. He didn't help in the fund drive. He didn't give to his church. He couldn't give himself to his family. The pores of his heart were stopped up and he couldn't give life's richest gift-himseif— to others. I remember Esther's last words to her uncle Mordecai as she prepared to go into the king's presence to plead for her people, "I will go ... and if I perish, I perish." With those words she walked into the hall of fame. OCommunttyAdvtftlilnfl 1B75 TMi column M e n ^ to our rcttftn. W« will ■cecpi prinubto Itaira and pay $1.00 for Mch ittm puMithod. In th« c m of quoutlom, tht namt of th« author and tha titia and puMMtar of tha book muit ba giwan. Addraia itami to "Ood't Fiva Minutaa.** Bok 12157. Fort Worth. Tan. 7«116 BILL MERRELL FURNITURE., INa “Where Comfort And Economy Mwt^ 701 Wilkesboro St JMockmille, N. Ci Phone 634—5131 REAVIS FORD INC. Where People Listen Bejtef Hwy. 601 North , Mocksville, N.C. Phone 634-2161 C s S m< PARKS & scon Insulating Servic* Mocksville, N. C . 27028 (^UnglnThe Summer Twiitm In 'The Winfer Office Phone: 634-5939 D .w iyPari»' P w H lh t^ COLLETTE ANTIQUES & ART SUPPLIES Antiques & Collectibles Fumiture-Lamps-Glassware-Silver Old Clocks-Picture Frames- WE BUY, SELL OR TRADE 1021 Yadkinville Road Mocksville, N.C. 634-2296 This feature is published in the interest of a better comihunity and is made possible by these sponsors who believe in building character. Mi^ODIST CHURCH ADVANCE BAPTIST CHURCH ^toodFstchpurch IRCH :ST lELUl . lODIST EATON’S BAPTIST CHURCH Sunday School 10 a.m.Morning Worship 11 a.m.Training Union 7 p jn. EDGEWOOD BAPTIST CHURCH FARMINGTON BAPTIST CHURCH O T d'TsW * FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH Cooleemee, N.C. MOCKSVILLE CHURCH OF GOD Depot Street Rev. James 1. Morris, Pastor Sunday School 10 A.M. Worship Service 11 A.M. Evening Service 7 P.M. Wednesday 7:30 P.M. LPENTECOSTAL LYNN HAVEN NURSING HOME INC. p. o! Box 423 ' State Liceiued B. E. Seats, Administrator METHODIST CHURCH FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH BLAISE BAPTIST CHURCH gort^^n St.. N.C.2 mUes No. of Mocksville off Rev. Charles BuUock A EvenlngWoi Ire.Paitor KENTUCKY FRIED CHICKEN HAVE A BARREL OF n iN Monday - Thursday 11 A.M. To 8 P.M. Fnday - Sunday 11 A.M. To 9 P.M. YadldmilleRaMi ModoviDe, N.C BIXBY PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH c a lv a r y BAPTIST CHURCH IAN CHURCH d?yt?~i.T8tm.’ ^PTTS'fcHURCH RCH UNITEDRCH FORK BAPTIST CHURCH Rwi^YaSs k° \|liSiiln. Pastor Sunday S.chopl 9pis ajn. 3 p.m. NO CREEK PRIMITIVE BAPTIST CHURCH CHINQUA BAPTIST ( CHURCH OF GOD Cooleemee, N.C. FULLER WELDING & FABRICATORS Certified Welding-Portable Wdder on Hand -Trailers Our Speciality MocksviUe, N.C. Philip Fuller Owner Phone: 634-3712 8 n M c § °“Rev. Glenn Hawley MocksviUe, Route 4 (Ephesus) CJIURCH^OF THE LIVING GOD CLEMENT GROVE 1th School 10ft.m. Vorihip Service 11 a.m. ODIS i^ S i& ’wi’d“,'^:'Sbp.m. M^THODIST^CllIm?:H Sunday School 9:4S ajn. Worship Service 11 a.m. N STREET » e r 'ioV js:- EATON FUNERAL HOME 328 N. Mi^ Mocksville, N. 0. Phone 634-2148 COMMUN TV BAPTIST CHURCH Gladstone Road „V School 10 aJtjn. 11 «jn. 7 P4D. Rev. Avery A. Ferguson COOLEEMHE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH Rev. James P. Knight, Minister Sunday Service 10 A.M. Worship Service 11A.M. £ S W s V » h CORNATZER BAPTIST CHURCH DAVIE BAPTIST TABERNACLE DULlNSyNl JERICHO CHURCH OF CHRIST CharW Isen&rs MinisterOfflce; 492-J29r-Home; 634-5257 JERUSALgM^B|^PmT CHURCH |p Sendee 11 a.ni. AN CHURCH ■tor MORAVIAN CHURCH Pastor SALEM UNITED METHODIST CHURCH SECOND PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH kfbru?sJh‘5Sf'ib'’r ' Morning Worship 11 a.m. SHILOH BAPTIST CHURCH M sW rch S^raODI^'cHUR^H*’ CA'nft^JCMISSION Sunday 10 ajn. - Swday Ailnlled also at uticipaloi)’ i HE I J. p. GREEN MILLING CO., INC. Dsiiv Flour W* Cuttom Blend 524 Depot Street Phone 6S4-2126 9:30 ajn. ajn. .SCOPAL CHURCH ing Prayer, Sermon 11 ajn. TURRENTINE BAPTIST CHURCH m s? sY !/iu W »o\,fs“T«(?a^“ iT A m N v DAVIE TRACTOR t IMPUMENT CO. Ford Farming-Sales and Service •Neii' Holland Equipment- A Complete Repidr Shop Salisbuiy Road Phone 634-5969 ODlSToPuiRCH (Dial—A—Prayer - 634-3311) ?;hurch DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, THURSDAY, JANUARY 2, 1975 - 13 Epiphany - - Time To Burn Christmas Greens Twelfth Night Tradition Ends Christmas .................... ihn Latltl DGOPleS Twelfth Night or Eplphany-- January 6--marks the end of the Christmas holiday season. This is the traditional time to burn Christmas greens, the National Geographic Society Mys. January 6 is celebrated with many other customs, rituals, and legends throughout the Christian world. Epiphany seems to have been observed in memory of the iiaptism of Jesus long before . December 25 was celebrated as Christmas, or Christ's actual birthday. Epiphany was first , mentioned in A.D. 194. By the 4th century, the feast of Epiphany was widely accepted. Iij 9th-century England, King Alfred made Epiphany a Saxon fixture by decreeing that the Christmas season should in­ clude Christmas day and the 12 days following. When Charles II ascended the throne, the Twelfth Night cake was a standard tradition along with the burning of the Christmas greens. One chronicler reported; “Wee had a great kake made in which was put a beane for the king. The kake was cut into several pieces andall put into a napkin, out of which every one took his piece as out of a lottery.” According to a Syrian legend, wild animals stay int their dens and caves on Epiphany Eve; at midnight trees kneel in adoration of Jesus and all wishes are fulfilled. The early Teutonic people took a dim view of any Twelfth Night revelry. They regarded the season as a fearful time when demons and spirits prowled the earth. At their feasts, they sacrificed food to the dead and drank to the powerful god Wotan. During the Middle Ages, Twelfth Night was com- memorated with plays staged in churches. Solemn observances largely disappeared in Elizabethan England. They gave way to joyous revelry and wassail. A popular song echoed the spirit: Wassail! Wassail! all over the town. Our toast it is white, our ale it is brown; Our bowl it is made of a maplin tree; We be good fellows all; I drink to thee. Shakespeare's "Tw elfth Night” reflects the merry mood. The play probably was first presented in a command performance at Whitehall Palace on January 6,1601, when Queen Elizabeth entertained a distinguished Italian guest, the Duke of Bracciano. Twelfth Night revels later declined in popularity, but the customs of feasting and staging masques still survive In parts of England. regard solemn Latin peoples Epiphany as both religious festival and the beginning of the pre-Lenten carnival season. Mexico's greatest pilgrim age is the Epiphany march of the devout to the shrine of the miraculous Lord of Chalma in a valley southwest of Mexico City. In present Christian tradition, Epiphany, Greek for “ ap­ pearance," has a threefold meaning; the visit of the Three Wise Men to Jesus, being the first manifestation of the newborn child as Savior of all; His baptism; and Jesus’s first miracle in changing water to wine at the wedding feast of Cana.' The three events sup­ posedly occurred on the same date though in different years. IV J:^l AOii.OlOl !UC STORE »WD OTMtH PMA»MACY COMMtWTSH E A L T H N E W S BY JIM DEAN Your PhirmtdtU: Roy Collette - BtH Collette. Jr. Robert Reuch A Special Pitch To Procrastinators We’d like to make a special pitch to those of you who tend to procrastinate, or to put things off. When your doc­ tor writes out a prescription order, don’t put it aside to be filled later. Have it dispensed that day! No therapeutic value what­ ever can be gained from a pre­ scription order which is left lay­ ing around the house or in a pocketbook. It must be taken , .......... to your pharmacist. Only he is qualified to transform your order into a life-saving or disease-relieving medication. And then only you can put that medication to work by us­ ing exactly as prescribed. So, get the maximum benefit and attach a “sense of ur­ gency’ to having your prescription filled promptly. We try to give you the beat presctription service at the lowest possible price. Always feel free to call us. Reports from field biologists and hunters indicate that this has been one of the best deer seasons in western North Carolina in many years, and new programs are now in the works to make it even better in the future. “ You bet we're pleased,” said Dick Hamilton as he leaned back in his chair in a tali building in downtown Raleigh. Hamilton is an avid deer hunter. He is also chief of the Division of Game for the N.C. W ildlife Resources Com­ mission, and thus is in charge of management programs to improve deer populations across the state. "Actually, the season was good statewide, but there are so many deer in eastern North Carolina that we almost take them for granted," said Hamilton. “ Estimates of the deer population in the state range up to half a million, and that’s the largest in recorded history. “The part that pleases me most, though, is the fact that the deer season in the mountains was so good this year. Kills on the areas we surveyed ap­ proached the highest ever reported in western North Carolina, and that is partly because our deer herds are iPESnaiL HEARING CTP Kj for residents of MOCKSVILLE and surrounding area, OIM WEDNESDAY AND THURSDAY JANUARY 8th. and 9th. from 10:00 a.m. until 6:00 p.m... FREE hearing tett* will be conducted by a team of eoniultanti from the U-HEAR COMPANY of Hickory, N.C. The consultant* are licenied by the State of N.C. and will uie the most modern electronic equipment available. Due to the expected number of persons who will attend, the teiti will be conducted at the LAKEWOOD MOTEL 2 miles south of highway 601, in MOCKSVILLE, N.C. if y o u s u s p e c t a h e a r i n g p r o b le tn comem and take advantage of this consultation to ease your mind about your hearing. You will be able to sit down in private and discun your hearing problem with someone who understands. He will be able to tell you If you really have a hearing problem. He can measure how much hearing ha* been lost and will also be able to measure how much hearing remains and to what use it can be put for you to understand bet­ ter. Evan if you have been told that nothing could be done to help or if you now use a hearing aid, you owe it to yourself and family to see what is new in hearing help that can now be offered. A HEARING PRO BLEM EXISTS IF V YOU HAVE JROUBLE UNDERSTANDING IN CHURCH. YOU HAVE TROUBLE UNDERSTANDING IN CROWDS. YOU HAVE TROUBLE TELLING DIRECTION OF SOUND. YOU NEED TO HAVE TELEVISION LOUDER THAN OTHERS. YOU HAVE TROUBLE HEARING AT A DISTANCE. IF YOU HAVE TROUBLE IN ANY OF THESE SITUATIONS IT INDICATES A HEARING PROBLEM THAT SHOULD NOT BE NEGLECTED. IF POSSIBLE, JRING ALONG A MEMBER OF YOUR FAMILY SO YOU CAN BE TESTED BY LISTENING T0~SOMEONE YOU ARE FAMILIAR WITH. D o c t o r n ^ S n r e I ^ r e w 3 c « n 7 t ^ e fe r a n y T u I r S o f* w I r i^ ^ to us for a through hearing evaluation. This is free and we wfll furnish the resiuts of the test upon request. Remember the above time and place. This could be the best opportunity to get expert advice about your hearing.... FREE. •I j -hear company one of the oldesf and largest hearing aid firms in n.c. 10-5 A R C A D E BLOG hiCKORY N.C. 28601 phone 3 e 7 - 3 7 B B references: HICKORY OR STATESVILLE CHAMBER OP COMMERCE OF THE PIEDMONT BETTER BUSINESS BUREAU OF CHARLOTTE. life,” growing out there.” Hamilton indicated that surveys on the Plsgah and Nantahala Game Lands showed that lots of hunters had good success. Kills from many surrounding private lands also increased, and Hamilton says this is a sure Indication that the herds on the carefully managed Game Lands are expanding and spreading out into other areas. “ There are deer in parts of western North Carolina where they have been virtually extinct in previous years," said Hamilton. “The growing herd is a good sign that the Game Lands are fulfilling one of their roles in increasing the population and spreading the hunting pressure. “This year was a good one for several reasons," continued Hamilton. “ We have had an excellent mast crop (acorns, etc.) and the deer are fat and healthy. Also, we were blessed with good weather. For the most part, the two-week western season had cold, crisp weather and the bucks were in full rut and moving. And, of course, our deer herds are expanding in western North Carolina.” Hamilton is quick to point out that the increasing and ex­ panding western deer herds aie directly related to the Wildlife Commission’s agressive game law enforcement and habitat management programs. He also cites excellent cooperation from the U.S. Forest Service which owns much of the Commission’s Game Lands. “The Forest Service is using small clear-cuts and thinning operations to increase the food supply where deer can benefit most,” said Hamilton. “ Best of all, the future looks even brighter because the Wildlife Commission now has plans to begin deer restoration programs in areas of the state where deer populations are still absent,” siad Hamilton. Three of these restoration areas have already been ap­ proved, and work to trap and restock deer in these areas will begin in January, 1975. One will be on the Cape Fear River in Wake, Chatham and Harnett counties, while a second will be in the Cowee Mountain section of Jackson, Macon and Swain counties. A third area will be the Bluff Mountain section of Madison County. “ We also have at least a half dozen other areas under study - most of them in the west - which have the potential to be deer restoration areas,” said Hamilton. “ Once an area is approved, we hope to stock at a rate of approximately SO deer per 10,000 acres which will give us a good breeding nucleus.” Hamilton said that several conditions must be met before restoration could be successful. First, the area must be large and have suitable deer habitat. Also, there must be strong local public support since after stocking, the area will be closed to deer hunting for several years while the herd builds. In addition, there must not already be a stable population of deer in the area. Ideally, there should be no deer at all in the area, otherwise you might be wasting deer by stocking them on top of a population that is sufficient to restock the area naturally. A final consideration is to initially pick areas which will provide public hunting. “ When we can meet these conditions, we can made deer restoration w ork," said Hamilton. Hamilton and other members of the Wildlife Commission staff will schedule a series of public hearings in January in the areas where deer restoration programs are planned. The dates, times and places for the meetings will be announced shortly. Love No cord or cable can draw so forcibly, or bind so fast, as love can do with a single thread. Burton After Christmas Thoughts By ROSCOE BROWN FISHER We stood on the overhead bridge. "Tell me about ' I said to Grandpa. Then he answered; —Christmas always reminds us how fruitful and how fruitless our lives have been. —Ife who is lord of his own thoughts holtl the key to makeof himself what he wills. —Man has always fashioned the tools to make of life something beautiful and lovely; likewise he has always forged the weapons with which he destroys himself. —It is unwise to keep thinking upon what we left behind; how much better it is to enjoy the new things around us and reach out for those new experiences to had only by those who believe they are there. 0, how often we need the art of learning to be quiet . . . and letting the forces beyond our reach slip through the barriers of ourselves. —How wonderful 'twould be . . . to keep Alive through th year the joy we planted in some heart at Christmastide. —The world is often a cruel, hard place; and yet, so often 'Us a bit of kindness and understanding that makes mountains tumble. —Time is on your side . . . wait, and at the ap­ propriate time you will know when to pour balm into the wound. —Every person has some spark of spiritual power. So often we crowd it into some small corner of our soul and spend the rest of our lives trying to convience out- selves it was never there at all. —Let go, sit loose, wait patiently, and listen . . . and God will speak to you — Revealing much you never dreamed existed. —Blessed is the man who takes some time every day to be quiet... and opens the secret chambers of his soul for the light and presence of God! Grandpa left off speaking. The stars were bright overhead. Giant Stocking Karen Zimmerman, center, was the lucky one on December 20 when she was presented the giant stocking shown above by Caudell Lumber Company. We understand that Karen was aiSo most thoughifui as she planned to share these gifts with children less fortunate than herself. Also shown with Karen are Miss Barbara Daniel, left, and Miss Barbara Goforth, right. Department Offers Service Resources Data BIRTH DCfCaS ARC fOftCV€R.UniCSS VOU HCLR JAmi€ UJRS BORn Buno. The Department of Human Resources will be using an extensive telephone “book” on January 2nd. The “ book” offers reliable information concerning human services in North Carolina. The Department’s new In­ formation and Referral system will offer a toll-free number for citizens to call for information concerning service resources which are available in their community and the state. Data on the human service resources which are available in their community and the state. Data on the human services has been computer-programmed and will be available by way of a data tool called a microfiche. The toll-free number 1-800-662-7030, will operate from 8-5:30, Monday through Friday initially. The system has the capability of 24-hour operation. “ We know there are a lot of services people don’t know about," said J. S. “ P ete” Grimes, Director of the In­ formation and Referral System. “ Our system will have in­ formation on public and private agencies and we’ll be able to answer questions or make referrals almost immediately. We’ll have data on everything from Boy Scout programs to mental health facilities to social services.” The system will have 12,000 agencies and 30,000 services cataloged. The system is not aimed at performing a crisis counseling service, however there is a bridging capability. “Sometimes we may need to put a caller directly in contact with a service agency. Through the bridging capability we can put the caller together with the agency-then we fade out since our part of the transaction would be complete,” Grimes said.While the information and referral system is primarily aimed at providing a service for citizens, the Department of Human Resources expects an internal benefit. “We will be able to find out a lot about the delivery of services in North Carolina,” said Secretary David Flaherty. “ We can identify unmet needs from the requests which indicate no resources exist, or we can find if there is duplication ISTHECOSTOF BEEFING UP YOUR HERD MIIKING YOUR POCKETBOOK DRY? It doesn’t have to. Whether you have a brood cow herd, feedlot, or dairy, you’ll find our new Mineral Mix, used with our Jim Dandy Liquid Supplement, wall provide one of the most complete supplementary feeding programs available today Without any unnec- essaw expense. Our new' Mineral Mix smplies a nutritional blend of s^t and calcium, along with enough magnesium to help prevent gpss tetany And it contains high levels of dried cane molasses, so cattle iind it palatable when fed free choice or mixed with their regular feed. With lim Dandy Liquid Supple­ ment ana Mineral M i x , your cattie shouldn’t require any other mineral or additional salt. So, for an economical, efficient w^ay to beef up your herd witliout milking your x)cketbook dry, see your ocal lim Dandy^dealer or simply wTite to Bill Tumlin, P.O. Box 339, Sax^annali, Georgia 31402. BiU Junker Junker & Son Feed Mill, Mocksville, N.C. 27028, (704) 634-2377 14 - DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, THURSDAY, JANUARY 2, 1975 NONE SOLD TO DEALERS C o o le e m e e SUPER MARKET OPEN EVERY NICHT TIL 8:30 P.M. SAVE WITH OUR LOWER PRICES C Lb. U.S. CHOICE DELUXE CUT VALLEYDALE SAUSAGE 12 0Z. PKG. I^ERED SYRUP tr 99' FRIeSH kosher pills 79' Fish Fillets GORTON'S FROZEN PERCH FILLETS 7 9 MIRACLE WHIPMARGARINE DRINK DEUCKMISLIPTON TEA 100-Ct.Pkg. $|I9 PANTRY BLACKEYE 1 D C PEAS 1 Lb. Pkg.1 9 VANITY FAIR Jumbo Roll PAPER O O c t o w e l s 4 9 7 A p p le Apf^ H l - C A S S O R T E D DRINKS 46-oz. Can 4 7 U.S. CHOICE BONE IN SHOULDER ROAST . 9 9 * U.S. CHOICE — BONELESS M SHOULDER ROAST .*1 ” U.S. CHOICE — LEAN ALL MEAT 100% PURE GROUND BEEF . 6 9 ' SLICED AMERICAN U.S. CHOICE — BONELESS CHUCK ROAST Lb. C O K E S 6 FULL QTS. KRAFT CHEESE 5 9 ' 8-Cl. Pkg. ■AMniCANSUCESMtnuMBimocai [• suciLiMyyjijj *1 •o;l] FABRIC SOFTENER ^ 67' VAMTYFAIRFACIAL TISSUE WE WISH A HAPPY NEW YEAR Open New Year’s Day Maxwell House INSTANT COFFEE 10-oz. JAR $ CITATION ICE MILK V i Gal. Ctn.6 3 c REGULAR ALL PURPOSE Potatoes 10 Lb. Bag c Gerber's Strained BABY FOOD 1 2 ' 4!/2 Oz. Jar SCOPEMOUTHWASH$1.35 VALUE.12-«z. M.9 9 < DUNCAN HINES CAKE MIXES 6 2 c Box ALL PURPOSE BLEACH CLOROX 1/2 Gal. Ctn. JFG Mayonnaise Q I. JAR. 9 9 Noah Absher teams to fly at 60 and it is the greatest thrill o f his life. Noah inside the cockpit of his very own plane with Instructor Bob Dalton of Sugar Valley Airport. Noah Absher\s ‘"''Three Dollar Flight'’\ . . G e t t i n g W i n g s A t S i x t y DAVIB C O U N T Y \Exti Features - IB January 2, 1975 A couple of months ago, 60-year-old Noah Absher walked into the Sugar Valley Airport in Davie County and wanted to take a “ three-dollar flight.” This day and time, three dollars just don’t take you very far — and flying is no exception. But it was enough for Noah to know that it would not be his last flight. And^Ue very next week he began taking flying lessons from Instructor Bob Dalton, an employee at Sugar Valley. A dream come true! “ For more than 40 years I have wanted to fly,” Noah says as he reminisced about his boyhood days on the farm and no matter what he was doing whenever a plane went overhead, his thoughts were always the same ... “ someday I’ll fly.” For many many years, even after Noah was a grown man, he continued to sub­ scribe to “ Skyways” magazine and dreamed of flying. And although Noah had never been up in a plane, he knew on that crisp autumn day in October when he made his first flight, that not only would he learn to fly, but he would someday fly bis own plane. This dream also came true for Noah. He bought his own plane on December 18, and on Christmas Eve, 1974, he made his first solo flight. It’s a little unusual that anyone being as determined as Noah to fly and with such a great love for flying would wait until they were 60-years-of-age to begin. However, Noah was married until several months ago and his wife was strongly opposed to his learning to fly, and he he respected her wishes. Now that Noah is alone and his own boss. when he isn’t working on his farm just this side of the Yadkin County Line, you can find him at Sugar Valley Airport or just a few air miles from here. Flying is strictly for pleasure for Noah. And he says flying is really easier than driving an automobile. It’s so peaceful once you get airborne, he says, "there's nothing to it.” However, he did admit that the hardest part is landing the plane but this can be mastered also. Dalton says it is quite unusual for anyone Noah’s age to be so determined to fly. “Most of our students are in their teens and twenties.” However, he quickly added that be has never met anyone who “ loves flying anymore than Noah, and he's doing a good job.” Story by Marlene Benson Photos by James Barringer Noah clears the treetops for a perfect landing. Noah’s first solo flight was made Christmas Eve after which his shirttail was cut o ff and posted inside Sugar Valley Airport. Soaring into the wild blue yonder is a dream come true for Noah and he spends his every free minute flying his plane. 2B - DAVfE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, THURSDAY, JANUARY 2, 1975 A Rrvhw O f 1974. It Was The Year Of N’s For Davie County by David Hoyle It was the year of N’s for Davie County in 1974, with nuclear plant, nudism and no gas making frequent headlines. Brian Wayne Hall, son of Mr. and Mrs. Wayne Thompson Hall of Route 4, Statpsville was the county’s first baby arriving right on schedule on January 1st. Davie County greeted the new year with empty gas tanks and some stations limiting sales, schools opening an hour later in the interest of safety and fuel conservation and a murder which oc­ curred as the victim was traveling on US 64 in her automobile. Clerk of Court Glenn Hammer was cited by the national passport office for out­ standing community service. ’Trooper Randall Beane was promoted to line sergeant and transferred to Burnsville. A hearing for the Duke Power Nuclear Energy Plant in Davie was held in the first week in January and Mocksville experienced a two hour power blackout. (The two not necessarily connected.) The Rev. James Weekly published a new book; local residents appeared in district court on gambling charges; and both Davie County High School basketball teams were tied for conference leads. By mid-month, Alton Carter had been made chief of police in Mocksville; Davie Community Services changed their name to Davie United Way; and county com­ missioners postponed their decision on rezoning of Duke Power property on the Yadkin where the nuclear plant was scheduled to go. Sgt. Randall Beane and former chief of police Joe W. Foster received Law En­ forcement Officers Association awards. $4,000 in stolen merchandise from a series of area breakins was recovered. By January 24th, Duke Power was clarifying reports by area dallies on tax benefits to Davie, safety violations at their Oconee Plant, nuclear waste and “ drying up of the Yadkin River.” Floyd Munday was cited as the state’s outstanding pork producer. The county commissioners postponed action on the Vulcan Materials rezoning request. Davie war vets received $22,000. The Enterprise- Record won two awards in state-wide weekly newspaper competition. By the end of the month, Richard Nail won the 24th annual Distinguished Service Award presented by the Mocksville Jaycees; $250,000 in cigarettes were hijacked in the county; Edwards Fur­ niture got a new owner; and the Davie County Hospital was given a waterbed by the Davie County Hairdressers Association. Duke Power had bought land in Davidson County and nuclear plant Ad Valorem taxes were assured to go in the county in which the plant is located. Davie greeted 1974 with empty gas tanks. April In April, new registrars were named for 12 precincts in Davie; the commissioners sought funds for the watershed; a television documentary was written on a local prison unit; and Davie Republicans held their annual Lincoln Day Dinner. Late registration for the May 7th primary was heavy in the county; Ed Goodwin was elected president of the Mocksville Rotary; the Hospital Auxiliary was reactivated; the Funder America, Inc. plant was dedicated; nuclear plant opponents sued Davie officials and Duke Power and the power firm applied for nuclear plant permits. Allen Webb was elected president of the Mocksville Lions - Club; Davie's second fatal traffic accident occurred; water system sign-ups were begun; Social Security offered teleservice to the county; Davie students attended national DECA meeting; and an area-wide Crusade For Christ opened to over capacity crowds. May May brought a four ballot primary to the county with Benny Naylor and Lib An- February In February, both Duke Power and Vulcan Materials Corporation got ■ rezoning from the commissioners and ' nuclear plant construction was slated to ; possibly begin in the fall of 1975. A truck blockade at Sam's Country Kitchen • crumbled and local service stations were turning away customers for lack of ‘ gasoline. • Duke Power continued to clarify points I on their nuclear plant in a Greensboro meeting. The new community building • was named after B.C. Brock, Sr. by the county commissioners. Bryan Sell was ■i honored for 50 years of scouting. The V Hinton Rowan Hepler house in Davie was • designated a national landmark. ■I The last of the month saw both parties ' announcing primaries; a gas pumping ' plan devised for the Mocksville area; ! Davie shopping habits were surveyed by ; the Davie DECA Club; Donald Dwiggins • appointed to the Air Force Academy; ; Richard Ferebee honored for 38 years of ‘ perfect attendance at Sunday School; and both Davie High basketball teams lost in • the first round of the North Piedmont Conference tournament. The month also ; brought Davie’s first traffic fatality for the • year, t March ; March brought plans for increased • kindergarten programs in the county. ’. William Hall and Harold Foster were • reappointed to the Davie Board of Elec- • tions and H.C. Gregory succeeded Dr. ? Ramey Kempt making the board • Republican. Mid-March brought the planning of a ; county water system; the scheduling of a ■ meeting on the Davie Nuclear Plant by the - Stale Water and Air Resources Board; and ' an open house at the new Ingersoll-Band - facilities. "N ick ” Mando Day was ; proclaimed; Ken Sales and Charles • Dunn were honored for United Fund I service; and the Courtney Ruritan Club : was chartered. Davie received an additional $125,000 for . secondary road work during the month: the commissioners initiated the county- wide water system; and the Davie DECA Club project won state-wide honors. Nick Mando was roasted and toasted; Pino- Farmington honored Betty West and John Pilcher, Jr.; Davie joined the Police In- formation Network; a hearing was held on Nui’lear Plant water consumption; and a spring snow covered the county. Thomas L. Perkins Nuclear Station derson re-elected to the Board of Education; Robert Somers, Gil Davis, Sam Daywalt, 'and Charlie Brown won Republican nominations, with George and Joe Smith going into a runoff for sheriff nomination and Genn Hammer and Ray Godbey having a rematch for clerk of county nomination. The Democrats nominated R.O. Kiger, Jerry Anderson and Joe Murphy. School operations in Davie were reported to cost over $2-million during the 1973-74 year, and tax refunds for the same amount were estimated for Davie residents. The nuclear plant suit was dismissed; Duke Power altered their cooling tower plans; Davie copped the North Piedmont Track Crown; Davie Schools received $96,975 for five kindergartens; Mrs. Gene Rauch was installed as N.C. Dental Hygienists Association President; and Davie won the Piedmont Bi-Conference Track and Field Championship. In the latter part of May, Bob Hall received the UNC Pharmacy School Award; Ostine West was named to head the state Association of Extension Home Economists; Davie won the WNCHSAA Track and Field Championship; county residents began signup for the new water system; and Davie experienced its third traffic fatality. June In June, Davie High graduated 248; a fatal airplane crash occurred in the county; Davie cut its tax rate and budget; Charlie Brown, Joe Smith and Glenn Hammer won Republican nominations; Davie Veterans recalled D-Day on its 30th anniversary; local prisoners termed Safriet sus^nsion as part of a power struggle; and the Mocksville Optimist Club celebrates its first anniversary. The Farmers Produce Market opened in June; the hospital increased its room rates; September 10th was set for the special tax vote for the water system; Archeologists dug on the Davie nuclear plant site; Davie considered a computer system for tax records; Jo Cooley was named Denuctatic Telethon Chairman for Davie; Northwestern Bank opened its first Davie branch; and a Cooleemee service station exploded. July In July, the nuclear plant reported a possible delay; Prentice Campbell was honored on his retirement; Dr, Ramey Kemp was named Davie Democratic Chairman; a Mooresville man became the fourth fatality in the county; and the “nudist camp” family campground was first denied. The Methodist Church consecrated its new sanctuary; Mocksville adopted a $540,992 budget; five inmates were injured and eight escaped in a July 4th disturbance at the local prison unit; David Fergusson was named new librarian; Mocksville got a new dialing service; a Mocksville man and child became the fifth and sixth traffic fatalities in the county in seperate ac­ cidents. The Funder Plant was featured in a national magazine; Hubert West starred in the Highland Games; Davie received a $1,287,550 grant for a water supply system; Davie Plyler was named to be master of ceremonies for the Miss Mocksville Pageant; the Atomic Energy Com­ mission reviewed Duke Power’s ap­ plication to build six nuclear generators; and an English preacher visited Davie on an exchange program with Methodist minister Charles Sisk. August Marijuana plants were discovered and destroyed in the county in August; and Davie funds were approved for the Far­ mington Medical Center. Sandra Clontz was crowned Miss Mocksville for 1975; Ann Stiller was named director of nurses at the hospital; SBI director Charles Dunn was featured speaker at the 94th Annual Masonic Picnic; and Davie citizens reported favorable reaction to Gerald Ford’s rise to the presidency. LaQuinta Mobile Home Development residents sued the developers; Suburban Foods Store was robbed; a 74-year-old jail breaker escaped from the loc^l prison unit; Davie received $101,849 for paving of secondary roads; and Duke Power cut back its construction program. Lester Martin was named chairman of Appalachian State University trustees; county schools opened; the La Quinta Club House burned; Davie High added in­ dustrial training to its program; and prison inmates were charged with possession of marijuana. September In September, Davie voters approved the county-wide water bond; Hank Van Hoy joined Martin & Martin Law Firm; Mrs. Ostine West received the National Association of Extension Home Economist Award; and the high school set a new attendance policy. The lightning bug became the county’s official bug; the Mocksville Masonic I>odge began construction of their new temple; John Guglielmi was elected head of the N.C. Polulry Association; the commissioners adopted a policy on water line installation; the Rev. Sisk and family returned from England; and a Salisbury youth became Davie’s seventh highway fatality. Davie High opened its football season; the National Guard building neared completion; Rufus Brock was named to the Real Estate Licensing Board; the stale began a nuclear station effect study; the Davie Sherrlff’s Department received funds for fingerprint equipment; Abe Howard was honored by the Davie Rescue Squad; and the county backed the splitting of the Piedmont Triad Council of Govern­ ments. Duke Power announced it had two alternative sites for power plants; Dwight Myers sought a patent for his Giant Water Slide; Davie received a check for $1,500 for its March of Dimes project; and the second annual “ Arts on the Square” was held in Mocksville. October During October, Maj. Edwin Waters was officially declared killed in action; the county United Way campaign began; Mocksville got $36,297 for the town streets; Buck’s Barbecue closed after 22 years; an organization of Davie citizens was formed to fight the proposed “ nudist” cam­ pground; the town started picking up resident’s leaves; the E.C. Tatum, Jr.’s received the “ Outstanding Farm Family” of the year award; and a Forsyth County golfer won the first annual Davie Open. Lynn McCulloh was crowned Davie Homecoming Queen; a $35,000 grant for district learning center was received; 4828 Democrats and 5978 Republicans registered for the November election; Mrs, Bobby Mott was selected to head the Davie Heart Fund Drive; and Governor James Holshouser visited the county. The nuclear plant announced an in­ crease in costs; the commissioners established a county Recreation Com­ mission; a Pino-Farmington Community exhibit won first place at the N.C. State Fair; Dr. R.F. Kemp was awarded Chiropractic honors; and the Davie United Fund reached $25,000. A controversy Sandra Clontz crowned “Miss Mocksville" erupted over courthouse use on the up­ coming election night; Ken Cassidy was named Heart Fund treasurer; 11,208 registered for the November 5th general election; and the Davie cross-country team copped the WNCHSAA crown. GQkl November Anderson, Brown, Hammer and Kiger , won county offices; Peter Hairston was elected to the state house; Davie Agricultural Extension Agent Bill West­ brook was named Alexander County’s Extension Chairman; Davie voted 57 j^r cent in the election on November 5th; Bill Johnson headed the March of Dimes in the county; and the Davie Zoning Board of Adjustment decided to reconsider the “ nudist” campground petition. Davie joined “ Project Reach” ; local Ruritan Clubs were honored at their district meeting; District Judge Hubert Olive resigned as chief district judge; turkey prices were down as ” Davie United Fund drive went over the top! approached; and Athena Redmona was named a Morehead Nominee. By the end of November, four persons were hired to help in signing up water system customers; Kiger and the two new commissioners assumed their duties; Carmen Walker received an award for service to the Credit Bureau; the basketball season opened for Davie High; and a “ Happiness Walk” netted $7,700 for Cerebral Palsy. December In December, Buddy Alexander was elected as chairman of the county com­ missioners; January 6th was set as the date for reconsideration of the “ nudist” campground by the zoning board; the United Way exceeded its goal; a new system for property tax listing was adopted; and the Mocksville Parade was / held in the rain. Charles Dunn was elected Tri-County Mental Health Chairman; Senator Robert Morgan visited the Ingersoll-Rand facilities; the new National Guard Armory was dedicated; Davie received $100,000 in Federal Funds for special work training; Donald Bingham was named to the State Resources Council; and the Davie Arts Council was organized. In the fading days of 1974, Mrs. Veatrice Towell retired as Davie County Tax Collector; Davie unemployment rate was lower than the state average; William Mills was promoted by Branch Bank; the Chamber of Commerce outlined telephone complaints to the companies; Lois Shore was named to head Davie Hospital Trustees; and Mrs. Margaret LeGrand retired as the Enterprise-Record Social i Editor. Final headlines announced D avie’s greeting of the Christmas holiday with worship and rejoicing as the year ground to a halt. But even as local government and business slowed for the holiday break, the seeds for new headlines in a brand new year had already been planted for 1975, and the three big headlines, nudity, nuclear plant and no gas will probably be around for 1975. An airplane crash at Twin in June claimed two lives. Annual Chiistnuis Parade held in the rain! DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, THURSDAY, JANUARY 2, 1975 - 3B Dwayne Grant Leads North Piedmont Conference Scorers Davie High sophomore Dwayne Grant scored 37 points on December 20th and surged from fifth place to first place in the North Piedmont Conference boys high school basketball scoring race. The 37 points against North Stanly topped his previous careerhigh of 31, set as a fresh­ man against North Stanly last season. During the final week in December, the 6-3 sophmore hit for 52 points in two games and raised his season total of 143 in seven outings for a 20.4 average. Davie has two other players in double figures; Robert Pulliam with 132 points and a 18.9 average, and Larry Mock with 114 points for a 16.3 point per game average. The Davie girls have two in double figures: Cathy Hutchens with 76 fwlnts and a 10.9 average and Ronda Smoot with 74 points and a 10.6 per game average. The North Piedmont Con­ ference .scoring leaders as of the pre-Christmas holiday period were: BOYSP l*»»r, Tt»m Grant. D«v<eG»unly Walktr. Mooretvllle AMI, Eatt Rowan Camt)b«n, South Iredatl Pulliam. Oavie County Mock, OavIe County WIthertpoon, Noftt* Rowan Wauo^ Welt Iredell Cloar, North OavidMn Moore, North Stanly Barrinoer, North Stanly * Allen, West Rowan Hairston. North Davidson Nanney, MooresvMIe Thomas, North Iredell Long, South Rowan Moore, South Iredell Lyons, North Davidson Hail, West Rowan Brawley. south Rowan , EJils, South Iredell Bost, East Rowan Steele, North Iredell R. Cuthbertson, West Rowan Barnes. South Rowan Everhart, North Oavlnson tflRLS Player, Team Morrow. South Iredell Klmrey. North Stanly Hayes. North Davidson Earnhardt, East Rowan Morgan. West Rowan Johnston, Mooresvllle Rhyne, South Rowan Rodgers. AtooresvUIe Hutchens, Davie County Chambers. West Iredell Smoot, Davfe County Weaver. South Rowan Jordan, South Rowan Cress, ^uth Rowan TP 0 AVOUi 7 iO.* 1 - 7 t 134 133 1S2 132 7 114 7 94 fc 10S103 1019911197H104 90 t02 ts97 J41Hi14fr 135127119esei767S74 737170 19.1 19.0 19.0 1B.9 16.315.715.0 }4.714.4 14.113.913.913.713.0 12.912.5 1J.112.111.4 11.1 10910.810.5 10.4 10.1 30.1.23.320.919.315.9 14.9 12.1 11.610.9 *0.7 10.610.4 10.1 10.0 Davie Plays At East Rowan On Friday Night The Davie High basketball teams will resume play Friday night at East Rowan and will play at North Rowan on Tuesday night. Coach Bill Peeler’s girls have a current record of one win and six losses, standing just ahead of North Rowan and West Iredell who have yet to win in seven attempts. East Rowan leads the conference with a perfect 7-0 record. Coach Bob Henry’s boys have four wins and 3 losses and are currently tied for fifth place with South Rowan and North Stanly. The East Rowan boys lead the North Piedmont Conference with a 6-1 record, followed by West Rowan and South Iredell with 6-2 records and North Davidson 5-2. © A Y ’S ORTSMAN Tox On Reioaden Proposed : Proposed legislation introduced by John Dingell of Itijticltigan would place an 11 per - — tendloading components such a prinieM. Tne bill difters from { er cent excise tax on as bullets, shot and previous excise tax siation on sporting arms and ammunition in that it "will pitvide important ne^ funding for range Con­ struction and hunter safety education. The i>ill provides that one-haU of-the revenues collected from handloadlng components be sent for wildlife restoration with states required to use the other half for range construction or Improvement and for hunter safety education. The new tax should bring In an estlma^d $6 million which would be al­ located to Individual states based on the states population, with state receiving over three per cent or less than oM'per cent. Private shooting clubs could qualify for these federal funds if they agree to open their facilities to ' ! public and also agree to fix range fees on a coast sic. States may also use these funds to construct new public shooting facilities for trap and sheet or ri­ fle and pistol target shooting. More Funds For Fish and Wildlife Over $33 million in Federal Aid funds for sport fish and.wildlife restoration and hunter safety pro­ grams has been appointed for distribution this month, br'mging to $70.3 million the amount made to the states this year by the Federal Government. U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service Director Lynn A. Greenwalt said these funds will be used to finance Hsh and wildlife restoration programs. Of the total funds available $53.5 million is for wildlife restoration and $16.8 million is for fish restoration. Funds for wildlife restoration and hunter safety programs come from an 11 per cent excise tax on Sporting arms and ammunition and a 10 per cent tax on pistols and revolvers. These funds may be used on approved State wildlife projects such as the acquisi­ tion of land suitable for habitat, development of habitat, and research, and to aid in managing game species. Fish restoration funds come from a 10 per cent ex­ cise tax on fishing rods, reels, creels, and artificial baits, lures, and flies. Activites performed by the states include the purchase of land water areas, construction and reKabllitation of lalces, development of access sites and facilities for fishermen, and research to aid in managementof sport fishers. North Carolina's apportionment for Wildlife Restoration for the fiscal year 1975 is $1,027,862 with $273,050 for flsh restoration. Firearms Film Available A new film, entitled “ Firearms Responsibility," has just been added to the National Rife Associa­ tion’s Public Affairs Film Library..The new film is designed to be used as a valuable training aid in teaching the fundamentals of safe firarms handling and covers all phases of gun ownership arid handling from tiw on the safe storage to how to handle several types 01 firarms in the field. the film is a 16mm 20-minute color film suitable for general audience viewing. The film is available on a free>loan basis with the borrower paying only for the insurance and postage. It may also be obtained from the National Rife As­ sociation, 1600 Rhode Island Avenue, N. W. Washington, D. C. 20036. Decoy Fish The decoy fish, Iracundut KignUer, uses its own dorsal fin as bait when fishing, National Geographic says. On sighting its prey, the fish unfolds its fin. which looks exactly like a tempting small fish, compieU* witli eye and mouth The victim darts close and tries to swallow the artificial lure but is swallowed instead by the decoy fish. History llislory is little more than the legisier of (lie crimes, follies, and misfortunes of mankind. Gibbon Recreation Basketball NORTH PIEDMONT CONPERCNCe BOY) Com. ovtrati The Mocksville Recreation Basketball League ended its first round of action with three games Monday night. In the first game, Mocksville Insurance beat Firestone 59-46. Mickey Morrison scored 24 points for Mocksville Insurance and Rick Allred picked up 18 for Firestone. Gray’s Exxon scored a double overtime victory over Heritage in the second game 86-82. W. Cassidy led Grays with 21 points and S. Jackson set a new league scoring record with 42 points for Heritage. Baity’s Tire Service nipped Ingersol 1-Rand 42-41 on a last- second shot by Ronnie James, Perry Creason led Baity’s with 12 points and Nate Dulin tossed in 17 tor I-R. East Rowan West Rowan South IredeM Nort»> Davidson South Rowan Oavie County North Stanly North Ireoell North Rowan Mooresvllle ilredetfWejt l< GIRLS Mocksville Recreation Basketball League Mid-Season Standings James’ Barber Shop Davie Enterprise Dewey’s Radiator Firestone Gray’s Exxon Baity’s Tire Service Mocksville Ins IngersoU-Rand Heritage Won 7 6 6 4 4 3 2 2 2 Lost 1 2 2 4 4 5 6 6 6 Scoring Leaders S. Jackson, Heritage J. Goodlett, James’ Barber Shop M. Morrison, Mocksville Ins. P. Beaver, Heritage J. Comelison, Mocksville Ins. J. Parker, IngersoU-Rand B. Tuttle, Davie Enterprise S. Dulin, Dewey’s J. Anderson, Gray’s Charles Dulin, Dewey’s 25.3 21,1 20.0 19.0 18.8 18.7 17.4 16.1 14.2 13.5 East Rowan South Rowan North Stanly Mooresvifte West Rowan North Iredell South Iredell North Davidson OavJe County North Rowan West Iredell Conf. Overall W L W L 7 0 7 0 & 1 6 1 SOUTH PIEOK^ONTCONPERCNCE Bey*Cenf. Overall AlbemarleThomasviiieSalisbury ConcordKannapolisStaiesviiie AsheboroLeiington Trinity GIRLS Alt>emar(eTrinityStatesvilleConcord AsheboroSaltsburr TiMmasviiieLexingtonKannapolis W L *4133$32 Cenf. Overall W L W L 4 0 4 7 4 0 6 3 0 2 73 i - 1 7 1 7 Dwayne Grant hits two more for Davie. SAVE TIME To make the best use of your time in meal prepara­ tion, cook and serve in the same utensil whenever possible. It makes serving and cleaning up easier, reminds Rachel Kinlaw, extension food specialist, North Carolina State Uni­ versity. Auto Racing 1974 Champs And Record Holdeis Atlanta 500 - Cale Yar borough. California Grand Prix — Brian Redman. CapiUi City 500 - Richard Petty. Daytona 450 - *R. Petty. Dixie 800 - R. Petty. Firecracker 400 — *David Pear­ son. Indianapolis SOO — Johnny Rutherford. Los Angeles Times 500 — Bob­ by Allison. Mason-Dixon 500 — C. Yar­ borough. Old Dominion 500 — Earl Ross. Pocono 500 — Rutherford. Rebel 500 — Pearson. Richmond 450 - Bobby Alii son. Road America — Mario Andret ti. Southern 500—C. Yarborough Talledega 500 - R. Petty. US Grand Prix — Carlos Reute mann. World; Emerson Fit tipaldi. Virginia 500 — C. Yarborough Volunteer 500 — C. Yarbor ough. Watkins Glen 6 Hours — An dretti. Western 500 — C. Yarborough Winston 500 — *D. Pearson. World 600 - R. Petty. Baseball World Series - *Oakland Athletics. American Leijue — West: '"OBkland. East: Baltimore. Playoff: Oakland. National League — West: Los Angeles. East: Pittsburgh. Playoff: LosAngelet. Leading Hitters — American: •Rod Carew, Minnesota .364. National; Ralph Garr, Atlanta .353.r Know the joy of leasing a High Quality Ford Vou can enioy'thls plaaiure by Isailng it fn ^ ui. That way, you eliminate a down paympnt, and enjoy «amfr«e car driving became we tee'that your car It pro­ perly serviced. We do thli for you because we're part of the largest deal­ er leaung organlxttlon in the world. I'ou get the Ford of your choice at rock-bottom cost. "CARS AND TRUCKS" See Us Today! LEASING Reavis Ford Inc. Leasing Division PHONE 634-2161 Hwy. 601 No.-Moeksville/N.C, Phone Toll TREE from Winston-Salem 722-2386 NCDL Np. 2416 Home Runs — American; Dick Allen, Chicago, 32. National; Mike Schmidt, Philadelphia, 36. Runs Batted In — American: Jett Burroughs, 116, Texas. National; John Bench, 129, Cincinnati. Leading Pitchers — American; , Jim Hunter, Oakland, and Fe^guion Jenkins, Texas, 25. National: Phil Niekro, Atlan­ ta, and Andy Messersmith, Los Angeles, 20. Earned Runs — American; Hunter, 2.49. National; Buzz Capra, 2.28. CX7LLEGE Atlantic — *North Carolina State. Big Eight — *Oklahoma. Big Sky — *Gonzaga. Big Ten — Iowa and ♦Minneso­ ta tied. Ivy — Harvard. Mid-American Miami, Ohio. Missouri Valley - *Tulsa. Ohio Valley-Murray. Pacific — Southern California Southeastern — ♦Vanderbilt. Southern — East Carolina. Southwest — Texas. NAIA — Lewis, Illinois. NCAA — ♦Southern California. Western — AiHzona. World Series — ♦Southern Cali­ fornia. Yankee — Rhode Island. Basketball ABA - New York Nets. NBA — Boston Celtics. AAU — Jacksonville. COLLEGE Atlantic — ♦North Carolina State. Big Eight - Kansas. Big Sky — Idaho State and Montana tied. Big Ten - Michigan and ♦Indi­ ana tied. Ivy-♦Penh. Mid-American — Ohio. Missouri Valley - ♦Louisville. N A IA-W est Georgia. NCAA — North Carolina State. NIT — Purdue. Ohio Valley - *Austin Peay and Morehead tied. acific Eight - ♦UCLA. Southeastern - Alabama and Vanderbilt tied. Southern — ♦Furman. Southwest — Texas. Western — New Mexico. Yankee — ♦Massachusetts. Boxing Heavyweight — Muhammad Ali. Light Heavyweight — WBC: John Conteh. WBA; Victor iSdiewetght - WBC; Rodrigo Valdes. WBA: Carlos Mon- zon. Welterweight — Jose Napoles. Lightweight — Roberto Duran. WBC; Guts Ishimatsu. Featherweight — AleXis Arguel- lo. Bantamweight — Soon Hwan Hong. Flyweight — Shoji Oguma. FootballAtlantic — Maryland. Big Eight — ♦Oklahoma. Big Sky — Boise State. Big Ten — ♦Ohio State and ♦Michigan tied. Ivy — Harvard and Yale tied. Mid-American — Miami, Ohio. Missouri Valley — Tulsa. Ohio Valley — Eastern Ken­ tucky. Pacific Eight — ♦Southern Cali- fornia.________________ THE LAKE NORMAN MUSIC HALL Hvyy. 150, Terrell, N.C. Gospel Sing Sunday, Dec. 29, 2:30 P.M. Featuring The Nation’s Number One Gospel Groupm Southeastern — Alabama. Southern — VMI. Southwest - Baylor. Western — Brigham Young. Yankee — Maine and Massa­ chusetts tied. Golf American Classic — Jim Col­ bert. British Open - Gaiy Player. BC - Richie Kari. Canadian — Bobby Nichols. Citrus —Jerry Heard. Colonial — Rod Curl, Crosby — John Miller. Doral — Brian Allin. Disney Team — Hubert Qreen and B. R. McLendon. Greensboro — Bob Charies Hartford - Dave Stockton. Hawaiian — Jack Nicklaus. Heritage — John Miller. Hope — Hubert Green. Houston — Dave Hill. Inventary — Leonard Thomp son. Jacksonville — Hubert Green Kaiser — John Miller. Kemper — Bob Menne. Kings Island - Miller Barber Philadelphia - Hubert Green Phoenix — J. Miller. Pleasant Valley - Vic Regala do. Quad Cities - Stockton. Sahara - Al Geiberger. San Antonio — Terry Diehl. San Diego — Bobby Nichols. Southern - Forrest Fezler. Tallahassee - Allen Miller. Tournament of Champions — John Miller. TPC - Jack Nicklaus. Tucson — J. Miller. US Open - Hale Irwin. Ama­ teur; Jeny Pate. Westehester — John Miller. Western - Tom Watson., Worid Open — John Miller. Worid Series - Trevino. COI^LEGE Atlantic — ♦Wake Forest. Big Eight — ♦Oklahoma State. Big Sky - ♦Weber State. Big Ten - ♦Indiana. Ivy — Penn. Mid-American — Miami, Ohio. Missouri Valley - NoHh Texas State. NAIA - U.S. International, California. NCAA - Wake Forest. Ohio Valley - Middle Tennes­ see. Pacific Eight-SUnford. Southeastern — ♦Florida. Southern — Appalachian State. Southwestern — Texu. Western — ♦Brigham Young. Yankee — Maine. Track AAU INDOOR 60 Yards - Herb Washington. 60-Yard Hurdles - Lt. Tom Hill. 600-^Wesley Williams. 1 ,0 00 -Rick Wohluter. One Mile - John Walker. Three Miles — Dick Taylor. Two-Mile Walk - Larry Walk­ er. Shot Put — Terry Albritton. 35-Pound Weight - Jacques Accambray. Long Jump — Jetty Proctor. Triple Jump — Milan Tiff. High Jump - Tom Woods. Pole V au lt-V ic Dia*. COLLEGE Atlantic — ♦Maryland, Indoor and Outdoor. Big Eight — Indoor; Kansas State. Outdoor: Kansas. Big Ten — Indiana, Indoor and Outdoor. Ivy — Indoor: Cornell. Q|it- door: ♦Penn. . Missouri Valley — Indoor: Drake. Outdoor: North T*x- u Stete. Mid-America — Eastern Michi­ gan. NAIA - Indoor: Texas South­ ern. Outdoor: Eastern New Mexico. NCAA - Indoor: Texes, El Paso. Outdoor: Tennessee. Ohio Valley - Western Ken- tucky. ♦ Retained Title JyST TB M o v e ME. c ^ o e o i r , AMAH ,•10 5 0 Arrea mo mao Autatiy e o m «e r s P | 4 ^ ^ | / II you have (o "prove" something.. .proveyou are a safe driver G EORGEE. M elNTYRE n o r t h CAROLINA FARM BUREAU INSURANCE 23 Couil Squall MOCKSVIUE.NC Buv 634-737I R«i I34'6)S0 THE INSPIRATIONS Guest Winlders Grove Quartet Adv. Adm. $3.00- Children $1.50 Res. $3.50 - Call 47-82498 Coming -Sat. Jan. 11, 8 P.M. Tlie Country Gentlemen The NEW YEAR is upon us and what it holds for us depends on how we apply ourselves as good Americans. We believe it is time to "Stand Tall, Think Tall, A c t Tall” . Although some phases of business have experienced difficulties tlie latter part of 1974, we as individuals working together using sound Judgment and hard work, can h»p make (lie NEW YEAR a most promising one. Our NEW YEAR'S resolution at the WESTERN AUTO STORE IN COOLEEMEE is to be "as tali as we know how" in every Uiing we do to fight inflation and in our efforts to serve you better. Our Wish For You: ‘‘A Happy, Successful New Vear” Thank you for making 1974 our best year yet! Sincerely, Western Auto Store Cooleemee, N.C. Mr. and Mrs. W.D. Bowen Richard Jon ir Tony N eti? te a t­ ’s SALE Starts Thursday January 2nd The First 100 People To Come In Will Receive £0% QFF Any Item In Store 1 LOT LONG SLEEVE Wrangler Shirts V 2 Price Bailey Hats ■^/2 Price 1 LOT Bailey Coats Price HODGES TRIPLE WESTERN STORE Loceud On NC 801 At Redlend Rd. Interiectton-Fermington Community Phone 99S4240 Hours: Week Days 1 P.M. To 9 P.M. Except Wednesdays 1 To 6 P.M. Open Saturdays From 9 A.M. To 5 P.M. t 4B - DAVrE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, THURSDAY, JANUARY 2. l‘)75 In Search Of The American Dream XIV Crisis Of Abundance And ‘‘Black Thursday” ---Jay Martin— The Author (Editor’s Note: This Is the 14th of 18 articles exploring the theme. In Search of the American Dream. This article liiscusses the depression days of the late I920’s and early ‘3fls--and the plans for recovery. The author is professor of English and contemporary literature at University of C alifornia, Irvin e.) By JAY MARTIN Copyright, l»74. Regents of the University of California Distributed by Copley News Service. America had always promised abundance-unending resources, unfailing fertility, and thus unceasing economic advance. During the 1920s, this dream of material plenitude blossomed; one might become rich, it seemed, with little effort, and Americans exhibited an extraordinary passion for wealth. Investment counselors dazzled them with visions of sure gain, bankers abetted them with credit, and steadily rising stock prices strengthened their confidence. President Coolidge, in his final message of 1928, referred boldly to “ the pleasing prospect” of “years of prosperity.” In short, Americans were determined to have prosperity, at any cost. And then, on Oct. 24, 1929, "Black Thursday,” the cost became clear: stock values began to slide from a paper value of $100 billion, and ended In a crash with a value of $26 billion. That crash and the ensuing Depression were incomprehensible. Why did people go hungry? Because modern agriculture produced too much food. Why did they wear rags? There was too much cotton, too many mills. Why was there unemployment? Because of Improvement in industry. What had happened to their utopia? It had been too fully realized. It hardly mattered, then, that the economist John Maynard Keynes called their predicament “ a crisis of abundance” when it looked the same as a crisis of poverty. The most pressing question, of course, was how to reverse the downward spiral. Most people took comfort in the traditional theory of depressions, which held that prosperity caused extravagance, reckless spending, and riotous waste, eventually overinflating the economy. Allowed to run its course, the depression would-in theory--cure the ills that created it, renew the virtues of industry and frugality, and automatically return the country to its proper business-business. Thus, Hoover relied on mild measures, such as tax cuts and easing of credit, and on the voluntary cooperation of businessmen to maintain current production, employment and wage levels. It soon became evident that this policy was an outright failure. By 1932, wages had fallen as much as 35 per cent, construction was at a standstill, and employment was steadily decreasing. By 1933, unemployment had risen to 25 per cent, industrial production was half Its 1929 volume, and farmers were burning crops which they could not sell for enough to cover the cost of harvesting them. Some Americans preferred to escape this state of affairs through the romanticism of novels or movies. But generally the people of America were forced to take a hard look at the real nature of their society, the character of its people, and the convictions that Americans had long cherished unexamined. Literary Skeptics Long before the economic crash occurred, writers had put together a case against the spiritual poverty of contemporary society. If the subject of T. S. Eliot’s "The Waste Land” was, as Edmund Wilson said, “ the starvation of a whole civilization,” that theme was repeated in many popular books of the time. Novelists as different as Ernest Hemingway and Edith Wharton agreed that the war had been followed by a period of moral decay. Essayists like John Crowe Ransom and Irving Babbitt, beginning from traditions as diffemet as Southern agrarianism and neo- Humanism, ended by agreeing that the contemporary mind was diseased. In opposite camps in every other way, Willa Gather and William Carlos Williams agreed that values for the present could be found only in the American past. A naturalistic novel like Theodore Dreiser’s “ An American Tragedy" and a lyrical one like F. Scott Fitzgerald’s “ The Great Gatsby,” both published in 1925, shared nothing but subject: the ashen romance of wealth. The public had listened to these writers in the ‘20s but politely demurred from taking their criticisms too seriously. After the crash, however, when actuality seemed to surpass the most apocalyptic imagination, the prewar literary traditions of muckraking and reform revived in popular esteem. Whether calling themselves Marxists, progressives, historians, or novelists, such writers as Michael Gold, Edmund Wilson, Matthew Josephson, and John Dos Passos could all be termed social critics. Some found their subjects in the affairs of the wealthy, as John O’Hara did, others in the suffering and endurance of workers-John Steinbeck’s theme; all were agreed that something was rotten in society. The Depression was their constant, unfailing illustration. Many citizens, of course, were doing their own reflecting and revising their beliefs accordingly. One thing seemed obvious: the crash of 1929 had been caused by remediable factors, including a vastly unequal distribution of income, corporate and banking structures unregulated by law and ripe for abuse, and a mad credit system. These problems caused doubts about Hoover’s belief that the economy would revive with no further tampering. Moreover, respect for the wealthy and the business leader dropped sharply. "As for leading us out of the crisis,” the editor of the Nation declared, “ the captains of inductry have plainly no vision, no plan, no economic program.” Even A1 Capone announced that though a gambler, he never plunged in stocks; Wall Street, he said, was "too crooked.” Numerous bank failures also raised questions about the wisdom of thrift. A popular cartoon showed an old man sitting desolately on a park bench while a squirrel inquires why he had not saved for a rainy day. "I did,” he answers. Attitudes toward the poor also began to shift. Americans had always assumed that poverty was the result of personal inadequacy. But when so many American citizens were living below "the standard of living,” this notion of poverty had to be reassessed. The new president, Franklin D. Roosevelt, announced his concern for the third of the nation that was "ill-housed, ill-clad, ill-fed” ; he was speaking for many members of the upper two-thirds. A New Deal People are not moved to revolt, the Declaration of Independence says, by “light and transient causes." During the Depression, European visitors to America kept asking, “ Will the Americans revolt?” By 1933, when Roosevelt became president, the Depression no longer seemed to be tolerable, and Americans were rejecting many of their traditional beliefs. But they never came close to revolution. Instead, the New Deal, gave them ways to cling to their utopian beliefs and to chart new paths toward old utopias. If they had begun to doubt that the dream of plenty could be achieved through unrestricted enterprise, they sought different modes of achieving that dream and new leaders to move them toward it. Hoover had defended his policies by arguing that he was "holding fast to the doctrine of individualism.” But for the first time, many citizens seemed willing to accord to the federal government a major, decisive role in managing the economy. Certainly, as many as a third of Americans still doubted the desirability of a policy of collective government action, but the rapid change in majority opinion was astonishing. Roosevelt’s genuis lay in his ability to sense this mood and to act upon the opportunities it gave him. He told his friend Raymond Moley in 1934 that he was not urging "the creation of new and strange values," only the rediscovery of "known, but to some degree forgotten, ideals and values." Many of the popular proposals for economic revival were more hopeful than workable-but the renewal of hupc in itself was a Bood sign. Plans were everywhere- Jay Martin, author of four articleslNos. 13 through 16) of "In Search of the American D ream ," the Courses by Newspaper series being printed ■by this newspaper, is an author of renown and one of the nation's leading authorities in comparative literautre. Martin, 38, currently is professor of English and comparative literature In the School of Humanities at the University of California, Irvine. He has held this position since 1971. Before taking the Southern California position, Martin was associate professor of English and American studies and director of the undergraduate program in American studies at Yale University. Martin received his B.A. degree at Columbia, his master's and doctorate at Ohio Stale. He specializes, in his writing, in critical studies of all phases of American life and history, and his Courses by Newspaper articles reflect this in-depth perception of subjects he seeks to analyze. He is author of "Harvests of Ciiange: American Literature, 1865-1914” (Prentice-Hall, 1962) and several other books and articles. History Of Banking Is Outlined BLACK THURSDAY - The Depression of the late 1920s and early '30s was a bitter period In American history. On Thursday, Oct. 24,1929, the Stock Mar­ ket crashed and millionaires turned to paupers in a matter of minutes. Picture, from the Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, shows a typical New York bread line of the time. By Mary Jo Cashion Some 95 years before George Washington was inaugurated president of the infant United States, the Bank of England was formed in London. In fact, the history of modern banking with Howard Scott’s Technocracy, the Townsend Plan, the "Share the Wealth’" scheme of Senator Huey Long, proposals for the issuance of non-hoardable scrip, for graduated taxes, public works, early retirements, lengthened schooling, free silver, and work conscription. “ There are about 350 plans here in Washington,” Roosevelt told reporters in 1933. . .1 should say they are still coming in at the rate of twenty-five or thirty a day.” The President had plans of his own and in the First Hundred Days and for many days thereafter began to try them out. Roosevelt set out to recapture through organization the utopian idea of community, believing that, as he put it, the government had the duty to create " a sense of connumity within a huge democratic industrial society.” In the alphabet soup of organizations which he sponsored, some notion of the community of work was always primary. In six years the Civilian Conservation Corps gave outdoor work and a small wage to nearly three million men. The Public Works Administration was designed to provide employment and to inaugurate work on projects which would be or permanent value to communities, such as bridges, dams, and civic buildings. The Civil Works Administration was created to provide temporary winter jobs for four million workers. The Works Progress Administration and the National Youth Administration gave jobs to more than eight million unskilled construction workers and even to musicians, artists and writers. The most important act passed during the Roosevelt Administration, the National Labor Relations Act, or Wagner Act of 1935, did not itself provide jobs, but rather spelled out equitable conditions for employment and established labor’s right to unionize and bargain collectively. "To preserve we had to reform,” Roosevelt said of his programs. His solution to the crisis of the ‘30s was to preserve the old American dreams by reforming the means of achieving them, shiftily the emphasis from individual to collective responsibility. Between 1933 and 1941, Americans reexperienced impulses that had diminished during the ‘20s: a renewal of confidence in the public realm and a willingness to pursue projects of' public improvement collectively. Thus, while several European countries tumbled into political chaos, Roosevelt was able to maintain and even strengthen the basic American institutions of individual liberty and private ownership Many old habits crashed with the market, but Americans had by no means lost their utopian belief in a better future. They had simply accepted that it would be different than they had dreamed. Courses by Newspaper was developed by UCSD Extension and funded by grants from the National Endowment for the Humanities, with a supplementary grant from the EXXON Education Foundation. Next: Cities On and Over the Hill by Jay Martin, professor of English and contemporary literature. University of California, Irvine. The more you do w ith me, the more lean do tor you. If y o u 're lo o k in g fo r a b an k that c a n h elp you d u rin g th e se tight m o n e y tim es, c o m e to C en tra l C a ro lin a B an k C C B bu ilds its b u sin ess b y takin g c a r e o f g o o d c u s to m e rs , la rg e a n d sm all. S o if you d o all you r b a n k in g with m e, III h elp you with all yo u r b a n k in g n e e d s Y o u *h a ve faith in C C B . an d w e II h a ve faith in you, CCB. We have a lot that other banks dont. Member FDIC, which now insures all deposits to $40,000. ••.I,,: A «,,, , A - - ■i.ini V :/,' ■ 1' f l f i e for consumersw f lU v V r from your BETTER BUSINESS BUREAU discounts and deposits stretches back to Italy In the Middle Ages, a North Carolina State .University economist notes. Banks spread lo England by the 15th century, moving wherever there was trade over long distances in order to finance the commerce. Historians have linked banking to goldsmiths who dealt with valuable gold and other metals. Because the goldsmith had a depository for his own valuables, he was often asked to keep gold for others. In return for their deposit, the goldsmith gave a receipt and over time, the receipt was accepted as the gold itself which never left the "bank.” In addition, the metal worker also discovered that there was always a large, stock of gold available, which led to his lending it and earning in­ terest. The history of banking is of special concern to North Carolina State University economist, Dr. Richard Sylla. He will study the transfer and evolution of banking theories and practices from Britain to America during the late 18th and early 19th centuries. His study, which will take him lo England for the 1975-76 academic year, is sponsored by the National Endowment for the Humanities. Sylla is one of 49 interpreters of the humanities selected for the fellowship for independent study and research from among 661 eligible applicants from across the country. Sylla will attempt to explain how theories held in a more developed nation, like England, Gold Rush In The Offing There's a gold rush on. As of December 31, anyone who has any money left over from Christmas can legally buy gold. That's when the federal government will lift its 41-year freeze prohibiting the general public from buying, selling or owning gold. You may already have seen ads stressing the allure of the precious metal in a lime of inflation, when the value of paper money is decreasing. What you may not have heard of is the growing number of frauds involving gold and other precious metals. Another problem is that the price of gold is subject to significant and rapid fluc­ tuations. Unsophisticated in­ vestors could lose heavily if they fail to study the situation very carefully. Because of this situation, the Belter Business Bureau suggests that you heed the warnings recently issued by the Securities and Exchange Commission (SECi and other concerned federal agencies. They recommend purchasers ol)lain as much information as possible about companies they plan to deal with. It’s a good idea lo call the BBB to check a com p a n y's rep u ta tion . If you are considering in­ vesting in gold, following these guidelines may afford you some protection: ■Be suspicious of unsolicited correspondence or calls from strangers concerning gold in­ vestment. -Don’t believe promises of tremendous profits; no one can guarantee a return on your investment. ■If you are pressured l» make an investment decision quickly, don't. •Be skeptical of claims of new or secret gold extraction processes. ■Try lo delermine the seller's iiiaik-up, or how much it cost Ihe seller lo buy (he gold. -Kcalize that you'll be paying moie Ilian Itie quoted price ol gold. There may be a refining charge, assay fees, com­ are transferred and adapted to a less sophisticated economic situation, like early America. He will also explore the impact of early American banking on economic and social develop­ ments in America in the decades following in­ dependence. His project comes as the U.S. moves toward its bicentennial. “ My real interest is to compare British and American banking,” Sylla said. “ Britain has had its own banking history and America has had its own banking history.” No historian has looked at the English response to American banking, the NCSU economist pointed out. He hopes to delve into British bank archives to determine how the British felt about American economy. The first bank in the United States was the Bank of North America founded in 1781 in Philadelphia. ,A private ven­ ture, the bank was formed to help finance the Revolutionary War. The Bank of the United States, established in 1791 by Alexander Hamilton, first secretary of the treasury, was patterned after the Bank of England, which had been set up a hundred years before. American banking has come a long way since those days, according to Sylla. And just how much influence the mother country had on the fledging United Stales’ financial in­ stitutions will be the center of his study. Sylla, a native of Illinois, holds degrees from Harvard University. He has been on the NCSU faculty since 1968. missions, shipping and storage fees, insurance costs and sales tax. All this may add 20 percent lo the quoted price. -Demand a guarantee in writing concerning the weight and fineness (purity) of the gold. Get the terms of your pur­ chase in writing, including how and when the gold will be delivered and stored, and what security precautions will be taken lo insure that your gold is neither shaved nor substituted with counterfeit gold. Find our whether the gold will be segregated and stored in your name, rather than that of the seller or supplier. Get a written receipt showing that your gold is being stored by a reputable concern. Lt. Morrison G. Carter With U.S. Marines Marine Second Lieutenant Morrison G. Carter Jr., son of Mr, and Mrs. Morrison G. Carter Sr. of Route 2, Advance, N.C., graduated from the The Basic School at the Marine Corps Development and Education Command, Quanlico, Va, The 26-week course includes Instruction in leadership principles, map reading, m arksm an sh ip, ta ctics , military law, personnel ad­ ministration, Marine Corps history and traditions, com­ munications and physical conditioning techniques. It is designed lo prepare newly- commissioned officers for duly in the Fleet Marine Force, with emphasis on the duties and responsibilities of a rifle platoon commander. A former student of Mars Hill College, Mars Hill, N.C., he entered the Marine Corps in November _ 1972. Lester Bullock Receives Award Marine Cpl. Lester E. Bullock, whose wife Sherry is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Charlie B. Swicegood of Mocksville, N. C.„received his first Good Conduct Award at the Marine Corps Air Station, Beaufort, S.C. He was cited for exemplary service during the past three years. S o u t h e r n D is c o u n t mm Loans 3^4 For Any Worth While Purpose 1. Back To School Needs 5. Cars Need Winterizing 2. Thanksgiving Holiday Expenses 6. Homes Need Winterizing 3. Christmas Shopping 7, New Winter Clothing 4. Bill Consolidation 8. Personal Needs Call Us Today About A Loan For Your Fall & Winter Needs. Open On Saturdays Through Holidays 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. _SEE_SD Southern Discount Court Square (Above Fashion Shop) Phune 634-3596 Tum., W«d., and Thtirt. 9.6:30 I DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, THURSDAY, JANUARY 2, 1975 - SB Car Towing Boat Is Hit By Trucl( A 1963 Dodge pulling a motor boat was involved in an ac­ cident December 24th on Rural Paved Road 1410 5.2 miles east of Mocksville. The Dodge was being driven by Darrell E. Phillips, 37, of Rossville, Ga. Also involved in the accident that occurred around 7:45 a.m. was a 1969 Chevrolet truck operated by James Ronald Benge, 23, of Rockwell, Rt. 2. State Highway Patrolman W.D. Grooms said his in- vestigatioli showed that the Dodge was to\ying a motor boat on a trailer. Trooper Grooms said that benge told him that he apparently \»ent to sleep, his truck hit the boat and motor, knocking tha trailer into the rear of the Oodge. Trooper Grooms reported that although the truck hit the towing traUer from the rear, there was /no evidence to in­ dicate the jjoint of impact. Damage td the Dodge was estimatedBt$200 and $250 to the boat, motor and trailer. Damage td the truck was estimated at $50. Benge was charged with failing to redtice speed to avoid a collision. social Security -Questions—Aiuwers- I'm 68 and I had planned to apply for supplemental security irtcome. But a neighbor told me I probably couldn't get supplemental security income payments because I have children across town who could help support me. ^ Is this true? No. Your eligibility for F ederal supplem ental security Income payments would not be affected by your children's ability to help you. H«wever, any support they May furnish you would couilt as Income and could affe t payment. Call or write I le Salisbury social securit; office for Information at lut applying for supplemei tal security income paymc its. My mother ha 1 to quit work almost 11 month ago when she became very 111. Someone told her she woiddn’tbe eligible for social security bpefits until she has been disabled for a year. Is this true?' ■ No. A disability is < a year or eligible for i starting witi month of diij payments ca up to 12 mon your motheij ker whose lipected to last Igger may be nthly benefits lithe sixth full lability. Back be made for however, so I Should get in touch with /the Salisbury social security office to file an applicatitn. I plan to retire in February 1975 when I reach 62. How much work credit will I need to be eligible for social security retirement benefits? Most men tbid women who reach 62 in'V|intr^can get social secuisy* weeks it they’ve workM Z^'calendar quarters - 6 years - or more in jobs covered by social security. ’ My wife was getting social security benefits on my work record, and we’ve been getting a sin^e check each month made out to both of us. She died last month., Can I cash this month's check even though it has her name on it? No. You should take or mail it the Salisbury social se»rity office. The people thtre will make the check ovej'to you so you can cash it. Aly amount not due you will |e withheld from your futile social security checks. Starting in January, I ’m going to i^nt out the second floor of tny home as an apartment Will the rent money I get be punted as earnings under sociifl security? In genf:ai, income from apartment (or I not covered under social secirily. Rental income may be pvered. however, if you provite personal services pant - such as room meals, cleaning, washing [dishes, and doing laundry, ^'or more information call or write the Salisbury social security office. I’ll be 12 next March and would like to apply for monthly social sei^rity retirement payments cn my own earnings record. W ll I be able to get benefits .»ven though my husband doesn’t plan to retire for sever*! years? If you worked long enough under social security you can » t reduced benefits when^ou're 62. The fact that our husband won’t apply for monthly social security payments for sever|il years has no bearing «n the benefits you may be entitled to on your own etirnings record. When I became eligible for Medicare I didn’t sign up for the medical insurance part of it. Now I've decided I'd like to have medical insurance protection I understand there's a certain lime of the year when i can enroll. Can you tell me when that is? If you didn't enroll for M e d ic a r e m e d ic a l insurance when you became eligible, you can sign up any tinu- dsring January, ••■pbruary. or March. There’s an open enrollment period during the first 3 muulhs uf every year. renting rooms) i^ C u s t o m e r l s G h ^c ^ t h e c u s t m i e r i s a h v : ^ i r k l i L BB&T■lUMCN ftiNKMo AND rm«r coMmwyCUSTOMER ■ S CHOICE '“STATEMENT 01 01 23 MR A C SMITH 123 SOME PLACE ANYTOWN NORTH CAROLINA 27893 101-3 00 4 5 67 . iT ^ p g w T D»rt 0 2 /2 8 /7 5 PREVIOUS BTATtMBWT BAUANC6 CHECKS/OEBiTS 251 CK. NO. DM CONS THE DURI WAS MULT RATC 15 P E 0 t THf WAS YOUR TO B ON 0 I 0203 0^03 0^04 0^10 0^110^13 02jl7 0217 02jl8 0^19 0^21 07,2<f 0^24 0^28 . jcu 'IN At^T SUf'l 0 IG |TH 3<(00 PlJIE 0F| , ieSuL iDdEO NgXI : t}EO 1-ljO - OCCKSIKBITS — r iqoo sqoo 5Q00 13j^2 3tjoq 1231 7^76 2qoo 2^97 ll'lO O 4^00 loqooI iTOMER'is NUMER I}CA :r e q i t |SU ' YOUR IDA J 31 Ofl .0 0 TH ) BY TH )00<.llQ n 'n U N T A rNG F TC YOU PAYMEN ICTEO P ?5. 1745.60 OBPOStTS/CREDITS 1576*25 SERVICE CHARGE STATEMENT BALANC6_ 3 7 9 ,4 9 CK. NO. HO 1C SEQ 1MARY LY L J IL L I ALAN ERTO JHICH ice C .OAN S SC 1 YOU oai7 0^17 0^1») o i 2l 0^24 0^28 .j;.H JEf^CE 3AN B IG |CY :E IMA 3tq 0 A A iT kAljcE 3A(>AN EpUL « flCC loHiq 2CjOO 56'7^ zdoaI 17300 24')95 locloc 7^00 6]|5C 2(joq t iV E CH^CK SEE GLANCE :l e M L Y :e . 10 3UNT DCPOsns^Eorra date 20q00CA 87625 50000 LIS T ED TODA^. PERIO q END PREVIQUS B MINUS{PAYM PLUS /|DVANI F I N |a N C H 'A R NEW B/|LANC AVAIL/|BLE CR ED IT LIM NEXT l>AYME 0^03 0^04 0^10 0211 0^13 0^14I 0^17 0^18 0^19 0^21 Nq □ M«|NC NXS :es -J- OAILYBALANCE 261|74 21174 13000 15^24 11982 996|07 52^72 34696 32696 22^99 49<|49 37^49 02/28^ 75 ^00 100^00 200^00 1^40 101«!40 398^60 500^00 lO^OO SCf H fV IM I UOI F M IICCONaLCMENT AND CONOmONI AND Tf MM Of ACCOUNT. ~KIVTOA*WfVIATIOWl“ •*«*• dA»m CNCCKfiOUflCf MC • IMSC.CQCT t t • lAVINOITIUNSMR K • MVUCNTOOnilECTiONCM • CKEOITMiMO U • (.WT CT • CLUtTRAMtffiN AC • ADVAMCiCOMICTIOfttOM • OUlTMtMO rx • tNTAfiTAX CA . CONSTANTCMOITAOV. Af . AMTOCONrANTCIIiOfTfVMr.tc » <mvtctcH*im BB&T0 AND TKUtr COMmNV CUSTOMER ■ S CHOICE “ STATEMENT 01 01 23 MR A C SMITH 123 SOME PLACE ANYTOMN n o r t h CAROLINA 27893 r <>CCOUWTNUimw 101-3 00 4 5 67 tTATm w TOATt 0 2 /2 8 /7 5 ' CK NO.DATE CHEOtSDEBrra CK.NO.DATE (HECKSflaraiTO r OCKSnSA»BXTS DATE DAILYBALANCE OM I 02i03 loioo 113 1 02!18 1 75*76 I '1... 0^03 11 2 6 lj?402J0310 7,'10 1 14 0 2llt 14^17 1 02[04 21 1»740211736l09 115 0^17 249|95 j 02jl0 130|00 lO I 02104 50»0 i j 200i00CA 0 2 ;ll 152^24 102 02l03 50I00 120 02!i 9 20J00 1 0213 119182103 02i03 20i00 121 O2I2I 75;oo B76i25 02; 14 99650710402117 i75;oo 122 02i2'.114}00 J 02*17 522}72105 02il0 25;00 123 02l2<.67^0 '02;18 34 6|96 106 02il3 20100 124 Q2l24 45j00 02jl9 326(96 107 02ll7 1 2,'3 1 125 02(28 100[00 1 02;2l 225199 108 02i21 2 5197 126 02IL8 lOOpO 500(00 02;24 499S49 109 02!13 l i t ?1 [1 02|28 379(49 110 02Jll 2 7’59 130 02|'28 20p0 t 111 O2I1O 5s:7<i 11 ]1 1 * * • *[1 1 1 t t ..fcu :TOMER'S (h o ic • J.H^VE CH EfK LISTE-'o j 'in11 NUMERltAI SEOl lENCE SEE B]BC TODAYI. 1 CONS 1 ANfT r R fD IT >SU»MARY. 1 1 • • • • • 1 PERIOD! END N(^' 011 0 2 /2 8 75 THE ;uhI Of y o u r 6a LY Lf !An1 B.LANCE !PREVIOUS LA|NCI 00 OURP 0 It h i 31 DAY 1 IL L If IG CYC LE J MINUS IPAYMI NTiS 100 00WAS :3400 00 TH IS {M tN <E -nA [PLUS AlDVANI ES!200 00 MULT PLiTEC BY ThIc i ER lot iIC] D iL Y :] I RAFF 0F| .( 004110', t HIGH IS| A 1 F ! /< ;a N (f: I [ 1 C H A R (» E!I 401 5 .o: i A N N U 'a I I 1 1r I P F i Cl 6 N r A [G f R A jT (1 I 1 j NEW BaIl ANCI 1 LOI 40 THE I e sjuL ING F1NA» ICE C!fARjCE 11 a v a il a b l e ( R E p !‘ 398 60 WAS / DDGD TO YQU« 1 OAN 1AL|AN(F . 1 C R E D Ill LIM T 1 500 00YOURNE'XT PAYMEN'T S SC lEDMLI D 1 NEXT PIa y MEI T ! 10 00TD Bl 0|ED(CTED FjROf YOU AjCC(lUNT 1 1>1ON o:- i p -5 , 1 1 1 1 1I1 1 t f IR IV B M E UDC FOR ReCONOLEMCNT AND CONOlTIONt AND TCRMt OF ACCOUNT. **'* CAT IN CHECK SEQUENCECU • CRfOiTMEMOOM - OEtIT MEMOSC • KEWVICt CHARGE___________ ‘K IV TO AN Rf VIATtONTMISC COST IT . SAVINOSTRAtaFER FC PAYMENT CORRECTIONLIST ■ CT CLURTRANSIER AC ADVANCE CORRECTIONSINTAN. TAX CA CONSTANT CREDIT ADV. Af AUTO. CONSTANT CREDIT FVMT Regular statemeiit. Customer’s Choice is the newest idea in checking account services. And it’s coming to North Carolina’s oldest bank early in 1975. Branch Banking and Trust Company is the first bank to offer this combination of choices: • Customer’s Choice makes a sequential statement available to businesses as well as individuals. And it’s free. Our sequential statement is the first one that; • Lists checks in the same order that you write them in your checkbook, • Gives you a daily account balance, • Notes unpaid checks with asterisks a space in the listing. • Customer’s Choice enables you to avoid paying a service charge. Just keep a balance of $100 or more in your personal checking account. Or you can author- Sequential statement ize us to keep a $ 100 minimum balance in your checking account by using BB&T’s Constant Credit, our overdraft plan. • Customer’s Choice lets you choose Constant Credit to cover overdrafts with $100 advances, or you may come in and get the exact amount you need up to your approved credit limit. With Constant Credit, you can borrow money by simply writing a personal check. • Customer’s Choice allows you to make automatic transfers from checking to savings and from checking to loan accounts. We’re telling you about Customer’s Choice early so you’ll have plenty of time to order specially numbered personalized checks if you choose our sequential statement. So take advantage of BB&T Customer’s Choice, No matter which statement and services you use, you’ll be right. B B £ T C U S T O M E R ’S C H O IC E O Rm R YOUR SPECIALLY NUMBERED PERSONALIZED CHECKS AT ANY BB£T OFFICE NOW 6B - DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD. THURSDAY, JANUARY 2, 1975 Home of the never ending sale. CHOICE V BEEF ) l U. s. CHOICC M B we welcome FOOD STAMP SHOPPERS PRICES GOOD THRU SAT. JAN. 4th QUANTITY RIGHTS RtSBRVBD. B4C0N ^129svwFT y ■ PREM. ' H VACPAC H LB. CHUCK R O A S T U.S. CHOICE BONi lN j Bom OR SIRLOIN S T E A K m U.S. CHOICE^ BONELESS U.S. ORMEL P&P, BOLOGNA OR SPICEDLUNCHMiATS .0. MDI IND. WRAPCHEESE DAK .12 OZ. r . 69* 89< .s. CHOICE BONE-IN U.S. CHOICE EXTRA LEAN ^ « 9 0 <=RESH PORK SHOULDER79* BEEF STEW . HOAST l b 79* .10 OZ. ROAST m CHUCK OR LB. DRUG DEPARTMENT s. C H O IC E C U B E D “ S C « ° ' « »< > N E L E S S t f l A < UHUCK STEAK- BEEF STEW COOKED HAM 5. CHOICE BONE-IN ^^^ICE EXTRA IHUCK STEAK..lb /t' BEEF STEW ^ 9 A Q SWIFT PREMIUM FRESH PORKFRANKS . O Z 78* STEAK CHAMPION i l i A r salt FISH FRESH PORK >LIVEimiSH - .s 49^ HERRING lb 99* SPARE RIBS l» 99* EVERYDAY SWIFT HAM P4TTffS •21 OZ.LB. iU IV E lO * WI1HTHIS COUPON ON FORMUIA 4 ^ COUGH MIXTURE 3 O Z .WITHOUT COUPON....11.24 limit one WRMogtiHoiP I/ Minute Maid ■ i| I 1 0 0 % ’ 1 1 I ORANGE JUICE ■ § I P\ants \n Rorida ® i ■;/ JUICE MINUTE MAID 12 OZ CAN s » 6 PACK 55‘ 2 LB. CAN CHAMPION CHICKEN AND M SUPERFINE BLACKEYE ^ no ^ ■ / lAHAM SALAD - ,o.6 T PiAS GORTON FROZEN DELMONTE i | 1 CPERCH FILLETS l b 99* PINEAPPLE 41* GORTON FROZEN & m Q O LADY KAY VANILLAFISH STICKS WAFERS . >kS^39* DELMONTERAISINS MT. OLIVE BABYKOSHER DILLS i‘.g^ o7* NESTLES CHOCOLATE QUIK COMETRICE CyerifDoii I Cyeri|DQi| I Cyeri|Dcii| I €yeri|DQi| Sole Price I Sole Price I Sole Price I Sole Price DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, THURSDAY, JANUARY 2, 1975 - 7B B U f SALl CHOICE BEEF 8 AM.-7 PM. (M-T-W-S) 8 A JM.-8 PJM. (THUR) 8 AJM.-9 PM. (FRI.) ______________MUMFORD DRIVE__________________ LIMIT ONC WITH A 7.50 OR NIORE FOOD ORDER Home of the never ending sale. CRfSCO SH O RTEN IN G 7 9 *______ miHnS 89* iTsmm A M ^ ^ ^ l / B A r % c i I I V C H J JFG ^ ^ L B . BAG OpQ COFFEE fe 8 8 * LIMIT ONE WITH 7 50 OR MORE FOOD ORDER 20 OZ. .BTL,T CANS ■ f V f r i M f V W ............irC A N S W -# ^ & l ) 9 f E l l l l V E .....................BTL. ^ M 3 < If o n parade a &mf%n KRAFT DELUXE MAC. AND M ‘cSif I CATSUP 3 ’bt?*^ I CHEESt_______6 9 * ^RISKIES m PET EVAPORATED DOG FOOD MILK Kh 2 7 * ^ N O WHITE HOUSE APPLE ^ V Al 5T0KELY W.K. GOLDEN lORN }G9 ^ N O t l A O JK0%C w hite HOUSE APPLE ^ N O < V A niAS M u ri^ M'MAUows feiib49* J4ucf 3 iN s’ i° ® ALE PRICE /ELCH'S TOMATOIWICf )ELMONTE PRUNE lUICi -IPTON riA BAGS ^RONOHEART ASST. FOOD >ARADE DRY ROAST PEANUTS ITAGON LIQUID iETERGEMT QT. -BTL. QT. .BTL. 100 CT. .BOX 15V2 OZ. .CAN ••••••••••••••••••• 8 OZ. BAG 48 OZ. , BTL. fIRlSIDl SWIETII r PIES 2 m OZ. 0 BOXES Cl Q r 5 1 * 66* i]29 12* s r 7 9 * ^ m 4 cm V b ^ 5 S .M ~ m m x o b 4af‘» I" H H i” .:.....^„„-»«9* MKiviuuK AMBOSTMfr. 1 .8 -7 9 * HWHPWPPifs - „ o z 3 9 * \ LIMIT ONE W 7 .5 0 Olf M O R f ORDfR POT^i TOES r T X i C O B B L E R ^ ■ I QUALITY CHECKED PRODUCE "ALWAYS FRESH" FRESH BUNCH _ COLLARDS 5 9 ^ 4 9 FRESH SHELLED BLACKEYE PEAS..............n OZ. PKG. wisf HOI a JO CHIPS 9 ‘ j OZ BAG S9( CASTLEBERRY HOT DOG CHILI ARMOUR B A K E R Y i- D E L I CARRY OUT LUNCH MEAT LOAF POTATOES GR. BEANS 2-ROLLS ARMOUR ALL MEAT BOLOGNA FRESH BAKED ITALIAN OR FRENCH BREAD LB. • EA. 8B - DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, THURSDAY, JANUARY 2, 1975 Mustard Was Popular Long Before The First Hotdog Alvin Whitaker received ,Uie East Davie Ruritan of the Year Plaque from Luther Potts at the December meeting held at Fulton United Mehtodist Church., The Ruritans’ wives were guests. Bingo was played with the prizes going to the ladies. Officers for 1975 for the East Davie Ruritan Club are: Richard Little, director; Wade Leonard, treasurer; Terry Potts, secretary; Andy Anderson, vice president; Alvin Whitaker, president. Henry L. Shore, Zone Governor, shown at far right, installed the new officers. The Young Revelations of Cornatzer United Methodist Church sang Gospel and Christmas songs for the East Davie Ruritan Christmas party. Social Security Office wants to get information to people who may be eligible for supplemental security income. The supplemental security income program makes monthly payments to people with little or no income and limited resources who are 65 or over or blind or disabled. The program is administered by the Social Security Administration. We've been making payments for almost a year now. Supplemental security income has ‘ been publicized in newspapers and on radio and television. There have been special campaigns to reach people who may be eligible. But we’re still concerned that there might be people who don’t know about the program and could be helped by the payments. If you know people in need who are 65 or over or blind or disabled, please tell them about supplemental security income, and please suggest that they call or write the Salisbury Social Security Office to get more information. The Salisbury social security office is at 105 Corriher Avenue. The phone number is 634-2868. Friends or relatives can call or write for people unable to do so on their own. The amount of the monthly supplemental security income payments people get depends on other income they might have. Eligible people with no other income at all get $146 a month for one person and $219 for a couple. I recently received' a refund on the taxes I’d paid on some land I own. Will this refund affect my supplemental security income payments? No. Any refund of taxes you’vp paid on real estate (or food purchases) is not counted in figuring your income for supplemental security Income purposes. I heard that the hospital insurance deductible is going up to $92 in 1975. Are the other amounts that a beneficiary pays under M edicare’s hospital insurance going up? Yes, they are. for benefit periods starting January 1 or later. For a hospital stay of over 60 days, the patient will be responsible for 123 a day (up from $21) for the 6ltt through the 80th day. For reserve days - after 90 days of hospital care in a benefit period - the patient will be responsible for $46 a day (up from $42). And for a post-hospital stay of over 2U days in a skilled nursing facility, the patient will be responsible for $11.SU a da)' (up from $10.50) for the 2Ist through tooth day. Man’s zest for mustard has been insatiable since Bible times. A spicy golden ribbon stretches from the parable of the mustard seed to the oozing hot dog at foolball games. The condiment never has been more popular in the United States. In 1973, more than 77,000,000 pounds of mustard seed were imported, most of it from Canada,‘ the National Geographic says. Domestic production no longer is very large. Besides decbrating hot dogs, mustard adds tang to mayonnaise, helps preserve canned goods, and gives zip to gravies in TV dinners. “ Today nearly half the world output of dry mustard never reaches the mustard pot,” notes a nutrition expert “ Four tons in every ten are marketed in bulk for use in other foods.’’ McCormick & Co., one of the largest mustard processors in the United States, keeps hun­ dreds of bags of mustard seed on hand in its Baltimore, Maryland, plant. In the milling process the seed is ground into a powder so fine that it can pass through the mesh in a woman’s stocking. "The raw mustard seed takes up more room than any of our other spices,’’ says Mc- cormick’s vice president, Edward J. Vinnicombe, Jr. “ It also creates more interest. A giant crop of curiosity con­ stantly surrounds the liny seed.’’ People have been fascinated with mustard for centuries. An ancient Egyptian papyrus mentions the plant as early as 1550 B. C. Early Greek arid Roman doctors recommended it as a medicine as well as a spice. The Rom an naturalist Pliny prcscibed mustard “ in cases of fits of lassitude and hysteria in females ...” Gourmets in Caesar’s time loved a sauce concocted with mustard and bits of anchovies, mackerel, and dolphin. N ot everyone was enchanted by the herb, then called sinapis. The dramatist Plautus had one of his characters say, “ If this man fed on mustard he could not be more sour and insensate.” Advance News I have been legally separated from my husband for the past 5 years. Will I be able to get monthly social security checks on his record? Yes, a legal separation from your husband will not affect your rights to wife’s benefits on your husband’s social security earnings record. However, if you should be divorced later on, your rights will end when the divorce is final if you haven’t been married 20 years or more. I thought widows were supposed to get monthly social security payments equal to the full benefits their husband would have received. My mother, who was recently widowed, is getting less than what my father’s full benefit would have been. Only women who first become entitled to social security widow's benefits when they're 65 or older get a benefit equal to the full amount their husbands would have received at 65. Also, if the husband was getting reduced benefits at the time of his death, the widow’s payments couldn't be more than what her husband would be gettUig If he were still alive. Four Cornets A group of people from Courtney Baptist Church went by bus to Faith Baptist Church of Troutman. Rev. W.C. Barkley is pastor. They all enjoyed worship in song. Mrs. Hattie Baity is spending a few days with her sister. Miss Mary Dinkins of Deep Creek. Mrs. Sadie Shelton and daughter of Kernersville visited Mr. and Mrs. George Laymon over the holidays. Larrie and Teresa Smith of Mocksville and Buddy Gough spent the night with Gregory Beck Friday night. Mrs. Ruby Brown and daughter of Pinnacle visited Mr. and Mrs. L.S. Shelton Saturday afternoon. The community extends their sympathy to Mrs, Flora Ratledge Taylor in the death of her husband. All the children and grand­ children and great grand­ children visited Mr. and Mrs. L.S. Shelton Sr. over the holidays. The old year will soon be gone and the new year coming in, may the coming year bring peace and happiness to all mankind. "Happy New Year to All” Gary Markland has spent the last seven weeks in Salt Lake, Utah snow skiing. His brother Dave Markland, a student at Applachian University, flew out to Utah to spend Christmas holidays with Gary. They plan to return home in the next week or so. Miss Ethel Smithdeal spent Christmas Day with her sister Mrs. Irvin Myers at Reeds. Sunday dinner guests of Miss Smithdeal were her niece and husband Mr. and Airs. Hugh Bennett and daughter Harriett of High Point, also her sister Mrs. Irvin Myers and Mrs, Homer Myers of Reeds. Mon­ day visitors of Miss Smithdeal were Mrs. Georgia Foster of Advance. Miss Belinda Potts of Atlanta, Georgia visited in the evening, also Danny Robertson of Elbaville and he brought a nice gift. Thursday Mrs. Roy Hopkins and children Maxie, Christie Ann, Teddy and Sam of Walnut Cove visited Miss Smithdeal. Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Williford of Dandridge, Tenn. are spending a few days visiting their son-in- law and daughter Mr. and Mrs. George Judd, Jr. and daughter Karen. Mrs. Georgia Foster had a family dinner at her home on Christmas Day. Guests were her brother-in-law and sister Mr. and Mrs. Headen Jordan of Woodleaf ; her children Mr. and Mrs. Jake Nifong of Winston- Salem, Mr. and Mrs. C. W. Foster, Jr. and children Kevin and Mandy, also her sister-in- law Miss Blanche Foster. On Christmas Eve Mr. and Mrs. Charles Crenshaw and children Elizabeth and Charlie of Mocksville visited Mrs. Foster. , Alvin Carter of Minneapolis, N. C. visited Miss Laura Shutt Firday. Other visitors during the week were Mr. and Mrs. Chris Farley and son Brian of Arlington,' Va., Mr. and Mrs. Jerry Hendrix and daughter , Andrea of Union, S. C., Mr. and Mrs. Eugene West of Shelby, Mrs. Brenda Hill of Long Island, N. Y., Miss Cynthia Bennett and Bradley Bennett of the Cornatzer commimity. G. W. Potts is a patient at Forsyth Memorial hospital. He has l^ n hospitalized for past 10 days with a heart condition. Get . well wishes are extended to him. Mrs. Sally Carter has been a patient at Davie Hospital for the past three weeks. She is showing improvement and hopefully will be able to come home in the next week or so. The family of Mrs. Rhea Potts met at her home Christmas Eve for a family dinner. All mem­ bers were present, with the Yadkin Valley The year of 1974 is coming to a close. Some will be saying it has not been such a good year, but if we will all stop and pause, and think of all the goodness, and merry the good Lord has shown upon each one of us it'has been on abundant year. “ Praise ye the Lord.” and Happy New Year. The virus “ bug” Is still on the go in our community there was several out of church Sunday due to this. We wish them a speedy recovery. There are several on the sick list, Mrs. Lillion Smith is im­ proved Mrs. Evola Sheek is still confined at home with the shingles but she is some better. Mrs. Nannie McBride had surgery last Monday at Forsyth Memorial Hospital, she has not been doing good, she is still having to take oxygen. Mrs. Jennie Howell is im­ proved and is at her home. Mr. Bill Wood has beei) ad­ mitted at Baptist Hospital we wish him and all others a speedy recovery. Mrs. Betty Jo Hartman is still doing fine at Forsyth Memorial Hospital. Allen and Julia Howell are confined to their home with the chickenpoxs. We hope they are soon able to attend church. Mr. and Mrs Henry McBride visited Mrs. Alma Smith at Fran Ray rest home on Friday night. exception of her son G. W. Potts. Mr. and Mrs. Lane Hall of Raleigh spent the holidays with her parents the Rev. and Mrs. W. C. Anderson. The “Ecumenicals” chorus presented a Cantata at Fulton Methodist church Sunday night. Mrs. W alter Shutt was Christmas Day dinner guest of Mr. and Mrs. Eugene Bennett and family. Mr. and Mrs. James 0. Black, their son and daughter-in-law Mr. and Mrs. Ronnie Black of Lexington were Sunday af­ ternoon visitors of Mr. and Mrs. Bill Zimmerman, Mrs. Brenda Hill and Mr. and Mrs. Jerry Hendrix. The Black’s also at­ tended the wedding of Miss Vivian Hilton and Mr. Yontz of Lexington who were married at the Bixby Church of The Living God Sunday afternoon. Mr. and Mrs. Joe Boger and daughter Jo Ann of Farmington were Christmas Day dinner guests of her mother Mrs. Recie Sheets. Mrs. Walter Shutt has been confined by a virus. Her visitors during the past week were all her children, her nine grand­ children and the five great­ grandchildren. A New Year’s Eve Service was held at the home of the Rev. and Mrs. "Bud” Chapman Tuesday night. Song service was from 7:30 to 8:30 P. M.; Fellowship from 8:30 to 9:00, followed by a worship service at 9:00. Many from our com­ munity attended. Mocks News Mr. and Mrs. Lonnie Hughes spent Wednesday with his parents Mr. and Mrs. Gujr Hughes of Lewisville. Mr. and Mrs. Joe White, Mr. and Mrs. John Jones, Mr. and Mrs. Richard White and boys of Winston visited Willie and Clyde Jones Sunday. Mrs. Emma Myers returned home Christmas day from the Baptist hospital where she had been a patient for the past week. Mrs. Margaret Carter was able to attend the Christmas program at the Church on Sunday night. Those visiting Miss Ethel Jones during the holidays were, Mr. and Mrs. Norman Jones and Mrs. Clarence Campbell of Thomasville, Mr. and Mrs. Glenn Jones of Redland, Mrs. Ruby Ledford of near Elbaville, Mr. and Mrs. Paul G. Jones. ' Mr. and Mrs. P.R. Carter spent Christmas day with their (laughter Mrs. Vida Allen of Smith Grove. Mr. and Mrs. Ed Pierce and children April and David of Norfolk Va, Mr. and Mrs. Wayne Monk of Fairfax Va. spent a few days with their mother Mrs. O.B. Jones. Mr. and Mrs. Alex Mock of Archdale visited Mrs. G F. Beauchamp and Mrs. Pete Carter Thursday. Gossip I hold it to be a fact, that if all persons knew what each said of the other, there would not be four friends in the world. „ , „ Pascal Smokey Says t The taste for mustard spread throughout Europe despite its sweet and sour reception. At one memorable 14th -century feast, King Louis IV of France and his courtiers supposedly lapped up more than 100 gallons of the popular sauce. A few years later King Ed­ ward III of England expressed his love for the condiment in ferocious fashion. “ War without burning," said the Planlagenet when he invaded France, "is sausage without mustard." To this day, mustard and sausage are as English as tea and crumpets or fish and chips. Early English herbalists thought the juice ol the seed also would improve vision, prevent "fallin g sickness, prevaile against the palsey of the longue,” and if “ taken divers mornings fasting, procure a good memorie." Mustard quickly took root in the New World. According to one story, Spanish missionaries scattered the plant in California as they went from mission to mission. The bright yellow flowers that sprang up enabled them to retrace their steps with ease, and the plant still gi ows near some missions. Library News Beginning Jan. 13, the public library will be showing fulll length films every otherl Monday night. Many prograihsl will feature an older fllm l classic, and we also hope tol show some newer selections! such as the “ Autobiography of I Miss Jane Pittman” and "Cool [ Hand Luke” . All of our patrons I are invited, and naturally there I will be no admission. I Our first film, shown on the! I3th, will be Alfred Hitchcocks | "The Thirty-Nine Step Robert Donat and Madeleine I Carroll star in this macabre, yet romantic and exciting, spy yarn. Sherlock Holmes will appear next, on the 27th In | “Study in Scarlet” . Information on the program)I will be available at the library so, LET US ENTERTAIN YOU! Agriculture Meetings| Are Announced Agriculture meetings an­ nounced by Davie County I Extension Chairman Leo I Williams for the first of the new I year are as follows: On January 9th, a tobacco I meeting will be held at 10 q.m. in the Davie County Qffi0e Building and on Wednesday, January 15, a corn meeting will | be held at 7:30 p.m. in county office building. Tuesday, January 28 and I Tuesday, February 4 will be dairy meetings, both at 7:30 p.m. in the county office building. The Regional Swine Con­ ference will be conducted, on February 13 in Turnersburg, North Carolina at the Ireddl Livestock Market. It will rim from. 4:30 p.m. until 9:00 p,m. with a barbeques<5)per tobe hdd at 6:00 p.m. • ■ carvfuUy built campfira keep* fire In iu placet Thank You It’s been a truly glorious year and we are grateful to all our loyal friends who helped to make it so. It is our wish to continue to serve you in the future. FACTORY—TO YOU I Ctistorw LIVING ROOM FURNITURE ALL STYLES OF RECLINERS LOVE SEATS & ODD CHAIRS All Stifles Made To Meet Your Needs. Early American Jiaditional,Contemporaiy, Spanish. We Have Hie Finest Factoiy Selected Nylon Rorals, Solid Heiculons, Plaid Herculons, Floral Cottons, Vinils, in in All CokMS. All Solid Oak Frames. PRICED AT NEAR WHOLESALE PRICES Christmas Specials- 2 Pc. Sofo& Chair Reg. *299.95 SALE • *148.95 2 Pc. Eariy American Sofa & Chair Ret *319.00 • SAL£ *279.00 Baby Rockets Refr *29.95 SALE *24.95 Umited Quanity Large Selecion Of National BRANDS OF BEDROOM-LIVING ROOM, DINING ROOM, FURNITURE. American Drew • Bassett • Craftique • Lazy-Biqr Reclineis-Sealy-National Mattress Reupholstery Work Done At Reasonable Prices Edwards Furniture & Uphol Co. Hwy.MW.R tl Mocksville, N.C. Phone 634-2244 I s Economic Recoveiy Possible In 1975? Editor's note: The following article, prepared by Thomas P. Rideout, Senior Vice President pt Wachovia Bank and Trust Company, comments on the prospects for economic i,recovery In 1975. Mr. Rideout is i portfolio manager in the Bond and Investments Department at . iVachovla in Winston-Salem. It is quite likely that 1974 will . go down in the economic history , books as a year of recession. Buffeted initially by the oil embargo and shortages induced by both price controls and the record demand of an un­ p reced en ted econ om ic Buperboom, the American economy during 1974 gradually ( BUccumbed to declining con­ sumer demand as inflation ‘iapped the real purchasing power of the average worker’s I paycheck. ' As a result of inflation, higher social security and other taxes-- in addition to fewer hours worked-the average worker ivith three dependenls has seen ' the real purchasing power of his ‘ fake-home pay deteriorate by 5 ■ jier'!ent in the last twelve months and by 8 percent in the ‘ fest two years. With higher ’W ees for food and energy reading the way, the cost of < living for essential needs now ‘ takes a decidedly larger portion itdf take-home pay than in the recent past. This has 'necessarily impaired the '•discretionary income that is ' normally available for the less 'Essential new car, refrigerator, or suit. In addition to the impact from a lower real volume of retail sales, 1974 was also affected by severe weakness in the housing Ihdustry. For the period from August to October, new housing starts averaged only 1.1 million units in annual terms, which *wds 55 percent below the peak ,months in early 1973. One of the major causes of the depressed ihousing market was a istrictive monetary policy lich the Federal Reserve irsued in attempting to slow inflation. While monetary policy has jbeen less restrictive in recent [months and promises to ease up imore so in 1975, it is not likely that Federal Reserve actions I'will be sufficient to halt the recession and promote a buoyant recovery in the next few months. Rather, a return to economic well-being is going to require a moderation of in­ flation and a gradual recovery that will not aggravate supply- demand imbalances. The prospects for such a •ecovery beginning in the ^on d half of 1975 appear to be reasonable. Historically, the recovery phases of a business cycle are influenced by either exports, housing, consumer spending or some combination thereof. The export sector does not appear terribly promising i)ecause the recession we are undergoing today is a world­ wide phenomenon. It will take recovery in the U.S. to fuel the export-dominated industries of many of the world’s economies thus creating greater op­ portunities for our export in­ dustries. The housing sector will benefit from lower interest rates and a reflow of funds into the traditional lending in­ stitutions. But even with im­ proved permanent financing availability . the capabilities in the land development and construction lending areas will not be as strong as usual because of the severity of our current housing industry problems. Therefore, while housing will be better during 1975, it is not likely that it will provide the strong impetus necessary for a sharp general economic recovery. During the first half of 1975, the American consumer is going to be confronted with severe yet moderating inflation and a continuing threat of unemployment. This should result in a continuation of his lowered spending profile. The consumer’s emphasis will be on meeting the basic needs and increasing his savings rate, if possible. This process would include the curtailment of Acidophilus Milk Is Developed Contracts were signed Wednesday on a process developed by North Carolina State University food scientists designed to increase the benefits of milk. The process involves adding b e n e fic ia l b a c t e r ia , tr a d e m a rk e d “ S w e et Acidophilus,” to pasteurized milk. Some industry sources say it could be one of the most significant developments in the dairy industry since vitamin D was introduced as a sup­ plement in milk during the early part of the 20th Century. Officials of the N.C. Dairy Foundation, which supports dairy science programs at NCSU, signed a contract with the G.P. Gundlach & Co. of Cincinnati, Ohio for marketing the product under the trade name “ Nu Trish.” A contract was signed earlier with Mar­ shall Laboratories, a division of Miles Laboratories of Elkhardt, Indiana who will prepare the cultures. Market tests are scheduled to start in the near future in North Carolina and a Midwestern state, probably Ohio. Scientists have known for more than 50 years that the b a c te ria L a c to b a c illu s acidophilus is closely associated with the health of the human intestinal tract. Scientific literature reports that those bacteria can aid the body in recovering from intestinal disorders such as diarrhea and flatulence or gassiness. Acidophilus milk has not been widely used, however, because many people found the flavor unpleasant. The NCSU development overcomes the bad flavor. Dr. Marvin L. Speck, a William Neal Reynolds professor of food science at NCSU, headed the research project that has been underway more than five years. The N.C. Agricultural Ex- Farmington News The Farmington Masonic ^ g e 265 held open installation t officers for 1975 and ecoginzation of St. John’s Day aturday night with some ninty . le enjoying the occasion. A in'quet of delicious foods were irved at 7:15 in the fellowship jail with the Farmington Fnited Methodist pastor, Rev. Shoaf offering the in- lation. After the banquet the lup adjourned to the second loor hall where Joe Langston ;ave all a welcome and ited twenty four women irith red rose buds. He in- iroduced Rev. Bennie Bearden >f Welcome who brought nemories of his form er mstorate in Farmington, and a [reat message on “ Building a iome where God reigns upreme. The life God gave !0ch one is his home to peep and arnish. He closed wishing M ’s blessing on all the homes luring 1975. The following of- ilicers were installed with Joe l«ngston installing officer and «(orman Blake installing Marshal, Master J. T. Green, Senior Warden James Howard, lunior Warden Jerry Davis, ITreasurer D. R. Bennett, Secy. John Hartman, Senior Deacon, ill W. Walker, Junior Decon 'ouman Smith, Senior Steward . W. Spillman, Junior Steward H. Langston, Chaplain je Boger, Tyler Buford ith Mrs. William Scholtes of 'inston-Salem and son Edgar iholtes and daughters, Betsy ind Linda, of Jacksonville N. 0. Saturday visitors of the ishley families. John M. Brock of Sumerton S. . spent Christmas with his iter Miss Margaret Brock. im Mr. and Mrs. Gene Johnson if Petersburg Va. spent istmas Eve and Christmas ly with his parents Mr. and ts. Ed Johnson and his .randparents, Mrs. Marion ■Johnson and Mr. and Mrs. Gene Wood. Mr. and Mrs. Grady Smith Msited Mr. and Mrs. Earl Smith ^ e a r Raleigh Sunday and inday. Mrs. John Hatman who has in a patient in the Forsyth imorial Hospital for over a ith continues to show im- ivement according to friends who visited her Sunday. Mr. and Mrs. Bill Brock, 'ank and Gela visited their lunt, Mrs. Gela Mustgrave in |i|Yemont over weekend. U Christmas guests of Miss te Brown were Mrs. Ruby and grandson, Scott Yale, Yadkinville. Mrs. Clifford ;herm and daughter, Mrs. 'earl Phillips of Forbush, adkin Co. Some thirty five members of M Mrs. and Mrs. Clyde Jarvis family gathered Christmas Eve at the home for a yearly get- together. Rev. and Mrs. Qarence Shore of Yadkinville joined them Christmas guests of the George Tucker family were Mr. and Mrs. Henry Tucker of Greensboro, Mr. and Mrs. Wayne Martin and daughter Julie, Mr. and Mrs. Thurman Martin of Walkertown, Mr. and Mrs. Henry Strupe of Winston- Salem. On Sunday Mrs. George Tucker and Gilbert Tucker visited Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Lash- mit in College Village and also Mrs. Bessie Hauser in the Health Care Center in Winston- Salem Mrs. Elizabeth Williard en­ tertained her family Friday night with a supper. Those present were Mr. and Mrs. Phillip Graham, Mr. Jimmy Graham and daughter all of Yadkinville, Mr. and Mrs. Ronnie Wall of Greensboro, Miss Laura Petty of Rural Hall, and Mr. and Mrs. John Graham Williard and children, Beth and Grant of Winston-Salem. Woodleaf News Mr. ancfMrs. W. D. Painter' have returned home from Chattanooga after spending the holidays with their son and family Mr. and Mrs. Howard Painter. Mr. and Mrs. Joe Koontz and children of Kingsport, Tenn. are here this week with their parents, Mr. and Mrs. Gleen Koontz and Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Knox of Mt. Ulla. C. 0. Waller is improving from injuries received in an auto accident several weeks ago. Mrs. Carrie Webb has returned from MacCleafild where she spent the holidays with her daughter Mrs. Jean Brogdon. Mrs. Kenneth Gillean returned home Wednesday from Orlando, Fla. where she spent several weeks with her son and family James Gillean. Jake Ward is improving at his home after being a patient in Rowan Memorial Hospital several weeks. Lewis Godbey is some better after a week’s illness. I.ifr Life is made up, not of great sacrifices or duties, but of little things, in which smiles and kindness, and small obligations given habitually, are what preserve the heart and secure comfort. Sir H. Davy periment Station, along with the N.C. Dairy Foundation, sup­ ported the research which was conducted in the food science laboratories at NCSU. Speck, a microbiologist, noted that bacteria always have played an important role in food and human health. “ By far in man’s existence,” Speck pointed out, “ helpful bacteria outnumber the harm­ ful ones. Microorganisms have been involved for centuries in the manufacture of both dairy and non-dairy foods.” Among examples cited by Speck of helpful bacteria are the pickling of vegetables, sour dough bread and cheeses. Speck emphasized that “ Sweek Acidophilus” milk should not be con­ sidered a medicine. “ 1 think we need to consider it and other microorganisms of the intestinal tract to have a role sim ilar to nutrients because they contribute to man’s well-being. What we’re doing with ‘Sweet Acidophilus’ milk is to increase the options available to the consumer to have a broader range of nutrient intake and thereby maintain his intestinal health.” Dr. William M. Roberts, head of the Department of Food Science at NCSU, said many modem foods, especially snack foods, are highly processed and virtually sterile, containing very few or no microorganisms. "A diet of sterile foods tends to make the consumer more susceptible to disorders of the gastrointestinal tract,” Roberts said. “ We need to put more emphasis on the types of foods that help maintain a healthy balance of microorganisms in the gastrointestinal tract.” Speck noted that when people ate more raw food in times past, they got more lactobacilli naturally. That is not true with today’s'highly processed foods. He added that lactobacilli in the intestinal tract “seem to have some antagonistic effects against undesirable bacteria that might become predominant in the gut if the lactobacilli are not present in adequate amounts.” For example, he said, when coliform bacteria become predominant in the intestinal tract after antibiotic therapy, they seem particularly involved in causing flatulence or gassiness and diarrhea. When the lactobaccilli become re-established in proper numbers and proper balance with other bacteria, he added, the coliform bacteria are reduced in numbers “ and that’s when the individual experiences more com fort in the gastrointestinal tract.” Ordinary acedophilus milk has been used for many years to help relieve people from in­ testinal disorders. But the distasteful flavor has caused it to be used only as a last resort. “ What we have introduced in ‘Sweet Acidophilus’ m ilk,” Speck said, “ is a product that has the same flavor as the pasteurized milk you’re ac­ customed to drinking.” Speck estimated that the cost of acidophilus milk would be “ a few cents per quart over the regular price of milk.” He said low-fat or skim milk is the most appropriate kind to use for this purpose. Medical specialists in dif­ ferent areas of the country have indicated a “ very definite in­ terest” and joint studies in­ volving the medical profession are planned. Speck said. Collaborating with Speck in the project has been Dr. Stanley E. Gilliland. Dr. Max E. Gregory, also of the food science department at NCSU, has assisted in the project. Technicians, graduate students and others have worked on various stages of the project. a column ol money management and personal banking inlormation by Karen McCall Wachovia Bank & Trust Co N A If you own any shares of the common or preferred stock of a corporation, you are accustomed to receiving an annual report of the flnancial condition of the company. Usually these reports are meticulously prepared and are quite impressive graphically. But after all, it’s the figures that count. And when you have money invested in a corpora­ tion, you would be wise to learn how to read, understand and interpret their flnancial report. Here are the major items found in a typical annual report and brief guidelines on what they mean. Usually they start off with the president’s letter to stockholders. This is a summary of the company’s financial highlights for the past year, plus reasons why profits were up or down. This should give you the company’s own assessment of its long-term outlook, with supporting facts. Next, is the income statement or earnings report. This is a summary of past year’s sales volume, other income, profits or losses with corporate figures for the prior year. A record for the previous five or ten years is usually summarized separately. You’ll find this a good clue to the company’s trend, up or down. Now, for the net profit ratio which is a prime indicator of the company’s efficiency. Figure it by dividing total net profit by total net sales. Today’s ratio may range from 1 to 30 percent or more. Compare the most recent year’s record against the record for previous years. Compare it also against performance of other companies in the same industry. Then, you can usually expect a retained earnings state­ ment. This tells you what share of company profits are being returned to you as dividends and what share is being held back. If the proportion going to dividends declines sharply, look for an explanation of how the extra funds are being reinvested. Next, look for the ratio of current assets to current liabilities. This reveals the financial cushion the company would have left if it paid off all current debts. A rule of thumb; many industrial companies maintain a 2-to-l volume of current assets over current liabilities. The report also may give you a debt-to<quity ratio, or leverage factor, which measures the amount of long-term debt the company is carrying in relation to stockholders’ investment. Normal ratio for manufacturing companies is over 50 percent. And last, the footnotes. Important information is often revealed in footnotes. Example: a footnote might explain how unusually high profit stemmed from a one shot, non-recurring financial windfall. Also significant is the price earnings ratio, which is simply a measure of how the overall investment community views the company. Ratio does not appear in the annual report but you can calculate it by dividing the current market price of a share of the company’s stock by the company’s last year per share earnings noted in the earnings reports. Now that doesn’t sound too complicated. Or does it? 1 realize that it is difficult to follow this description without an annual report right in front of you. Next time you receive a report, it will pay you to study it carefully and learn all you can about the company in which you have invested your money. consumer debt. As an example of this trend, outstanding consumer debt, measured from September 1973 to September 1974, increased by only 9 per­ cent compared with a 15 percent increase for the previous 12 months. The inflation rate should drop from the current near-15 per­ cent to the seven percent range by the second half of 1975. For the average worker this would mean a return to some real gain in personal disposable income, in contrast to his experience in 1974 when benefits from in­ creases in earnings were eroded by spiralling inflation. Com­ bined with some stabilizing effects from deficit spending at the federal government level and perhaps some tax cuts or other fiscal policy initiatives, consumer spending sentiment could begin to slowly improve. With such a gradual and prolonged period of recovery, America cculd enter 1976 with a large part of the battle against inflation won. In order to achieve this goal, the temp­ tation to massively relate the economy through pump- priming policies at the federal level should be resisted strongly. Davie County Citizen Committee Meets On Zoning Case The Davie County Citizens Committee met on December lOth for the purpose of for­ mulating plans to oppose the issuance of a permit to Freewood Associates to open a so called family camp ground located on Mocksville, N. C., Route 5. Notices have been sent to the Churches and Pastors of Davie County requesting that they urge the interested people in Davie County to come for the zoning hearing to be held in the Davie County Court House on January 6th at 7:30 p.m. Legal counsel has been solicited and paid for by interested citizens who object to a zoning permit being issued which would permit a nudist colony being established in Davie County. The leadership committee requests that citizens interested in protecting the morality, integrity and property rights of the people of Davie County to execute their legal and God given rights by attending the zoning hearing Monday night at the Davie County Court House. Love Love and a cough cannot be Herbert DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, THURSDAY, JANUARY 2, 1975 - 9B Jerry«Reavis, left, is shown presenting plaque to C. Edgar Cartner on behalf o f the Shefiield-Calatialn Ruritan Club. Ruritans Honor C. Edgar Cartner At the regular December meeting of the Sheffield- Calahaln Ruritan Club a plaque was presented to C. Edgar Cartner by all the members to show their appreciation for the outstanding job he did as District Governor of Piedmont District 31. The club feels it is fortunate to have one of its members to have served as District Governor and also another memlier, Danny Reavis, to serve as District Secretary. Jerry Reavis, meml>er of the program committee, made the presentation of the plaque to Mr. Cartner. Notice of TAX LISTING D u r i n g t h e M o n t h o f JANUARY 1975 ALL PROPERTY On Hand Januray 1, 1975-Either Real or Personal is SURJECT TO TAXATION Regardless of Age or Sex of Owner All Business shoidd list their property by mail or at the Courthouse. Township listers will not be able to do this. It is noted that all property should be listed as of January 1,1975 except inventory. This should be listed as of your last fiscal year inventory. Tax listers will only be in Rural Areas a few days in various places, in each township. Please make a note of these days so that if you need help in listing, you may be able to go to them. You may list with any lister in any township. You are required to bring your listing form when seeking the aid of a list taker. However if you lose your form you can only list at the Courthouse. If you are a new lister, you may list witlvany lister in any township. You should have received yoiu: forms in the mail, if you listed in 1974. If you have not, contact the tax office. We have received many returns with wrong addresses. We urge you to list by mail if at all possible. Tlie tax listers will be in the following places for listing taxes. The time will be from 9:00 A.M. until 6:00 P.M. each Monday and Friday. Each Wednesday from 12:00 Noon tmtil ’8:00 P.M. and each Saturday firom 9:00 A.M. until 12:00 Noon during the month of January and 9:00 9:00 A.M. until 12:00 Noon February 1,1975, except JerusalemTownship each Monday firom 8:30 A.M. untU 4:30 P.M. Calahain Township Jan. 6-13-20-27 J.C. Stroud Grocery Jan. 2-4-8-10-11 -1S - 17-18-22 24-25-29-31 and Feb. 1 Center CommunKy BIdg. Mrs. Dale Chaffin, List Taker Jerusalem Township Jan.3-4-B-10-11-15-17-1B-22- 24-25-29-31 and Feb. 1 Jerusalem Fire Dept. Jan. 6-13-20-27 Cooleemee School Gym. Mrs. Margaret Cope, List Taker Farminsiton Township Jan.6-13-20-27 Bogan Kar Klaen Service Jan. 4-B-11 -15-1B-22-25-29 and Feb. 1 Bates Grocery and Service Across Road From Old Smith Grove School Jan. 3-10-17-24-31 Ed Johnson's Grocery & Service Mrs. Jack Boger, List Taker Clattevilie Township Jan. 3-4-B-B-10-11 -13-15-17- 1B-20-22-24-25-27--29-31 and Feb. 1 William R. Davie Fire Dept. Mr. L.S. Driver, List Taker Shady Grove Township Jan. 3-4-8-10-11 -13-17-18- 20-24-25-27-31-and Feb. 1 Advance Fire Dept. Jan. 8-15-22-29 Robertson's Grocery (Bixby) Mrs. Jane Carter, List Taker Fulton Township Jan. 3-4-6-8-10-11 -13-15- 17-18-20-22-24-25-27- 29- 31 and Feb.1 Fork Fire Dept. Mrs. Floyd Monday, List Taker Mocksville Township Mocksville listers will be at County Courthouse Monday through Friday from 8:30 A.M. until 5:00 P.M. Saturday, January 11 and 25 from 9:00 A.M. until 12:00 Noon. Mrs. Marjorie Green, List Taker TAX RELIEF FOR THE PROPERTY OF ELDERLY PERSONS WITH LIMITED INCOMES If you are 65 yean of age , or if you will become 65 during the year for which you are listing property taxation, and your disposable income did not exceed five thousand dollars ($5,000 includes husband and wife) for the precceding year, you are eligible for a tax excluaionof up to five thousand doUan ($5,000) for property you hold and use for personal purposes. All Late Listing Subject To 10% Penalty Please Make Your Return As Early As Possible TAX SUPERVISOR, DAVIE COUNTY I lOB - DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, THURSDAY, JANUARY 2, 1975 Cold Weather Aids Record-High Electric Bills jre u r Colder than normal weather and higher cleclric tales have combined to produce record electric bills so far this winter, a Duke Power spokesman said today. Ed Goodwin said unusually cold weather is causing increased use of electricity. “ Winter tem­ peratures already are running ;I7 percent colder than Inst year, and we have noted that some customers are using 40 percent more electricity than they did last winter." he said. In addition, Mr. Goodwin said, “ Electricity costs more than It did last December. Electricity is now costing about 25 percent more for o household using 1000 killowatt hours a month, 2000 Killowatt, which cost $;)B.24 last December now costs $51.42." “ Despite con­ servation measures of many customers, colder than normal weather and higher rates are offsetting their efforts lo a large degree" Mr. Goodwin said. “ Due to the large number of inquiries many customers are getting a busy signal when they have tried to call us, but we are taking calls as rapidly as possible." said Mr. Goodwin. “ Many of the customers inquiries may take several days to process but all calls and letters will be answered." Mr. Goodwin listed some of the reasons why our households use more electricity in the winter than any other season. 1. Water heaters work harder Farm Tips By Dr. J. W. Pou Agrfcultural Specialist Wachovia Bank & Trust Co., N.A. Latest figures show a continued downward trend in the amount of tobacco used per 1,000 cigarettes produced in the United States. In the early 1950’s, manufacturers were using 2.7 pounds of domestic and imported tobacco in making 1,000 smokes. The figure dropped to 2.5 pounds in the years 1955-59. Last year, according to the U. S. Department of Agriculture, usage of (,,bacco per 1,000 cigarettes was only 1.9 pounds. That was 4 percent le.ss than in the previous year. The downtrend has been steady for two decades. Dr. W. K. Collins, extension tobacco specialist at North Carolina State University, said new tech­ nology has enabled manufacturers to increase their yield of cigarettes from a given quantity of tobacco. He said improved processes have led to complete utilization of stems by the companies, and some use also is being made of “pulled” tobacco to boost the cigarette yield. Another factor has been the rising popularity of filter-tip smokes, which now dominate the market. When filters are used in cigarettes of a given length, less tobacco is needed. “ Some changes in manufacturing have been made for economic reasons — that is, to increase the effi­ ciency of cigarette production,” Collins said. “ Other changes have been made to offset claims of health hazards in smoking, and others have resulted from attempts to make cigarettes that will meet the needs and preferences of consumers.” The N. C. State University specialist said tobacco farmers should not be "unduly concerned” about the higher output of cigarettes from a given quan­ tity of tobacco. “ Over the long haul, increased efficiency in pro­ ducing cigarettes will help manufacturers maintain a position of financial strength and enable them to pay the farmer for his tobacco,” Collins said. He added that the tobacco grower knows there will be buyers available at the warehouse with the money to purchase his crop. This is not true of some other commodities. Flue-cured or bright leaf tobacco, the chief money crop of North Carolina fanners, accounted for from 56 to 58 percent of the cigarette blend in the 1950’s. By last year, the flue-cured proportion had declined to 48 percent. During the same period, the propor­ tion of imported Turkish or aromatic tobacco in the blend increased from about 8 percent to about 15 percent. Other types of tobacco used in the American blend are burley, accounting for about 35.5 percent, and Maryland leaf, which makes up about 1.5 per­ cent. to heat the much colder water coming into the house. 2. Families spend more time using indoor lights and elec­ trical appliances. 3. The cost of heating homes with electricity increases when the weather gets colder. About pne-half the annual healing bill occurs the 2 months of December and January. Even homes with gas and oil furnaces require electric motors to operate fans and pumps. 4. Customers generally cook heavier meals in the winter. 5. Fewer daylight hours in the winter require a greater use of household lighting. B. Customers generally use electric washers and dryers to a greater extent in the winter. “ We are very concerned about the people who are receiving these higher bills, particularly during the holiday season. We are making every effort to keep our costs down without jeopardizing electric service, but like the cold weather, many of our basic costs are just not under our control" Mr, Goodwin added. “ Inflation has made it much more costly to make and deliver electricity" Mr, Goodwin said. He pointed out that coal, which makes most of Duke's elec­ tricity cost $1.3.6.') a ton last December, last month the price soared to $31.56, TOMATO PROBLEMS If you had problems with your garden toma­ toes this past summer, now is the time to do something about avoiding similar problems next year. Blossom-end rot ia a common tomato ailment in North Carolina gar­ dens. It can be reduced by having your soil tested now and liming according to soil test results. Lime now, don't wait until next spring, N. C. State Uni­ versity specialists suggest. Clothes Budget Pinch Eased by 'Recycling' " Social Security ... by Hal Griffin onniNAitr OHOUP ISl>tl^TRIA^ TOTAt j K. ' T,.—^ 1__u . . . _ .-H .1 4'X*.00 ,1 400.1M10 InmrrH dgrmt n>rr*nt |fitr 0___0 9 5.203,00 a 5.303,00.1i: R»itM d*rlp.| fwftfiil )r»»r........ N___N« Bjr tfi {■!!.........K 9 5,W1.W 8 5,20J.OO|b H|t 9*)intnt on i^prowiMdf, T»UI S 5,To3.W 9 5,f03.i» 1 • Amauni rtjKlM].--"S - 5.W3.0P « H l»>p..d tW. II ____1 4'Kr.opJ S T A T E M E N T CWHYSl« PSVmWCE COHP*.Sy _ B,695,.01.73, I IjS07j31S,ll . .471^171.35 f„. I T<-UI Ai 775.40l,ll7,.M4.vU :4l,»'*4.7^l7JjS75.<210,4'4.kV • tplUl p»i| Up iir»M >" •'''1 igiplut (undi tnaMlcvH fundt , tiJ,207.tjS , 1,610,250. , 1,50},826.<10 ■UBINtSa IH THt •T*rc or NONTM CAKOUN* OUIKMO 12,7M,110.00 HJ.l'IJ.Sb 10,'*76.21 . ')1,20H.A> >72,60 27,000.011 27b,iWi.W-- 159.61).S4 .. 2lSab».«5 U,814,J77.5H Son,aj4.55 1S,S26,222.1J f WIMMil AM AMMUrr comioiiAtWMi OHDINAHV i,2J6.ex •niTAi. 20,193.22 r hrffirhrr >l ..t pft«iaut r< K. 5« .500 NU16,500 ,0104,500 ,K59£ * Kfkllti Pr*inliiin« t - _________________ * ll.tlUi Inmrrvri |_________________________Tr...»t,r _ _____________ . .. .offift -^SM.ciw.Avs\«e, _________________Attomrr tor trtln John R.ndalph fncrwn, CammUttoMr *f Unrtnn. N CKOBTH CAR0L1KA DKPARTMKNT OF INSURANCE<*••11 R.ififfc. . . !«_'*_I. Jokfi R«k4o)H> ('omm.o.Mifr «{ In.uiiBf*. 4e Mrtby c*niry (Kti th* tWr I. • Inw tnd .h.triM «t ih* tUUiMxt o( Ikr-PHiUBUfJIlA.-jiyiTED ________________ _________________ fiM Bilh ikli Ik* raadillsn at mM CMB^nr »WllRMt k.nd IlKici.l maI th* d*r (nd d«U (teft >ilUi ol l> S T A T E M E N T CIK Insurwtc* Corpor«rion , . io.72s.m.a7- 7i.PH.Qa_ A. U..V 1*J., .-x, 1 .I.jU, 7»; i>uj . l>«n y.ii homtl 1 ANI.I.ISA I'tlAhll The M edicare hospital in­ surance deductible will be $92 starting January. 1, 1975. A Medicare patient who goes into a hospital after December 31 will be responsible for the first $92 of the hospital bill. The 1974 deductible was $84. Under the Medicare law, the amount will increase to keep it in line with the average cost of one day’s stay in the hospital. The increase to $92 for 1975 is a result of a review of hospital costs during 1973. However, the present $84 deductible remains in effect throughout any benefit period that started in 1974 even if the period of hospitalization goes into 1975. Under the law, the increase in the deductible means there also will be increases starting January I in three other amounts Medicare patients pay for covered care. For a hospital stay of over 60 days, the patients will pay $23 a day (up from $21) for covered services furnished on the 61st through the 90th day. For a post­ hospital stay of over 20 days in a skilled nursing facility, the patient will pay $11.50 a day (up from $10,50) for the 21st through the 100th day. For reserve days used-after 90 days of hospital care in a benefit period-the patient will pay $46 a day (up from $42). Medicare hospital insurance helps pay for hospital stays and certain post-hospilat care of people 65 and over, disabled people under 65 who have been entitled to social security disability benefits for 24 con­ secutive months or more, and many people who have chronic kidney disease and need dialysis or a transplant. My 28-year-old son' has been disabled since he was 10, 1 understand that when I get my monthly social security retirement payments that he’ll also be eligible for monthly checks. Will his payments start the same month mine do, or does he have to wait 5 months like disabled workers do? If your son is eligible for ch ild h ood d is a b ility payments, there is no 5- month waiting period. His payments will start at the same time yours do, and continue as long as his disability lasts. When he has been getting childhood disability checks for 24 months, he’ll also be eligible for Medicare protection. RALEIG H — Clothing budget getting tight? Save money by recyclin g the fam ily’s clothes. This Is just another w ay of saying, "D o some mending,” point out extension clothing spe­ cialists, North Carolina State University. Notion counters carry replacem ent pockets, zippers, elastic, slip and bra strap replacem ents and Iron-on patches. M ost teenagers w ill proudly w ear jeans that have been mended with the new assortments of iron-on patches, the spe­ cialists observe. The secret of success with Iron-on patches is to use the right pressure and heat when applying them. In correct application w ill resu lt in the patches becom ing loose after washing o r cleaning. Shrinks, or the b rief sw eaters that look as though they have shrunk, are very fashionable right now, the specialists note. Check your closet. You may have the latest fashion already — If too hot w ater was used when a sw eater was laundered. Sew-on patches canl used to cover holes,! reinforce, and add dec-j oratlve details. LeatheJ patches can be applied td elbows and knees oil trousers to add strength and life to the garmentJ The patches can be added as pockets to update the appearance of a garment^ And decorative stltche can be used to apply thtj patches. Where hems havd been let down, cover thd lengthening line with braid, rick rack or dec*-] oratlve stitching. Change collars oil dresses to update themj If the underarm section o f the sleeve is wornl rem ove the sleeves] low er the neckline of thif garm ent and make jum per out of the dressi R e-do and tnake-dol Som etim es the re-m ad^ garm ent Is m ore popula than the original. Parents Parents who wish to train „ their children in the way the. should go, must go in the way iil which they would have theil children go. 971^191 I736,750 I 1,133,I 584,605 I • * I I I I I . 1 D O C U M E N TA R Y S TA M P: A revenue stamp Issueld for the paym ent of a tax on documents, as deeds, checks or wills. Gwyn Street - 2 bedroom house with bathr~Cheerfuily decorated throughout. Lot with lovely fenced back yard with storage building and picnic shelter. This house and lot offers the “ most for your money.” Call, let us show it to you today. Carrowoods - 2600 sq, ft., tri-level, 4 bedrooms, 2 full baths. Large recreation room with fireplace. Den with sliding glass doors opening onto patio. House is electrically heated and cooled. Situated on lot 125 x 200 with city water. This house offers lots of room for even a large family. Call today for complete details. Wandering Lane - Custom-designed Colonial home situated in the midst of 3M acres of beautiful woodland. A painted brick exterior combined with crab orchard stone wings is roofed with western cedar shakes with copper valleys. This home features superb construction throughout and will surely please the discriminating buyer. Hemlock Street - 3 bedroom rancher with 2 baths, full basement with 4 rooms and garage. Large lot with fenced in back yard. Call Mary Forest for complete details. ise Walt Wilson Road - 4 bedroom house with bath situated on beautiful I'/i lot with several out buildings. House has 1238 sq. ft. with good loan assumption. Priced to sell at $12,900, Call today. Sanford Road: This house has it all ... Good location large lot(200 x 300)... 1650 sq. ft. heated area ... Den with fireplace & exposed beams ... 16M sq. ft. basement with fireplace... 16x36 in ground heated swimming pool. And many other features too numerous to mention. Call I Forrest for complete details. 1 Mary Mill Street - Nice 2 bedroom house with bath in very good condition. Must see to appreciate. Call us for complete details. stir,;; __________________________ _ ___ New Construction - Sanford Road, Partially completed new home. Owner wants to sell as is,, Buyer may finish house to suit his likes. Call for complete details. Country Estates - 3 bedroom, baths. Electric heat. Large kitchen with built-in appliances including dishwasher. Lot 125 x 200, Financing at 8% percent already approved, ACREAGE 7.6 acres land on Highway 64 east of Mocksville, 3 acres open remainder in woods. Excellent lot to build on. Priced to sell. Development Tract - water and sewage; Mocksville city limits, 100 acres of good prime land. Financing available, LOTS Woodland Development - 2 wooded lots available. One lot, 150 X 200, priced at $3900. One lot, 230 x 355, priced at $3280. Southwood Acres - Lot approximately ISO x 160. Building? Choice lot which offers a beautiful building site in an exclusive residential area. Call us today for details. Corner of Main Street and Milling Road - 4 lots 112.6 x 303 with frontage on Milling Road. Priced at $50 per front foot.Hemlock Street - Approximately 2 acres of land with plenty of frontage. Call us for details. Depot Street - 3 developed lots conveniently located near town. Sale price is $1,000. Hwy. 601 South - 3 bedroom house with 2 baths, full basement on 1 acre lot. Priced at $26,900. Call today for an appointment to see this house! _ HOUSES Clemmons - Unwood Drive. 3 bedroom brick rancher on 1 acre land. Nice neighborhood and is convenient to 1-40 interchange. Call Mary Forest for complete details, RENTALPROPERTY Gwyn Street - Lovely 3 bedroom house with bath, new carpet and just painted. Rents for $175 a month, 601 South - 3 bedroom house convenient to town. $125 per month.24 X 50 mocular home permanently located on private lot. An entirely new concept in mobile home living. Spacious, yet compact in construction, this design offers the conveniences, luxuries, facilities and beauty of a permanent residence. Now available for monthly rental of $135, BUSINESS PROPERTY Commercial Property - 112 North Main Street, Mocksville, Building with 2200 sq. ft. situated on lot facing North Main Street. Lot extends back from building to Clement Street. Owner financing available. Call today for full details. RESORTPROPERTY Attention Campers! - Two lots platted with camping in mind. Located in the Boone-Linville area, N.C, Call us for details. REAL ESTATE CO. Swlcsgood ProfMiional Btdg. J«rrv Swicvgood, Broker 634-6997 333 Sslifbury St. 634-5997 Real Estate Sales, Appraisels, Leaset, Management Survi;ying by DAVIE SURVEYING CO. Mary Forreit, Sain Rap. 492-6437 DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, THURSDAY, JANUARY 2, 1975 - IIB Scientists' Balloon Trip Studies Pollution In Air R n nn iisp fn lir n nn n ip anonf fl ntraM im t in M n \ ro m h n r n n H tUn nhnnrH thp H n V in n l h n lln n n VOU h sV 6 hiBccause four people spent a hectic night in a balloon, scientists are gaining a better understanding of the air that I ' makes life possible on earth. A team of three men and a woman floated across most of New Mexico under a 70-foot ballon to study the movement and content of the lower atmosphere and its interaction with pollutants. The helium-filled balloon, with more than a ton of 'scientific instruments mounted on its two-deck, open gondola, I , went aloft from Las Cruces one evening in November and landed the next morning near Wagon Mound, in the northeastern part of the state. Dubbed Project da Vinci, the experimental flight was sponsored by the National Geographic Society, the Atomic Energy Commission, and the Army’s Atmospheric Sciences Laboratory. The Da Vinci flight originally had been expected to last up to 36 hours and end in Texas after covering some 400 miles. Instead, pushed by winds from a storm system building up in You and your pet By TED KAVANAUGH, DIRECTOR, ALPO PET NEWS BUREAU the area, the balloon crew covered nearly 305 miles in 12 hours. Advised to land when the weather began to deteriorate and it appeared the balloon would drift into rough terrain, they touched down in a field near an abandoned ranch house. Before their flight was cut short, they had succeeded in performing 20 to 25 planned experiments. Winds at 13,000 feet occasionally sped the balloon along at 46 miles an hour, making it hard for monitoring vehicles on the ground to keep pace. But telemetric equipment in the vans was able to record sufficient scientific information to fill 30 reels of magnetic tapes. “ Based on the observation of data received during the flight, only two of 46 instruments aboard the Da Vinci balloon failed to operate," reports Dr, Harold Ballard, the project’s science director. He said that in one instance the freezing temperatures aloft evidently drained the power out of an instrument’s battery. Dr. Ballard, who is with the .\rmy's Atmospheric Sciences Laboratory, is one of a dozen scientists who had experiments aboard the manned balloon. He says he and his colleagues will need several months to analyze the wealth of information they've been given. But he has no doubts that the flight has been a scientific success. “ Whenever you have so many experiments from so many different scientists integrated in one time and place," he explains, “ and that many instruments function and you can integrate all of the results- you have had a very successful flight.’’ Project da Vinci recorded data on atmospheric densities and pressures and measured gravity waves. Inversions and turbulence layers, temperature and water vapor variations, the chemical composition of aersols and pollution, and the effects of radiation in the air. Dr. Rudolf Envelmann of the Atomic Energy Commission, th« scientist on board the gondola during the flight, is preparing for a second and longer balloon trip. He and his Da Vinci team hope to lift off from Oregon or California this summer and drift eastward for three days or more, studying the air we breathe. You,can speed up the pace... Birth defects are forever. Unless you help. March of Dimes Training Your Dog For Tracking The dog moves through on open field, intently followine her nose along an Invisible path of a scent. Her master lollows - some 20 yards behind. Suddenly she pauses, snilllng the light breeze from one point to, another. Recapturing the S cen t, stronger now, she’s eagerly moving again on an alt­ ered course. Minutes later she finds the o b je c t she’s been tracking and brings it happily IftJto her master, who praises her highly Tor finding the old glove , he had hidden there. The man is Milo Pearsall, and that was a brief scene from "Training for Tracking,” a film In which Milo and Margaret Pearsall show you how to train ' dog in tracking. The Pearsalls are two oC H America’s foremost dog train- S.ers and teachers. That film is j one In a series of five they re- I cently made for ALPO to help ) owners train their dog. Obedience Training Films Entitled "Dog O b e d ie n c e 113 Training,” this film series also i teaches Puppy Training, Basic Novice, Open, and Utility I ■ training. They were filmed out- doors on location in 16 mm. iftill color/sound, with excellent l^photography and expert cam- Jera work. Best 0/ all, this scries of Zflve 15-minute films is available “on loan to interested groups Jtoifftouf charge. According to scientific re- ^search, a dog’s sense of smell ’Is a million times greater than human's. Tracking, in a way, nes a game or contest , whereby y o u r dog uses that ability, on your command, to fo llo w one particular scent path over a tricky course to find a certain object. Purebred Bull Mastill A lm o s t any dog can be trained for it, assuming some proficiency in retrieving and the basic commands. You will learn the th e o r y of scent and how dogs follow it; then the practicalities of tracking. That includes train­ ing aids, desired topography for la y in g out courses, and working with your dog. And it you wish, qualifying your pet to earn the coveted tracking certification of the American Kennel Club. Obtaining the Films The set of five Dog Obediencc Training films may be request­ ed on loan for up to one week without charge by any club or group (no Individual requests please). Just write me at ALPO Pet Foods. Box 2187. Allentown, Pa. 18001. State 1st and 2nd choice dates at least 30 doys in advance. These films are a tree loan service of the ALPO Film Lib­ rary. Users are asked only to pay return postage insured. Lane Aparlmente, Inc, (UNITS AVAILABLE) Luxury Living In A Country Atmosphere Each tw o bedrootn uiUt. overlooks a beautiful w^oiUand scene, w ith sh d m g.^ ss doors to each private sun deck or patio lo r added pleasure. -O th e r Features- Convenient to 1-40 Carpeted Living Room & Bedrooms Kitchen & Bath Tiled All Electric (central air-lutility bill pays all Laundry Hook-Up In Each Unit Ample Closet Space T O SEE U N IT S N O W A V A IL A B L E : T u rn o ff 601 N orth at city lim its on Country Lane. A p proxim ately V* miles on right. Resident man­ ager available betw een 10 a.m. to 6 p.m . in unit Jean Hauser Real Estate Agent i Phone 634-5800 or 634-2884 J PHOTO BY VERA SIMONS CREW readies Da Vinci Kondola to receive balloon beliSre launch. Ballast bags line cowling, above hose that was lowered to sample air. Large acoustic sounder (left), swung out in flight, nests beside “ porch” where scientists stood to make observations. ’The flight was sponsored by National Geographic Society, AEG, and U. S. Army. Flowers Inspire Words In Universal LanguageI-** |t It is not raining rain for 1 me, It’s raining daffodils; In every dimpled drop I see Wild flowers on the hill. The clouds of gray en- / gulf the day And overwhelm the I town; It is not raining rain to [me, ! It’s raining roses down. H It is not raining rain to me But fields of clover ^ bloom; Where any buccaneer­ ing bee ...... Can find a bed and room. A health unto the happy, A fig to him that frets; It is not raining rain to me, It’s raining violets. April Ram — Robert Loveman Heroism Self-trust is the essence of heroism. Emerson THINKING OF REMODELING Or Adding That Fireplace? call: A. L (Pedro) Plott 634-5448 A Hom e O f Your O w n . . . There's Nothing Like It LAREW-WOOD, INC. INSURANCE- REAL ESTATE NEW LISTINGS Road 1308. off Hwy 601 North 3 bedroom brick veneer home with bath, living room, kitchen-dining combination, carport, basement and large outbuilding. Only $26,000 GREENHILL GENERAL MERCHANDISE BIILDING - Intersection of Greenhill Road and County Home Road. One acre lot, plus over 4,000 square feet, plus partial basement. A grocery store is being operated m this building now, but it is ideal for many types of businesses. Only $28,500. Good Loan Assumption. HARDISON STREET - 3 bedroom brick veneer home with bath, living room and kitchen. l‘,4 acres behind this house also available. House and both lots priced at $18,000. HOUSE AND 16.42 acres located on Rd. 1100 (Riverdale Rd.). From Greasy Corner, travel south on 601 2.7 miles. Turn right on Riverdale Rd. last house on left. Upper story has 2 bedrooms, living room, hall and bath. Lower story has 2 bedrooms, bath, kitchen-dining combination, and den. Carport has sundeck on top. Laundry room and storage room on back of house. Electric heat. LA-QUINTA MOBILE HOME VILLAGE - Total electric double wide mobile home has living room, dining room, kitchen, den, 3 bedrooms, 2 baths and large screened porch. The kitchen appliances, washer, dryer, drapes, and several pieces of furniture are included. This is one of the most attractive lots in La Quinta and is close to the Club House which has tennis courts and will have a swimming pool. See to appreciate. SOUTIiWOOO ACRES - Have you seen the new section which has just been opened? Make your choice from many beautiful wooded lots. GARDEN VALLEY Three bedroom home now under construction. This home has many fine features, such as double carport, full basement, fireplace in den and basement, central air. etc. TOT STREET - 3 bedroom brick veneer home with 2 baths, living room, dining room, kitchen, utility room, storage room and carport. Central air. CALL OR SEE DON WOOD or HUGH LAREW Office 634-5933 Nights 634-2826 or 634-2288 i< yn * 1^1 ■» Howard Realty ASSUME 7% PERCENT (A P R ) LOAN Beautiful 3 bedroom brick home with 1% baths, modern kitchen with dishwasher, lovely den with laree fireplace. Must see to appreciate. Only $35,000. Can today._________________________________________ FOR RENT; Brick, all electric, 3 bedroom home, full size drive*in basement, IV^ bathrooms, patio, carpeted, entire yard fenced.____________________ 460 M APLE AVENUE - Nice two bedroom home >vith extra nice lot. Central heat. Priced to sell at only $13,500^________________________________ HARMONY - Good five room house with an acre lot. Good well and new pump. Owner will finance part of the $8,500. BOONE - 3 large bedrooms, living room with excellent view and fireplace. All electric, completely furnished. Priced at only $27,000. MOCKSVILLE • 6 rooms with bath in this home. Beautiful yard with fruit trees. Call for appointment. Reduced to $21,000. BETHEL CHURCH ROAD - 6 beautiful acres with a remodeled home. Three large bedrooms, modern kitchen with range and refrigerator, large fireplace. Only $30,000._____________________________ CRAFTWOOD - See this 3 bedroom, 1V4 bathroom, ail electric home. Nice kitchen with range included. Large lot with paved drive-way. 100 percent financing. CRAFTWOOD - Full basement, all electric, 3 bedroom home at a reduced price. Must see to appreciate the value here. Only $100 to approved Duyer. Low monthly payments. HWY. 64 W - Three bedrooms, kitchen with range, living room carpeted, a nice lot, paved drive-way-ail for only $20,000. $100 down payment. 128 Acres farm - with a large two-story frame house completely remodeled. Pack house, tool house, chicken house. All fenced. Barn, two tobacco bams, old smoke house. 3 acres of tobacco allottment. Owner will help finance. HICKORY HILL - We have two beauUful homes at Hlckorv Hill Just waiting to be lived in. These homes were built by Carolina Custom Builders. Four bedrooms. 2>^ bathrooms, the upmostin comfort. Call us to see three homes. Good financing.________ NEW LISTING • Davie Academy Road. Three large bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, carport with utility room, beautiful lot . . . owner will finance. Call us for appointment to see. COMMERCIAL - All stock, equipment, appliances of this furniture store. A good business for an energetic couple. Call us today Tor full information. i s a n ^ . R E A L E S T A T E ; We have added a complete Insurance Department. Let us discuss your Insurance needs with you. Call us for information. Julia C. Howard Office 634-5273 Home 634-37S4 “A Co-operating Brokerage Firm '’ IT’S 1975---hAPPY NEW YEAR EXTENDING ALL GOOD WISHES FOR A YEAR WHEN WE REGAIN THE FEELING OF “ WHAT’S GOOD IN AMERICA” . IT TAKES FAITH IN ECONOMY TO MAKE IT WORK. A SPECIAL THANKS TO THE FRIENDS WHO HAVE GIVEN US THEIR CONFIDENCE BY ALLOWING US TO BE OF SERVICE IN THE PAST. Extending all good wishes for a year when we regain the feeling of "Wat's good in America” . It takes faith in economy to make it work. A special thanks to the friends who have given us their confidence by allowing us to be of service in the past. BUILDER’S DISCOUNT ’This 3 bedroom. 2 bath, colonial rancher is a steal at the offering price. Formal living and dining, ultra-large family room with fireplace, carport, plus a full basement. Many, many other nice features. YOU WON’T BELIEVE IT . . . . ! $45,500. Everyone likes to get the most for the money . . . Here’s the opportunity. 2% acres of land in a great location with a completely renovated house, central heat and air. Customized mobile home with 3 bedrooms, 3 baths, den, patio, all modern conveniences including central heat and air. A package deal in the high 30’s. A NEWLY CONSTRUCTED HOUSE IS A GOOD BUY BECAUSE THERE’S MONEY AVAILABLE AT 8V4 PERCENT INTEREST RATE The beauty of autumn abounds in nice open country surroundings at Hickory Hill- Jerry Cartner has built a splendid colonial rancher with a great view of this area. Vividly decorated, featuring a most unusual kitchen, gracious formal area, 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, this house is a “ must see” . 95 percent financing available. If neatness is your thing, this is the house for you. ’There’s no need to lift a paint brush or a hammer in this colonial brick rancher just under two years old. The floor plan is excellent and space and charm abound. It’s sitting on an acre lot and priced in the mid 30’s. Letis “ see today” . Will sell FHA, VA. Owner will consider paying closing cost. Country atmosphere with city convenience is the feel you get because this large formstone house has spacious rooms and two acres of land in a very private setting." Beautiful floors and 3 large bedrooms, basement, outside sitting porch and double carport. An extra plus-there’s an extra building suitable for small business, apartment or workshop. Let’s tour today! Breathing space is the beauty of owning this bungalow with 5'/2 acres in a very desirable location. 3 bedrooms, two bath, large kitchen with an abundance of cabinets, full basement, double car detached garage. Shown by appointment. In the high 20’s. A good way to build security is to invest in your own tract of land. Tracts of 1 to 4 acres for a building site, garden, beef, horses. In a very desirable area of Davie County. Financing can be arranged. Farming is our future. A sound investment in a good working farm. 180 acres surrounded by two large streams, suitable for hogs, cattle, etc. Excellent buildings. New Listing - 24 acres near Duke Perkins Power Plant site. Reasonably priced. Terms. Lots In Greenwood Lakes, the place to build a home of your ciioice is the river area. We have a beautiful lot over one acre, could we show it to you? Commercial Property A very good offering-Rarely do you find a tract of this size on the market in town. 47 acres adjoining Ingersoll-Rand. Owner offers attractive terms and interest rate. Rental Property Farm house for rent in the Sheffield Community. 6 rooms with bath, electric heat, washer dryer hook-up. Beautiful view. Owner will allow tenant to keep some horses or cattle. Security deposit required. A Complete Real Estate Service Specializing In * Residential • Land ‘ Farms •Commercial ‘ Industrial ‘ Rentals Myrlle Crimes 634-5797 Office Jean Hauser 634-5800 634-2884 W e Ruild Hom es! For M ore Inform ation Call: Martha Edwards 634-2244. NEW iViSTlNOST WE BUY EQUITIES Farmington area ... 5 acres with this 3 bedroom custom built brick rancher ... only I yr. old ... den with fireplace ... 2 baths ... plus garage ... also large red barn with upstairs ... could be converted to an apartment ... must see to appreciate this one. Brand new just completed ... beautiful 3 bedroom rancher with lovely den with fireplace ... 2 baths ... stove and dishwasher ... also patio ... 2 car carport ... onlv l3i..'>on. Approximately 3'n acres on Salisbury Street with lovely older home... completely remodeled inside and out ... new carpet and wallpaper ... 2 baths plus basement ... also .1 car garage and barn... must see this one todav. Large lot with city water and sewer with 1973 model all electric home set up on property ... $1000 and assume loan on lot and home. Nice starter home for young couple ... 5 room with bath ... lovely gold vinyl siding ... large lot with garden space . ... only $14..“i00. , Lovely brick home only 2 yrs. old ... custom built... large family size kitchen with built-in stove and dishwasher ... 2 baths ... electric heat also central air ... double carport ... plus large patio ... only $30,000. Redland Road ... beautiful 3 bedroom custom built brick home ... den with fireplace ... drlve-in basement ... 2 baths ... pius4H acres land fenced with small barn ... eall for appointment. (I.4K wooded acres with beautiful 10 room brick home ... 4 bedrooms plus beautiful paneled and carpeted playroom in basement with fireplace ... also room with wet bar ... fireplace in den upstah*s ... 2 car carport ... plus 2 car garage with furnace ... no way to describe this homo ... must see to appreciate. Lake Norman ... beautiful It room cedar and brick home ... waterfront on main lake in exclusive area ... completely furnished and beautifully decorated ... 6 bedrooms ... 3 baths ... 2 kitchens ... dining room ... living room ... plus playroom ... screened porch ... 3 decks ... also floating dock ... lovely lot... only $135.000... no way to describe iiome. Beautiful 3 bedroom rancher ... only 3 years old ... electric heat, built in stove ... large den ... plus carport... all this on i'k acres land ... price only $28,900. No down payment to qualified buyer. :ibeautiful large lots in Greenbrook Forest. Clemmons. N. C .... Reasonably priced . .. call for information. 19',4 acres on Davie AcaH<”- oad .. . with 3 bedroom home with bath ... ’ excellent buy. Mi , lO appreciate. Milling Road ... Beautiful Im -^ 'ate 3 bedroom brick rancher ... lovely redwo- • - r tV * ' -n g off very modern kitchen ... V i bajths »^ va rp ort and full drive-in basement on acre lo .... No down payment to qualified buy^. . Cooleemee ... good 4 room home, with bath ... recently paneled and new roof on home... good size lo t... excellent rental property. Farmington area ... situated on an acre of beautifully landscaped land this pretty brick rancher features a fireplace in den. large kitchen. 3 bedrooms, I Mi baths plus carport and utility room. Priced only $32,500. Good loan assumption at 8 percent.________________ Davie County ... new 6 room home on shaded lot ... completely furnished ... large walk-in closets ... 2 full baths ... only $24,500. _______ Farmington area ... (horse lovers paradise)... the farm you have been waiting for ... n acres ... all fenced and cross fenced ... 1 yea- ' ba™ ••• ‘‘ *® f®“‘filled riding ring ... pi ... all this plus beautiful 2V4 year old brick rancher with full basement, carport and central air ... must see to appreciate. ________ 650 South Main Street . . . good 8 room home . ... m ■ baths... 5 bedrooms ... large lot with extra lot adjoining property... Looking for a good home to remodel, this Is it ... excellent buy ... call for details. _____________________COMMERCIAL_____________________ Davie County ... brick store building ... major highway ... good parking ... near housing development... standard brand gas ... also 6 room home ... financing available ... $41.250.___________________________________________________ ' FARM & LAND County Line Road ... 28 acres ... good road frontage ... stream ... financing available. 92 acres with barn ... fenced and cross fenced ... streams ... sown in grass ... only$92.000 ... financing available. 12 acres all fenced with beautiful 7 room brick home ... 2 full baths ... full basement ... garage and patio ... plus nice 12 x 55 mobile home ... 2 wells and septic tank ... all this only $59,000 ... must see to appreciate 46.54 acres off Davie Academy Road ... 7 acres open ... also stream ... call for information. 317 acre farm with old house ... also river frontage ... could be subdivided ... only $550 per acre. Hickory Hill area ... approximately 30 acres fronting on Highway 64 and old Cornatzer Road ... beautiful tract land... real buy ... call for more information. Academy Acres ... choose your own 5 acre mini farm In Academy Acres ... beautiful 5 acre tracts on Davie Academy Road ... call for information. 296 acre farm ... all under fence ... near Advance ... call for more information. 13 acres on Cedar Creek Road, near Farmington . . . beautiful tract of land . . . approximately 5 acres good timber . . . balanc^ cleared. _ Iredell County near Statesville ... 60 acres land ... in •' beautiful Baymont Meadows ... beautiful home sites hi exclusive area ... horses are permitted ... street cut through property ... good investment for developer ... land could be sub-divided into small acreage tracts ... stream on property ... price only $1,700 per acre. 6.12 acres off of 64 east aboui 2 miles from Country Club ... stream on back of property ... only $1,000 per acre . .. land lays w ell._______ 31 acre farm with old house and barn ... some timber ... could be subdivided. ~"Appr6x7l6Tacres all under fence . .. very modern barn with large silo and automatic feeding system and automatic water... good tenant house ... beautiful farm with paved road through property . ■ . only $210,000.00. '~2i acre tract... approximately 3 miles from Sheffield.. ■14 acres in bottom land balance reset in pine . . . This would make a nice summer home or get-away for weekends... Call for infomation... price 700 per acre. “ S a'cre's on Pine Ridge RoadT. . will sell part or a ll. . . financing available. MAKE O FFE R ___________________ ' Atten. Investors . . . approx. 50 acres commercial property at Cloverleaf of 1-40 .. . Farmington exit . . . beautiful site for motel... call for more Information. ^_ Sacres ... 2nd exit off No/64 adjoining the Cloverleaf of I-4U ... excellent location Ipr bifciness or m otel. .. price t23.UU0 for total of 5 acres . ..more land available adjoining this property. Office spare for rent or lease remodel to suit tenant. good location ... will "Hickory Hill” Let us show you around the Hickory Hill Country Club and all the new homes under construction . . . choose yours today lIAIMGS REALTY AND INSURANCE COMPANY 2070 BMch St. 722-7136 Wlniton-S«ltm. N.C. "Give Us a Chance to~'SERVE YO U ' and We'U Make Another Friend" Martha Edwards, Euwne Bennett,Broker Mock»iii*.N.c. Salesman Home - 634-2244 - Office - 998-4727 • Home i i2B - DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, THURSDAY, JANUARY 2, 1975 Garden Time Public Notices Cold Damage Depends On Plant Age By M. E, GARDNER N, C. State University Last week 1 commented about the vagaries of our winter’s weather and the effect of the very low tem­ perature on plants. This time, let's take a closer look. Let me say in the begin­ ning that the degree of damage will depend upon the kind of plant, age, vigor and exposure to cold, drying winds. Many camellias were in full, beautiful bloom and, of course, all flowers were killed. I have not observed any severe damage to foliage, although I have had one report of heavy foliage damage. Moderate to heavy dam­ age has occurred to pyracantha and Ilex cornuta Burfordii berries. How­ ever, this injury is more disfiguring than serious. I have observed Burfordii plants within 10 feet of each other; one at the corner of a building exposed to the wind and tne other, protected by a building. The corner plant was heavily hurt (berries and foliage) while the protected plant is all right. Moderate to severe dam­ age has been noted on the following plants: abelia, heavy damage. This plant is, in most seasons, ever­ green in our area but all plants that 1 have observed have been heavily hurt and will defoliate; ligustrum, a very hardy plant, has been severely damaged, espe­ cially the weak, leggy, over­ grown plants; plttosporum has been heavily damaged. I have one large plant on which the foliage has turned a beautiful deep brownish orange color. It will most likely defoliate so I will enjoy the sudden change in color while the leaves are still holding on. Continuing: Gold Dust aucuba has been hurt. How­ ever, most damage has occurred on young plants and on some of the older branches of mature plants; Yunnan Honeysuckle (Lonicera yunnanensis) has been heavily damaged. If you do not Icnow this plant, it somewhat resembles cotoneaster in growth habit. Other plants which have been damaged are: osman- thud, Formosa azaleas, gardenias and liriope. S T A T E M E N TPKOTtCTIVL LIFL IfiSURANCE COMPANY Stotki iMfll M> ml MUU (pmI h*«l(h »> Arrmitil Rii * 14,7<>4,:?53T^ • i;'446,T‘)l.07 . S.SM.Oojiil . 502.733, a , . ‘*P^3,477.9i. r*ikf canlrtM rUlnt Lift r«t dlTid*nJ> p«|taH« U<r tullnwtnr ri PnmiiifM aiU uinvity cM»i4ir*li«n tn tdonr* CWnlHiMi u 4(*t<U 4iw Bt MtrW C*f>*r*l ttprnm da* «r •ivri>*<lTom, 1k*n«n fm *r arctuMl lEkrM>nr Ir,' r*d*n) Immm T*in Dw sr AcrruH ffwnitUMM *114 «*> tlWttri BtrtVMd iimmt snd Irtertd tKmm ’ Mtid*t«rr MmHtin rtlvMlM ttffn AltWKl ilyKAnt All •Iktr In drUijMt t» >nnu>l iKInmnl) I 13I.59S ” 2,974, 4,257/ . 2,135,. U20J,425, 149,■ m.791—m. 060^0^ , yjbVoo ,j)i7^q^ .77I.OO,683,00i902.^0_ ,757.99,602.00 t>7!>.04 ctrtui f U *» inrrliti fuMt bililitt ■'•piKli, b,oOO,000.00 I 4^0,7^7.00 I 19,284,752.5S I i<*7,5J2, , _2&r It’S $ ‘^3, b7_8 ,392.221.00 502,733.75riy7j^.7‘‘7,34_ 539.5^ 3_26.92 >4 TMt tTATl Of NOKTH CAKOLIN* C I AHMwnr S'ra.,*"*ORhlNARY oRour CREDIT IIFE 7Q5.273a45 677*278.34 , 37a 133.34l,9»)S.OO 70;,271.45 677.278.34 3 7 .I8J.J4 «,419, 735. 13 l,*J9S.O0 POLICV EXHIRIT CREnir LIFE I In fiHTi SI •{ fntmtf f*e I. iMiMd 4«ti*t tur _ t. rr*wO U W in (am 4arit<| r*ar iKall N.’■KT-- a— 4,62:1 i 2 . 016,027 102 6<j,45JaS7j 537 8, 020a046 26 23a6l3a49l 9 2a 3 15.129 5 6, 822, 771 AKMtRt« Haallh A»u». A H..IU. U -. , . >. 603,90a. 2j^ WILLIAM C. RRANNON______SatraUry___ ■a <mif.-------------------2C2Z-fic*J5.203_a. Btlalfk. N. C.JakB lUnMMi Inrrtm, Ci IMI t. Jaki. iKfran. (' IhU iHpartmffil, tho>ltkf tKa roaditton of aatd Coiaiwtir an Ika Ilal 4*r “t IWml •a in, hand and OfC.o.l a«4l ih. da, ai.<i dal* *te*a oruu. •f t«ayiHO*TH CAiOIJNA DKPABTMEVT OP INIURANCt. . _Aiujuat,^0--------- io harabr ffrtlfj, (Kal tha ahiia U a lr»» aotf aktlcarl of 0>» tuuiraot of Iba STATEMENTPMVlDOa UFE AND ACCItOff INSURANCX OOMPANY . BMki Mancao •«Kail aatataPalvr )~*aCallaunl laaM Caat. a»4 liaak «ap and kaali» All aO^r ai r>an<iuni dua a»4 uni.aid » daU'lad in annual il ...-......326^931^^21.3129,040,067-0? 10,18J,S4?:79 ... . A.295,a5»-ii. .. .. 19,27S,SL3.Si , 9U^50>^4^Ar3J LlASIVITICt SURPLUS ANO OTMI* fUNOS A>c>d«i« and kaallk P»(>cik.M,r'i di>i4tnd ac<««ttla>l^a frvtioan fM diud^nl. ra>ah|r i Fadtra) lnt«n« Taaaa I>»a °> At.cuad Ranillanrai and lUnx not tHi<ial»d Bariv««d wueai and ■niaiaa' (ktravo HandaWtr wtunwi .aiuiti^n trMrrt Uruaa pa>< i* »'•<> omixkoUdtMciai It l'n*a*i#Md fv»d. I 531.04k) .00 I 305,700.00 I 71,je»,os7.is t W,«)94,i40.00 *43j4?9,«0-'2« S4,JS4.0e0.2S‘>,j5o.,‘iaitOc. . 3374i4,7M.oi 1,240,490.^7 9W,4l‘b>.4J7,33\i53rl9 4,iej,ObO^. 900,735.0.4- . 3^«W4iS’a»-L^ 7b0,048,7il.97 1 W,yi;,«Hj73*' ‘>ll,5«>2,4;i.jS <>. TMi »i*ri ( M«cl auwHiat M* Awwrti i IVAKY liKnl-f lIUJilT 1 njTAi.1 tif. Ir.yra'ir hic.U I7,s:?.79 1Aanuilf i</a»4aiali«Kt 4*Jt«,S'W I 4O0,oji,i* t^ai*4y ;17,SJ7.7V 1 I'ollO i:iHltl|T ..nil'INAK\inuni ' 1 . i ’'.•'-“I." k. Iw .rn 1 3« 1 ! •,040,40^f Iaa.a4 a.ua«>a9V7 W 1«1 ( .aM4 1- U >a >aar . h«l li),lSii,Ub ’Si ^ -“V7,4:9)1 U I.... ,1 .l,..r,n 1 I:b.4S4.014 1 41J 1 — bAh AM ---------------------^^^^------------1--------------^^-------------------------------- f^ial MiL.aMAU u«i.IKAIl» 1 t' A>Vi,S>X' iii i,OiJa740 j S>4v4.yo» .W4 is >3 ii ISjJ 5,Jlv',e7; J. >9'» 11,500 { 9O,V30 lA'-’T.flO . i i iN,o>o1S.4.V 1 ]101,000 fi5jSaS57 >,P4. 1 I 10.10111 i.bs1 1■a lew, JO.'1 j l>,44.;,vWl \ y N4.4(ib A>c,4.ni « H.a •* i i I riaa.4.n> KuiP NfkilcilM-». iJillWl ih-jW al .-.Ji H-M »t(K« I«U)c»»vi' i740«l.» ....... ^.*r, Rand-If^ l<«ra»- -I ln.,iai..» ‘KokTH lAlliil.lN* I>l.tAK1M»>.1 I ikMp H»>a«k AMS'** '■1. J^a kand.'t* l'4>a«' > .-n.xi >.1 iM.iai.r* Mo>> Ual O'* ate >• i, a ang .. i <» i ai.iiaPNOviooiT u n AKi> AfviDO>i ihARA.sv4 awrA.\t i uia II I am sure that you, too, have observed that there is a wide variation in plants as far as their ability to withstand low temperature is concerned. Some plants may remain frozen all winter without injury while others may be killed. There are Internal con­ ditions which have a bearing on the ability of a plant to resist cold damage, such as concentration of cell sap; and the holding of water by the plant tissues against the forc0 of freezing. What are my suggestions now? Leave the plants alone as far as pruning, removal or replacement are con­ cerned. It is too early to take drastic measures. If we have a prolonged dry spell, keep your plants well supplied with water. MATCHING EVERYTHING Color and pattern coor­ dination is now complete for bathroom and kitchen with the introduction of matching “ everything” : vinyl pat­ terned wall covering, fabric for curtains or tablecloth, towels and shower curtains. Using matching acces­ sories is a simple way to coordinate an interior, agrees Mrs. Edith Mc- Glamery, extension house furnishings specialist. North Carolina State Uni­ versity. But, you’ll need to balance all the patterned items with restful spaces of solid color, she cautions. SEW-IN LABELS Sew-in care laliels are coming next summer. The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) has ruled that as of July. 1972, all fabrics sold over the counter must have care labels “ which con­ sumers can affix perma­ nently to the finished product," PRE-SEWN BUTTONS Patches with pre-sewn buttons have recently come on the market. The patch Is iron-on and repairs the spot where the old button has pulled off. Patches are almost Invisible and the pre- sewn buttons are there to stay. MORE VEGETABLES Tar Heel farmers pro­ duced an estimated 143,677 acres of vegetables in 1970 worth $66. B million. In the next five years, expansion to 171,000 acres and $93 million is anticipated. This growth is projected in the “ Impact ’ 76” program, a five-year development plan launched recently by the N. C. Agricultural Exten­ sion Service. NORTH CAROLINA DAVIE COUNTY NOTICE OF SALE OF REAL PROPERTY Under and by virtue of the authority vested in the un­ dersigned substituted trustee under the terms of a certain deed of trust from Oscar Smith et ux, dated April 22, 1974, and recorded in Book 87 at page 6B3, Davie County Registry, and an instrument designating the undersigned as substituted trustee, recorded in Deed Book 90, at page 794, Davie County Registry, the said deed of trust being subject to foreclosure upon default, and default having occurred, and at the request of the holder of the note secured thereby, the un­ dersigned substituted trustee will offer for sale and sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash on Friday, the 24th day of January, 1974, at 12:00 Noon, at the Courthouse door in Mocksville, Davie County, North Carolina, the following described tract of real property located in Davie County, North Carolina, and described as follows, to wit: First Tract: Being L.ot Number Eight (8) of Block No. 2, Section 2 of the GREENWOOD LAKE SUBDIVISION, according to a plat thereof prepared by John G. Bane, C.E. and duly registered in Plat Book 3, page 88, Davie County Registry, to which reference is hereby made for a more particular description of said lot. Second Tract: BEGINNING at a point, a stone, Ellis Plowman’s corner, said point being located North 30deg. East 6.82 chains from a point in the center of Rainbow Road, runs thence North 87 degs. West 4.00 chs. passing through the common corner of Ellis Plowman and William Smith to a point, a stone in William Smith’s line, Glenn Smith’s corner; thence with Glenn Smith’s line South 5 degs. East 6.10 chains to a point in the center of Rainbow Road; thence with Duke Smith’s line North 30 degs East 6.82 chs. to the BEGINNING, containing One and Twenty-two Hundredths (1.22) acres, more or less as surveyed by A.L. Bowles, Registered Surveyor, Sep­ tember 21, 1964. Said sale shall be made subject to outstanding liens and encumbrances of record in­ cluding Davie County ad valorem taxes and shall be subject to upset bids and con­ firmation of the Clerk of Superior Court of Davie County, as provided by law. This the iBth day of December, 1974. JOHN T. BROCK, Substituted Trustee 1-2 4TN STATEMENT Ihr Church Inaiirdnce Coapony BUH» Mait(a«« loan, a« raal aaUW Raal aauu Collaural loana ■ Taak .nd tank d^poalU A(«P|U- kalanr.a at ynrollKUd f„ Panda kald br ar 4»a>IM aiu n Billa rat*l«akla. Ukan far prani.i Rr»i>«ran>« racwraWa a., lata Inuraaf. tfiti4aadi W raal aatata mrataa rfm •ecrur4 All aibai aaaala aa daUiM In aUUMant Toial Aaaau I _ 3,247_,3_99.43_ .._l/?9ti,298 .So . . 2t.2,'«7.‘*?., I , 507,127.2j!^ 3I2,757.80___ ijt,0'hl.9^2’»2,i4»V,’io , 11,0(19,979.44 ANO OTHCa rt/WM d ulhar tiiaiilar ckarfaa TaiM lK>nw< and fm iaatlud, radaral inramc Uix L’Harn*< pttmlimt piildandi da«la>«4 and I54,2!'0._50 ‘22.097.-41. J2,h74.‘M . 52, 50f«,7‘i 1,3* 5,7l>^.t>9 la kald br n mounu ■ilkkald M taUinad bf romrani l>r actuunl af aOtaf .rin.yran.. . n | laaart t ^ 01 « 2 03..,290,341 .79 ~n.Mn.r.39 397 1^1 fanda kald ur r*Uin*d It 'nnivan) (>■' arfount of »irh vnautlwriMd MMpam i.mt, of iiabiiro an.1 <«iHpanu(></<i aUUtxfy and rol«nlarr 'rarr>#a t»tt All ,rfk*> habiUtMi. a> dfUiwd i« iiaiainaM Toul LiabiMiaa »(»(ial •ytFlxa fy»4t • t _'«Of’7.42 Catiiai m>4 .ard . .3?0,^00^0„ 1'naaaifn.d f«nd. uarplaai »>, M»Cl^2^7 a< rvfarda ,005.49 ,‘wr.49 ,'540.30', IIS,059.I9 040,930.31 j 2,«'S2,0I4.I4 I I ,oi>9,»79.44 I Oraan iMf.fL • Ulani ».•<« i,i7U:o 70,42'i.:i J,32l.f.’‘ 1,025. 1.35'). n Ao.iali < > and tn.fl T Kvikai aad r.,i> A. Kol' • » .•.O..J Av, M. ii.k v KOklU I'AlltjUSA 1‘UAhlMtSI I' 'if ). iTiil >r .f Ua«iM>.f baiak, awUl> t*M «*a AM.a NORTH CAKOIJNA DAVIE COUNTY UNDKU AND BY VIKTUE of an Order of the Superior Court of Davie County, North Carolina, made in the Special Proceedings entitled ‘‘Thelma G. Ulackwelder and husband, el. al., Petitioners vs. Minnie G. Gill, Widow, et. al., Respon­ dents'', and signed by Ihe Clerk of Ihe Superior Court; and under and by virtue of an Order tif Resale made by the Clerk of llie Superior Court upon an advanced bid, Ihe undersigned Commissioner will on the 6th day of January, 1975, at 12:00 o'clock Noon, al the door of Courthouse in Mocksville, Davie County. North Carolina, offer for sale to Ihe highest bidder for cash upon an opening bid of $5,:i00.00 on the THIRD TRACT, but subject to the confirmation of the Court, the following described real estate, lying in Mocksville and Calahaln Township, Davie County. North Carolina, and more particularly described as ibilows: BEGINNING at an iron, Koch’s corner in Rebecca Koontz’s line, and runs thence from Ihe beginning. North 79 degrees 07’ 07" West 496.78 feet to Frances Turner's corner in Rebecca Koontz's line; thence with said Turner's line. North 4 degrees nr ,')2" West 1,231.97 feet to an iron, the Southwestern corner of Tract No. ,'j allolted to Clara G. York; thence with the line of saidTracI No. 5,South80degrees 2K' 2:)” East 512.38 feet to an iron, the Southeastern corner of said Tract' No. 5 in the line of Koch; thence with the line of Koch, South 3 degrees 41’ 37” East l.2;!9,67 feel to the point of BEGINNING, containing 13.B7 acres, more or less. This tract is being sold subject to an easement for ingress and egress along the Western margin as is allotted in this Special Proceedings and there will be sold with this tract all rights of ingress, egress, and regress as is allotted in this Special Proceedings. The above described tract of land will be sold subject to 1974 Davie County ad valorem taxes and in all respects will be subject to the confirmation of the Court. The last and highest bidder will be expected to make a cash deposit of Ten (10) jjcrcent of his bid with the Commissioner at the sale and the balance upon delivery of a Commissioner's Deed. This sale will lay open for tent 10) days in tlie office of the Clerk of the Superior Court for upset bids and in all respects is subject to tlie confirmation of the Court. This the 10th day of December, 1974. L. Hugh West, Jr. Commissioner 307 Davie Avenue Statesville, North Carolina 28677 12-26-21 n PUBLIC HEARING Application has been made by Freewood Associates Ltd. to Davie County Board of Ad­ justment for a Conditional Use Permit for the operation of a private family campground on Approximately 60.65 acres owned by Freewood Associates, Ltd. located on State Road 1313, adjoining the property of Clay Gaither, Harper VanHoy, D.L. Whitaker, Mrs. Ola Smith, Ocie S. Dyson, Lethia B. Potts, P.G. Barker, M.E. Stanley and E.W Prevette, Jr. A public hearing on this Application for a Conditional Use Permit will be held by the Davie County Board of Ad­ justment at 7:30 P.M . on January 6, 1975, in the Grand Jury Room in the Davie County Corthouse Mocksville, N.C. R. Bruce Tuttle Davie County Zoning Enforcement Officer 12-19-3tn Co-Executor’s NOTICE NORTH CAROLINA DAVIE COUNTY Having qualified as Co- Executors of the estate of William M. Cartner, deceased, late of Davie County, this is to notify all persons having claims against said estate to present them to the undersigned on or before the 27th day of June 1975, or this notice will be pleaded in bar of their recovery. All persons indebted to said estate will please make immediate payment to the undersigned. This the 26th day of December, 1974 Sam Cartner and William Cartner, Co-Executors of the estate of William M. Cartner, deceased. 12-26 4tn PLASTIC COVERS North Carolina tobacco growers have made increas­ ing use of plastic — rather than cotton — plantbed covers in recent years. With good management, plants can be ready for transplant­ ing about 60 days after seeding when grown under plastic covers. NOTICE NORTH CAROLINA DAVIE COUNTY UNDER AND BY VIRTUE of the power of sale contained In a certain deed of trust executed by DENNIS MICHAEL KNIGHT and wife, LINDA WHITE KNIGHT, dated March 27, 1974, and recorded in Book 88, page 947, in the office of the Register of Deeds of Davie County, North Carolina, default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness thereby secured, and said deed of trust by the terms thereof subject to foreclosure, the undersigned Trustee will offer for sale at public auction to the highest bidder for cash at the Courthouse Door in Mocksville, Davie County, North Carolina, at twelve o'clock, noon, on the 6th day of January, 1975, the property described in said deed of trust, the same lying and being in the County of Davie, Stale of North Carolina, and more particularly described as follows: BEGINNING at a point, an iron stake in the Southerly right of way line of Granada Drive, said pointals being the Nor­ thwest corner of Lot No. 93, Block “ B” , LaQulnta Sub- Division. Running thence along the Westerly line of said Lot No. 93, South 33 deg. 12 min. 52 sec. West 150.56 feet to an iron stake in the Northerly line of Cor- natzer property; thence along the Northerly line of Cornatzer Property North 58 deg. 48 min. 30 sec. West 90 feet to an iron stake, the Southeast corner of Lot No. 96, Block “ B” ; thence along the Easterly line of said Lot No. 96, North 33 deg. 12 min. 52 sec. East 150.56 feet to an iron stake in the Southerly right of way line of Granada Drive; thence along the said Southerly line of Granada Drive South 58 deg. 48 min. 25 sec. East 90 feet to an iron stake, the Northwest corner of said Lot No. 93, the POINT AND PLACE OP B E G IN N IN G , containing 13,550.4 square feel. Being presently known and designated as Lot No. 95, Block “ B” , LaQulnta Sub-Division, Davie County, North Carolina. Surveyed by Wayne Horton, Registered Civil Engineer and Surveyor, dated November 17, 1973. THIS CONVEYANCE is subject to those Restrictive Covenants, executed by La Quinta Corporation and recorded in Deed Book 89, page 285, and rerecorded to cover the, above lot, said recording being in the office of the Register of Deeds of Davie County, North Carolina. BUT THIS SALE WILL BE MADE subject to all out­ standing unpaid taxes, municipal assessments and prior deeds of trust, and the successful bidder will be required to make a deposit as required by law, and said bids will remain open for upset bids for 10 days thereafter. This 2nd day of December, 1974. GUARANTY STATE BANK, Trustee By: J.E.Causey,Jr. George W. Martin, Attorney, Mocksville, N. C. 12-5 4tn NORTH CAROLINA DAVIE COUNTY NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE OF REAL PROPERTY Pursuant to the authority vested in the undersigned Trustee by virtue of a certain deed of trust from Country Lane Apartments, Inc. to Foy N. Goforth, Trustee, dated November 26, 1972, and recorded in Deed of Trust Book 83, at page 187, Davie County Registry, and a certain in-- strument appointing the un­ dersigned as Substitute Trustee recorded in Book 90, at page 728, Davie County Registry, the said Deed of Trust being by its terms subject to foreclosure upon default, and default having occurred, and at the request of the holder of the said Deed of Trust and the note secured thereby, the undersigned Substituted Trustee will offer for sale and sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash on Friday the 3rd day of January, 1975, at 12:00 Noon, at the Courthouse door in Mocksville, Davie County, North Carolina, the following described lots, or tracts of real property situated in Mocksville Township, Davie County, North Carolina, and described as follows: Being Lots No. 6 and No.7 of the Murray-Spillman Subdivision as described on a plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 4, at page 22, Davie County Registry, to which said plat reference is hereby made for a more par­ ticular description of said lots. Said property shall be sold subject to ad valorem taxes for calendar year 1974 and prior years and shall be sold subject to any liens or encumbrances of record which are superior to the lien of said Deed of Trust. Said sale shall be subject to upset bids and to confirmation of the Clerk of Superior Court of Davie County, as required by law. This 3rd day of December, 1974. JOHNT. BROCK Substituted Trustee 12-12-4tn Administrator’s Notice NORTH CAROLINA DAVIE COUNTY Having qualified as Ad­ ministrator of the estate of Frank Alexander King, deceased, late of Davie County,' this is -to notify all persons having claims against said estate to present them to the undersigned on or before the 13th day of June 1975, or this notice will be pleaded in bar of their recovery. All persons indebted to said estate will please make immediate payment to the undersigned. This the 12th day of December, 1974 Joe H. King, Administrator of the estate of Frank Alexander King leceased. 12-12-4tn AIR. WELL DBIiUMfiJa. Route 9, Box 127 Stategvifle, N.G 28677 PHONE 87^7614 A d «w »,N .C FH(»SE 9964141 Executor’s Notice NORTH CAROLINA DAVIE COUNTY Having qualified as Executor of the estate of Eugene Clinton Benbow, deceased, late of Davie County, this Is to notify all persons having claims against said estate to present them to the undersigned on or before the 3rd day of July 1975, or this notice will be pleaded .in bar of their recovery. All persons indebted to said estate will please make immediate payment to the undersigned. * This the 20th day of December,1974 James E. Benbow, Executor of the estate of Eugene Clinton Benbow || deceased. William E. Hall Attorney at Law 1-2 4tn Administrtor’s Notice NORTH CAROLINA DAVIE COUNTY Having qualified as Ad­ ministrator of the estate of Cecil D. Smith, deceased, late, of Davie County, this is to notify all persons having claims against said estate to present them to the undersigned on or before the 12th day of June 1975, or this notice will be pleaded in bar of their recovery. All persons indebted to said estate will please make immediate payment to the undersigned. This the 12th day of December, 1974 Cathy L. Smith, Administratrix of the estate of Cecil D. Smith deceased. 12-l2-4tn Mrs. Ca thy L. Smith Route 3 _ Advance, N.O Executor’s NOTICE NORTH CAROLINA DAVIE COUNTY Having qualified as Executori of the estate of Frank Raymond Smith, Jr.; deceased, late of Davie County, this is to notify all persons having claims against said estate to present them to the undersigned on or before the 27th day of June 1975', or this notice will be pleaded irt bar of their recovery. All persons indebted to said estate will please make immedifitii payment to the undersigned. ' This the 26th day of December, 1974 North Carolina National Bank, Executor of the. estate of Frank Raymond- Smith, Jr.; deceased. u 102 West Third Slrek Winston-Salem, N.Ct { Hatfield and Allman, Attorneys Executrix’s NOTICE j NORTH CAROLINA ! DAVIE COUNTY Having quallfifed as Executrix of the estate ff Woodrow Wilson Owlngs, deceased, late of Davie County, this is to notify all persons having claims against said estate to present them to tb$ undersigned on or before the 27th day of June, 1975, or this notice will be pleaded in bar of their recovery. All persons indebted to said estate wt)l please make immediate payment to the undersigned. . This the 26th day of December, 1974. Sarah Lou G. Owings., Executrix of the estate of Woodrow Wilson Owing^, deceased. 12-! LAND POSTERS N.C. Geiwrai Statute 113-120.2 providM that sign* or pettcri prohibiting hunting "... thall moasure not lou than 10 inches by 12 inche< and ihall b* cempicuously petted on pri­ vate lands not more than 500 yards apart close to and along the boundaries. At lease one such notice, sign, or poster sholl be .posted on eodi «ide of such land, and one at each corner thoMief . . The statute also provi^s that in case such pott­ ers are to be used for prohibiting fithing, they thouM be potted not more than 300 yardi apart around tlw t^ore line of the pond or lake involved. POSTERS IN STOCK $|00 l ^ e r Dozen DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, THURSDAY, JANUARY 2, 1975 - I3B Cards Of Thanks EMPLOYMENT FOR RENT MISC.FOR SALE FOR SALE FOR SALE TAYLOR The family of the late Bowie taylor wishes to express their appreciation to all our friends and neighbors for the kindness, thoughtfulness, flowers, cards and food during our time of tereavement. Sadie Woodruff Taylor And Family HOWELL ‘Not now, but in the coming ■years ■ It may be in the better land .We'll read the meaning of our tears And then perhaps we’ll un- t'* derstand. Because his heart was tender and pure Because he was good and when he became good enough The Lord Plucked his finest flower To make room for more. To all our friends and relatives, thank you for your kind expressions of sympathy during the death of our beloved Dad and Husband - Rev. Luther R . H o w e ll. Mrs. Gertrude C. Howell and Family FINANCING CONSOLIDATE YOUR BILLS . . . Home Improvement . . . Second Mortgage Loans . . . irrom $900 to $5,000 cash . . . ask for Mr. Wleneck, call collect 704-246-5136.... C A PITO L FIN ANCIAL SERVICES, 17 South Main Street, Lexington, N. C. 4-27-tfn Help Wanted Avon Asks . . . Want To Earn Extra Money After School? . . . if you're 18 or over, sell part- time as an Avon RepresenUtive ... fun products for teens too! .. no selling experience necessary . . . call Peggy Long, 704-873-9828 or write Route 3, Box 57, Yadkinville, N.C. 27055. 1-2-ltn Texas Refinery Corp. offers opportunity for high income, cash bonuses, fringe benefits to mature individaul in Mocksville area. Commission regardless of experience, airmail A.S. Pate, Pres., Texas Refinery Corp., Box 711, Ft. Worth, Tex. 76101. 1-2-ltn OPENINGS in this area with Sarah Coventry ... Fine Fashion Jewsliy... Let me interview you for a fashion show or part time work ... Nina Scoggins 246-2397. 1-2 Itn COOK WANTED - above average salary. Also waitresses full and part-time plus cocktail waitress. Experience preferred but will train. Apply in person to Mr. Perry at Bermuda Run Country Club Tuesday - Friday 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. 1-2-tfn Would like to keep children in my home on Sanford Avenue the first and second shifts. For information, cail 634-2258 or 998- 4920, Advance. 12-5-tfn Cooleemee News , Claude Williams returned to his home for a few days from Davie County Hospital and then entered Medical Park Hospital for further treatment where he still remains a patient. Brady Barney underwent mirgery at Forsyth Memorial Hospital Monday. .' Sunday afternoon visitors of Mrs. Nora Smith were Cathy Und Tracy Smith, Mrs. Margaret Perrell and children, tnd Mrs. Linda Barnette and Children. >' Mr. and Mrs. Woodrow Bailey 6f Rock Hill, S. C. spent Christmas with Mrs. Ethel McDaniel. ’ Mac Barnhardt, son of Rev. and Mrs. Derry Barnhardt of Walnut Cove, underwent surgery for appendicitis at Forsyth Memorial Hospital on Dec: 19. His condition is im­ proving. Among those enjoying a Potts and other relatives. The Cornatzer Homemakers club enjoyed a Christmas party at the home of Lucille Potts on Dec. 19. Mrs. Laura Jane Barnhardt and Anita have been confined to their rooms for a few days. Recent luncheon guests of Mr. and Mrs. Homer Potts were: Mr. and Mrs. Bruce Hinkle, Mr. and Mrs. Edward Hinkle and daughters, Sheila and Dana, Mr. and Mrs. Donald Hinkle and boys of Creedmor, and Mrs. R. J. Wood of Salisbury. Homer and Douglas Potts visited Hoyt Bailey Tuesday. 0ristm as dinner at the home of j|ev. and Mrs. Derry Barnhardt Were Mrs. Ethel McDaniel, Mr. ind Mrs. Harold Frank and oys, Mr. and Mrs. Danny t-ank, Mr. and Mrs. Bill Mc- niel and boys, and Mr.and Mrs. Woodrow Bailey. ^ Miss Belinda Potts of AUanta, ga. spent last week with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Ititchen Ca^nete Store Fixtures Conunercial & Resident Remodeling & Repair All Work Guaranteed PPEEESTlMMjE^tToSm.tt Jack Masten Phone 493-4266 Mocksville, N.C. Route 5 REPAIRS^^REMPDEUNG & CONTRACT WOKK Uperienced jn All Kinds Of Plumbing Work J,C. Kimmer Phone 634-5707 or Dwight Sammons Phone 284-4380 Wagner Plumbing & He^ng Route 4, Mocksville No. License 5567 FOR SALE ALUMU^UM PLATES Size 23 X 32 lncliet,‘ .009 Tliicii 25* Eich ($20 per hundred) New you ctn com thd pump bouM... chlckin coop... M pta... pony iltblc... dom In undtntMth Um houM. .. pttch ttul old iMky bvn or ihcltir or bulM • tool houM fo( tkit Uwn mower to kMp ll In out of the tilny WHthar. ilwuMndi ilrtiiy Mid. mIw nch ity, BUT: ... New Supply irallibte d«lly. C«l youn noil SALISBURY POST FRONT OFFICE 6)6-4}3l Or. Will deliver 10 du MocktvtUt EnlcrpriM uy ord«n for prtvloui week FOR RENT; Trailers and trailer spaces . . . 20 mln. from Winston-Salem . . . lO.min irom Mocksville . . . lighted and paved streets, with paved driveways, nice lawns with cemented patios . . . I--40 Mobile Home Village . . . . In­ tersections of 1-40 St Far­ mington Road . . . Route 2, Mocksville... Call after 6p. m. 634-3889 or 634-2244. 5-9tfn FOR RENT . . . CRESTVIEW APARTMENTS . . . Lexington Avenue, Mocksville . . . very nice four rooms and bath . . . call 634-5420. 6-20 tfn ROOMS FOR RENT . . . by the month . . . downtown . . . phone 634-2244. 9-26 tfn CLUB FAC ILITIE S FOR RENT: The former Masonic rooms above the Branch Bank on Main Street across from the Court House. For details, write: Holmes Investment Co., Box 904, Salisbury, N.C. 28144. 11-7 tfn FOR RENT . . . building in junction of Depot Street and Hwy. 64 E ... formerly Allens .. . $75 month as is or will remodel and repair for reliable tennant. Contact Mr. Lloyd Allen 634- 2421. 12-5-tfn FIVE ROOM HOUSE FOR RENT ... bath and hot water ... L.C. Dedmon ... 284-2433. 12-12 tfn MOBILE HOMES FOR RENT ... Two and three bedrooms ... all utilities furnished ... good location ... close to city ... Westside Mobile Home Village ... call during day 634-5959 ro 634-5086 at night. 12-12 tfn FOR RENT ... APARTMENT on South Main Street. Call 634- 2721 after 5:00 p. m. 12-26-3TP FOR RENT. . .2 bedroom trailer. . .approximately 10 miles from Mocksville on Hwy. 158.. .oil and water furnished.. .couple preferred. Mrs. Garland Robertson 998-4584. 1-2-ltp FIREWOOD FOR SALE . . . Fu m itU re slabs or round wood . . .call 634- ^ --- 3476 or 634-2684 after 6 p.m. 10-10 tfn FOR YOUR WALLPAPER needs contact M ERRELL FU RNITU RE COMPANY, Wilkesboro Street, Mocksville, N. C. 10-24-TFN Opening — new craft shop at 505 Avon Street. THE CRAFTY LADY ~ plaques, tole pain­ tings, art supplies and decoupage. Phone 634-5219. ll-14-tfn TAKE soil away the Blue Lustre way from carpets and upholstery. Rent electric shampooer. C.J. Angell Ap­ pliance & Jewlry Store. l-2-5tn SPECIAL . . . best grade 100 percent polyester doubleknit reduced from $3.49 a yard to $2.98 a yard... 62” and 64” wide ,.. large selection of colors... a real buy . . . SHEFFIELD GROCERY & FABRIC SHOP .. . phone 492-7983. l-2-2tn NEW & USED Office Furniture Fireproof Files and Safes. Rowan OBk* Furniture 118 N. Main St. Salisbury, N. C. phone 636-8022. tfn FOR SALE . . . Philco and Sylvania Televisions .... financing and service available . . . VOGLER'S TV SALES & SERVICE ... Advance, N. C ... . phone 998-8172. 5-16 tfn FOR SALE ... Motorola Color TV ... 25 inch screen ... in good condition... call Faith Goodin ... 634-3230. 12-19-tfn FOR SALE ... 10 x 15 ft. Olson reversable wool and nylon blend rug ... oatmeal beige ... never been used on one side ... good condition ... call 284-2354. 1-2-ltp /Animajs FOR SALE OR RENT: Registered Poll Hereford Bull.. .. 4Mi years old... Call 634-5090. Mobile Homes SPECIAL . . . 12 X 60 Mobile Home . . . 2 bedrooms . . . completely furnished ... $5450 . .. over 35 more to chftose from starting at $3995 . . . RAY'S HOMES, Hwy. 601, Mocksville. 9-5 tfn FOR SALE . . . 10 X 55 New Moon Mobile Home . . . good condition... partially furnished . . . call 493-4237 after 6 p.m. 10-17 tfn FOR SALE ... MobUe Home ... 60 X 12 ... air conditioned ... washer, dryer, dishwasher ... 2 porches... oil tank ... un­ derpinned ... 22 foot expando ... also 100 X 150 foot lot ... oak fence ... paved drive ... call 998- 5296 after 7 p.m. 10-17 tfn FOR SALE ... repossessed 1966 Ritzcraft Mobile Home . . . 12 x 50 ... already set up on private lo t.. . contact Branch Banking and Trust Company . . . phone 634-S951. 12-12-tfn GERT’S a gay girl - ready for a whirl after cleaning carpets with Blue Lustre. Rent electric , shampooer. Merrell Furniture Ai|t0S Co., Inc. ^-- 1-2-ltn l-2-5tn No longer responsible for any debts but my own. Steven Moxley. l-2-2tp SPOTS before your eyes- on your new carpet - remove them with Blue Lustre. Rent electric shampooer. Mocksville Fur­ niture & Appliance, Inc. l-2-5tn FOR SALE....used car- s...several makes and year models to choose from....can be seen at CENTRAL CAROLINA BANK, Mocksville....or call 634- 5941. 12-19 tfn We have most any style piano. We can save you at least $200 on any new piano. We have no high rent, no city taxes, no high- commissioned salesntan. Open Monday - Saturday 7 til 5. Call 704-279-955S for evening appointment. Located on U.S. 52, 7 mi. East of Salisbury. Kluttz Piwo Co., Inc., Gnnite Quarry, N.C. CffTKXMAOflNES Typewriter! iydi^Afadines SenioeOtAUIVUas EARLE’S' OFFICE SUPPLIES Dial 636-2341 Sdi8buy,N.C NOTICE ’WANTED TO BUY LIVESTOCK Beef cattle, hogi, vaalt, or .feeder cattle. I have an order for all type* of cattle. Will pay nnarket lirice for yitur liv^tock, right on the' farm. <Payment In caih or check, which ever you prefer. PROMPT PICK UP SERVICE ■I Will buy one header awhpleherd.. GIvameactllll. FRED 0. llUi Uve«t9jek and Auctioneering Service Rt. 4, MocksviUe, N.C. 634-5227 or 998-8744 ^IM oi^rejidentofD ^ Services J. R. CAMPBELL AND SONS SEPTIC TANK SERVICE. Have largest truck and only Company certified to pump' septic tanks in the county, very experienced, Telephone Jimmy Campbell, 634-5341 or Norman Beaver, 634-5726. 5-14-tfn ELECTROLUX SALES & SERVICE . . . 118 East Broad Street... Statesville, N. C. call 872-7117. 5-23 tfn BLACK & WHITE and COLOR TV R E PA IR ... in the Advance, Farmington and Fork areas ... VOGLER‘S TV SALES AND SERVICE . . . Call 998-8172. 9-20-73 tfn Painting and Repairs. James P. M iller, 998-8340 l-2-tfn Service on all makes and models of color, B-W TV’s, Stereos. Antenna Systems. . .Service calls made evenings, weekends. . . Davie Elec­ tronics service, phone 634-3652 or 634-5110. l-2-5tp N E W I IYIANTSO TO BUY Livestock A.L Beck & Son Wholesale Meats Thomasville, N.C. I Will Buy 1 Cow Or 100 Cowti ! ...■ lio.Bulli,VM lt,Fe«l8r: I Celvei. . . Wa hiy Ctih For ■ IAU Cattle When Hcked Up. I I J.L . Beck J r . I I Rt. i, Yhomasville i I Day Phone 919475^773 | lY E I^Night P h ^ J » ^ 7 M ^ j | A R ! ajiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiuillllllllL E CONTACT: I iBrewer’s Glass & Mirror I S (jlut off Sanford Road) s I For Your Glass Needs | i Storni Windows And Doois | To Fit Any Size Opening Mill Finish-White-Bronze =★ Plate Glass ★Mirrors ★Shower Dodis| i ★ Storm windows and door repaired | S 8 ^m. t^5 p.m. S i Route r 6 3 4 -^ 5 Mocksville, N .C .| ...................................................................................................... .C a r i n s u r a n c e : Paying too much for too little? Our complete coverage may cost less than you’re now paying. Call a Nationwide agent today for details. J.E. KeUy, Sr. and J.E. KeUy. Jr. 303 Wilkeiboro St., MockaviUe, N.C. Phone 634-2937 NATIONWIDE INSURANCE Nationwide is on your sideIS Nationwid* Mutual Iniurancc Company Homa Offica: Columbui. Ohio THERE'S SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE... All the current events...the latest in fashions...what's happening on the sports scene... you'll find the information you're looking for right in your local paper! 15^ per copy $6.00 per year (in state) $8.00 per year (out of state) IN THE PAGES OF DAVIE COUNTY MB - DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, THURSDAY, JANUARY 2, 1975 F o l k - W a y s a n d F o l k - S p e e c h n T T r « I With an abundance of wood cut and Stacked in the dry, it looks as if Mrs. Bea K p /ld lJ F o r V r t f l t e r / phniips of Route 7, M ocksville is prepared for whatever weather old man winter ” nians todish out. (Photo by Jim Barringer) Excellent Participation In Essay Contest Davie County schools reported excellent participation in an essay contest sponsored jointly by the Davie County schools and Ingersoll-Rand Corporation. The subject of the contest was “My • Favorite President-and Why.” A committee at each school determined the in­ dividual school winners in four age categories: six through eight, nine through twelve. thirteen through fifteen, and sixteen through high school. School winners by ages were; Lee Rollins, 8, and Denisa Plippin, 10, at Mocksville Elementary; Kim Wells, 11, and Aaron Miller, 13, at Mocksville Middle; Kim Ward, 8, Jerome Hendrix, 10, and Anita Peebles, 13, at Shady Grove; Glenn Mixon, 8, and Beth Foster, 10, at Cooleemee; and Polly Mitchell, Cooleemee News Mr. and Mrs. Gene Milholen and family have returned to their home in Emerson, New Jersey after spending the Christmas holidays here with her mother, Mrs. Bessie Canupp and other relatives here and in Salisbury. Mr. and Mrs. Bill White spent Christmas Eve night in Burlington with Mr. and Mrs. L. B. Owen and children. They returned home the following day. Bill Campbell and daughters, Christine and Carol of Washington, D. C. arrived the later part of Christmas week to spend a couple of days with the Whites. They returned home Saturday. Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Jacobs were the weekend guests of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Spake and Melanie at their home in Decatur, Georgia. Johnny Miller of Wilmington spent Christmas here with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Hunter Miller. Mr. and Mrs. Fred Pierce and children of Decatur, Georgia spent the holidays here with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Fred Pierce, Sr. Mr. and Mrs. Woody Yarbro and Mr. and Mrs. Don Hillard, Gray, David, Donna and Mark spent Christmas in Morganton with Mr. and Mrs. Glenn Bolick and in Hickory with Mr. and Mrs. Sherman Fisher. Among the out of town guests visiting here with Mr. and Mrs. Grady Spry, Sr. during the holidays were their children and families from Raleigh, Carrboro, Wilmington, Georgia, Taylorsville, and Mocksville. Mrs. Lillian Trexler remains a patient at Davie Hospital where she has been undergoing treatment for the past two weeks. Mrs. Ben Everhardt also continues to undergo treatment at Davie Hospital where she has been a patient for the past couple of weeks. Mrs. Cordie Campbell Nichols is sick at her home in N. Cooleemee. Oscar “ Red” Wyrick is a patient at Rowan Memorial Hospital. Ray Smith is a patient Davie County Hospital. at Mr. and Mrs. Paul Hoffman returned home Sunday night from Ft. Lauderdale, Florida where they spent Christmas week with their son and family, Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Hoffman. F e e l lik e a m illio n . You don’t have lo be wealthy to feel healthy. Shaklee Kootl Supplemenls. made the old-fashioned way, are giving thousands a special feeling of self-assurance even millionaires would envy.l'oday's busy world has increased nutritional problems by improper diet-frequent quick snacks, hurried breakfasts and speedy dinners. Hunger pains may be satisfied by these substitutes for proper diet, but the body's nutritional needs are not. I'or generations, Shaklee Food Supplements have been the quality brand Make them yours. A call lo your Shaklee Distributor is all it takes to bring these line products to your home. \ ita-('.\ il.i-Lea. l.iqui-l.c.i. Calcium,\'ita-l.. Insi,int I’roiein. I— . -I S h a ld .e e Distributorship s Available Phone (919) 768-5161 Collect 7, Lynn Dyson, 12, and Rita White, 13, at William R. Davie. Mike Hendon, 8, Chester Studevent, 10, and Robin Miller, 13, won at Pinebrook; Cheryl Barker, 13, Donnie Mackie, 14, and Wanda Reeves, 15, won at Davie High School but only on of the three will be selected to compete in the county com­ petition. In the 16 and over category, Susan Tutterow, 16; Michael Wall, 17; and Katie Peebles, 17, will compete for first, second and third prizes in this age category. A committee of five members will judge the winning essays from each school to determine the county-wide first, second and third place winners. The committee members are Mrs. Sandra Chitty, Mrs. Knox Johnstone, Mrs. Leo Williams, Senior Citizens The Cooleemee Senior Citizens will hold the first meeting of the new year on Monday, January 13, in the fellowship hall of the First Baptist Church at 10 a.m. Tattletales “ Lovitt” and “ Ginger” are two cute little short-legged Dachshunds. “ Lovitt” resides with the Vic Andrews on Wandering Lane; “Ginger” makes her home with the Bill Collettes, some distance up the road on Park Avenue. Mrs. Sue Couch was familiar with “ Ginger” living across Park Avenue from her parents, the Gilmer Brewers. However, she did not know “ Lovitt” . On a recent Sunday Sue was enroute to her parents when she noticed a little Dachshund, whom she thought to be “Ginger” , playing on Park Avenue. Doing her good turn, she stopped and picked up the little dog and carried it to the Bill Collette doorstep, left it, admonishing it to stay home. However, “ Lovitt” wasn’t about to remain in strange territory, and just as soon as Sue left, she headed home as fast as her little short legs could carry her. But she didn’t get to remain on Wandering Lane long. Sue passing by again spied what she thought was the errant "G in ger” . Once again she picked up the little dog and once again returned it to the Collette residence. And once again little “ Lovitt” , this time a little weary and footsore” , padded her way back to Wandering Lane. Yes it did! It happened the third time! But this time Sue was getting a little outdone with the little dog she thought was "Ginger” . This time she sought out Bill Collette and told him: "Bill, you got to do something about your dog. She keeps on running away from home. This is the third time I found her as far away as Wandering Lane!” Bill, with a smile on his face, replied: "Sue, that’s not Ginger. She is here in the house. That’s Vic Andrews dog!” Bill called Vic and this time “Lovitt” did not have to walk back home. Vic went after her. It was reported that “ Lovitt” was not usual active self for the rest of the day. All she wanted to do was lay around and rest her tired, little, short legs. George Martin, with' brief case, was going around handing out New Year’s presents, Tuesday. George gave every ap­ pearance of being secretive as he approached a friend and pointed to his brief case: “ I’ve got you something in here! Is it all right to give it to you here?” With that he opened the brief case and handed out the present: A bag of black-eyed peas. David Fe^gusson, and a representative from Ingersoll- Rand Corporation. The committee will meet the first week in January to determine county winners. Good Shepherd Women Meet The women of the church of the Good Shepherd Episcopal Church, Cooleemee will meet on Wednesday, January 8, with Mrs. Paul Rickell of Mocksville at 7:30 p.m. by Roger Whitena- If your younguns woke up this Christmas, raced to the tree and came back with disappointed faces over the reduced number of packages compared to those of last year, you just might suggest that they need lo discover a little bit about Christmases of the distant past- -Christmases without a cheerful tree and stockings containing, at best, a few sticks of candy, soom nuts, and perhaps an orange. Willard Watson, a maker of folk toys at his home on Wildcat Road near Boone, remembers many lean Christmas mor­ nings: “ Oranges? Lord a- mercy, I didn't know about 'em till I was way toward grown. 1 was lucky to get a few pieces of stick candy-and maybe a hand- me-down pair of brogans!” But If the presents were few in the Watson household, there was food in abundance to Whitaker Reunion The family of the late Lonnie L. Whitaker met Dec. 22 at the home of Mr. and Mrs. James Barnes of Pork for their annual Christmas reunion. Attending were Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Ratledge and children, - Kenneth, Jr., Karen and Sharon of Route 1, Mr. and Mrs. William Summers and children Bill and Bob of Route 6, Mr. and Mrs. Rex Johnson and daughter, Allison of Clemmons, Miss Etta Lashmit of Clem­ mons, Miss Cynthia Bennett of Cornatzer, Mr. and Mrs. Atlas Teague and daughters Melanie and Shannon of West Palm Beach, Fla., Mr. and Mrs. Lonnie Ray Whitaker and children Doug and Penny of Route 2, and Miss Kathy Whitaker of University of N. C. at Greensboro. Also attending were Mrs. Fleeta Whitaker of Mocksville, and Stephanie and Susan Barnes, daughters of the host family. compensate: fresh pork, sausage, liver mush, steaming pots of backbones and ribs, chunks of tenderloin, and wedges of crackling bread. Younguns today, according to Willard, know little about the good eating of the past: “ All they know is burnt hamburgers and canned rubber biscuits. Maybe they wouldn’t be so all­ fired anxious about presents if they got the same good eating I got." Frank Hodges, a near neigh- ix)r of the Watsons, echoes Willard’s sentiments: “ No, I don't remember much by way of presents-a few things in my stockings on Christmas mor- ning-but I do remember the cakes and pies baked especially for the holidays. Apple sauce cake was a favorite-made with molasses instead of sugar-and then we nearly always had' dried apple and pumpkin pies. We didn’t worry much about presents.” Mrs. D. W. Cook, also a craftsman, who lives at Sands, North Carolina, also notes the lack of a Christmas tree and the ' limited presents, but she also attests to the abundance of good food: "As far as our Santa Claus was concerned, we might get a wax China or rag doll in addition to fruits and nuts, but we usually went to church for Christmas tree services.” “ Food? There was always plenty. Turkey, chicken, wild game, country ham, sometime.s a goose. We had ail manner of bread, from biscuits to skillet cornbread, but most of all I remember the desserts: top apple pie, stickies, fruit cake- called 'knee deep' because it had so many layers-and maple sugar candy." Estella Barnes, another craftsman who lives on the Jefferson Road just outside Boone, like Mrs. Cook remembers an occasional doll for Christmas, often a Dell or China doll, with "painted on hair." She, too, recalls the Christmas food, in particular that prepared over an open fire: "There was usually a vegetable pot going, and sometimes we cooked ham and other meat over the flames. Also we-would sometimes have spice or sassafras tea, along with roasted chestnuts and other nuts which we would ‘shatter out' on the hearth." .■ "Usually we would go to church for the Christmas tree and special services. There were Christmas songs, reciting of Bible verses, and the giving of other recitations.” Harold "Slim " Garrison, of Bald Mountain, North Carolina, becomes downright scornful when Christmas present's are mentioned: “ My Lord, we didn't need presents-we made our own: wooden-wheeled wagons, sleds, sling shots, and play pretties of all kinds. What we really cared about was the good food, like molasses cake, ■pore do' (cornbread in hot grease), 'sweet line stacker’ (fruit cake), and fatty bread. You give me that kind of eating today and I’ll be as happy as I was then!" Well, maybe not. But on the other hand ... Please send all material to: Rogers Whitener, Folk-Ways and Folk-Speech, Box 376, University Station, Boone, N. C. 28R08. Oppression There is no happiness for him who oppresses and persecutes; there can be no repose for him. I For the sighs of the unfortunate ' cry for vengeance to heaven. Pestalozzi Did You Know The Traffic Law This space has been set aside to review traffic laws from time to time that many motorists may not be aware of or which may need reviewing to avoid a traffic ticket or accident. This week’s column will review a few more of the traffic laws which have been added or amended to go into effect on January 1, 1975. Beginning in 1975, a driver’s license will be automatically revoked if he is convicted of driving at least IS miles an hour faster than the posted speed limit. For example, driving 60 m.pJi. in a 45 m.pJi. zone. A driver attempting to elude a pursuing police officer at a speed at least 55 m.p.h. and 15 m.p.h. over the posted limit could be fined $1000 and jailed for two years. The minimum amount of liability insurance is now $15,000 for each injury or death in an accident, was $10,000. Formerly, it It is now unlawful to operate i vehicle displaying white or clear lights in the rear while the vehicle is in forward motion. This act does not apply to « white light used to illuminate a rear license plate nor to “ back­ up” lights used when a vehicle is in reverse gear. Motorcyclists who travel more than two abreast will now be subject to a maximum penalty of $100 fine and 60 daj« in jail. The old law had b maximum penalty of $50 fine and 30 days in jail. ; Pedestrians are prohibited as ofof the first of the year from walking on the roadways wheh sidewalks are provided. ; The maximum penalty for speeding or driving in the wrong direction on a one-way street will be doubled. The top punish­ ment is now $100 fine or 60 dayi) in jail. there's more now when you save at First Federal • • • A N N U A LLY 72 M O N TH S SA V IN G C E R T IF IC A T E nooo M IN IM UM 8.06% Annual yield Annual Interest Rate 71/2% Minimum Deposit *1,000 Term 48 Months Certificate Annual Yield When Earnings Are Retained in Account for One Year 7.79% 6%%*1,000 30 Months Cerftificate 6.98% 61/2%*1,000 12 Months Certificate 6.71% 5%%*500 90 Days Certificate 5.91% 5V4%*1.00 Daily Interest Passbook 5.39% Federal regulations require that a substantial penalty be charged for savings certificates redeemed prior to maturity. In terest compounded d a ily on a ll savings plans DIVIDENDS PAID TO SAVERS for the 4th QUARTER Over ^1,450,000 TOTAL DIVIDENDS FOR 1974 Over *5,550,000 R w t 3001 Waughtown StrMt in Pwfcvitw Shopping Canwr 230 North Charry StrMt, 2818 Roynolda Read, 130 South Stratford Road. Winaton-Salam and 218 Oalthar Straat, MooksviUo Counterfeit Bill Passers Nabbed By David Hoyle and Jerry Paige An alert cashier at Lowe’s and quick action by the Mocltsville Police Depart­ ment led to the arrest of two persons for passing counterfeit bills Monday In Mocksviile. Mocksville Police Chief G.A. Carter requested that the names of the suspects not be used as further investigation is pending, but he reported one was a white male about 35 years of age. and the other a white female, around 27 years of age and both of Buncome County in North Carolina. Each suspect has previous records. Chief Carter said the police department received a call Monday morning around 10:15 from Lowe’s reporting a woman had tri«tl to pass a counterfeit $20 bill. Mrs. Barbara Carter, cashier at the store, noticed the $20 bill was counterfeit and told the woman the bill was no good. The woman then grabbed it back, saying she had received it at the Super Dollar Store next door and would take it back. When the suspect saw a Lowe's em­ ployee using the phone, she ran to an unoccupied while Plymouth but could not get into the car. Meanwhile, the Lowe’s personnel were calling the Police Department when she did not return to the Super Dollar Store. By this time, Mrs. Carter and other clerks were coming out to try to get the license number of the car. The woman fled on foot but the store personnel noticed her trying to get into the car agrtin. The male suspect was in the car by this time but the door in which the female suspect was trying to enter was still locked and seeing someone chasing the woman, the male suspect drove off and left her. Store employees chased her for some distance across the Monleigh parking lot, noting she tried unsuccessfully to get into several parked cars, supposedly to make a getaway. Chief Carter trailed her to the bus station at Jeff Tutterow’s filling station where she was reported to have gone over to Millers. Carter entered Millers but there were several women in the restaurant so he sent Policeman Gary Edwards back to Lowe’s to get someone to identify her. As Edwards and a store employee were on their way back to Carter, they spotted the woman on foot out along US 601 North bending down to throw something under a car. The police apprehended her, picked up Chief Cartel, after which they went back to search around the car where she had stopped but they could find nothing. The woman was taken to the county jail where she was searched by Deputy Betty Rouse. City and county lawmen, armed with a description of the car and the license number, apprehended the male suspect in the Plymouth, at Sam’s Country Kitchen. He was picked up by Captain R.W, Groce of the Mocksville Police Department and Deputy Sheriff Donald Edwards and charged with Improper registration since It was discovered the plates he had did not belong on the car he was driving. With both suspects in the county jail, Chief Carter called the FBI who referred him to the Secret Service which is con­ nected with the Treasury Department and an agent was immediately sent from Charlotte. Shortly before the agent arrived, the female suspect began to have drug with­ drawal symptoms and she told the officers she was a registered addict and must have her medication. A local doctor was called in and she was taken to the Davie County Hospital for medication. When she returned, she was questioned by the Secret Service Agent but admitted nothing. The male ,suspect, when questioned, said he did not know her and had never seen her before. He also denied being in Winston-Salem recently where bogus bills had been passed. The police department already had evidence that he had been in Winston- Salem two nights before and were checking into other areas where the bills had been passed which included Charlotte. Continued on Page 4 DAVIE COUNTY $6.00 PER YEAR THURSDAY, JANUARY 9, 1975 SINGLE COPY 15 CENTS Local Robbenr Has Tragic Results By Jerry Paige Kenneth Dale Spencer, 17, of Mocksville Rt. 2 has been charged with the robbery of the Cletus Miller home on Mocksville Rt. 4, Fairfield Road, last Friday. Spencer (probably assist^ by others yet to be named) is accused of breaking into Hus was a familiar scene in and around Davie County early Monday morning as ice collected on trees and shrubs.'. (Hioto by James Barringer) I Decision On Rezoning Delayed Until Febuary Freewood Admits Plans to Establish Nudist Camp In Davie By David Hoyle Freewood Associates, Inc. had nothing to hide concerning their plans for a nudist colony in Davie County during Monday night’s zoning hearing. Following three hours of testimony, however, a decision on the issue was postponed until February 3 so the board members could study the testimony given at the lengthy meeting. As in past meetings concerning the proposed nudist colony, the courtroom was packed with some people standing during the more than three hour meeting. The full executive committee of Citizens of Oavie County was present and the majority of those in the audience appeared to be members of the congregations of the pastors who bead up the citizen com­ mittee. Also present were most of the county commissioners, a number of local lawyers, and other officials interested in the case. In all, there were well over 170 present at the beginning of the 7:30 meeting. Before the hearing began, the lawyers for both sides met to set the ground rules. Representing Freewood was Stafford R. Peebles. Jr. of the American Civil Liberties Union and Don Donadio, a Winston-Salem attorney represented the Citizens of Davie County. Following the meeting of the lawyers, the witnesses for both sides were sworn in with the exception of John P. Allgood, who stated he wished to be affirmed rather than sworn in. Allgood is secretary- treasurer for Freewood Associates. Bruce Tuttle, Davie County Zoning Officer, brought the board up to date on the history of the campground since he was first approached on the matter last summer. Allgood was the first witness and he made no secret of his plans to develop a nudist colony on Freewood's 60 acres of land off NC 1313 which connects .Bear Vandalism On School Site Vandalism is continuing tu occur on the construction project at the William R. Davie School. Bob Hendrix, foreman for the Banger Construction Company, reported to the Sheriff’s Department Tuesday morning tliat sometime Sunday pipes were broken off at the face of the wall in one of the bathrooniii and shower stalls. The cost of replacement was pul at around $90. It was also reported that the freshly concreted roof had footprints and other marks on it. Approximately three months ago a machine parked at the school had hydraulic guages broken and the dip slick taken. Two new wheelbarrows were reported taken. Tlie Davie County Sheriff’s Depiirlnieiit IS investigating. Creek Road. The land. Allgood said, was purchased in December of 1972 with the intentions of establishing a nudist campground. He was careful to point out that the road leading into the property is blocked by two gates, numerous "no trespassing’’ signs and that the actual campground cannot be seen from the road. He submitted into evidence a handout by the American Sunbathing Association of which Freewood Associates holds a charter, and announced that the first membership was sold in July of 1973. Asked by Peebles if he intended to operate a sunbathing camp on the property, Allgood replied, “ That has been the purpose ever since we bought the property.” Allgood introduced bills from several local companies for services rendered in improving the campground, all dated before the zoning law went into effect in November, 1973. He also submitted an ad which appeared in the August and Sep­ tember, 1973 issues of the American Sunbathing Association publication an­ nouncing there was now a nudist camp in North Carolina, “ Freewood, the natural place to be." Allgood revealed that he had paid $2,200 for the land and an additional $21,800 for development and attorney fees. He said every precaution that could possibly be taken to avoid any publicity was taken and the association never tried to cause any trouble in the county. By November 1st, 1973, Allgood reported the campground already had six families as members. The total is now up to 13 families. Under cross examination, he also stated that the county health department had said the sewage facilities would be adequate for up to 50 campers at a time. Allgood said Davie County was chosen as the site of the campground because “ it was an isolated, private, rural area only seven miles from 1-40,’’ and close to their corporation office in Winston-Salem. "He said he had told his plans to the person from whom theproperty wasbouglit and had anticipated no opposition. Michael D. Avent, a real estate ap­ praiser with a long list of credentials was Man Shoots Rifle Into Occupied House A 38-year-old disabled Negro of Mocksville Rt. 5 has been charged with shooting into the house of Annie Lois Hunter, Mocksville Rt. on January 3rd, around 10:50 p.m. Theodore Patterson was charged with discharging a rifle into the Hunter house, located in the vicinity of Farmington, while it was occupied. As of Monday he was in the local jail. Ms Hunter signed the warrant that alleged lhal the bullet entered the outside wall uf her liome and continued through the inside room wall while she was in the iiousc the next witness for Freewood. He stated he had done an impact study on the proposed campground by studying similar campgrounds in Maryland and South Carolina. After talking with realtors in those areas, he told the board, “ based on this data, it (the campground) would not affect the property values in the county.” The final witness for Freewood was E. W. Prevette who owns and resides on property next to the proposed cam­ pground. Asked if it had any adverse af­ fects, he replied, “ no, I haven’t had any problems so far.” “ As long as they stay in the woods,” he said, “ it’s not going to make any dif­ ference to me.” As for property value going down, Prevette said that it did not matter since he had no intentions of selling his property. The Rev. Grady Tutterow, pastor of Bear Creek Baptist Church spoke first against the petition. Tutterow is the chairman of the Citizens of Davie County who hired the lawyer to oppose the cam­ pground. “ Noting that a petition of 900 names against the campground and more than $1,000 in donations had been gathered, Tutterow said “ it is a moral issue in our county that we do not need.” Other ministers speaking against the campground, brought such charges as that it would bring dope and crime to the Continued on Page 4 St. John’s Banquet The Mocksville Masonic Lodge’s Annual St. John’s Banquet will be held on Saturday, January 11 at 6:00 p.m. at the new Masonic Temple. Nine members will receive 25 year certificates at the banquet and all mem­ bers and wives are invited. The speaker will be the Rev. Benny Bearden of Welcome, formerly pastor of the Davie Charge of the United Methodist Church. Vehicle Hits Building A single vehicle accident resulted in over $3000 in damages on Sunday, January 5th around 1:15 p.m. on Sanford Avenue in Mocksville. Involved was Betty Jo Harris, 16, of Mocksville operating a 1969 Chevrolet. According to the investigating officer, Mocksville Police Chief G.A. Carter, the Harris vehicle had just turned left off Salisbury street when a dog ran onto the street in front of the car. Chief Carter said she apparently swerved to avoid the dog and lost control of the vehicle running off the road and into the Davie Freezer Locker. Carter said the driver may have hit the accelerator in­ stead of the brakes as there were signs of the rear wheel spinning after the vehicle had hit the building and stopped. There were no charges in the accident which resulted in $1000 damages to the vehicle and approximately $2500 to the building. the Miller home and taking around $4,700 in cash, seven guns, television set, portable calculator, savings bonds, tape player, two pocket knives, and around $700 in old silver. Total estimated value was $8,700.. Money taken in the robbery is believed to have been used to purchase two cars in Winston-Salem last Saturday ... a 1969 Pontiac and a 1967 Plymouth Station Rainfall Rainfall for IB74 in. .Uavle County .totaled !i4.|inlich^8- MiWdlngfo.C. F. MeroneJ'. Ji ‘tT.'Is ^ than for 1973. when 53.17 inches were reeorde^d.,# ' For the month of Deceitber, Davie had 5.16 inches, an inch less than December 1973 when B.Ifi inches were recorded. Rainfall was recorded as .49 of an Inch during the final week in December. Wagon. Also purchased were two tape players for the vehicles. The 69 Pontiac, registered in the name ot Spencer ,was the vehicle being operated by C. Jeff Bailey of Pompano Beach, Florida at the time it wrecked on the Old Vineyard Road in Forsyth County early last Sunday morning. Bailey was killed in th? accident and David Raymond Baker of 529 Church Street Extension, Mocksville, was critically injured. Deputy Sheriff John O’Neal and Deputy Steve Stanley investigated the robbery. ’They report that the television set, tape -plByer;.sptneof the snver'i-artij sSittC^«hor>' small stiiff taken in th6 robbery has beeq , recovered. Tho other vehicle, a 1967.': Plymouth stationwagon, also registered in the name of Dale Spencer, was impounded in Winston-Salem. Spencer was arrested by officers when he went to the hospital early Sunday morning to see about the’ wreck victims. As of Tuesday he was in the Davie County Jail in lieu of a $10,000 bond. Youth Killed; Another Critical First Of 1975 Davie County’s first baby of 1975 was Kirk Henry Cleary, son of Mr. and Mrs. Kirk W. Cleary of Mocksville, Rt. 5, boro at 7:40 p.m. on January 2nd at the Davie County Hospital. Dr. Ray Hartness was the attending physician. The infant weighed 7 lbs. 12'ii ozs. at birth. The maternal grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. R. H. Brock and the paternal grand­ parents, Mr. and Mrs. Clyde Cleary. (Photo by David Hoyle) Pocketbooks Taken From Grocery Carts Two recent instances of the stealing of women’s pocketbooks from the shopping carts of local grocery stores have been reported. At Lowes a woman had her pocketbook stolen when an unidentified woman pushed the cart in which the shopper had put her pocketbook around the aisle, out of sight, and picked up the pocketbook and walked out of the store. Last Friday at Heffner’s a sirrilar attempt was made. C. Jeff Bailey. 17. of Pompano Beach, Fla., formerly of Davie County, was dead on arrival Sunday morning at the Forsyth Memorial Hospital, Winston-Salem. Death resulted from injuries sustained in an automobile accident around 1:50 a.m. on the Old Vineyard Road, Winston-Salem. The Winston-Salem Police Department reported Bailey, apparently driving at an excessive rate of speed, lost control of the car in a curve. It reportedly travelled in the right ditch 200 feet, struck a driveway embankment and then crossed to the other side of the road. The car then overttuned, rolled down an embankment and struck a tree, according to police reports. A passenger in the car, David Raymond Baker of 529 Church Street Extension, Mocksville, was injured and was reported in critical condition Tuesday at the For- Continued on Page 4 Mrs. Roger Whittaker, shopping for grocery, had put her pocketbook in her cart. She was reportedly looking at some onions when she turned around to see a strange woman pushing her cart down the aisle. Thinking that the woman had just made a mistake, Mrs. Whittaker followed, but once around the aisle saw the wopian with her pocketbook making an exit from the store. Mrs. Whittaker followed the woman into the parking lot and called to her that she had her pocketbook and if she didn't give it back she (Mrs. Whittaker) would call the police. With that the woman dropped the pocketbook, got into a car with a man and sped away. Four Saddles Stolen Pete Parkers, of Cedar Church Road reported four saddles stolen to the Oavie Sheriff’s Department. The exact time of the theft was unknown but it was reported to the Sheriff’s Department on 'Tuesday, December 31, 1974. Approximately $700 in saddles, bridles and other equipment was reported missing. Deputy Donald Edwards is in­ vestigating tiie case. Ready For Session! Rep. Peter W. Hairston adjusts a picture of Daniel Boone which has a rightful place on the desk which was once used by his grandfaflier's great grandfather. Rep. Peter Hairston. See interview of Rep. Hairston coiicerniog (he forthcoming session of the tieneral .Assembly on Page 4. (Photo hy James Barringer). Counterfeit Bill Passers Nabbed By David Hoyle and Jerry Paige An alert cashier at Lowe’s and quick action by the Mocksville Police Depart­ ment led to the arrest of two persons for passing counterfeit bills Monday in Mocksville. Mocksville Police Chief G.A. Carter requested that the names of the suspects not be used as further investigation is pending, but he reported one was a white male about 35 years of age and the other a white female, around 27 years of age and both of Buncome County in North Carolina. Each suspect has previous records. Chief Carter said the police department received a call Monday morning around 10:15 from Lowe’s reporting a woman had tried to pass a counterfeit $20 bill. Mrs. Barbara Carter, cashier at the store, noticed the $20 bill was counterfeit and told the woman the bill was no good. The woman then grabbed it back, saying she had received it a( the Super Dollar Store next door and would take it back. When the suspect saw a Lowe’s em­ ployee using the phone, she ran to an unoccupied white Plymouth but could not get into the car. Meanwhile, the Lowe’s personnel were calling the Police Department when she did not return to the Super Dollar Store. By this time, Mrs. Carter and other clerks were coming out to try _to get the license number of the car. The woman fled on foot but the store personnel noticed her trying to get into the car agrtin. The male suspect was In the car by this time but the door in which the female suspect was trying to enter was still locked and seeing someone chasing the woman, the male suspect drove off and left her. Store employees chased her for some distance across the Monleigh parking lot, noting she tried unsuccessfully to get Into several parked cars, supposedly to make a getaway. Chief Carter trailed her to the bus station at Jeff Tutterow’s filling station where she was reported to have gone over to Millers. Carter entered Millers but there were several women in the restaurant so he sent Policeman Gary Edwards back to Lowe’s to get someone to identify her. As Edwards and a store employee were on their way back to Carter, they spotted the woman on foot out along US 601 North bending down to throw something under a car. The police apprehended her, picked up Chief Carter, after which they went back to search around the car where she had stopped but they could find nothing. The woman was taken to the county jail where she was searched by Deputy Betty Rouse. City and county lawmen, armed with a description of the car and the license number, apprehended the male suspect in the Plymouth, at Sam’s Country Kitchen. He was picked up by Captain R.W. Groce of the Mocksville Police Department and Dcpuljf Sheriff Donald Edwards and charged with improper registration since it was discovered the plates he had did not belong on the car he was driving. With both suspects in the county jail, Chief Carter called the FBI who referred him to the Secret Service which Is con­ nected with the Treasury Department and an agent was Immediately sent from Charlotte. Shortly before the agent arrived, the female suspect began to have drug with­ drawal symptoms and she told the officers she was a registered addict and must have her medication. A local doctor was called In and she was taken to the Davie County Hospital for medication. When she returned, she was questioned by the Secret Service Agent but admitted nothing. The male ,suspect, when questioned, said he did not know her and had never seen her before. He also deni<^ being in Winston-Salem recently where bogus bills had been passed. The police department already had evidence that he had been in Winston- Salem two nights before and were checking Into other areas where the bills had been passed which included Charlotte, Continued on Page 4 DAVIE COUNTY $6.00 PER YEAR THURSDAY, JANUARY 9, 1975 SINGLE COPY 15 CENTS Local Robbery Has Tragic Results By Jerry Paige Kenneth Dale Spencer, 17, of Mocksville Rt. 2 has been charged with the robbery of the Cletus Miller home on Mocksville Rt. 4, Fairfield Road, last Friday. Spencer (probably assisted by others yet to be named) is accused of breaking into This was a fomiliar scene in and around Davie County early Monday moming as ice collected on trees and shrubs. ’-. (Photo by James Barringer) '■ ■ " " - ■ I Decision On Rezqning Delayed Until Febuary Freewood Admits Plans to Establish Nudist Camp In Davie By David Hoyle Freewood Associates, Inc. had nothing to hide concerning their plans for a nudist colony In Davie County during Monday night’s zoning hearing. Following three hours of testimony, however, a decision on the issue was postponed until February 3 so the board members could study the testimony given at the lengthy meeting. As in past meetings concerning the proposed nudist colony, the courtroom was packed with some people standing during the more than three hour meeting. The full executive committee of Citizens of Oavie County was present and the majority of those in the audience appeared to be members of the congregations of the pastors who head up the citizen com­ mittee. Also present were most of the county commissioners, a number of local lawyers, and other officials interested in the case. In all, there were well over 170 present at the beginning of the 7:30 meeting. Before the hearing began, the lawyers for both sides met to set the ground rules. Representing Freewood was Stafford R. Peebles. Jr. of the American Civil Liberties Union and Don Donadio, a Winston-Salem attorney represented the Citizens of Davie County. Following the meeting of the lawyers, the witnesses for both sides were sworn in with the exception of John P. Allgood, who stated he wished to be affirmed rather than sworn in. Allgood is secretary- treasurer for Freewood Associates. Bruce Tuttle, Davie County Zoning Officer, brought the board up to date on the history of the campground since he was first approached on the matter last summer. Allgood was the first witness and he made no secret of his plans to develop a nudist colony on Frcewood’s 60 acres of land off NC 1313 which connects .Bear Vandalism On School Site Vandalism is continuing to occur on the construction project at the William R. Davie School. Bob Hendrix, foreman for the Banger Construction Company, reported to the Sheriff’s Department Tuesday morning tiiat sonielmie Sunday pipes were broken off at the face of the wall in one of the bathrooms and shower stalls. The cost of replacement was put at around $9U. It was also reported that the freshly concreted roof had footprints and other marks on it. Approximately three months ago a machine parked at the school had hydraulic guages broken and the dip stick taken Two new wheelbarrows were reported taken Tlie Davie County Siienff's Department IS investigating. Creek Road. The land. Allgood said, was purchased in December of 1972 with the intentions of establishing a nudist campground. He was careful to point out that the road leading into the property is blocked by two gates, numerous “ no trespassing’’ signs and that the actual campground cannot be seen from the road. He submitted into evidence a handout, by the American Sunbathing Association of which Freewood Associates holds a charter, and announced that the first membership was sold in July of 1973. Asked by Peebles if he intended to operate a sunbathing camp on the property. Allgood replied, "That has been the purpose ever since we bought the property.” Allgood Introduced bills from several local companies for services rendered in improving the campground, all dated before the zoning law went into effect in November, 1973. He also submitted an ad which appeared in the August and Sep­ tember, 1973 issues of the American Sunbathing Association publication an­ nouncing there was now a nudist camp In North Carolina, “ Freewood, the natural place to be.” Allgood revealed that he had paid $2,200 for the land and an additional $21,800 for development and attorney fees. He said every precaution that could possibly be taken to avoid any publicity was taken and the association never tried to cause any trouble in the county. By November 1st, 1973, Allgood reported the campground already had six families as members. The total is now up to 13 families. Under cross examination, lie also stated that the county health department had said the sewage facilities would be adequate for up to 50 campers at a time. Allgood said Davie County was chosen as the site of the campground because “ it was an isolated, private, rural area only seven miles from 1-40,” and close to their corporation office in Winston-Salem. “ He said he had told his plans to the person from whom theproperty was bou^it and had anticipated no opposition. Michael D. Avent, a real estate ap­ praiser with a long list of credentials was Man Shoots Rifle Into Occupied House A 3U-year-old disabled Negro of Mocksville Rt. 5 has been charged with shooting into the house of Annie Lois Hunter, Mocksville Rt. 5, on January 3rd, around 10:50 p.m. Tiieodore Patterson was charged with discharging a rifle into the Hunter house, loi’ated in the vicinity of Farmington, wiiiU* it was occupied. As of Monday he was in the local jail. Ms. Hunter signed the warrant that alleged that the bullet entered the outside M ill! ul tier iionie and continued through llie inside room wall while she was in the liou.se the next witness for Freewood. He stated he had done an Impact study on the proposed campground by studying similar campgrounds in Maryland and South Carolina. After talking with realtors in those areas, he told the board, "based on this data, it (the campground) would not affect the property values in the county.” The final witness for Freewood was E. W. Prevette who owns and resides on property next to the proposed cam­ pground. Asked if it had any adverse af­ fects, he replied, “ no, I haven’t had any problems so far.” "As long as they stay in the woods,” he said, “ it’s not going to make any dif­ ference to me.” As for property value going down, Prevette said that it did not matter since he had no Intentions of selling his property. The Rev. Grady Tutterow, pastor of Bear Creek Baptist Church spoke first against the petition. Tutterow is the chairman of the Citizens of Davie County who hired the lawyer to oppose the cam­ pground. “ Noting that a petition of 900 names against the campground and more than $1,000 in donations had been gathered, Tutterow said “ it is a moral issue in our county that we do not need.” Other ministers speaking against the campground, brought such charges as that It would bring dope and crime to the Continued on Page 4 St. John’s Banquet The Mocksville Masonic Lodge’s Annual St. John’s Banquet will be held on Saturday, January 11 at 6:00 p.m. at the new Masonic Temple. Nine members will receive 25 year certificates at the banquet and all mem­ bers and wives are invited. The speaker will be the Rev. Benny Bearden of Welcome, formerly pastor of the Davie Charge of the United Methodist Church. Vehicle Hits Building A single vehicle accident resulted in over $3000 in damages on Sunday, January 5th around 1:15 p.m. on Sanford Avenue in Mocksville. Involved was Betty Jo Harris, 16, of Mocksville operating a 1969 Chevrolet. According to the investigating officer, Mocksville Police Chief G.A. Carter, the Harris vehicle had just turned left off Salisbury street when a dog ran onto the street in front of the car. Chief Carter said she apparently swerved to avoid the dog and lost control of the vehicle running off the road and Into the Davie Freezer Locker. Carter said the driver may have hit the accelerator in­ stead of the brakes as there were signs of the rear wheel spinning after the vehicle had hit the building and stopped. There were no charges in the accident u'liich resulted in $1000 damages to the vehicle and approximately $2500 to the building. the Miller home and taking around $4,700 In cash, seven guns, television set, portable calculator, savings bonds, tape player, two pocket knives, and around ^00 in old silver. Total estimated value was $8,700.. Money taken in the robbery is believed to have been used to purchase two cars in Winston-Salem last Saturday ... a 1969 Pontiac and a 1967 Plymouth Station Rainfall Rainfall for 1974 in .Uavie County .totaled M MUikches. ^c^nrdjng ta C- F- Merone}. ir'T K Is vm.Slifilty-'MWl*' than for 19.71. when 53.17 Inches were record ed.',' ' For the month of DeceiAber, Oavie had 5.16 inches, an inch less than December 1973 when 6.16 inches were recorded. Rainfall was recorded as .49 of an inch during the final week in December. Wagon. Also purchased were two tape players for the vehicles. The 69 Pontiac, registered in the name ot Spencer ,was the vehicle being operated by C. Jeff Bailey of Pompano Beach, Florida at the time it wrecked on the Old Vineyard Road in Forsyth County early last Sunday morning. Bailey was killed in the accident and David Raymond Baker of 529 Church Street Extension, Mocksville, was critically injured. Deputy Sheriff John O’Neal and Deputy Steve Stanley investigated the robbery. They report that the television set, tape -pl8yer,.?otrieof the gilveir.-wnq ^ small stuff taken iii the robbery has beeii' recovered. Tho other vehicle, a 1967' Plymouth stationwagon, also registered in the nameof Dale Spencer, was impounded in Winston-Salem. Spencer was arrested by officers when he went to the hospital early Sunday morning to see about the- wreck victims. As of Tuesday he was in the Davie County jail in lieu of a $10,000 bond. Youth Killed; Another Critical Fint Of 1975 Davie County’s first baby of 1975 was Kirk Henry Cleary, son of Mr. and Mrs. Kirk W. Cleary of Mocksville, Rt. 5. born at 7:40 p.m. on January 2nd at the Davie County Hospital. Dr. Ray Hartness was the attending physician. The infant weighed 7 lbs. I2>i ozs. at birth. The maternal grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. R. H. Brock and the paternal grand­ parents, Mr. and Mrs. Clyde Cleary. (Photo by David Hoyle) Pocketbooks Taken From Grocety Carts Two recent instances of the stealing of women's pocketbooks from the shopping carls of local grocery stores have been reported. At Lowes a woman had her pocketbook stolen when an unidentified woman pushed the cart In which the shopper had put her pocketbook around the aisle, out of sight, and picked up the pocketbook and walked out of the store. Last Friday at Heffner’s a similar attenpt was made. Mrs. Roger Whittaker, shopping for grocery, had put her pocketbook in her carl. She was reportedly looking at some onions when she turned around to see a strange woman pushing her cart down the aisle. Thinking that the woman had just made a mistake, Mrs. Whittaker followed, but once around the aisle saw the wopian with her pocketbook making an exit from the store. Mrs. Whittaker followed the woman into the parking lot and called to her that she had her pocketbook and if she didn’t give it back she (Mrs. Whittaker) would call the police. With that the woman dropped the pocketbook, got into a car with a man and sped away. Four Saddles Stolen Pete Parkers, of Cedar Church Road reported four saddles stolen to the Davie Sheriff’s Department. The exact time of the theft was unknown but it was reported to the Sheriff’s Department on Tuesday, December 31, 1974. Approxiiriately $7U0 in saddles, bridles and other equipment was reported missing. Deputy Donald Edwards Is in­ vestigating the case. C. Jeff Bailey, 17, of Pompano Beach, Fla., formerly of Davie County, was dead on arrival Sunday morning at the Forsyth Memorial Hospital, Winston-Salem. Death resulted from injuries sustained in an automobile accident around 1:50 a.m. on the Old Vineyard Road, Winston-Salem. The Winston-Salem Police Department reported Bailey, apparently driving at an excessive rate of speed, lost control of the car in a curve. It reportedly travelled In the right ditch 200 feet, struck a driveway embankment and then crossed to the nther side of the road. The car then overturned, rolled down an embankment and struck a tree, according to police reports. A passenger In the car, David Raymond Baker of 529 Church Street Extension, Mocksville, was injured and was reported in critical condition Tuesday at the For- Continued on Page 4 Ready For Session! Rep. Peler W. Hairston adjusts a picture of Daniel Buone which has a rightful place on the desk which was once used by his grandfather’s great grandfather, Rep. Peter Hairston. See interview of Rep. Hainton concerning the forthcoming session of the General .Absembly on Page 4. (Photo by James Barringer). 2 - DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, THURSDAY, JANUARY 9, 1975 WFMY-TV To Film Here Friday ■ WPMY-TV newsman Bob Garner will be ill Mocksville this Friday to film com­ ments by Davie County citizens for use on Chan'nel 2’s "Main Street” feature which Is shown on the station's weekend newscasts. Garner and Channel 2 photographer Bill Gordon will be on the square Friday at noon to film comments and other Davie County residents on any subjects of their choosing, from local to national affairs. The filmed comments will be shown on Channel 2 newscasts this Saturday at 6:00 p.m. and 11:00 p.m. and Sunday at 7:00 r p.m. and 11:00 p.m. • Each segment will contain different ' tomments and will last from two to four minutes. Comments in other cities visited by Gfiannd 2 have covered a variety of topics, ; such as the economy, traffic congestion, ■ lack of recreational facilities, medical and !' educational needs in the community and ; state and local government services. Vehicle Damaged . In One-Car Wreck I Damages estimated at $300 I - ivas done to a 1954 Chevrolet of ; ^ Boger Texaco when it wrecked ’ ; on December 30th on Rural 1--Paved Road No. 1142, around T 11:30 p.m. _ -; At the time of the accident, ^ t the vehicle was being operated ' by Albert Denton Boger, Jr., 17, ■ df Mocksville Rt. 3, Milling 1 Road. He was not injured. State Highway Patrolman ; K.W. Ledbetter said his in- ; ; vestlgation showed that the - vehicle was traveling west '!! when the driver lost control due ; to excessive speed on a slick ' road. The vehicle overturned in the roadway and came to rest on it’s top in a ditch bank on the left side of the roadway. Boger was charged with : exceeding safe speed. RAIN, RAIN Over a period of many years, North Carolina has rain about one day out of three in the spring. However. State Climatol­ ogist Albert V. Hardy, North Carolina State University, said these figures were reversed this year. There was rain on about two out of three d ^ s . ____________ Did You Know The Traffic Law The E nterprise-Record reported in its "The Traffic l..aw” column an excerpt from an Associated Press Story stating drivers convicted of speeding 15 miles faster than the posted limit would lose their licenses in North Carolina after January 1, 1975. The Associated Press later corrected its story saying they had not qualified their report by saying the driver must have been trying to elude a police officer. It is correct that under the new North Carolina traffic laws, drivers speeding faster than the posted limit while trying to elude a police officer will automatically lose their licenses. They will also be liable to a fine of up to $1,000 and jail terms up to two years. The E nterprise-R ecord checked with Line Sgt. W. R. Woolen and found out that the AP story was very nearly correct. , Sgl. Wooten referred us to (he N. C. M otor Vehicle Laws, Chapter 20-16.1 which states a person exceeding by more than 15 miles per hour the speed limit, either inside or out of any city limits, will lose his license for 30 days, providing he was going over 55 miles an hour at the time of the offense. Any second or subsequent offense within a year carries a 60 day suspension. The law Is not new, however, having been on the books for at least 20 years. The Hugh Foster home after the New Year’s Eve fire. WFiWY-TV newsman Bob Garner andind photo„ . Bill Gordon will visit Mocksville Friday lo film comments by Davie County citizens for the station's “ Main Street” news feature. Green Meadows Cooleemee News pjfe Destroys Hugh Foster Home Start The New Year Off Right... Take Your Prescription To Foster Drug Complete Tax Service We Will File All Insurance Forms ipO STER J DRUG CO. If cant save you money then we don t deserve your business!! Wednesday night after first Sunday is still Family Night at Green Meadows Church. This Wednesday, Rev. J. C. Shore and the Assn. Brotherhood leader will meet with the men of the church to discuss and plan organizing a brotherhood for the church. All men interested in the most important phase of church work are urged to attend and become involved in this organization if possible. Mrs. Joe Langston and Mrs. Bessie Smith visited Mrs. Evola Sheek last Tuesday afternoon. Mrs. Sheek has had a very severe case of shingles, but seems to be improving now. Virginia Ellis of Winston- Salem visited PatSy Wright last Tuesday afternoon. Harry Wheeler, brother of Mitchell Wheeler, has not been as well as usual for several days but was improved on Sunday. Mr. and Mrs. Sam Austin were called to Asheville Friday, Clarksville Club Meets Mrs. Stacy Beck The Clarksville Homemakers Club met Friday, January 3, at the home of Mrs. Stacy Beck. Fifteen members were present, and guests were Miss Sarah Merrell, Mrs. EWwin Walked and Mrs. Er^' Latham. '• After several announcements ^ and the business session, Mrs. Ostine West, Extension Home Agent, handed out perfect at­ tendance certificates to Mrs. , Roger Ireland and Mrs. Bill Shelton and reading certificates to Mrs. Stacy Beck, Mrs. L. G. Wallace, and Mrs. Lonnie Miller. Mrs. Era Latham told the group of her recent United Nations tour of Washington and New York. Officers for the following two years were announced: Mrs. Maurice Anderson, president; Mrs. Bob Gardner, vice President; Mrs. Bill Shelton, secretary; Mrs. Jerry An­ derson, assistant secretary; Mrs. L. G. Wallace, treasurer; Mrs. Stacy Beck, assistant treasurer; Mrs. Lonnie Miller, song leader; Mrs. Jerry An­ derson, pianist; and Mrs. Roger Ireland, card sender. The meeting was adjourned with the club collect, and the hostesses, Mrs. Beck and Mrs. L. G. Wallace, served refresh- ments. due to the illness of Mr. Austin’s father. Mrs. Maggie Sheek of Yadkin Valley Community, spent Tuesday afternoon with Mrs. Henry Douthit. Mrs. Sallie Riddle spent Sunday night and Monday with her sister, Mrs. Ethel Mc- daniel, of Cornatzer Com­ munity. Mrs. Joel Beauchamp has been a patient at Davie Co. Hospital for several days. She was some better on Sunday. Mrs. Bessie Smith and Mr. and Mrs. Joe Langston visited Mr. and Mrs. Otis Holt in Farmington on unday night. Mrs. Kenneth Smith and sons, Mrs. Tommy Harper and son Kim, Mr. Bob Hendrix and several others of this area accompanied the Community Singers to the Lewisville Baptist Church on Sunday night where they presented a program of music and song. Mr. F. E. Schulte visted the ■ Joe Langstons on Sunday af­ ternoon. Mrs. Sam Austin is ex­ periencing some complications from recent surgery but has not had to re-enter the hospital. Well, the snow didn’t begin in the gloaming but started falling on Monday morning-a normal January day. Mrs. Versie Carter has returned to her home on Joyner Street after a two months visit in Dale City, Virginia with her daughter, son-in-law and family, Mr. and Mrs. James Ijames. Keith and Betsy Hodgson have returned to their home in Ithaca, New York after spen­ ding the past two weeks here with their parents, Mrs. Elsie Hodgson of Cooleemee and Mr. and Mrs. R.S. Gobble of Circle Drive, Salisbury. Seven ladies got together during the Christmas holidays for the first time in 27 years. They all grew up here and at­ tended school together as youngsters. Mrs. Allie Milholen of Emerson, NewJersey, Mrs. Margaret Branch of West Virginia, Mrs. Millie Blaylock, Mrs. Libby Creason, Mrs. Reba Holt, Mrs. Frances Click and Mrs, Doris Veach Williams all gathered for dinner at Staleys Steak House in Winston-Salem for an evening of fellowship. Mrs. Lillian Trexler returned home last week from Davie County Hospital where she has been undergoing treatment for the past two weeks. Airman Ronnie Blackwood will leave later this week for Loring Air Force Base, Maine for duty with a unit of the Strategic Air Command. He has been spending a 30-day leave here with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Fred Blackwood, Mrs. Stella House entered Davie Hospital last Thursday Cornatzer News Brady Barney returned to his home last Friday from Forsyth Hospital after undergoing surgery. His condition is improving slowly. Claude Williams underwent surgery at Medical Park Hospital last Friday. Norm an Smith and Margaret Potts spent a few days with Mr. and Mrs. Mark Smith in Wareham, Mass. last week. Mr. and Mrs. Luther Potts are the proud parents of a baby daughter. Dona LuRae, weighed 7 lbs 5 oz. born Dec. 31 at Forsyth Hospital. Week end visitors of Mrs. Ethel McDaniel were Mrs. Sally Riddle and Rev. and Mrs. Derry Barnhardt and family. Harold Frank visited his father, Mr, Edd Frank in Tyro Sunday. Mrs. Margaret Potts was Share YOVB Views with Channel 2 Hews! Join us in MOCKSVILLE for on-location color filming of^ ^ "Main Street in M OCKSVILLE" 12 Noon FRIDAY WHERE? Join the Channel 2 News team Friday at 12 Noon on the 1 square in downtown Mocksville. BOB GARNER, anchor man, Channel 2 SaL & Sun. Newt What’s your opinion? What do you think? Tell it to Bob Garner. A Channel 2 News photographer will record it on film. Then watch for highlights of these “man on the street” interviews in Mocksville four times on Channel 2 News this weekend: SATURDAY at 6 & 11PM; SUNDAY at 7 & 11PM w fm y*tv honored with a spaghetti supper for her birthday Saturday night at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Butch West. Mr. and Mrs. James Boger and boys and Dean Allen were also present for the occasion. Farren Shoaf spent Sunday afternoon with Darwin Whittaker. The family of Harvey Potts enjoyed a supper on New Year’s eve at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Douglas Potts. Sunday night visitors of Mr. and Mrs. Homer Potts were Bruce and Cathy Hinkle. Eva Potts and Mr. Dennis Barney visited Mr. Brady Barney Saturday night. Wednesday night guest of Mr. and Mrs. Ray Potts were Mr. and Mrs. Jim Davis and daughters, Julia and Jenny of Haggarstown, Maryland. Berita Shoaf visited Pam Potts Thursday night. Life There is nothing which must end, to be valued for its con­ tinuance. If hours, days, months, and years pass away, it is no matter what hour, day, month, or year we die. The applause of a good actor is due to him at whatever scene of the play he makes his exit. It is thus in the life of a man of sense; a short life is sufficient to manifest himself a man of honor and virtur; when he ceases to be such, he has lived too long; and while he is such, it is of no consequence to him how long he shall be so, provided he is so to his life's end. Steele. for observation and treatment. Mrs. Cody Osborne continues to undergo treatment at Rowan Memorial Hospital where she has been a patient for more than a week. Meetings Announced The following meetings have been announced for January and February by Leo F. Williams, County Extension chairman. Annual Tobacco meeting, Thursday, January 9, iv,'a.m. at Davie County Office Building; Hog meeting, Thursday, January 9,6:30p.m. (supper) at Turnersburg Livestock Com­ pany; Corn Production meeting, Wednesday, January 15, 7:30 p.m. at Davie County Office Building; North Carolina Pork Producers conference, Wed­ nesday and Thursday, January 15-16 at Royal Villa Inn in Raleigh; Dairy meeting, Tuesday, January 28, 7:30 p.m. at Davie County Office Building; Dairy meeting, Tuesday, February 4, 7:30 p.m. at Davie County Of­ fice Building; Area Hog meeting, Thursday, February 13, 4:30 to 9:30 p.m., supper at 6:30 p.m., at Tur­ nersburg Livestock Company; Beef Cattle conference, Tuesday, February 18, 8:30 a.m. in Raleigh. Vi(jlllam Owens Is Honored William Owens of Cooleemee was honored during the Sunday morning worship services at the First Baptist Church, Cooleemee on January 5. Rev. Ray Pennell and members of the congregation set this day aside as “ William Owens Day” to pay special tribute to a man who for approximately half a century has been actively in­ volved in various areas of the church. As a result of a heart attack several months ago, Mr. Owens has been unable to continue working as the church custodian, an area in which he has twice served amounting to 45 years. He was elected to the work of a Deacon around. 1928 and served continually until 1951 when the rotation system of deacon service was begun. From this time, Mr. Owens was never off the active “ board” of deacons more than the required one year after rotating off, until his recent illness interfered. He taught the Juniors and Primaries in Sunday School, led in Training Union, served on two Pulpit Committees, three Nominating Committees, three Finance Committees and served as church treasurer for two terms, which amounted to 20 years. Therefore, the church set this special day aside to express their appreciation to this very devoted man and the entire service was dedicated to him. A special “ Love” offering was also taken to help with the many medical expenses incurreed during illnesses of the past 14 months. This offering was only a small token of the church’s appreciation to a very devoted member. D A V i a C O U N T Y 124 South Main Street MocksviUe, N.C. 27028 Published every Thursday by the DAVIE PUBLISHING COMPANY MOCKSVILLE ENTERPRISE 1916-1958 DAVIE RECORD 1899-1958 COOLEEMEE JOURNAL 1906*1971 Gordon Tomlinson.................Editor-Publisher Sue Short..............................Associate Editor Second Class Postage paid at Mocksville, N.C. SUBSCRIPTION RATES $6.00 per year in North Carolina: $8.00 per year out of itite Single Copy 16 centi ________ The home of Mr. and Mrs. Hugh Foster on Lexington Road was totally destroyed by fire around 11:30 p.m. on December 31. According to Mocksville Volunteer Fire Department Chief Andrew Lagle, the positive cause of the blaze was unknown but it was theorized that the fire started around the chimney. A roomer at the Foster home discovered the fire after smelling smoke and opening the door to the upstairs which was all in flames. The Fosters were also at home in the downstairs area but all residents escaped uninjured. The Mocksville Fire Department an­ swered the call but the home was totally involved before the firemen could reach the scene. The house was ruled a total loss following the blaze. The home of Mr: and Mrs. Mickey Keller on Milling Road was damaged by fire around 10:00 p.m. Saturday, January 3rd. According to Mocksville Volunteer Fire Department Chief Andrew Lagle, the Kellers had built a fire in the fireplace earlier in the evening. Smelling smoke, ■Mr. Keller looked up the chimeny and could see flames. It was later discovered that a piece of wood was left in the masonry allowing the fire to get in between the walls. The Mocksville Fire Department answered the call and opened a hole in the living room wall to extinguish the blaze. There was little smoke damage to the home and the fire damage was contained to the area around the chimney. There were no injuries in the blaze. Fire Calls Fires reported to the fire control center include: December 31st, the Mocksville Fire Department answered a call to the Hugh Foster house around 11:25 p.m. on US 64 East. January 2nd around 7:35 p.m. the William R. Davie Fire Department an­ swered a call to the Buster Phillip’s Trailer Park. January 4, around 9:55 p.m. the Moc- skville Fire Department answered a call to the residence of Mike Keller on Milling Road. The fire was confined to the wall around the chimney. Conservation District Sponsors Essay & Poster Contest In Schools The Supervisors of the Davie Soil and Water Conservation District are spon­ soring an essay and poster contests in the schools in Davie County. It is not intended that essays or posters be restricted to soil and water conservation but to any sound idea of our natural resources that the student may wish to present. The essay contest is open to all students at the sixth grade level. Winners will be selected from each school and will be eligible for entry in the county contest. Frizes on the county level will, be first, $25.00 Savings Bond; second, $15.00; and third, $10.00. First and second place area winners are eligible for entry in the state contest. State prizes shall be: first, $100.00 Savings Bond; second, $50.00 Savings Bond. The poster contest is open to all students in the fourth, fifth and sixth grades in schools within Davie County. First place winners on the county level, from each grade level, will be eligible for entry in the area contest. First place winners from each area, from each grade level, will be Bloodmobile The Bloodmobile will be at the National Guard Armory on Highway 64 East Thursday, January 22. There is still a need for blood to meet the needs of Davie County. Hours will be given next week. eligible for entry in the state contest. State prizes for each grade level will be: first prize - $50.00 Sayings Bond; second prize - $25.00 Savings Bond. Interested students are asked to contact their teachers for further information or call the local district office at 634-5011. The deadline for both contests will be Friday, January 17, 1975. One Injured In Accident On Bethel Church Road One person was injured in a two vehicle accident on December 31sl on the Bethel Church Road. Involved was a 1969 Cadillac operated by Marthalene Linn Brannon, 31, of Mocksville Rt. 3, containing two passengers. State Highway Patrolman J.L. Payne said his in­ vestigation showed that the Nichols vehicle entered the rural road from a private and turned into the path of the Brannon vehicle that had the right of way. Nichols was charged with failure to yield right of way. Damage to the Cadillac was estimated at $250 and $700 to the Chevrolet. DRAPERY FREE sheer fabric with overdraperies made from Empress or Cameo fabrics. Choose from 82 fashion colors. J Fdays| only ■ GtmiRIE’S DRAPERY DEN 9 9 1 -5 2 9 5 / 7 2 4 -9 8 6 9 Our decorator comes to your home, at your convenience, days, evenings, weekends. No charge or obligation. DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, THURSDAY, JANUARY 9, 1975 3 A r o u n d ( j i n ^ A h o n t Wedding Held Saturday At Graylyn Estates with Betsy Pennington TO ARRIVE FROM ATLANTA Mrs. Jimmy Dickinson and sons Will and Charley will arrive Monday, January 13 from AUahta. Ga., to spend a week with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Chapman on Lakewood Drive. RECENT VISITORS Recent visitors of Mr. and Mrs. Sam Nichols of Carolina Street were Mrs. Bessie Pease and Mr. and Mrs. Jack Nichols, all of Alexandria, Va. RETURNS TO M ILITARY ACADEMY Tony Driver of North Main Street returned to Carylisle Military Academy at Bamberg, S. C. after spending the holidays with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Rob Foster. ATTEND FUNERAL Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Chapman attended the funeral of his uncle, Floyd Cobb of Tryon, N. C., Monday, January 6th. NEW YEAR’S VISITORS Recent visitors of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Ridge of North Main Street were R. V. Latimer of Honea Path, S. C., Mr. and Mrs. Hank Ridge of Dumfries, Va., and Miss Janet Ridge of Robbins, S. C. SPEND WEEKEND Mr. and Mrs. H. T. Meroney and son, Chris, of Norfolk, Va., spent the weekend with Mr. and Mrs. Jake Meroney at their home on Church Street. RETURNS TO SCHOOL SUNDAY Miss Gina Woodruff will return to UNC-G Sunday where she is a student, after spending the holidays with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Woodruff of Wilkesboro Street. STUDENTS RETURN TO PEMBROKE John Nicholson, son of Mr. and Mrs. John D. Nicholson of North Main Street, and Larry Driver, son of Mr. and Mrs. Rob Foster of North Main Street, returned Sunday to Pembroke University, where they are students. SUNDAY VISITOR Gerald Troutman of Rockwell, a senior at Pfeiffer College, visited Miss Lynn Hicks of Yadkinville Road Sunday afternoon. Miss Hicks is also a student at Pfeiffer. SPENDS WEEKENDS IN SPARTA Mr. and Mrs. Daniel M. Andrews and children Julie, Mark and Andy of Route 1, spent last weekend in Sparta visiting Mr. Andrews’ father, the Rev. M.W. Andrews. NEW YEAR VISITORS Mr. and Mrs. David Randall of Asheville visited at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Randall of Jericho Road, during the New Year holidays. Also visiting was Mrs. Randall’s sister, Mrs. Dolan Watson, of Tryon. ATTENDSGRADUATE SCHOOL Miss Nancy Williams, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Leo Williams of Jericho Road, left Sunday, January 5th to begin her graduate studies at the University of Tennessee. MRS.SODOLSKI VISITS Mrs. L.V. Sodolski, of Menasha, Wisconsin , arrived December 12th to visit her daughter and son-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. John Norton at their home in Southwood Acres. She will be here until the end of January. SPEND A WEEK HERE Mr. and Mrs. Ramey Kemp, Jr., and children Tracy, Mike Brian and Melissa of Raleigh spent last week with his parents. Dr. and Mrs. Ramey Kemp at their home on Halander Drive. INJURED IN FALL Miss Jo Cooley was recently injured in a fall at the home 6f her brother in Asheboro. Miss Cooley suffered a broken hip and leg. She is recuperating at the Baptist Hospital in Winston-Salem. HERE FOR WEEKEND Miss Jane Click of Winston-Salem spent the weekend here ' with her mother, Mrs. Mae Qick at her home on Wilkesboro Street. RETURNS HOME L. E. Feezor has returned home after spending the holidays with his daughter, Mrs. Jack Elliott and family in Shelby. RETURN TO TEXAS Lt. Col. John H. Hodgson, Mrs. Hodgson and David have returned to their home in Abeline, Texas after spending the Christmas holidays with her parents, the A. C. Cheshires, his mother, Mrs. W. H. Boyd, of Route 1, and his brother-in-law and sister, Mr. and Mrs. B. G. Johnson of Charlotte, FRIDAY NIGHT DINNER GUESTS Dr. and Mrs. Robert Fox of Winston-Salem were the Friday night dinner guests of Dr. and Mrs. Frank Church at their home on Church Street. MRS. LEGRAND RETURNS HOME Mrs. John P. LeGrand returned to her home on North Main Street Saturday after having spent the holidays with her daughter and son-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Rom Weatherman and children, in Lexington, Virginia. Rom Weatherman and . John Weatherman brought Mrs. LeGrand home. They returned to Lexington Sunday. During this past summer I happened to hear Arthur Smith give a poem on his show from Charlotte. I wrote to Mr. Smith and he sent a nice letter and a copy of the poem for me to share with you. I hope you enjoy It: A friend is a person who is for you under any suspicion. He does not ask proof. He asks the accuser to clear out. He likes you just as you are; he does not want lo alter you. Whatever kind of coat you are wearing suits him; whether you have on a dress suit or a hickory shirl with no collar, he thinks it's fine. He likes your moods and enjoys your pessimism as much as your optimism. He likes your success and your failure en­ dears you to him the more. He is better than a lover, because he is never jealous. He wants nothing from you except that you be yourself. He is the one tx?ing with whom you can feel safe. With him you can utter your heart, its badness and its goodness: you don't iiave to be careful. In liis presence you can be indiscreet, which means you can rest. There are many laith- ful wives and husl>ands: there are few faithful friends. h'nendship is llie niosl ad­ mirable, amazing and rare arlic'ie among liumun beings. Anybody may stand by you Miss Linda Bowden and Jonathan Foster Hale were married Saturday, January 4, at 4 p,m. at Graylyn Estates In Winston-Salem, N. C. The Rev. Charles Bullock, pastor of First Baptist Church in Mocksville, officiated at the double ring ceremony. He was assisted by Dr. Ralph D. Amen, Professor at Wake Forest University. . Members of the family and very close friends of the couple witnessed the ceremony in front of an open fire in the main ballroom of, the mansion. The bride is the daughter of Mr, and Mrs, L, S, Bowden, Jr., of Mocksville. She is a 1971 graduate of Davie County High School; attended Wake Forest University; and graduated from the school of Cytotechnology at Bowman Gray School of Medicine. She is eniployed at National Health Laboratories in Winston-Salem. The bridegroom is the son of Brigadier General and Mrs. A. B. Hale, currently of Reston, Virginia. He is a 1971 graduate of Jefferson High School, Alexandria, Virginia, and a graduate of Wake Forest University, where he was a radio announcer at Station WFDD-FM. The bride, given in marriage by her father, wore a gown of candlelight Quiana knit designed with pearl trimmed high neckline and long slim sleeves. The empire bodice had a modified tie, and the full A- skirt extended into a chapel train. Her full length silk illusion veil was held by a Juliet cap covered in Quiana knit with matching pearl trim. She carried two long stemmed white roses. Miss Teresa Brown of Roanoke, Virginia, was maid of honor. She wore a long rust colored formal gown of Quiana knit featuring a high neckline with self-fabric tie, long slim sleeves and full gathered front bodice. She carried a long stemmed orange-delight rose. Bridesmaids were Miss Paula Hale, sister of the groom, and Miss Margaret Anne Daniel of Winston-Salem, cousin of the bride. They wore dresses identical to the honor attendant and carried a long stemmed orange-delight rose. A. B. Hale, Jr., was his brothers’ best man. Ushers were Jeff Bowden, brother of the bride of Mocksville, Charles Lynch of Alexandria, Virginia, and Greg Gelburb and Drew Joyce of Winston-Salem, N. C.' Dexter Duncan of Radford, Virginia, presented a selection of his personal piano and guitar compositions prior to the ceremony. The bride’s mother wore a beige anil burgandy floor length dress and carried a long stemmed pink rose. The groom’s mother wore a beige floor length dress and carried a long stemmed pink rose. RECEPTION A reception, given by the bride’s parents, was held in the dining room at Graylyn following the ceremony. Greenery and candles were used throughout the mansion. An arrangement of mixed flowers centered the serving table. Misses Amy Hardwick and Bethie Shattuck of Winston- Salem served the cake. Miss Lynn Corpening of Win- ston-Salem poured punch, Jim Matthews and Miss Helen Woerhle of Winston-Salem served champagne. Miss Sandy Dwiggins of Mocksville assisted with the serving, Mrs, Bob Dwiggins of Mocksville directed the wed­ ding. After a skiing trip in Western North Carolina, the couple will make their home in Winston- Salem, Out of State guests included; BriE, Gen, and Mrs, A, B. Hale MRS. JONATHAN FOSTER HALE ........was Linda Bowden of Reston, Va., Mrs. William L. Hale of St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands; William F. Hale of Massapequa, New York; Mrs. Wilbur Petty of Heliport, New York; and Jack Moss of Omaha, Nebraska. WEDDING BREAKFAST Mrs. Thea G. Brown and Miss Joanne Grose entertained the bridal party and out-of-town guests Saturday at Mrs. Brown’s home on Gwyn Street at the wedding breakfast held at 11:30 a.m. The' bride-elect wore a long formal for the occasion and she was presented a corsage of pink glads to compliment her attire. Guests included the bride- elect and groom-elect; Mr, and Mrs. Sheek Bowden, Jr.; Brigadier General and Mrs, A, B. Hale, Duke Hale, of Reston, Va.; Mrs, Wilbur E, Petty of Bellport, New York; Mrs, William L, Hale of St, Croix, Virgin Islands; Mr, and Mrs, T, J, Caudell; Mr, and Mrs, L, S, Bowden, Sr,; Miss Margaret Anne Daniel; Miss Teresa Brown of Roanoke, Va,; Dexter Duncan, Gregg Gelburb, Drew Joyce; Charles Lynch of Alexandria, Va,; Rev. and Mrs, Charles Bullock; Mrs, Robert Dwiggins and Miss Sandy Dwiggins, The bridal table was centered with a brass candelabra filled with white candles and pink carnations and pink baby's breath. The individual tables seating the guests were' cen­ tered with vases filled with pink glads. The menu served consisted of fresh fruit cup, golden rod eggs in pastry shells, ham, broiled tomatoes, buttered tea biscuits, wedding cake and coffee. AFTER-REHEARSAL PARTY Mr. and Mrs. Bill Howard and Mr. and Mrs. Sam Howard entertained with an after- rehearsal party Friday night for their niece, Miss Linda Bowden, and her groom-elect, Jon Hale, The party was held at the Sheraton Kona Kai Lounge in Winston-Salem, The bridal table was The Kitchen Almanac when you are right: a friend stands by you when you are wrong. The highest known form of friendship is that of the dog to his master. You are in luck if you can find one man or one woman on earth who has that kind of affection for you and fidelity to you. Like the shade of a great tree in the noonday heat is a friend. Like the home port with your country's flag flying, after a long journey, is a friend. A friend is an Impregnable citadel or refuge in the strife of existence. It is he who keeps alive your faith in human nature; who makes you believe it is a good universer. He is the antidote to despair and elixir of iiope; the tonic for depression; the medicine lo cure suicide. When you are vigorous and spirited, you like to lake your pleasure with him; when you are in (rouble, you want to tell him. When you are sick, you want lo see him; when you are dying you want him near. You Ulve to him without reluctance and burrow from him without embarrassment. It you can live fifty years and FIND ONE ABSOLUTE FHlKND.you are fortunate, for lit the thousands of human I'lealures lhal crawl the earth I'KW AHE MADE OF SUCH STtlKK O n eiila l Consistory illl.i Thickening custards or pud­ dings? Two egg yolks or two egg whiles have the same thick­ ening power as one whole egg . , , Looking for meat alter- n.ites? Consider dry beans, eggs, dry peas or lentils — or how about peanut butter? * * * For breakfast variety, top a bowl of'crunchy, sweet peanut buller cereal wilh banana slices and pineapple chunks. Serve with milk or cream . . . For more even browning and a per­ fect golden color, use unsalled butter for grilling sandwiches,* * * I’opeye loved spinach, but how about the folks at your house? Basil, mace, marjoram, nutmeg or oregano add a gour­ met touch to spinach,• • » Shinni'riiig Xiatisiics; In May, 1974, the retail price of a pound of boneless sirloin was- $2..'9 in Washington, D.C., $3.66 in Honn, West Germany and a whopping $14.60 in Tokyo. » * * Catching up on short cuts —Many home­ makers are finding the Hotwater Dis­ penser a great time - saver. Just in case you’re not fa­ miliar with it, this KitchenAid appliance dis­ penses hot water preheated up to 190°. It's ideal for many "in­ stant” and convenience foods. (Add hot water to instant cereal and breakfast is ready!!) The versatile appliance also warms baby bottles, blanches, thaws and melts. It sure beats healing the teakettle every time hot water is needed. And, think how much time llml takes. » • • Some fruits and vegetables do nol freeze well. These in­ clude green onions, lettuce and other salad greens, radishes and tomatoes (except as juice or cooked). Here’s one of the finest pie crust recipes to be found. It comes from one o f the finest cooks w e’ve e ve r 16 stick butter Vi teaspoon salt Mix ingredients together with pic crust blender. Blend the juice of Vi lemon, 2 egg yolks and 5 tablespoons of ice water into the flour mixture. Add your favorite pie or cobbler fill­ ing and bake in the oven at 425° for 15 minutes or 350* for 30 minutes. ^ found — Elna C a rlso n o f Chicago, The crust can be used with your own favorite pic or cobbler fill­ ing. (Tip; Follow the directions carefully and don't "cheat" on ilic iiinndieiits. This is pie crust the way pic crust should be!! World't Best Pie Cnift 2 cups flour I stick margarine .AlilJlN'G l 'P - ( i i l l - i u l l u i i L'dulllluv llu lu ( itlli' M ills l)uui.Ill l)ll^'s 1\\ < l-pu-tl- suit l.lslliuli s l.IM ilitr litlli'li lui)k. ( Illtlltilt-SLUIIM^ ).ll ki t ll-.ltUll'S ',:.>lliru'(l V like .iiltl Millii puLki t; ljlltl< >11-1 III s k i l l ll.IS llll lu ll W a is l. tiW /. I_______Annouucpinents Mr. and Mrs. Bill Johnson of 906 Duke Street, Mocksville, announce the birth of a daughter, Ellyn Victoria, born Tuesday, December 31st, at Forsyth Memorial Hospital in Winston-Salem. The baby ^ weighed 7 pounds and 4 ounces, Maternal grandparents are Mr. Jk >» and Mrs. Roy Harris of Salisbury Street, Mocksville. Paternal grandparents are Mrs. W. G. Johnson of Route 2, Mocksville, and the late Mr. Johnson. Mr. and Mrs. Luther B. Potts, Route 3, Mocksville, announce the birth of their first child, a daughter, Dana LuRae, born Dec. 31, at, Forsyth Memorial Hospital in Winston- Salem. The baby weighed 7 lbs. 5 ozs. at birth and was 19'*i inches in length. Maternal grandparents are Mrs. Paul Harpe of Route 1 and the late Mr. Harpe. Paternal grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Potts of Route 1, Mpcksville. The baby’s mother is the former Hilda Harpe. decorated with a mixed floral arrangement, silver can- delabras entwined wilh lilies of the valley and orange blossoms. Buffet hors d’oeuvres were served. Oyt-of-town guests attending were Brigadier General and Mrs. A, B, Hale and Miss Paula Hale of Reston, Virginia; Mrs, Wilbur Petty of Bellport, New York; Mrs. William L, Hale of St. Croix, Virgin Islands; and A. B. Hale of Chapel Hill. Approximately 70 guests attended including friends from Mocksville and Winston-Salem. BRIDALLUNCHEON The bride-elect was honored at a bridal luncheon Friday, January 3rd, given by her aunt and grandmother, Mrs. William C. Daniel and Mrs. T. Jeff Caudell, and Miss Margaret Daniel, cousin of the honoree and an attendant in the wed­ ding. The honoree was presented with a corsage of mums upon her arrival. Those attending with the bridal party included Mrs. L, S, Bowden, Sr,, the bride-elect’s grandmother; Mrs, William L. Hale of St, Croix, Virgin Islands and Mrs, Wilbur Petty of Bellport, New York, the groom- elect’s grandmothers; and Mrs, L, S, Bowden, Jr,, of Mocksville and Mrs, A, B, Hale of Reston, Virginia, the touple’s mothers. The Forsyth Room of the Hyatt House in Winston-Salem was decorated with mixed arrangements of flowers. The menu consisted of mixed green salad, chicken Bavarian served in lemon butter, O’Brien potatoes, glazed carrots, Kona coffee ice cream, French rolls, coffee and tea. The hostesses presented the bride-elect with crystal in her pattern. The bride-elect also chose this time to present gifts to her attendants. 'Uhe Jdewest you BY ANN 0. ALLEN One of the questions I'm most often asked is this one: How do I get my children to drink more milk? That's easy to answer. Just tell me what your child's favor­ ite flavor is. Combine with milk and/or ice cream and it's easy as sippin' through a straw! Is it peanut butter? Mix Vz cup of peanut butter with I pint of softened vanilla ice cream, then add 2 cups of milk and '/t teaspoon of vanilla extract, and you'll get 4 to 5 cups that will serve two or three children, nicely, and they'll thank you sweetly. •'‘ L Stephen Dunn'and Jeana Dunn, son and daughter of Mr. and Mrs, Hubert Dunn, celebrated their birthdays in December with a birthday dinner at their home on Gordon Drive in Advance, N, C. Mr, and Mrs, Glen Robertson and Glenda ate with the family. Hairdressers Will Meet The Davie Hairdressers Association will meet Monday, January 13th at 7 p,m, at C’s Barbecue for a dinner meeting. Installation of officers will take place following the meal. All new and old members are urged to attend. Western Square Dance Lessons A ,new series of beginners western square dance lessons will be held in the Farmington gymnasium in Davie County, The lessons will begin on Friday, January 17 at7:30p,m. There will be no charge for the first two lessons. Ed Raybuck of Advance will be the instructor. > % Couch-Ward Mr. and Mrs, George E, Couch of Route 7, Mocksville, announce the engagement of their daughter, Nancy Christine, to Kelly Nathaniel Ward, son of Mrs. Opal Ward of Route 3, Mocksville and the late Owen Ward. Mis$ Couch is a 1973 graduate of Davie County High School and is employed at IngersoU-Rand Company in Mocksville. Mr. Ward attended Davie County High School and is employed at Gravely Tractor in Clemmons. No wedding date has been planned yet. PR EC ISIO N P A T C IIE S - Paltlio.s mid pliiid.s iii<‘ a cliild- riglit combination in l)iillun-oii dress by Little Star in eoinloi- table, colorful all-eotton IVoni V.l.P. rabrics. Skirt features printed ileniin patches while bodice is mix of madias plaids. A t- FOR COMFORT-TiirlI<:s liefc on Lillie Slar'.s .scJiooltlross ol elassKmm-boiiiid all-cott()n eortluroy irom Cone .Mills. C’om- foit-.scorinK, sleeveless dic.ss slips on undenieatli long- sleeved \est with polka-dot bodice. TRAVEL With The Matlisoii Touts, 1975 Personally Conducted Tours Natchez, New Orteans..................................March 8-16 Florida, Disney World...................................March 19-23 Hawaii, San FranciKO....................................May 11-21 Mexico, Deep South......................................June 14-July 5 California, Old Mexico.. . . . ;.....................June 14-July 6 Nova Scotia, New England...........................June 21- July 6 Alaska, Western Canada.................................ju|y 11-August 12 California, Canadian Rockies.......................July 12-August 9; Write R.B. Madison, Moclisville, N.C. Tel. 634-2525 The Calico Oafs SECOND AND YOU ARE INVITED You will want to take advantage of these savings EVERY ITEM W ILL BE REDUCED 25% SOME ITEMS Wia BE REDUCED AS MUCH AS 50% We Accept Master Charge HOURS: Daily Tues. thru S«t. 1-5 p.m. Open Friday Night till 9 p.m. Closed Mondays. SALE DATES Duiing The Cali(» Cat’s Regular Hour; Beginning January 1, 1975 and Ending January 11, 1975 TEN DAYS ONLY 1 SHOP EARLY FOR BEST SEUCTIONS THANK YOU For Shopping At The Calico Cat HAPPY NEW YEAR! Gift Wrapping Extra During Sale t-OCATlON: In tiie Red Bam at the comci uf North Main and Greenwood Avenue, MocksvUle, N.C. Phone:634 3414 4 - DAVtE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, THURSDAY, JANUARY 9, 1975 Jaycees Seek DSA Nominees The Mocksville Jaycees each January honor one of this community’s most distinguished young men as Its out­ standing young man for the past year. The Distinguished Service Award (DSA) is presented to the man of Jaycee age (21-36) who exhibits most meritorious service to his family, community, and nation. The DSA is the highest award the Mocksville Jaycees annually present. The DSA Banquet will be on January 23rd, 6:30 p.m. at the Hickory Hill Golf and Country Club. This awards ceremony will recognize and honor the qinner’s achievements and provide a stage for the honoree to challenge and inspire young men. The names of young men of all fields of endeavor may be submitted by an in- dlviuual, organization, association or institution. The winner will be selected by a group of distinguished citizens. Rules governing the nomination provide that the nominee not be over 35-years-of- age as of January 1, 1975. He must be a U.S. citizen and work or reside within the Mocksville area. Nomination forms, similar to the one reporduced below, may be obtained from Dick Nall, Jaycees DSA Chairman, telephone 634-5462, Mocksville. All nominations must be In Mr. Nail’s hands by January 20th, the deadline for sub­ mitting nominations! “There are many young men in the Mocksville areas who are deserving of the DSA award. However, they must be nominated. The Jaycees urge that friends, ralatives, organizations, etc. submit these nominations for consideration of this year’s awards. Anyone desiring further information should contact me, Dick Nail, phone 634-5462” , said the Jaycees DSA Chairman. PLEASE TYPE USINa BLACK RIBBON N onilnM 'i Pull N anw . , P teienI A g t, C K In nshIp . Address .B ir th d s tt. . C i i y ______. S tale ., Home Phpne_ Oocupatlon o r Profession. Piece or W ork_____________ A d 4 r e s s _ . ^ _ .P o sitio n or T itle , - C iiy . Marital Status (wife’s SeAoots attended, deflreea. academic honora. e lc .:, .C hildren (name and a g e ). Civic, fraternal, religious organizations and affiliations (e.g., American Red Cross, Director. 1970) Published w o rk :^ Nominator’s name;, A d d r e a a _ _- C ity . ^ Signature _ _______State. , Business P hone. Occupation, B usiness:. Davie Commissioners Hear Petition For Funds The Davie County Board of Com­ missioners met in their regular Monday session on January 6. The first issue before the board was an at^arance by Sheriff Rob Kiger and his chief deputy, Woodrow Wilson to petition f$r more equipment for the Sheriff’s Department. ; Included was a request for two new automobiles and replacement of two o^ers as well as equipment for the cars and additional personnel for the depart­ ment. The board advised the Sheriff’s Department that most of the requests could be obtained through the depart­ ment's current budget. Additional autos and men would have to be considered by the third Monday meeting in January. The commissioners approved an ad­ dition to Dogtrot Road (SR1818) which is off NC 801 at Dutchmen Creek. A Historic Properties Commission Ocdinance was adopted which would create a commission in the county, not wing county fun^ but contributions for pi^vate sources and state and federal grants, for the restoration and preser­ vation of historic property. The property w$uld be designated as of historic value by the county commissioners. contract for servicing the elevator in the courthouse on a monthly basis as r^uired by the state of North Carolina w4s approved by the board. The Davie County Board of Education h ^ requested for up to $50,000 in ad­ ditional funds to be added to the $ 120,000 left owsr from school bonds for use in iwnodding Cherry Street School for the Qrard of Education’s administrative of­ fices. !The request had to be denied for the :i Youth Killed ;. (Continued from Page 1) S]^ti] Memorial Hospital. ?the car was owned by Kenneth Dale Sj^ncer of Rt. 2, Mocksville. ^he Bailey youth was visiting relatives iiiJJavie County. He was a resident of PMnpano Beach, Fla., living with his nfotoer, Mrs. Donnie N. Beddington. I^uneral services were held Wednesday a(> Concord United Methodist Church, DaiVie County, with the Rev. Charles SBerrill and the Rev. Egbert Craver of- fifuating. Burial was in the' church c^ftietery. Survivors include his father, Franklin N. Buley of Advance, Rt. 3; his mother, Mrs. Dc^nie N. Beddington of Pompano Beach, Fla.; a half sister, Paula L. Bailey of Advance Rt. 3; a half brother, Robert J. Beddington of Pompano Beach, Fla.; grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Grady Nail of Mpcksville Rt. 7; Clyde G. Bailey of Mayock, and Mrs. Louise Perroult of Lakeworth, Fla. Counterfeit Bills Passers Nabbed (Continued From Page 1) Statesville and towns in Tennessee and South Carolina. Jn the car, officers found $1390 in five, ten and one dollar bills in the dash pocket. The trunk was filled with what amounted to- four trash bags full of 98 cent to $6 items. Two more Secret Service Agents arrived and the coupic was charged with passing counterfeit money and the agents were preparing to take them to a federally approved jail in Greensboro. Before they left, however, Chief Carter and Policeman Edwards returned to the scene where the woman had been observed throwing something under a car and after more searching, found the $20 bill that the woman had tried to pass. By this time, it was 10:30, twelve hours since the series of events had begun. Secret Service men were overheard highly praising the work by the Mocksville Police Department, which had ap­ prehended and gotten statements from the witnesses by tlie time they had arrived, adding that they had been looking for the P9ir for some time. The suspects and all evidence were turned over to the Secret Service Agents who are now holding them in custody in Greensboro. If convicted, the suspects could receive a maximum penalty of K,000 fine and a 15-year prison sentence for each bill passed, as each passing of a coun­ terfeit bill is treated as a seperate offense. present time due to lack of available funds in the county budget but will be recon­ sidered at county budget planning time beginning in March. Rita Vogler was reappointed by the board of commissioners as the county accountant. The board assigned Ron Vogler, county manager, to check out the com­ munications systems in the county to see what is presently owned and what consoles serve what units. Connie Stafford, Davie-Yadkin Health District director, came in during the session for a get acquainted meeting with the commissioners. The meeting ended with Ron Vogler, Davie County Manager, making the regular monthly reports for the hospital, dog warden, Social Services, Sup­ plementary Education Center and on the sales tax collections. Club Hears Rotarian From Zambia Rotary Club flags of Luanshya, Zambia and Mocksville were exchanged at the meeting of the Mocksville club, Tuesday. Representing the Luanshya Rotary Club was Lee Stocks, who is in that Central African city as a Southern Baptist Missionary and is a member of that club. Prior to the presentation, Mr. Stocks told the Mocksville Rotarians about the ac­ tivities of his cliib and Luanshya. The Luanshya Club was described as one having international flavor as a great number of countries were represented in its membership. He said his club con­ ducted such community service projects as business seminars for the residents, medical aid to the needy by a flying doctor service, a farm on which the. blind lived and worked, and a home for the han­ dicapped children. Funds for these projects were raised through such projects as rummage sales, wild west barbecues, and others such as are similar in this country. “ We can’t use the word president for our club, nor for any club for that matter” , Mr. Stocks told the Rotarians. "The designation of president is reserved solely for the president of Zambia.” The speaker said that Zambia was located in central Africa and was the third largest copper mining area in the world. The climate is ideal, similar to that of southern Florida. The country has 75 differnet tribes that speak 75 different languages. However, the business language of the country is English. The Rev. Charles Bullock had charge of the program and introduced Mr. Stocks. President Ed Goodwin presided. Special student guests included Lynn Spargo, Jeannette Daniel and Luke Howard. Breakins At Lakewood A breaking and entering was reported to the Davie Sheriff’s Department Tuesday, January 7 which occurred at the Paul A. Foster home in Lakewood Village. According to the investigating officer, Sgt. Johnny O’Neal, the home was entered between 6:30 a.m. and 3:45 p.m. Tuesday. Entry was made through the front window of the home and approximately $500 worth of guns were reported missing. Sgt. O'Neal is investigating the incident Davie Schools Set Meetings The Davie County Scnool Board scheduled three meetings to study curriculums and special programs at the Elementary and high school levels last night. The meetings have been schedule for the third Monday of January, February and March. The meetings will involve central office staff, principals, board members and advisory council members. Annual Meeting Thu annual meeting of the United Way Fund Drive campaign will be held Mon­ day, January 13th, at 6:30 p.m. at C’s Barbecue. This will be a Dutch Treat dinner meeting. Stephen W. Head, son of Mr. and Mrs. James W. Head of ! Cross Street, Coolecmee and a senior at Davie County High School, has been nominated by Congressman Earl B. Ruth to the United States Air Force Academy. Freewood Admits To Nudist Camp (Continued from Pagel) county, set a bad example for the kids, produce traffic hazards, and give a bad reputation to the county. One minister said, "These people have their rights and so do we." He added that “ I think people who are practicing this thing ought to be caught up in a butterfly net.” Two residents living near the property testified that they thought their property values would go down or that a traffic hazard would be created. Gary Cleary, who lives in a newly built home 100 feet down the road and across from the Freewood property said, “ I think it would devaluate my property ... I don’t think people want this in the community.” Two local realtors were asked to ap­ praise the Cleary property by Citizens of Davie County and both agreed that it would have a detrimental affect on property values in the area. One of the realtors stated that if he had to sell the Cleary house, the first people he would contact would be members of the sunbathing society, implying it would be hard to sell to anyone else in the county. Joe Mando, a sanitarian with the Davie County Health Department, testified that the septic tank, well and pumping station on the property was inspected and “ in­ stalled properly” , though he added he couldn’t say it would work forever. Before the lawyers gave their final summation, John Allgood was recalled to answer questions by zoning board member Calvin Ijames. Responding to questions. Allgood revealed that 13 families are now members of the campground, none of which are from Davie County. Five of the families, Allgood said, are from adjoining counties and there were two inquiries from Davie residents. Asked by Ijames why he had told a reporter that there were no firm plans of any kind during an earlier interview. Allgood admitted that he had lied to the ' reporter because he did not want any publicity. “ We stated it only to those with whom we were dealing in business,” he said, “ because it was nobody else’s business.” The opposition lawyer, Donadio, sum­ med up his case by saying, “ the fact of the matter is we’re here to oppose a petition, lawfully made by a land owner in Davie County.” He noted a lot of good reasons, both emotional and logical, had been presented. "These are plain and simple folk who know one thing,” he said, “ and that is what they don't want and won't tolerate. The vast majority of the community are op­ posed because of a danger to their public welfare. Peebles countered by saying they were dealing with fear, whether justified or not. The people are afraid of unconventional behavior, Peebles argued, although it is not a question of whether nudity is a moral activity. He concluded by saying it was a private campground, as required, and it was not detrimental to the public good or general welfare. Following the summations, the motion was immediately made that transcripts be made of the tapes recorded during the hearing and that the members be allowed to study them before their February meeting. The motion carried and the meeting broke up around 10:45 p. m. with nearly ail of the seats in the courtroom still filled at the close of the meeting. In making their decision at that February meeting, the board must con­ sider two things which must be proved by the petitioners, according to zoning officer Bruce Tuttle. Those are, that a conditional use permit for a private family campground not affect the health or safety of persons residing or working in the neighborhood and that it would not be detrimental to the public welfare or injurious to property or public improvements. To grant the petition, four of the five members of the board must vote in favor. The members are Vernon Dull, chairman; Bud Hauser, Calvin Ijames, Rad Melton and Lester Allen, serving as alternate for Gilmer Rights. Vehicles Collide A two-car accident occurred Monday, January 6th around 8:10 a.m. on Salisbury Street at the Depot Street intersection in Mocksville. Involved were Janet Sue Patterson, 20, of Route 7, Mocksville, driving a 1974 Ford and Connie Thurio Ellis, 17, of Route 2, Advance operating a 1972 Oldsmobile. According to the investigating officer. Police Chief G. A. Carter, the Patterson vehicle was traveling north on Salisbury Street when the Ellis vehicle made a right turn off Depot Street onto Salisbury Street and into the path of the Patterson car. Chief Carter reported that Ellis was charged with failure to see safe movement could be made in safety. There was $500 in damages to the Ellis vehicle and $200 to the Patterson car. Poler W. Hairston. . . Ready For New Session! Peter W. Hairston, a Mocksville at­ torney who is one of three Democrats elected to the North Carolina House of Representatives by the 30th House District in November, says he is looking forward to going to the General Assembly again. Hairston, who went to the legislature during the Elsenhower landslide 20 years ago, told the Enterprise-Record that “ it is important to me to be in the legislature on the 200th anniversary of our country.” “ I'm interested in the over-all quality of the legislature and the general tax structure” , Hairston says, “and the budget is going to have to be watched very closely.” Hairston also commented that in his opinion “a great deal of study needs to be done on the prisons in the 30th House District,” comprising the counties of Davie and Davidson, and, among other things, he expressed an interest in the non­ political appointment of judges. There was another Peter Hairston who went to the General Assembly shortly after the Revolution. “He was my grand­ father’s great-grandfather” , Hairston explained, "and old Pete went four or five times.” This was the old Peter Hairston who sold bear skins, ran a country store and who first bought the Cooleemee Plantation. In Hairston’s office on Number 1 Court Square, Mocksville is the desk which the eider Peter used generations before and is still in excellent condition today. Hairston will leave for the General Assembly on January 15, in time for the swearing in ceremony around noon. Two Charged With Possession Of Marijuana Two Davie County men have been charged with possession with intent to distribute more than five grams of marijuana. Arrested and posting $1000 bonds each each in Davie County District Court were Daniel Paul Desnoyers of Mocksville Rt. 2, and Roger Dale Myers of Mocksville Rt. 4. The two were arrested January 1st by Sheriff R. 0. Kiger and Deputy Don Edwards. The warrants charge "possession with intent to distribute a controlled substance, to wit: more than 5 grams of marijuana, which is included in Schedule 6 of the N. C. Controlled Substance Act. This substance was subject to the control and dominion of the defendant in that it was located on the property rented by the defendant.” The marijuana was found behind the house on property rented by Dale Myers located across from the Davie High School. It was reported that Myers sublets a room to Desnoyers. VFW Meeting VFW Post 4024 will hold their monthly meeting on Tuesday night, January 14 at 7:30 p.m. at the post home. Westinghouse Model 1J\270P Westinghouse Slngle-Speed Agitator Washer with Double Action Washing Model LA270P □ 10-lb. capacity Q Double-Action washing □ IHeavy duty transmission and suspension system □ Powerful non-clog drain pump □ Porcelain enamel tub □ Lock ’n Spin™ Safety Lid □ Backed by Nationwide Sure Service Regular >219.95 CLEARANCE PRICE Westinghouse 12.0 Cu. Ft. Capacity Refrigerator with Auto-Defrosting R^rigerator Section Model RT122R D Freezer door shelf □ 2 quick-release ice trays □.Adjustable shelf □ Full-width vegetable crisper □ Butter server □ Built-in egg storage □ Full-width, full-depth shelves a Deep door shelves □ Magnetic door gaskets □ Woodgrain handles □ Infinite-position tempera­ ture control ’1650 0 Reiular 7(9.95 CLEARANCE PRICE 4 6 9 “ ^ 0 H !Z iL 25” COLOR TV Automatic Color With AFC ZENITH COLOR TV NEEDS FEMEST REPAIRS In • rcccnt nationwide aurvey, for the (ec- ond conMcutIv* year, Independent TV aer- vice technlclana named Zenith color TV by more than 2 to I over the next lieat brand aa needlna (eweal repalra. Survey detatla available on requeat. Chromacolor Tube * 5 8 8 0 0 M ocksville Furniture & BANK FINANCING Appliance Co.BANK FINANCING No. 2 Court Square Phone 634.5812 DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, IHURSDAY, JANUARY 9. 1975 - 5 Appointments Accepted In Scouting Development Campaign John W. Thomas, Jr., general campaign chairman, an­ nounced today that two divisional chairmen and a campaign treasurer have ac­ cepted appointments in the $349,850 Development Cam­ paign of the Uwharrie Council, Boy Scouts of America. E. Lee Cain, senior vice president of Wachovia Bank and Trust, N. A. In High Point, will serve as chairman of the Pacesetter Gifts division. Calvin T. Rice, executive vice president and secretary of the , High Point Chamber of Com­ merce, will serve as arrangements chairman. James M. Randle of Harris® and Covington Hosiery Mills, Inc. in High Point will serve as campaign treasurer. W. Kenneth Gobel, M.D., of Uplnion The world is governed much more by opinion than by laws. It is not the judgment of courts, but the moral judgment of in­ dividuals and masses of men, which is the chief wall of defence around property and life. With the progress of society, this power of opinion is taking the place of arms. Channlng Denton, is chairman of the Advancc Gifts division. Serving with Vice Chairman Amos R. Kearns, Jr. of High Point are Lewis C. Ferretti, C. McNair Ga.skins, Clarence Keever and Frank Sizemore, also of High Point; James E. Lambeth and Jerry L. Wells of Thomasvllle; Paul 1. Briggs of Lexington; and W. J. Brian Sell of Mocksville. The campaign to “Help A Boy Go Good” is in keeping with the council’s long-range goals and follows more than a year of intensive study and plannmg. The Development Fund will provide for a long-term lease of service center facilities and much needed facilities and equipment of the 300-acre Camp Uwharrie in Guilford County. Major camp improvements include an olympic-size swimming pool, trading post, protective fencing, added roads and culverts, troop shelters, tent platforms, archery and rifld ranges, canoes and other improvements. Special Device Fisliing Licenses To Be Offered Paula Shew conducts a workshop for local 4-H Club presidents. 4-H Clinic Held For Officers Letters To The Editor Dear Editor: I would like to take this means of expressing our feelings just now. I guess we all take our Volunteer Firemen for granted until we need them. I always had until Saturday, January 4th, about 10 p.m. when I discovered that my house was on fire. 1 called the Fire Department and in just a few minutes they arrived. Every effort was made to keep damages to a minimum and to insure that the fire was com- Mogt men reach 62 in and women who illustrate what social security is 1975 can collect all about? monthly social security checks if they've worked as little as 6 years in jobs covered by social security. People earn retirement benefits by credit for work covered by social security done in or after 1937, the year social security started. The work credit Is measured in calendar quarters-January-March, All you have to do is get in touch with the Salisbury Social Security office and discuss your program with them. Our office has publications, posters and films, and we will be happy to help you develop a program on social security. I’m 66 and get monthly social security widow’s payments. I’m April-June, July-September, or planning to remarry in June. October-December. Will my social security checks Most employeesget credit for stop when I get married? a quarter of work if they’re paid $50 or more in that quarter for work covered by social security. Most self-employed people get social security credit for 4 quarters in any year their annual self-employment net income is $400 or more. Most I jobs and self-employment are ^covered by social security. To be eligible for social "security retirement benefits, need, Social security benefits continue for most widows who remarry after they’re KO; however, the amount of your monthly payments may change. You should get in touch with the Salisbury Social Security office. Someone there will be glad to check Into your specific •• case and give you the answer to your question. I'm planning to apply for social security •;you need, at a minimum, “quarters of work equal to the monthly •‘•number of years between 1950 retirement payments in a “ and the year you reach 62. So, if couple of months. I understand -you reach 62 in 1975, you need at that my son, who's 19 and in ^ least 24 quarters-or 6 years-H)f college, will also be eligible for ' work cr^it. Eligible workers can begin ^collecting their full social security retirement benfits at 65 'or reduced benefits at 62. ^Dependents can also get .^.payments based on the worker’s ^benefit. Quarters of work credit help :determlne eligibility for social security retirement benefits but they don’t affect the amount of ;;your monthly check. That’s Tbased on your average social ^.security earnings over a set period of time. . I’m going to start a new job next month in a beauty shop. When I was interviewed, the nanager said I’d make quite a >it of money in tips and I'd get l^ocial security credit for my 4ips, as well as my salary. How l^es that work? If your tips add up to $20 or more, in cash, in one month, you must give your employer a written report of , those tips and the social i. security contributions by ~ the lOth of the following month. That's how you get " social security credit (or ' your tips in addition to the credit you get for your regular salary. This can mean higher cash payments • for you and your family when you’re eligible for r. monthly social security benefits. I used to work as a jihotographer for a department .store and they took care of reporting my salary and the .'social security contributions. .Now I've opened my own studio, doing all the work myself. Can I .get social security credit for my -earnings? ^ You cun gel suciai ■ security credit for your !; earnings as a self-employed '. person if you net at least $400 a year. You can get credit for earnings up to the maximum on which social security contributions are paid. The maximum for 1975 L is $I4,1UU. You can gel the necessary forms at any , Internal Revenue Service ' office. If you have any . questions, you can call Internal Revenue or the . Salisbury Social Security office. I'm the program chairwoman of a parent-teacher group. For our next meeting, which will be In February, I’d like to do a program on social security Because there seems to be a ffea i deal of interest these days Si what benefits are available under social security. Where and how can I gel informational pialerials that will graphically monthly checks on my earnings record. What information will I need to give social security about him when I apply? You'll need you son's birth certificate, his social security number, the name and address of the college he goes to, the date the school term ends and the date of the following school term. If you've worked long enough under social security, your son's monthly payments will continue until he's 22 if he goes to school full time and remains unmarried. I'm going to be 62 soon and I've been thinking about retiring and applying for my monthly social security retirement payments. If 1 get my checks for a while and then decide I don't like not working, can I go back to work and then retire at a later date or am I committed to retirement? No you would not be committed to retirement. You can return to work after getting monthly social sec u rity re tire m e n t payments. However, when you do decide to retire permanently, there would be a small adjustment In your benefits to take into account any payments you receive before you're 65. My mother and father live in another state. He’s 66 and she’s 61. They have a very small income and practically no resources. Would they be eligible for supplemental security income even though my mother is only 61? Your father might be eligible for supplemental secui'ity income payments, but not your mother unless she's disabled or blind. Supplem ental security income payments are for people 65 or older, or blind, or disabled, who have little or no income or resources. If you think your father may be eligible for these payments, ask him to apply at the Salisbury Social Security office. Turkey's Best Friend Tlie lui key's best friend, who ^iso liad iiltie good to say about the bald eagle, was Benjamin Franklin. In 1784 ho wrote his daughter from France "The iiald Fable is a ini U of bad nioi ai fharacler, like those men who live i)y sharping and riilj|)ing, while liie lurkey is a inui'ii more resperlable bird a liui' onginal nalive of .\iiicnca " He reriinimended llii‘ luriii'.v, mslead ol llie liaid I'juli', a.s iiur iialionai synil)oi. pletely out before they left. 1 didn’t get a chance to thank cach of them personally, but I want to express my deepest appreciation to each one for saving my home and quite possibly our lives. I am very proud that we have such an efficient Fire Depart­ ment and will never forget what they did for my family and me. Thank You. Sincerely, Mike Keller Dear Editor: May we take this means of commending the Law En­ forcement officers for their prompt and efficient handling of problems that have been en­ countered recently in our store. We are indebt^ to all who have helped us. Sincerely, Lowe’s Food of Mocksville On Saturday morning, January 4, in the County Office Building, forty-two 4-H club officers and thirteen volunteer leaders attended a club officer training and parliamentary procedure workshop. County 4-H Council Officers, Paula Shew. Jerry Tulbert, Darlene Shew. Pat Seamon, Ron Blackwood Is Air Force Graduate Airman Ronald F. Blackwood of Spring Hill Drive, Cooleemee, N. C., has graduated at Chanute AFB, 111., from the U. S. Air Force air­ craft mechanic course con­ ducted by the Air Training Command. The airman, who learned to maintain and service multi- engine jet aircraft, is being assigned to Loring AFB, Maine, for duty with a unit of the Strategic Air Command. Airman Blackwood, son of Mr. and Mrs. Fred L. Black­ wood Jr., is a 1973 graduate of Davie County High School in Mocksville N. C. Beth Kelly, and Danny Allen began the workshop with two parliamentary plays showing the right and wrong way to conduct a meeting. After the group session, council officers conducted in­ dividual workshops to train local 4-H club officers. Club Officer duties and respon­ sibilities were explained and discussed. While 4-H members were meeting in individual groups, 4- H Adult Leaders met and discussed 4-H programs and special projects for the coming year. Organic Gardening, Bicycle, Recreation, and Crafts were among the topics discussed. The group set a quarterly meeting schedule with the first one set for Saturday, February 1, to receive training on Orgainc Gardening. Silicon Silicon, which makes up 28 percent of the earth’s crust, stands second only to oxygen in abundance among the elements, and forms the basic stuff of most soil and rock, National Georgraphic says. The North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission has adopted new regulations which offer two types of Special Device Fishing Licenses. These new regulations will become effective January 1, 1975. The changes will eliminate the requirement of obtaining a separate special device license for taking rough and migratory salt water fishes in each county, and establish a State Special Device Fishing License for taking rough fish and migratory salt water fishes (shad, herring and mullet) for personal use. They will also establish a State Special Device Fishing License for taking rough and migratory saltwater fishes for other than personal use including sale, and provide information necessary for intelligent management of the fishery resources. A Special Device Personal Use Fishing License will permit the use of special devices for taking rough and migratory saltwater fishes for personal use only and not for the purpose of sale. Not more than 100 yards of gill net, drift net or seine and no more than five baskets or traps of any sort may be used under this license. Any device set and left unattended shall be affixed with a card or tag furnished by the license holder and bearing his name and address. These licenses are available from authorized license, agents and cost $3 for residents, and $10 for nonresidents. A Special Device Nonpersonal Use Fishing License will permit the use of special devices for taking rough and migratory saltwater fishes for personal use and nonpersonal use, in­ cluding sale. Individuals must apply directly to the N. C. Wildlife Commission License Section, Albermarle Building, 325 N. Salisbury Street, Raleigh, North Carolina 27611 for this license. Application forms are available from the W ildlife Commission and license agents. In the intital stages for the program, ap­ plications will also be available from wildlife protectors and selected fish houses. Each unit of gear used under this license must have a tag affixed showing the license number, tag number, year date, type of gear and name and address of the license holder. Tags must be obtained from’the Wildlife Commission for $1 per tag. Each holder of this license is required to make a monthly ualch data report on forms furnished by the W ildlife Commission. This report must be mailed on or before the 15th of each month to the Division of Inland Fisheries, NC Wildlife Resources Commission, 325 N. Salisbury Street, Raleigh, North Carolina 27611. Failure to submit the catch reports will result in rev.ication of the license. The Special Device Nonpersonal Use Fishing License will cost $10 for residents and $25 for nonresidents. Please consult the 1975 Inland Fishing Regulations for seasons and waters open to special devices NASA's Antennas The "big dish" antennas of NASA’s Deep Space Network' are so sensitive they can pick up a spacecraft's radio signal as weak as 1- 100,000,000.000.000,000,000 watts of power. If this energy were collected for 19 million years, it would light a 7.5-watt Christmas tree bulb for only one- thousandth of a second. Miss Shanlon Hudson , Completes Degree Miss Hazel Shanlon Hudson- completed requirements for the Bachelors Degree at Winston- Salem State University, December 18. 1974 in Mathematics and Computer Programming. She will return' to the school in June to march, with her graduating class. At State, Shanlon was a' Dean's List student, a member ■ of the Math Club, the> secretarial staff of the Student. Government Association and tlie Yearbook staff. She has ■ served as Chairperson for^ Women's Week, Campus Big" Sister, tutor. Residence Hall: Assistant, Counselor and House. Director for Upward Bound, homecoming queen for Iota Phi Theta Fraternity and was nominated to Who's Who in American Colleges and Universities. Miss Hudson will fly to Oiicago, Illinois February 16, where she will be employed at'_ The Sears Tower for Sears and' Ftoebuck in the Computer F»rogramming suites. Miss Hudson, the daughter of- Mrs. Magalene Gaither, Route. 3, and Troy Hudson, Williams St., is a 1971 graduate of Davie County High School. IT’S OUR 1975 53rd AAlNIVEB^m And we are proud to have kept in step with the people and progress of Davie County...We are proud of our record, since the days of our ifounding in 1922, the Mocksville Savings and Loan Association has never skipped a divi­ dend. Every dollar entrusted to us has earned well! Your money is safe here. (1) Savings accounts are insured up to *40,000 (2) Our unusually large reserve acts as a further safe guard. These are facts worth considering "when you are pondering what constitutes a wise investment...when you are planning how best to protect your future. We believe that our 53 year safety record makes this a piece of und advice. Whether you have five dollars or five figures to invest. veil SHW IN 1HE ^$79,8S1.66 In Earnings Paid In 1974 To MOCKSVILLG SAVINGS & LOM SA W ? Everyone in step...That Does I Regular Pa.s.sbook Accounts 5M% CERTIFICATE ACCOUNTS up to 7V2% (A substantial intcre.st penalty is required for earl\ withdrawal on certificate accounts) Comcjii and we will explain the detajk \\ e have a SAVINGS PLAN to suit ever\ person. Let our friendl) staff help you work out > our personal plan. USE OUR NIGHT DEPOSIT BOX JUST BEYOND DRIVE-IN WINDOW WHEN WE ARE CLOSED Office jH(ours Mon.-Tues.-Wed.-Thurs. 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Fridays 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Open During Lunch Hour -Closed All Day Saturday- Mocksville Savings and Loan Assn. b Sv, fIsft At the Time and Temperature Sign Phone 634-5936 Mocksville, N.C. 6 - DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, THURSDAY, JANUARY 9, 1975 CAUSE WE VALUE OUR O JESSE JONES FRANKS 12 OZ. FANCY WESTERN R O U N D FANCY WESTERN BONELESS rrl •• JESSE JONES SAUSA 12 OZ. PKG. ^ T E A K t (09 f FANCY WESTERN LEAN TENDER] R U M P i m J EXTRA LEAN TENDER FLAVORFUL CUBED STEAK $ HOLLY FARM'S FRYER LB. JESSE JONES SLICED BOLOGNA 9»53 s f 4 \ l i O BACON $ LIPtON'S TEABAGS 24 COUNT FAMILY SIZE99 it SAVE 20« 'Total Shopping Value 3 ^ 1 No Limit Specials ? Valuable Tiadinj; Stamps J 3 Discount Piicps Tetley TEA BAGS 100 Count ■k Save 36* *1.23 Tetley TEA BAGS 24 Count Family Pack ir Save 30* niil EXTRA SIAMPS! ' with ttiii Coupon *nd Purdui* of Or Mon Food Order .—NOTE: Ltaill of OIM Fso4 Bonul Coupon with ttch oidu Good Only. At HoffMr*. Thriii«h January 16,1975 EXTRA BTAlyipd With Uik Coueen intt^grch^ ol ___ 1 - 3 Oz. Can Sauert Black Pepper .Pood Only At IMtrm'i Throi«h January 11,197B Right Retarvtd TO Limit Quanity NONE SOj.0 TO DEALERS Regular Alcoa Foil 25 Foot Roll 29* 4* For Dishes Calgpnite 33 Oz. Size 73‘ 24* Regular - Lemon Pledge Wax 14 Oz. Size *1.29 30* Daytime Pampeis 30 Count *2.19 10* Miracle Whip Salad Dressing Quart ‘1.33 14* Karo Blue Label Syrup 16 Oz. Bottle 47*2* Phillip’s Beans & Franks 8 Oz. Size 25*6* Assorted Colors Dial Soap Reg. Size 2/43'6* 1 Kotex- Regular or Super 1 Sanitaiy Napiiins p^g ^fiz 59* 18* Dry Bleach Clorox 2 40 Oz. Box 85* 4* Laundry Detergent Tide Giant Size *1.13 12* Laundry Bleach Clorox Vi Gallon 49V 6* VALLEYDALE'S DRY CURED CRISP FRYIN LB. 5P F R Y II^ _109 ROYAL RED SOCKEYE SALMON $ FLAT CAN ^ SAVE 20!i r^ffeeinaKi Coffee Mate ^ - “ COFFEE CREAMERf 99* ★ Save 20* DISH DETERGENT HEFFNeRl Jack in the ] Com Jack in the 1 Cut Green J-F-G Coffee Wyler’s Onion Soup Honnel’s Corned Beef Maitindale Sweet Potatoes Quaker Quick Grits Green Giant Garden Peas Assorted Colors Kleenex Beverly Braalitet lIlU lk k iU v e x F U i ICaiFood nPtidde^sso«te!^[^ Dog Food 32 OZ. BOTTLE 201.HEFFI SAI ■H THI J BUY b WITH THIS ( YOU BUY A. ^ SAVE 2d ★ SAVE 41 ioowcome.f AT._ HEFFR ^ 1 LB. CAN 0 | >«M thout Coupi ONE COUPON pen < 2 LB. PKG. ic SAVE 20< I FLORIDA WHITE MOCKSVILLE - CLEMMONS - YADKINVILLE - LEXINGTON RAPEFRUIT I0« TASTY GREEN TO SPIUI ONii EACH £M LEAN OUND DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD. THURSDAY. JANUARY 9, 1975 - 7 LYKES HEARTY CANNED LYKES TASTY BEEF STEW VIENNA SAUSAGE RED CROSS TENDER 24 OZ. CAN 5 OZ. CAN Garden Peas ★ SAVE 30* LYKES FINE LYKES RICH FLAVOR 3V2 OZ. CAN ★ SAVE 31 NOMIS CUT ir SAVE 24< J R O N L B W H E N 1 . C A N O F Idumpun ^ 23 OZ. CAN Tftxte iV B 2 4 * |«IC E S 1 DItoount 1 PriM YOUSAVE liitoh'or Whole K 303 Can emel 35*4* 303 Can 35* d' 4* 1 Lb. Bags 99*10V Pkg.of2 2 /2 9 ‘6 *1 12 0z. Can *1.29 i ( r | 2MSize1 *. • "49*8* 1 2 Lb. Bag 4 r «• 1 303 Cans 37*4‘ J ^200 Count 47V 6 * 1 :;^Oz.Can 49*2* 1 4 Lb. Bag *1.39 30* ^ 1 ' 1 15 0z. Can 2/39*8*1 LAND OF POOD iir in i '-41.43 WITH COUPON N o. 45J ■■■ I— ■ ■. M ASOO PFIR IX V IR It Jan. 11, It ir SAVE W WHIFF'S PUFFED WHEAT CELO BAG ic SAVE 8< RED CROSS TENDER * ..V.*- TOMATOES * SAVe 3«* GIANT LIMAS SOLID PACK 1 303 CAN 1 LB. QUARTERS Blue Label KARO SYRUP 32 Oz. Bottle 8 r ★ Save 41 ★ SAVE 10 IMxle STOKELY'S DIXIE I»RNOIL MARGARINE 1 LB. QUARTERS ★ SAVEW 1 HEFFNER’S PRICES Diioount YOU ^ S A V ^ Assorted Flavors Hi-C Drinks 46 Oz. Cans 51*8 * Kotex Regular Sanitaiy Napkins Pkg. of 40 •‘1.39 ’1.10 1 Peter Pan Smooth'Crunchy 1 Peanut Butter w o' S'*' 89*10* A-1 Steak Sauce 5 Oz. Size 49*4* Duke’s Mayonaise Quart *1.29 20* Jif Regular-Crunchy Peanut Butter 12 Oz. Size 61*4* Hunt’s Tomato Catsup 14 Oz. Size 39* 4* Kraft’s Q Mayonnaise Quart *1.39 18* In Friskies • Assorted Flavors n Cat Food IS Oz. Can 2/39*8* f l 'ftee Sweet 6 Pkg. • 6 Oz. Can If Orange or Grapefruit Juice 71*8* S White House 1 Appie Sauce 303 Can 31*4* 1 Nibiet Com 12 Oz. Can 37*4* SENECA PURE GRAPE JUICE 48 OZ. BOTTLE ir SAVE 20« KRAFT'S PURE FRESH 'A GALLON ir SAVE 8« FOR BAKING - FRENCH FRIES RUSSET POTATOES 10 LB. BAG 9 9 " ★ SAVE 36'MOCKSVILLE - CLEMMONS - YADKINVILLE - LEXINGTON 8 - DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, THURSDAY, JANUARY 9, 1975 New Home For Delinquent Boys Now In Operation In Advance By Mrs. Edith Zimmerman The state of North Carolina has given a permit to plan and develop a group home for delinquent boys which Is located west of Advance on the Baltimore Road, and named Faith Mission Youth Ranch. This home is for boys who are not in real trouble, but who are on the threshold of becoming Involved in something deeper than they already are, and who have this only chance, or the next place will be a detention center • where most of these boys do not need to be. As a rule these boys are youngsters who need love and compassion, and a place that they can realize that everyone is not against them, but will help them. Most of these boys will be coming from broken homes. They do not need a jail to become hardened criminals. Every dog needs regular grooming, regardless of whether it's a $10 wash-and-cut at the local pet shop or a quick brushing twice a week at home. Good grooming improves more than the appearance of your pet. Besides removing dust and grime, regular combing and brushing discourages skin and coat parasites. It also spreads skin oils through the hair for a glossy coat. Unless your pet needs special attention for show purposes or complicated trims, you probably can handle the grooming yourself. The tools for the job are simple: a brush (short bristles for short or medium-haired breeds; long bristles for long-haired breeds); comb ( fine teeth for short-haired dogs, widely- spaced teeth for wire-haired and long-haired dogs); scissors and nail clippers. One of the keys to easy grooming is to start your pet when he is young. This will help avoid irksome obedience problems later. Another is to place your pet on a small table or bench so that you can comfortably reach his back and sides. (Ma'ke sure that the top has a non-skid surface.) Now you are ready to begin. Remember that the comb Is the basic tool of grooming. Use it to locate and remove snarls and tangles, always working in the direction that the hair is to lie. Start at the head and work back, so that loosened hair and dust will fall away from the combed area. The brush should be used only to smooth out the , coat after the dog has been thoroughly combed. As you comb, you may find foreign objects like burrs and small twigs caught in the hair. These should be worked loose by hand and removed. The ears and legs are often trouble spots for amateur groomers. Some owners bypass the ears completely when their dog puts up a struggle. But doing this may lead to the formation of large, bulky mats of hair behind the ears- especially in breeds like collies and spaniels. If left unattended, these mats may have to be cut out at a later date, leaving unsightly gaps in the coat. The legs should be groomed after the back and sides are Hnished. Gradually move the comb down the legs, but be careful not to pull the thin skin. You may need an “ assistant” to steady your pet until he gets accustomed to the process.Check each paw for burrs or matted hair that can cause pressure or limping. If your dog needs trimming around the muzzle or feet; move slowly and keep the scissors pointed away from the animal. Be content with trimming only an inch or two until your pet loses his fear of the procedure. Once a month, check the length of your pet's nails. Dogs that stay inside sometimes develop nails that curve back into the flesh. Using a heavy pair of clippers, remove only the transparent portion of nail that extends beyond the foot pads. You should also check the nailonthedewclaw, or residual toe, that some dogs have just above the ankle. If your dog has dark nails, have your veterinarian poing out the small blood vessel that runs through each toe so that you will not accidentally cut into it. For short-haired breeds like terriers or beagles, a 15-minute combing once a week is suf­ ficient. Larger dogs with medium length or curly coats may need care twice a week. And, of course, dugs with long coats like collies or afghans may need grooming every day or so. Regular grooming will help control hair shedding. And speaking uf shedding, if you note excessive or prolonged hair loss and suspect something is wrong, don't take chances; contact your veterinarian. but a home of love and un­ derstanding. Hopefuly this home will be similar, and serve this area, as two other delinquent homes in North Carolina are doing where none of the boys come from the courts or Juvenile authorities, the parents bring them to the home themselves. The Youth Ranch Is a spiritual organization, Faith Missions, Inc., with an organized church on the premises. Services are held every Saturday night at the chapel, and are so organized that the boys and their parents may attend. This Is a non- denomlnational church with only Bible doctrines taught. Various ministers from the Triad area are enlisted to come out every Saturday night and bring the message, with special music always being a part of the program. At present the Youth Ranch will accomodate eight boys. Plans are underway for a larger building which will house many more boys. Right now the work is only in the Triad area, but hopefully it will reach through­ out North Carolina. Also In the making are plans for a private school staffed with Christian, licensed teachers for the boys. This school plan is in the county interest as there has been some criticism and hesitancy In placing the boys in public schools due to the many involvements there, plus the over-crow ded conditions already existing. Hopefully a private school will solve many of ghe problems, and perform the work of the Ranch In a greater way, as some of the elements found in an out-side school have perhaps influenced, or led, the boys to go wayward. This is not always true, but as is commonly known some boys are weaker and fall into bad habits more easily than others. This is what the private school is hoping to eliminate. The boys will be taught spiritually and orientated so they can go back into society. Love and com­ passion are the main objects! Along with the learning responsibilities and spiritual needs the boys will have a planned recreational program, including many types of sports. A recreational director has been named. The Rev. Bud Chapman is director of Faith Mission Youth Ranch. He and his wife and family have come here, purely on faith, from the state of Florida. Mr. Chapman was Captain of the Salvation Army in Florida, and is also an or­ dained minister. He has been affiliated with this work for the past eleven years; also with Prison Ministry and working with delinquent children. His work has been cleared through the Better Business Bureau in Winston Salem. Any church or organization who desires a speaker or to give a program should get in touch with Mr. Chapman. Programs have already been given featuring some of the best known singing groups in this area. No admission is charged at the Gospel Sings. Mr. Chapman operates strickly on work of faith. The Veterans Corner Does the compensation check I receive monthly from the Veterans Administration for a 20 per cent service-connected disability include allowances for my children? No. A veteran's service- connected disability must be rated 50 per cent or more before allowances can be paid for dependence. A Service-Connected injury for which I received treatment at a Veterans Administration hospital about two years ago is Riving me trouble again. Will Good ars & le n s e btnVUmmAMmHlm Prison Staff Trains At ECU John H. Gentle of the Davie County Department of Corrections is among eighteen employees from the North Carolina Department of Correction, Division of Prisons, enrolled in the Institute of Correctional Administration at East Carolina University. The Institute at ECU is conducted as a training program for personnel in the state's prisons and correctional centers. Participants are currently engaged in full-time studies In the area of corrections and will continue their studies at ECU for the entire winter quarter. Upon successful completion of the Institute they will be awarded a certificate and will return to full time employment. The Institute is sponsored by the ECU Department of Social Work and Correctional Services of the School of Allied Health and Social Professions. The winter season lengthens the cover of darkness for house burglars, so it is wise to take steps to discourage thieves from choosing your home. The importance of good locks on all doors and windows can­ not be overestimated. All ex­ terior doors should t>e equipped with "dead boll" locks, and the latch should protrude at least one-half inch when engaged. Sliding glass patio doora pre­ sent a special problem. For ut­ most protection, the standard glass should t>e replaced with a C* plastic laml- C nated glass. 0 And the ordi- ^ n ary lo c k ^ should be sup- ^ 0 ^ p lem e n te d with a locking cross bar device which blocks the sliding door's path. Glass panels near the locks on exterior doors should also be replaced with laminated glass to prevent a burglar from break­ ing a pane and unlatching the door himself from the inside. Give your house the appear­ ance that someone is always home. If you are going out for the evening, leave a radio on and several lights burning. Turn existing outdoor lights to your advantage by filling shadows around your home's exterior. And never leave your garage door open. If you leave on vacation, be sure to have a neighbor check your house daily. Notify local police, and have all deliveries held until you return. Readers' questions are wel­ come and should be sent to P.O. Box 2210, Newport Beach, CA 92663. Distaff Deeds Cut-Off Jeans Leg Is Ideal for Making Bag JANICE By CHRISTENSEN “ Got an old pair of blue jeans that you plan to cut off for shorts? Well, don’t throw away the legs that you cut off,” advises Pearl Ann Weather, Clayton, Rt. 1. This teenager uses the legs of old blue jeans to make bags. For example, she made a pocketbook by cutting off a shallow length near the bottom of the pants hem, seaming up the cut edge, and using the leg hem for the top of the bag. After attaching yarn, she had an attractive shoulder bag. Pearl Ann also wanted a tote bag, so she used the other pants leg for it. She constructed it in the same maimer but made it deeper. The tote bag would make an excellent beach bag if it were lined with placftic, adds Mrs. Patricia Brown, asso­ ciate home economics extension agent, Johnston County. BETTER HOME Members of Craven County’s Extension Homemakers Clubs firmly believe that “ Today’s Home Builds Tomorrow’s World.’’ So they decided to redecorate the home of a young family living at Cherry Point, the U, S. Marine Corps Air Base. The homemakers remodeled and refinlshed furniture and added creative, decorative touches, says Jan Johnson, home econom­ ics extension agent. The done-over house was then opened to other military families to inspire creativity, econ­ omy and prove that governmental housing and furniture can be home-llke. HELP CHILDREN More than 20 children at the Western Carolina Center for Children at Morganton are being helped by Haywood County Extension Home­ makers. Sponsors make an ini­ tial donation of $12 per child, which gives the child an allowance each month and money for spe­ cial occasions such as boUdays and birthdays. “ Clothing and other necessities are furnished when needed,’’ observes Mrs. Gwilll Brendell, home economics exten­ sion agent. During the county’s Christmas Ideas Exhibit, the homemakers dec­ orate a tree. Later, these ornaments and decora­ tions, along with numerous gifts, cookies and donations are taken to the Center for the children. “ Haywood County homemakers feel this project Is a worthy one," Mrs. Brendell concludes. VA treat me again? Vcs, and since you have already established scrvlce- connection, all you need to do is apply for treatment again. I’m a veteran in a state which has no burial space left in its national cemetery. Does the Veterans Administration pay anything toward cost of burial plots in private cemeteries for such veterans? Yes, Public Law 93-43 (June 1973) allows VA to pay up to )l.<iO in plot and Interment costs of veterans not buried in national cemeteries. I bought a car six years ago with an auto grant from the Veterans Administration, and the adaptive equipment is wearing out. Will VA replace this equipment? Yes. Since enactment of PL 91-666 in 1971, VA has been authorized to repair or replace adaptive equipment for eligible service disabled veterans. Suggest you apply to your regional VA office for this benefit. Fishing Spot A good fishing spot was held in almost sacred awe by Eskimo ice fishermen of nor­ thern Canada, notes the National Georgraphic Society’s new book, “The World of the American Indian.” To ensure continued luck, a fisherman placed his catch alMUt him in a large circle, heads pointed toward the hole in the ice. Doing so, he believed, enabled to fish's spirit to return to the water and speak favorable of the man who had dealt honorable with him. Coast Line Bogue Sound...It is season now for bay scallops and it does not take a fancy rig to get some. All you have to do is pick them up. Bogue Sound usually has the most. Core Sound can be good. New River sometimes has bay scallops, Ocracoke too. You have to know where to go because scallops are not scattered everywhere. Scallops are shelled creatures found on the bottom not attached to anything and not buried. Mature round shells are usually two to three inches across. Inside the two distinc­ tively fluted shells (the Shell gasoline symbol is a scallop shell) is a finger-to-thumb-thick white muscle the scallop uses to close its two shells. This muscle is what you eat. 1 found recently a few scat­ tered in thigh deep water and used an oyster rake to get them. It was a sunny windless day, and with winter-clear water the scallops were easy to see. A shoal was close by and as the tide ebbed some of it was without water and grass beds were exposed. When 1 got to the shoal, in elbow deep water, I gathered by hand. In about an hour and a half of leisure gathering I had about a bushel. On the shoal I could have had a bushel in a half hour. Com­ mercial fishermen with boat power pull small dredges (toothless rakes with catch nets attached) and early in the season can get their 20 bushels limit before noon. The easy part is gathering the scallops. Getting the tasty muscle is another story. Not that it is hard work, but at>out half way through the bushel (pick up a scallop, insert knife, sever the muscle close to where it connects on one shell, open and remove viscera from around muscle, cut muscle free from other sheli-pick up another scallop) it got monotonous and completely time consuming and I thought how much I liked peanut butter. It took forever to fill three pints. Most bay scallops are hand shucked. Considering the hand movements involved, the shallow water scallops are underpriced. Commercial men can gather 20 bushels on Mondays and 20 more on Wednesday. You can too. but shuck a bushel first and see how it goes. If a boat is used in any way, such as tran­ sporting the scallops back to the ramp, an inexpensive com­ mercial fishing boat license is required. Last season the N. C. com­ mercial harvest was about 26.000 gallons of bay scallops meats, according to Slate records. TIRE BARGAINS . B. F. OOODBICH All sizes of T / A white letter in stock .GOODYEAR All sizes of white letter in stock New Year Specials "Pramium Xcel" P/G BELTED WHITE SIDEWALL Manufactured by B. F. Goodrich SIZE "^RICE F78-14......................................$26.00 G78-14......................................$27.00 H78-14......................................$28.00 G78-15......................................$27.00 H78-15......................................$28.00 J78-15......................................$29.00 L78-15.....................................$30.00 Attention, Owners Of Vegas-Pintos-Toyotas-Datsuns STEEL RADIAL BLEMISH BR 78-13 White Stripe, 2 ply $3L95 MAldR BBAND Steel belled Badial Blemished white letter BR78-13.........................835.00 195/70R-13...................«37.50 BLEMISHED WHITE WALLS 195/70R-13............... *35.00 CR78-14.........................336.00 DR78-14.........................837.00 ER78-14.........................*38.00 FR78-14.........................*40.00 HR78-14.........................*44.00 GR78-15.........................*38.00 JR78-15.........................*46.50 BOAD HUGGEB White letter fintf A70-13...............................*25.50 A70-15...............................*27.00 D70-14...............................*27.50 E 70-14...........................*2 8 .5 0 F70-14............................. *30.00 070-14/15.........................*31.50 060-14/15.........................*37.00 L 60-14/15.........................*42.00 050-14/15.........................*41.00 M50-14............................. *45.50 L50-15............................. *45.50 LR78-15.........................*48.50 Plus old tire and N.C. state tax 4%. All prices include federal tax All tires mounted and balanced PIRELLI AND BRIDGESTONE MOTORCYCLE TIRES AND TUBES Hours: 8 to 6 weekdays, 9 to 1 Saturdays. Courtney shop closed Saturdays BAITY'S Tire Service COURTNEY JUNCTION YADKINVILLE MOCKBVILUk DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, THURSDAY, JANUARY 9, 1975 - 9 State University Set New Records in 1974 i IS'Iorth Upiversity Carolina State set new records adademlcally and athletically % ln g 1974. A total of 15,750 men and ^6men from every section of North Carolina, 47 other states aiid 71 other countries came to the campus to study the s c ie n c e s , h u m a n itie s , t^hnologies and arts taught at the Land-Grant University, ^trhat total, highest in history ^ NCSU, included a record number of women (4,000) and a r&ord number of graduate students (2,600) seeking ad- viinced degrees. >The schools and faculty ranked high nationally, textiles rtmklng No. 1, forestry 4th and architecture 10th. Illustrating tfife stature of NCSU curriculums, architecture and fdtestry recently were awarded nAlonal recognition as among the best in the U.S. '7he national champion basketball team packed Reynolds Coliseum. The ex­ citing Wolfpack football team repeatedly filled Carter Sodium with students, faculty, alumni and other friends of Nipsu. The swimming and baseball teams, both con- fefence champions, attracted supporters across the state. On the campus, students were filling classrooms for two new degree prqgrams-business management and accounting in (he renamed Department of Economics and Business. A new Department of Speech- Communication was approved, indicating the growth of NCSU as a center for studies in fields other than the historically strong sciences and technologies. The Board of Governors approved plans for a School of Veterinary Medicine at the campus, noting the longtime strengths in the biological sciences. The University’s extension services continued during the year its Land-Grant University mission of taking higher education to people from the Atlantic to the Appalachians. Faculty and staff members worked to aid the individual and Viirough him the economy and the culture of the state. To provide the facilities for extension education for the general public of North Carolina, NCSU started con­ struction on a $4,884,000 Ex­ tension Education Center. That center will serve as NEWS FROM YOUR lv<County Farm Agent ■i current economic hard- iip encountered by cattlemen pirfesents a real demand for lowering the costs of produc­ t s . Since feed costs account for such a large portion of ductlon costs, a challenge In supplying a level of )lemental feeding that will impair real performance and the future productive al^lity of the cow herd. "In order to remain in business aiM realize a profit, or minimize an loss, the herd must be piSpvid^ with the necessary nptrients, especially protein, • which will maintain it in a vigorous, productive condition, ready for an upturn In future markets. Also, to get better use o f low-quality, or protein dtficient roughages, a certain n$)nimum level of protein is required in the diet. At current p^ces, oil-seed meals may be used to advantage as natural p^teln supplements, as well as S rces of energy and sphorus. JCows Are Remarkable Oteatures. Fleshy cattle can sand mild energy deficiencies, t|p to 10 percent of their normal needs, for several months and /r§;over quickly on fresh spring pastures. However, on low feeds a cow requires it 7 - 8 percent protein in her al diet to maintain her ap- gtite, consumption, and gestive functions. Adequate ral protein means better Jllzation of dead, weathered l^tures that would largely go td* waste, either by not being eSten or by not being well dijiested. This more complete Use of hays and pasture F(iighage can actually save money on feed costs. ]^ o r Accurate Sup- fementation, roughages must I tested for nutrient content, t I^flciencies can then be sup- [demented in the necessary mounts. Most herds of various ^ e s and breeds consist of bulls, cows, cows nursing calves, arid growing steers and heifers. ItSvill depend on the “eye of the master” to adjust his feeding li^gram to keep each of these gKups in the condition that he desires. ^ a guide for feeding, cot­ tonseed meal or other oilseed n^als should be fed at the rate of;l.S pounds per head per day and the rate adjusted according ASCS News A 1975 national feed grain allotment of 89 million acres - tlw same as for 1974 ~ has been announced by the U. S. D ^rtm en t of Agriculture. ^ e allotment represents the nuinber of harvested acres of fM d grains, based on the euim ated national average yield, needed to produce the qiiantity of feed grains (less iif^ rts ) that will be used dcmestically and for export . dtffing the 1975-76 marketing yekr. Projected 1975 per bushel grain yields on which the allotment is based are 93.0 for cwn, 60.0 for grain sorghum a ^ 45.5 for barley. The allot­ ment does not represent a limit • oqracreage but is computed only ' for the purposes of distributing pigments to producers should such payments be required. ^h e Department on November 27, also announced: the average loan rates in e ^ t in 1974 for wheat and feed groins will be continued at the s ^ e levels for the 1975 crops. Tl|e present per bushel loan rOes are $1.37 for wheat, $1.10 for corn, $105 for grain sorghum ($1.88 per hun­ dredweight), $0.90 for barley, $034 for oats and $0.89 for rye. Jh ere will be no loan pwgrams for soybeans, dry edible beans, flaxseed, gum naval stores and honey, bsginning with the 1975 crops. Department said little use hw been made of the loan W gram for these permissi. support commodities in recent yttrs because market prices two to three times loan levels. Continuation of loan support on these commodities whm not needed would require unnecessary administrative expenditure, the Department pointed out. Wheat and Feed grain loans will no longer have identical maturity dates but will mature 12 months from the first day of the month in which the loan is made. This procedure should assure producers more flexibility in marketing crops under loan. A purchase program for honey for which price support is mandatory will continue to be available. On April 11 the Department announced a 1975 national wheat allotment of 53.5 million acres. The allotment does not represent a limit on the amount of wheat that may be planted. It is used solely to determine what payments would be made to wheat growers if the national average market price for wheat during July-November 1975 falls below ^.05 a bushel. The 1974 national wheal allotment was 55 million acres and far­ mers planted 70 million acres. Why does a white nylon slip turn pink or some other color? B e c a u s e white nylon is so “ friend­ ly” it picks up color from anything, observes Judi- eth Walker, e x t e n s i o n -lothing specialist. North ^-fRlBNDLv'So, wasn o.i.., vhite laundry loads. headquarters for short courses and a wide scope of other educational programs for pre- collegc and post-college students. Work on an addition to Ricks Hall, headquarters of the NCSU Agricultural Extension Service, was nearing completion. In addition to teaching a record number of students on the campus, and accelerating its extension programs across the state, University faculty members conducted hundreds of research projects-making known the unknown with their work in laboratories on the campus and at experiment stations across North Carolina. Among many examples of the value of that research to the people of North Carolina and the nation were a better pine tree and a new milk process. Private industries have planted more than 500 million superior pines across the Southeastern part of the nation for the important wood-related products. Those pines wfere developed as genetically superior seedlings in the NCSU Tree Improvement Program. At year's end, the result of five years research on milk was released to the milk industry and the consuming public. It is called “ Sweet Acidoohilus” and will be marketed under the trade name of "Nu Trish.” It is designed to add to the beneficial effects of milk in human digestive systems. Support for the milk research came from the Dairy Foun­ dation-one of 11 foundations that raise funds for NCSU. Those foundations also set a new record in 1974, passing the $2 million mark for the first time. As the University looked toward 1975, following a year of records in 1974, it was looking nationally for successors to its chancellor and another top administrator. Chancellor John T. Caldwell announced he will retire next June 30. Walter L. Smith, chairman of the Board of Trustees, is heading a search committee for a new chan­ cellor. Another committee is seeking a replacement for Graduate Dean Walter J. Peterson, who retired earlier in the year. One final record was reported before the students left campus for the Christmas holidays: NCSU students, led by the In terfratern ity Council, collected 14,000 pounds of food so that needy families in the Raleigh area might have a Merry Christmas. D istric iro n Stacey Regina Arnold celebrated her first birthday Christmas Day with a party. Her guests were Richard and Catherine Neely, Tracey Arnold and Sonya Arnold. The cake was decorated with a Christmas Tree on top. The guests were served cake, cookies, M & M candy and ice cream. Paper Drive Cornatzer-Dulin Scouts will have a paper drive Saturday, January 11, beginning at 1:00 p.m. "in Comatzer-Dulin com­ munity areas. “ Please have paper in front of your house for pick-up” said orpanlzers. s There was no District Court December 23, 1974 due to Christmas Holidays. The following cases were rtisp'isf'd of in the regular December 30, 1974 session of District Court with Lester P. Martin, Jr., Presiding Judge and Carroll C. Wall, III, Solicitor; William Earl Warren, damage to personal property, nol pros with leave. William Earl Warren, larceny of auto, nol pros with leave. Robert E. Clayton, speeding 75 mph in 55 mph zone, $31 and cost. Bud Eugene Craver, ex­ ceeding safe speed, $24 and cost. Charles King Dunlap, Jr., speeding 82 mph in 55 mph zone, $27 and cost. Rick Headrick, larceny, nol pros; larceny, dismissed. Kenny Luster, larceny, dismissed; larceny, nol pros. James William McCuiston, operating motor vehicle while under the influence of In­ toxicating liquor, nol pros with leave. Ronnie Lee Holmes, improper mufflers, nol pros with leave. Ruby Christine Howell, speeding 50 mph in 35 mph zone. nol pros with leave. George Randall Brooks, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, nol pros with leave. Grady Lee Carter, operating motor vehilcp while license suspended, nol pros with leave. Marvin Lee Medlin, speeding 67 mph in 55 mph zone, nol pros with leave. Jamie Gray, worthless check, nol pros with leave. Richard Lee Jones, speeding 65 mph in 55 mph zone, nol pros with leave. William James Barnette, possession of marijuana, nol pros with leave. Linda Todd Chisholm, speeding 66 mph in 55 mph zone, nol pros with leave. William Curtis Goforth, speeding 67 mph in 55 mph zone, nol pros with leave. William Andre Little, speeding 69 mph in 55 mph zone, nol pros with leave. Massey Bunyon Whiteside, Jr., speeding 65 mph in 55 mph zone, nol pros with leave. George Daniel Hardister, speeding 50 mph in 35 mph zone, nol pros with leave. Mary Alice Curry, without valid N. C. operators license, nol pros with leave. Charles Stanley White, to animal performance and the quality of other feeds. A range of .5 to 2 pounds of cottonseed meal per head per day will supply the protein requirements of most types of cattle, and will provide liberal amounts of energy and phosphorus. Some Methods Of Feeding Supplemental Protein Can Save Labor Costs. It has been demonstrated that interval feeding of cottonseed pellets can be done from daily up to weekly intervals with equivalent performance. This can be done by feeding, at one time, the total amount of protein required for the interval period. Cottonseed meal and other ground feeds may be self­ fed to reduce labor by mixing salt with them to control Intake. A general rule-of-thumb is to start with a mixture containing 20-25 percent salt and adjust as necessary to increase or decrease intake. Close at­ tention must be paid to cattle on minimum supplementation so that feed may be adjusted to fit their changing requirements through the winter. The Long Term Investment Aspect of a herd may require that many management practices be followed more intently this year to ejihance the., value of supplemental feeding. Some ranchers will severely cull their herds to a level that can be maintained on the forage and roughage that they available. By adding some protein and other nutrients as needed, they will maintain a nucleus of vigorous brood stock. Heifers can be kept for replacement, since they require less feed while they are young and growing than old cows. Some herds can be separated and fed according to their requirements. Heifers, lac- tating cows, and herd bulls should receive about 1.5 times the amount of protein and energy required for dry- pregnant cows. Younger cattle have limited feed capacity and should receive feeds that are higher in nutritive value per unit of feed. Any good management practice that improves ef- hciency of production and reduces costs is important, but care must be taken to avoid cutting costs at the expense of productivity. speeding 50 mph in 35 mph zone, on waiver of $10 and cost. Beth Winters Parrish, speeding 67 mph in 55 mph zone, on waiver of $10 and cost. Viola Triplett Blankenship, failure to yield right-of-way to oncoming traffic, on waiver of cost. Ray Holleman, obtaining property under false pretense, dismissed on cost by prosecuting witness. County Officials Are Sworn-ln Mrs. Pauline Wagoner of Mocksville, Rt. 7, was sworn In as Davie County Tax Collector and Mrs. Lucille Melton of Mocksville, Rt. 6, was sworn in as deputy tax collector on Thursday, January 2. The swearing In took place In the coutily tax collector’s office and was performed by Clerk of Court Glenn Hammer. County Manager Ron Vogler also at­ tended the brief ceremony. Heart The heart of a wise man should resemble a mirror, which reflects every object without being sullied by any. Confucius o 1 g) I Q I ilCHtl Satisfaction Guaranteed • Replacenient or Money Refunded S IG N A L H IL L M A L L1619 E. Broad Street, Statesville HOURS: 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Monday thru Thursday 10 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday 1 to 6 p.m. Sunday JZSL ladies blazers, bike JACKETS AND PANT TOPSValues to $12.99 Your Choice la d ies pants Sollds-Plalds-T w eeds V alues to $9.99 lADIES LONG SLEEVE pant TOPS V alues to $9.99 Your Choice lad ies jean s Corduroys—Twills Values to $4.97 Your Choice Your Choice IV\ISSES PANT COATS'^VonySuede-CurivUamb-FaKeFur Values to $29.99 Your Choice lad ies pan tsuits V alu es to $15.99 Your Choice Girl's Snorkel Jackets sues 7 to U Values to $14.44 LEISURE PANTSUITS Floral and Abstract Prints V alu es to $14.77 Your Choice Your Choice Children's Sweoters, Body Suits Your Choice CHILDREN'S PANT TOPS and body suits Your Choice r i g h t g u a r d diodorant RIGHT guard DEODORANT • Regular • New Super Dry Formula YOUR CHOICE REG. *1.07 STANDING TERRARIUM Reg. *12.88 CURITY DISPOSABLE DIAPERS Toddler24 Count ^ 2 ** Reg.j3.16 Overnight 12CounT ^1®* Reg. *1.60 Daytime 30'Count $074A Reg. *3.04 Newborn 30 Count Reg. *2.47 THE NQ-CAP WIG Reg. 7.99 CLAIROL FAMILY AIR BRUSH ‘14“Reg. $16.88 500 wattt of power for fotter drying, «otier »ty(inQ. 4 oHochmenit; detong(«r, comb, ttyling comb, drying bru»h, ipot curler- 2 tpe«di. 120/230 V. 6 ft cord . YASHICA 35SG-35 IVWl WITH ELEaRONIC BRAIN iKwltar feslproell Ov)' S o A 9 9 • landing Hontfy tQrif H W ...................... Reg. *119.95 DUAL a OR SUPERB PROJEaOR $ 5 8 ’ * Reg. $79.95 k. Converts from 8 to Super 8 d1^ f/<pof Stvuch. ZoomItni.into malic-fhread/re^md. plus nDjny more*aniedfedlures Hurryin* 20 PIECE IRONSTONE dinnerw are $999 REG. $15.97 Chooie from 4 Lo n lem iio rary pdt terns Each if t ititludes 4 t-dCh: diriner !>j(cids, suups. cupsand saucers Buy lur yourseM and for the gift season at'ead Sawt now! SATISFACTION GUARANTEED-REPLACEMENT OR MONEY REFUNDED 10 - DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, THURSDAY, JANUARY 9, 1975 Deaths And Funerals CLARENCECARTER Clarence Ray Carter of Route 2, was dead on arrival at 6:30 a. m. Monday at Davie County Hospital, Mocksville. Funeral services were held Wednesday at Fork Baptist Church, where he was a member, with the Rev. Yates Wilkinson officiating. Burial was in the church cemetery. He was born Sept. 2, 1918 in Davie County to the late Samuel C. and Nezzie Sheets Carter. He was a retired farmer and was a former member of Davie County Board of Com­ missioners where he served for eight years. Survivors are his wife, the former Pauline Earnhardt; a daughter, Mrs. Eugene Vest of Route 1; three sons, Paul Carter of Rt. 3, Mocksville, Leon Carter of Rt. B, H ickory and Kenneth Carter of Cary; eight grandchildren; a sister, Mrs. Willie Mae Jones of Rt. 3, Mocksville; five brothers, Allie Carter of Southmont, Frank Carter of Lexington, Bill Carter of Tennessee, Aaron Carter of Rt. 3, Mocksville and Coleman Carter of Mocksville. MARSHALL BAILEY Marshall C. Bailey, 80, of Cypress Drive, Lutz, Florida, died Dec. 30 in Florida. Funeral services were con­ ducted Saturday at 2 p.m. at Voglers Main Street Chapel, with burial in Forsyth Memorial Park. Mr. Bailey was born in Davie County to Martin and Maggie Walker Bailey. He was with the Westinghouse Corp. of Philadelphia for over forty years. He had lived in Florida for the past eighteen years. Surviving are his wife, Mrs. Alberta Wilson Bailey; one sister, Mrs. W.D. Adams of 2245 Parkway Drive; and two brothers, Robert Bailey of Faison, Pa. and John W. Bailey of Sanford. JAMES WILLIAM HUDSON James William Hudson, age 53, of Rt. 2, Advance died Tuesday, December 31st at the VA Hospital in Durham after an extended illness. He was a veteran of World War II, and a member of Mainville AME church. Funeral services were held Friday, January 3 at 1 p.m. in the chapel of Morrison Studevent Funeral Home. The Reverend R. Q. Allen officiated and burial was held Monday morning, January 6 at 11 p.m. in the National Cemetery in Salisbury, N. C. Mr. Hudson is survived by two sisters, Mrs. Helen Hoover and Ella R. Long, both of Lexington and one brother, R. J. Hudson of Lexington. Yadkin Valley The Church choir met at the Pastor’s home Mr. and Mrs. Leon Wood last Wednesday night for a social gathering each one was served decorated cake squares, fruit cake, nuts, coffee and punch, everyone enjoyed the evening together. Mrs. Nellie King and Mr. Clifford Green have both been patients at Davie County Hospital since last week. Mrs. King returned to her home on Sunday evening. Mr. Green was moved out of intensive care on Saturday. Cara Beth Parker spent the weekend with Tracy Parker on the Bailey Church Rd. she at­ tended Sunday school with Tracy. Mr. and Mrs. Henry McBride visited Mr. and Mrs. Hal Warden in Yadkinville Satur­ day evening. Mrs. Pansy Allen, Mrs. Hazel Riddle, and Amy Weatherman and Mrs. Ann Rothrock visited Mrs. Maude Hauser and Ruby last Friday. Mrs. Emma Boles visited them on Sunday. Everyone from the church and any visitors who wish to come out on Wednesday evening for 7 o’clock prayer service to hear the teaching of the Book of James in the Bible. There are still several out with the virus that is going around. We wish each and everyone a speedy recovery. Mrs. Nannie McBride is bdtter, and is expecting to come home on Monday of this week. Four Corners Tammy Shelton of Danville, Va. visit^ Mr. and Mrs. George Laymon and John Hugh Shelton New Year’s Day. Von Shelton and girls of Mocksville and Mrs. Peggy Shelton and Ginger were all dinner guests of Mr. and Mrs. Joe Shelton. Mr. J. B. Chaffin has entered Davie County Hospital on Tuesday for eye sergery by Dr. Holt, Mrs. Flora Ruth Ratledge Taylor of Mt. Holly will be moved from her home to Fran Ray Home at Mocksville. Mr. and Mrs. L. S. Shelton, Sr., were dinner guests of Mrs. Betty Potts and Patricia and .lerry. Mr. and Mrs. Grady Belk and girls visited friends in Rural Hall Sunday. S. H. TURNER Stephen Henry Turner, 74, of Rt. 7, died January 1st at his home. Funeral services were held Friday at Eaton's Funeral Home Chapel, conducted by the Rev. Charles Sisk. Burial was in Smith’s Grove United Methodist Church cemetery. Born in Yadkin County Feb. 3, 1900, Mr. Turner was a son of the late Stephen H. and Etta Pardue Turner. He was a retired farm er and of the Methodist faith. Survivors include his wife, Mrs. Lizzie Padgett Turner; three daughters, Mrs. Laura Lee Smith, Miss Thelma Turner and Miss Evelyn Tur­ ner, and a step-daughter, Mrs. Ernest Frye, all of Rt. 7, Mocksville, another step­ daughter, Mrs. Charles Cun­ ningham of Danville, Va.; five step-sons, Kenr'sth <md Ronald Peacock of Rt. 1, and Gary Peacock of Rt. 3, Mocksville, and Hermon Peacock of Har­ mony and Harold Peacock of Jonesville; a sister, Mrs. Pearl Ireland of Danville, Va.; a half- sister, Mrs. Irene Chappell of Jonesville; one brother, Lloyd Turner, and a half-brother, Harvey Turner of Hamp- tonville. MRS. JULIA GREEN Mrs. Julia Annie McIntyre Green, 73, of 23 Duke Street, died January 1st in Davie County Hospital, Mocksville. Funeral services were held Friday at Wilkinson Funeral Home Chapel, Concord, with the Rev. John Daniels and the Rev. Ray Pennell officiating. Burial was at Mill Grove Methodist Church cemetery in Midland. Mrs. Green was born June 28, 1901 to the late Robert and Lillie Lambert McIntyre. Her husband was the late George ’Thomas Green. Survivors are two daughters, Mrs. M aggie Brindle of Cooleemee and Mrs. Dora Yates of Concord; five sisters, Mrs. Ray Brindle of Cooleemee, Mrs. Bertha Thomas of Charlotte, Mrs. Ella Kelly, Mrs. Kate McLarns and Mrs. Lou Rooks of Concord; seven grandchildren; seven great­ grandchildren. Memorial To Barry Potts Barry Harding Potts of Route 3, Mocksville, was killed Thursday, December 27,1973 when the aircraft he was piloting struck a tree and a car before scraping a one-story beer warehouse and striking a vacant dry cleaning establish­ ment at Hagerstown, Maryland. Mr. Potts was born in Davie County to Ray and Louise Jones Potts. He is survived by his parents; a sister, Mrs. Barbara Allen of Route 2, Mocksville; and, a twin brother, Garry Potts of Route 2. The following is a reprint of a memorial written by Homer Jenkins for ‘“The Daily Mail” , a newspaper in Hagerstown, Maryland: No greater gift can any man give than that he lay down his life to save that of another. On December 27, 1973, that is exactly what Barry H. Potts did. • Mr. Potts most undoubtedly 1 knew at least 10 minutes before ; his plane crashed that it was going to come down and he could have bailed out at any given moment letting the plane crash where it may, but not Mr. Potts, knowing that he was risking his own life he circled over our city three times searching for a place to come down where the least people or no one would get hurt and he succeeded in doing just that. This act certainly broadens my thoughts that the youth of today are very considerate of others and very honorable people. Wouldn’t it be so nice if all of us put other people first in all that we say and do? So many people today think only of themselves, they are not con­ tent with their share but want other people’s too. I feel so sorry for these kind of people, because I am a recovered alcoholic and for years I was so self-centered even to the extent of t>eing ' greedy where a dollar was involved. I was out to get it, no matter, who, or how, and then one day I decided that was not ' the way and I decided to get off the receiving end and get up front by giving. Today, materially I have nothing. But I don’t need anything, my immediate needs are being taken care of. Today, I have what money can not buy. I have peace of mind, happiness, contentment and pretty good health. Have you? Life The shaping of our own life is our own work. It is thing of beauty, or a thing of shame, as we ourselves make it. We lay the corner and add joint to joint, we give the proportion, we set the finish. It may be a thing of beauty, and of joy forever. God forgive us if we pervert our life from pulling on its appointed glory. Ware I • ■ TH tR E IS A T I M l f O R e v e K V T H IN G . ' Ecclm ilH i 3 t f/w tiVinj Tyndllt HouM QOt)’S Five MlNlilTeS OS© LYNN HAVEN NURSING HOME INC. p. O. Bos 428 State UeenMd E, Sm U, Adminirtntor C.A.SEAFORD LUMBER COMPANY Jericho Road MockivlUe, N. C. Pham 684-5148 PARKS & scon InwicrtlnB Service Mockivllle, N. C. 27028 Cooling In T l« Summer-Warm In The Winter Office Phonei 634-5939 Daway Porta Dwight Scott DAVIE FREEZER LOCKER, INC. 9S2 8dldMinratMet Phone 684-3785 MOCKSVILLE MOTOR CO. Cuitom OiMiMnttl Iran Woilc StMlFibilialli« -ConuMtcU* RMldnltl- romu>w«uii«s««iM Phone 634-2379 SlSWBkeeboroSt. MARTIN HARDWARE & GENERAL MERCHANDISE F*m)i, Dry Goodi, CrocciiM, PtitillMr Phone 684-2128 J. P. GREEN MILLING CO., INC. M iy Flour Wa Cuitom HMid 524 Depot Street Phone 634-2126 A PROCLAMATION OF AMNESTY W HEREAS "He hath made him to be sin for us, who knew no sin; that we might be made the righteousness of God in him.” U Corinthians 5 :?U AND W HEREAS “ His own self bear our sins in his owr^ body on the tree . . (I Peter 2:24) TH ER EFO R E "Let the wicked forsake his wdy, and the unriqhteous man his thoughts; and let him return unto the Lord, and he will have mercy upon him; and to our God, lor he will ABUN DAN TLY PARDON." (Isa.ah 55 7) ++++++++++++++++++ ATTEND CHURCH THIS WEEK + + + + + + + +.+ + + + + + + + + + OCoi inUvAdv»rtWn#l97B TN tc I ID our rudtn. Wt«witl m m pI printiWt itatm and pay $1.00 for oich ittm publitli«d. In iht c m of quoutiom. ihf n«m« of \ht author and tha tHIa and publithar of t»>a book imat ba givan. Addran itamt to ‘'Qod'a Fiva Minutai." Bon 121S7, Fort Worth. Tax. 76116 C’S BARBECUE “Barbeque At It’s Bert’ 842 Salisbury St. Phone: 634-2495 5?! S I DAVIE TRACTOR & IMPLEMENT CO. Ford Farming-Sales And Service -New Holland Equiptment- -A Complete Repair Shop- Salisbury Road Phone: 634-5969 FULLER WELDING & FABRICATORS Certified Welding-Portable Welder On Hand -Trailers Our Speciality Route 4 MocksviUe, N.C. Philip Fuller Owner Phone: 634-3712 This feature is published in the interest of a better community and is made possible by these sponsors MEra'ODlST CHURCH ADVANCE BAPTIST CHURCH ad v an c e & fT ffi^ T ” p T u k c T ""‘’ r a s « R C H BETHEL UNITED METHODIST CHURCH BETHLEHEM UNITED METHODIST CHURCH Rev! A*£.*aeshire, Pastor MomingWoiship 11 a.m. Evening Worship 7:45 p.m. BIXBY PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH CALVARY BAPTIST CHURCH AR CREEK “ 1ST CHURCH CENTER UNITED METHODIST CHURCH CHESNUT GROVE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH CHINQUAPIN GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH CHURCH OF GOD Cooleemee, N.C. CHURCH OF GOD OF PROPHECY Rev. Glenn Hawley MocksvUIe, Route 4 (Ephesus) CHURCH OF THE LIVING GOD Bixby, N.C. CLEMENT GROVE CHURCH OF GOD who believe in building character. DUTCHMAN CREEK BAPTIST CHURCH EATON’S BAPTIST CHURCH Sunday School 10 a.m.Morning Worship 11 a.m.Training Union 7 p.m. EDGEWOOD BAPTIST CHURCH ELBAVILLE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH FARMINGTON BAPTIST CHURCH FARMINGTON UNITED METHODIST CHURCH FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH Cooleemee, N.C. FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH North Main St., MocksviUe, N.C. Rev. Charles Bullock FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH Church School 10 a.m. Worship Service 11 a.m. FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH Rev. Austin Hamilton Sunday School 10 a.m.Worship Service 11 a.m. FORK BAPTIST CHURCH 6 miles East on Hwy. 64 Rev. Yates K. WUWnson, Pastor Sunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship Service 11 a.m.Evening Worship 7:30 p.m. FULTON UNITED METHODIST CHURCH GREEN MEADOWS BAPTIST CHURCH Rev. Walter L. Warfford Sunday School 10 a.m.Worship Service 11 a.m.B.T.U.%: 30 p.m.Evening Worship 7:30 p.m."'-d.,7:3" MOCKSVILLE CIRCUIT Rev. Jack Luther Bethel Methodist 9:45 a.m.Comatzer Methodist 11 a.m. Mo c k sville Pe n te c o stalOLINESS CHURCH arrison B. Hickling, Minister Sunday School 10 a.m.Worship Service 11 a.m.Evangelistic Service 7:30 p.m.YoutTi Night, Mon., 7:30 p.m. MOCKSVILLE WESLEYAN CHURCH Hospital St., MocksviUe, N.C.Rev. Rotert L. Taylor Sunday School 10 a.m.Mondng Worship 11 a.m.Evening Worship 7:30 p.m. 'IION UNITED IDIST CHURCH NO CREEK PRIMITIVE BAPTIST CHURCH N STREET —'CHRIST nJcGhee, Minister Sunday School 10 a.m.Worship Service 11 a.m.Evening Worship 7 p.m.Wed. Service 7:30 p.m. KENTUCKY FRIED CHKKEN HAVE A BARREL CV FUN Horn: 10:00 A M 1b 8:00 PJM. YadkinviDe Road ModcsviOe, N.C ME' COLLETTE ANTIQUES & ART SUPPLIES Antiques And Collectibles Fumiture-Lamps-Glassware-Silver Old Clocks-Picture Frames- WE BUY, SELL OR TRADE 1021 YadkinviUe Road MocksviUe, N.C.634-2296 OAK GROVE . METHODIST Cl RCH Prayer Sleeting ^ Wed^,'?: 30 p.m. HARDISON UNITED METHODIST CHURCH I.W. (james, Pastor Sabbath School 10 a Worship Service 1 p.m. Prayer Meeting Wed., 8p.m. CLARKSVILLE PENTECOSTAL HOLINESS CHURCH Mocks^e, Route 5 ’ Rev. Albert Gentle Sunday School 10 a.m.Worsiiip Service 11 a.m. COOLEEMEE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH Rev. James P. Knight, Minister Sunday Service 10A.M. Worship Service II A.M. COMMUNITY BAPTIST CHURCH Gladstone Road Sunday School 10 a.m.Worship Service 11 a.m.Evening Worship 7 p.m. Rev. Avery A. Ferguson S S S M S o , CORNATZER BAPTIST CHURCH DAVIE BAPTIST TABERNACLE METHOmSTCW HOLY CROSS LUTHERAN CHURCH Sunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship Service 11 a.m. IJAMES CROSS ROADS BAPTIST CHURCH JERICHO CHURCH OF CHRIST Jericho Road Charles Isenberg, Minister Office: 49Z-5291-Home: 634-5257 JERUSALEM BAPTIST CHURCH Sunday School 10 a.m.Worsh p Service 11 a.m.Worship Service 7 p.m. LIBERTY UNITED METHODIST CHURCH LIBERTY WESLEYAN CHURCH Troy C. Vaughn. Pastor MACEDONIA MORAVIAN CHURCH Rev. John H. Kapp, Pastor Sunday School 10 a.m. Eveninx Worship 7:30 p.m.Adult Choir Rehearsals: 15 p.m. MOCKS UNITED METHODIST CHURCH MOCKSVILLE CHURCH OF GOD Depot Street Rev. James I. Morris, Pastor Sunday School 10 A.M. Worship Service II A.M. Evening Service 7 P.M,Wednesday 7:30 P.M. REAVIS FORD INC. Where rtopU LMwi BttMr Hwy. M l North MoebvUto.N.C. PboM 684->216I REDLAND PENTECOSTAL HOLINESS CHURCH SALEM UNITED METHODIST CHURCH SECOND PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST Milling Rd., Mocksville, N.C.Lonny G. Liebelt, Pastor Sabbath School 10 a.m. Morning Worship 11 a.m. SHILOH BAPTIST CHURCH 3R0VE 1ST CHURCH ......I GROVE UNITEDMETHODIST CHURCH Rev. Leonard VonCannon, Pastor Visitors Welcome B, SMI' BILL MERREU FURNITURE CO, INC. ‘‘Winre Comfort And Econaiqy Mwt” TOlWflkMboioSt. Mocfaffflt,N.C. niOMeS4-5131 CATO^JCMISSIONa.m. - Sunday obligation ■ iclpatory mass on THE CHURCH OF THE GOOD SHEPARD Cooleemee, N.C. Morning Prayer, Service Chi .jyer- Sermon 9:30 a.m. :hool 10:45 a.m. THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH Fork.N.C.The Uiurch of the Ascension Church School 10 a.m. ,Morning Prayer, Sermon 11 a.m. TURRENTINE BAPTIST CHURCH UNION CHAPEL UNITED METHODIST CHURCH WESLEY CHAPEL UNITED METHODIST CHURCH EATON FUNERAL HOME . 838 N. Mala SHMt Moclu*iUi,N.C. nuHM 684-3148 YADKIN VALLEY BAfTIST CHURCH ZION UNI' METHODi:fCHURCH (Dial—A—Prayer - 634-3311) DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, THURSDAY, JANUARY 9, 1975 - 11 Bits Of Life I Fork Baptist Awards Scholarships Dr. Robert A. Davis, Mrs. Georse RudisiU and Dr. George Rudisill are shown at the District Conference held Sunday at Denton United Methodist Church. District Conference Is Held program helped to show that the "good news" could be com­ municated by singing. Dr. Robert A. Davis, I The United Methodist Church of the Thomasville District held a conference Sunday, January 5, in Denton, under the leadership of Dr. George Rudisill, District Superin­ tendent. The conference opened with devotions by Rev. A. A. Ferguson, the appointment of a secretary, Mrs. Adelaide Talbert of Brooks Temple United Methodist Church, and the appointment of District trustees. An offering of $296.10 for world relief was taken. The major focus of the con­ ference, according to Dr. Rudisill, was telling the good news through evangelism and Christian education. “These exist, not side by side, but co- equally in the mission of the church.” Rev. John Rufty gave the report on ministerial creden­ tials and some 20 men and women were approved for the ministry of the church. This also constituted the roll call which reported an attendance of 263 registered delegates and some 25 visitors. The five Sub-District Councils on Ministries, which are to function under the District Council were lifted up: Lexington, Thomasville, Davie, North Davidson and Denton. The purpose of these councils is to involve people at the local level in planning, program and election of officers. The Heritage Singers of Midway United Methodist Church, under the direction of Canaille Murphy, presented an out;tanding program. Their president of Brevard College, was the main speaker using the subject “Teaching The Good News At Our Colleges.” He pointed out forcefully that the world at present is in crisis of spirit and direction. “ Perhaps the whole western civilization is at the brink” , he said. “The task of humanity of today is to find ways to form real men. This cannot be accomplished by science alone. It is the ministry and primary function of the church. It is the role of our church colleges to enable the young to find the abundant life that gives moral values as well as trains the mind. The church colleges seek to reach out and join hands with the church in these trying hours.” Rev. Wilbur Jarrett gave the statistical report for the con­ ference. The church mem­ bership increased by some l!76; number of confessions on faith was 136 over last year; church attendance reported down and so was Sunday School at­ tendance. The work of the Youth of the District was termed best in the conference and possibly in the world. “ With their insight and inspiration, we are certain that the church will succeed in this decade.” Good Hope United Methodist Church extended the invitation for the District Conference to meet at their church next year and it was accepted. Rev. Gilbert Miller is pastor of the church which hosted Sunday’s meeting. a column of money management and personal banking information .V € ■i by Karen McCall Wachovia Bank & Trust Co . N A ■ Unless you arc accustomed to paying off loans with monthly installments, you are probably only vaguely aware of the difference between the “actuarial interest rate” and the “add-on rate.” I think everyone should be familiar with these terms and what they mean, especially if you have to borrow money occasionally or if you buy your car or your appliances with monthly time payments. When the Truth-in-Lending Act became effective about five years ago, many consumers became aware, for the first time, of the annual percentage rate of interest they were paying for a loan. TTie traditional way of stating the cost of credit has been in terms of annual interest. So when a lender offered a loan at a cost of, let’s say, $6 per $100 (Of course, the rates are higher today.) and the borrower needed $1,000, the total amount to be paid back to the lender was $1,060, or what appeared to be six percent annual interest. Now most borrowers like to pay off a loan in monthly installments. So the total sum of $1,060 was divided by 12 and the borrower paid the lender $88.33 each month for 12 months. Because the borrower was steadily paying off his loan, the amount of his loan, over a period of a year, averaged about $550. Yet, he paid out the entire $60 for the privilege of borrowing the original sum of $1,000. This practice resulted in the “add-on” Interest rate. The "add­ on” interest rate was six percent, but the actuarial percentage rate was 10.9 percent. Today, all lenders - and that includes banks, savings and loan associations, department stores, credit card issuers, credit unions, automobile dealers, loan companies, mort­ gage brokers and anyone who charges for providing cpnsumer credit - must disclose in writing the true actuarial percentage rate. Now, you know at a glance exactly how much you are paying for credit and its relative cost in percentage terms. Jt has been the policy of most banks to make sure that their customers understand clearly every detail of their mutual transactions. That’s why they welcomed the Truth- in-Lending Act as an important step forward in the financial enlightenment of consumers. While I’m on the subject of installment loans, I think you might like to know how the added on interest is “earned” by the bank and “charged” to (he customer - an important point if you pay off the loan early. It is called the “ Rule of 78.” That’s the technical name for it. Here’s how it works: Because you have use of all the money during the first month of a 12-month loan, the bank charges you for the use of all 12 parts of the loan. During the second month of the loan, you have use of only 11/12 of the money. And during the third month you have use of 10/12 of the money, and in these months the bank charges you for the parts used. Now add up the numbers 1 through 12. It totals 78. So 78 becomes tlie bottom number of the fraction. In the first month, you are charged with 12/78 of the total interest. In the second month, 11/78; in the third month, 10/78, etc. This same formula is used on installment loans regardless of the lime period and regardless of what interest rate is charged, but it is not an Important consideration unless you prepay the loan. If you don’t quite understand how or why this “ Rule of 78” works, you’re not alone. It isn’t easy to understand until you give it some study and thought. But it is a practical method that has been widely used by most lenders to give a fair pro-ration of “add-on” interest on accounts that pay off early, and It is the method specified by North Carolina law. I I I III I I Thoughts For 1975 By ROSCOE BROWN FISHER Again I found a seat upon the old ottoman next to Grandpa’s easy chair. “ Now that 1974 is history, how about some suggestions for the New Year?” He began to speak: —Everything is always over. —Accept matters as they are. . .and go from there. -L ife is lived on an incline where It is easier to slide back than go forward. —He who carries his burden In silence has time to listen to those who have been where he Is going. —Reporting the sins of others has a way of depositing gall in one's own mouth. —Kind words upon the sea always return with the tide. —Holding the door for someone els^ may furnish the light to keep us from stumbling in the dark. —For most of us the biggest difficulty is, getting ourselves out of our own way. —The surest way to hold on to a fault is to look for it in someone else. —What matters is not what happens to you, but how you handle it. —He who gives himself away without bargaining for a reward will never walk alone. —The world has never lacked God; people have lacked the ability to see God. Sunday, January Sth during the 11 a.m. worship service Fork Baptist awarded the second grant of the Melissa M errall Scholarship Fund. Three grants of $100 for college level were presented to Martha Jane M errell and Tommy Eugene Cope. One $200 grant for seminary level was presented to Roger Dale Cope. The Melissa Merrell Scholarship Fund was established in memory of Melissa Merrell, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Wilson Merrell of Fork Baptist Church. Melissa was born March 21, 1970 and died May 15,1971. The fund was established by a gift from a friend and has been added to with gifts from the church and other individuals. The purpose of it is to aid students in preparing for full-time Christian servicef Roger Dale Cope, second year recipient received the $200 award. He is a senior at S o u th e a s te rn B a p tis t Theological Seminary, Wake Forest, and is pastor of the Blackman’s Grove Baptist Church in Four Oaks, N.C. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Charlie Cope of the Fork Community and is married to Church Activities Seventh Day Adventists To Offer Special Course For Women COOLEEMEE METHODIST A service of symbolic ab­ solution was held Sunday on the outside of the Cooleemee United Methodist Church. Members were asked to write out their past sins and to present them to the church and most of all to God. Bob Hoyle, charge lay leader collected the papers. As the congregation gathered on the outside of the building, Tom Vogler, Layman of the Year of 1974, struck the match to burn the collected papers. The service of burning symbolized that God remembers our sins no more, and neither should we. A special course entitled “Fascinating Womanhood” will be given at the Seventh Day Adventist Church on Milling Road. The first session, to be taught by Mrs. Lonny Liebelt, will be held Sunday, January 12th, at 3:30 p.m. at the church. “ Fascinating Womanhood” is said to be a course of study which maps the way to supreme happiness in marriage. "The course gives a woman to secret of becoming a fascinating woman. She can learn how to understand men, their needs, characteristics, sensitivity and masculinity. She learns how to react to her husband’s different moods and feelings in order to build up his confidence and respect in himself. It tells how men look at women and how women can understand men” , says the article describinR the course. In further describing the course the article says: “ In understanding men, the course teaches a woman that she must first accept her husband for the man he is, concentrating on his merits rather than berating him for his shortcomings. She learns his need for sympathy, for the problems and difficulties he faces away from home. She learns the feminine role and the happiness which comes with its fulfillment. Also taught is the masculine role, the pressing duties a man has as the leader, protector and provider for his family and the respect due this divine calling. The application of this approach has resulted in tremendous revitalization of marital bliss in thousands of marriages across the country. Many grateful women have expressed their deep ap­ preciation for these teachings.” Ministers Have Monthly Meeting T^e Davie County Ministerial Association met at the First Baptist Church Tuesday with Fifteen ministers and two guests (Wayne Harrleson of the Social Service and Mel Denton of Tri- City Mental Health Clinic in Salisbury). Old business included discussion of a ministerial pulpit exchange on Jan. 26 on a voluntary basis. Lonnie Liebert is chairman of the committee. New business included Melvin Denton presenting to the ministerial Association an upcoming seminar on alcholism for ministers in Davie and Rowan County which will be held February 3 at Ketner’s Cafeteria in Salisbury. The ministers decided to forgo their next meeting and attend the seminar. The Reverend Leland Richardson announced the forming of an Alchollc Anonymous at the B.C. Brock Building Wednesday, Jan. 15 at 7:30 p.m. It will be a closed meeting for persons with problems. Wayne Harrelson of The Social Service presented the program which included in­ formation on food shortage problems, providing checks for the needy, adoptive home service, foster care, home for the aged, and a counseling service. It is now funded by United Fund, County, State and Federal assistance. There are 165 people in Davie County on AFDC 300 medical assistance cases and 600 food stamp recipients Harrelson said. He had a staff of 15 in the Social Service Department. Harrelson made a special appeal for churches to provide canned foods to pe|'sons below poverty line but who were not ' eligible for federal support. J.N. Weekley, Ray Fennel and Yates Wllkerson were to formulate plans and be responsible for them. Calvin Ijames talked about the prison camp ministry and Yoke Fellowship services at the prison and the possibility of forming a youth choir to go to the camp for services once a ' month. His daughter was invited to attend the March meeting and present her plans on the prison mission work. The next regular meeting will be at Oak Grove United Methodist Church on March 4, 1975. Art Class Is Scheduled To Start An intermediate art class is scheduled to begin at Rowan Technical Institute on Wed­ nesday, January 8 and continue until February 26, 1975. Intermediate classes will delve into advanced techniques and work in a variety of mediums. Classes will meet from 7:15 until 10:15 p.m. in room 106. To pre-register, call the Continuing Education Division of Rowan Tech. Students are required to pay a $2 registration fee and bring their social security numbers to the first class meeting. Success Success is little more than a chemical compound of man with moment. Philip Guedalla UNION CHAPEL There will be a Men’s Break­ fast Sunday, January 12, at 7:30 a.m. at Union Chapel United Methodist Church. A guest speaker «rill be present. Cooleimee_Seniar . I____Citizens The Cooleemee Senior Citizens Club will hold their first meeting of the new year on Monday, January 13, in the fellowship hall of the First Baptist Church at 10 a.m. Farmington Some thirty members and friends of the Davie Bible Club enjoyed five days in Eatonton, Georgia, attending a gathering of Bible Clubs at the Rock Eagle Camp. Those going from this area were Edie Bailey, Debbie Lashley, Teresa Atkins, Stan Riddle, Tony Atkins, Danny Smith and their leader, Mr. Ronnie Riddle, teacher at Davie High School. Last week visitors of the George Tucker family were Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Strupe • of Lewisville, Mrs. George Feezor and daughters, Tonya and Billie, and Miss Linda Griffin, of Lexington. Mr. and Mrs. John A. Seats of Clemmons visited his mother, Mrs. Burton Seats, Sunday. Mr. and Mrs. Bill Brock, Frank and Gela Brock visited relatives in Elkin on Sunday. Miss Pheobe Eaton who has been making her home with Mr. and Mrs. L. F. Mock on Fraternity Church Road in Forsyth County, suffered a stroke about noon Sunday and was intered into the Davie County Hospital. the former Joy Sawyer. Roger was reared in the Fork Com­ munity and ordained by the church January 14, 1973. Martha Jane Merrell was awarded a $100 grant. She Is a second year student at Wingate College studying to be a church secretary. She Is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Aubrey Merrell. She was reared in Fork community and Is a member of Fork Church. The grant of $100 was presented to Tommy Eugene Cope, the son of Mr. and Mrs. Charlie Cope. He now attends Davidson County Community College and is married to the former Sandra Carter. He was licensed into the ministry on December 29, 1973 at Fork Baptist Church. He was reared in Fork community and is a member of Fork Baptist Church. Making the presentations were Wilson and Libby Merrell, parents of Melissa. They were assisted by the Scholarship Committee established to a administer the fund. Members of the Scholarship Committee are: Wade H. Leonard, Jr., CThairman, Ann Barnhardt, Hilda Seaford, P.M. Johnson and Mary Frances Hendrix. m - ' Golden Anniversary Mr. and Mrs. Hugh Gartner were honored on their SOth wedding anniversary when their children entertained at their nome on Route 4, Statesville. was prepared and serv^ the A family dinner . . ^ children: BillCartner, Jim Cartner, D. R. Gartner and Mrs. Clarence Comer, all of Route 4, Statesville; Jack Cartner of Route 1, Mocksvllle; and Mrs. Edgar Honevcutt of Kannapolis. One son, Bob Gartner, was unable to attend because he is serving in the U. S. Air Force and is presently stationed in the Philippine Islands. Thirty-one guests attended Including the couple’s children; 12 grandchildren and 1 great grandchild. Early N.C. School History Given North Carolinians have always been singularly proud of their excellent education systems -• from the early grades on through graduate studies at many fine univer­ sities. However, how many know that New Bern was the site of the first publicly supported school in North Carolina? The New Bern School, opened the first week in January, 1764, became only the second private secondary school in English America to receive a charter. But two centuries ago, establishment of a school was not as simple as matter as voting a school bond issue. Time and again during colonial years monies were ap­ propriated for schools but were used for other purposes; Among the first mentions of school in THE COLONIAL RECORDS OF NORTH CAROLINA is the 1749 bill for a free school introduced by John Starkey of Onslow County. In 1754, the sum of 6,000 pounds was authorized for schools, but unfortunately, was diverted for military purposes. Other funds appropriated from time to time were disallowed in England. The 1758 Assembly asked > King George II that some monies for schools and chur­ ches be provided by the Crown in return for war aid, but ob- ' jections were raised up to 1763. It is reported that even mer­ chants objected to the use of public funds for schools. However, Royal Gov. Arthur Dobbs recognized the lack and frequently emphasized the need for schools and more schoolmasters in the province. In 1760 he proposed to the Colonial Assembly that each parish vestry raise funds to pay the parish clerk and register to act as schoolmaster, and also serve as substitute church reader. The money was raised, but was again channeled to the military. Another appeal from Governor Dobbs for clergymen and schoolmasters and repeated requests by Parson James Reed, the Assembly chaplain, went out in 1762 to the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel. These pleas finally brought response. During December, 1763, Thomas Thomlinson arrived in New Bern from Cumberland County, England, and on Jan. 7 opened a school to teach children “ in such branches of useful learning as are necessary in several of the offices or stations in life, and imprint on their tender minds the principles of the Christian religion agreeable to the establishment of the Church of England.” The school was an almost immediate success. In March 1764, the Assembly provided the schoolmaster a residence, and a school building for his classes In 1766. However, the conscientious schoolmaster, to see the building completed, lent the money - half his annual salary - - for the floors and brick chimneys until he could obtain more pledges. The Assembly, which met in the fall, came to his rescue. Historian Alonzo Dill writes that the Assembly “passed an act authorizing contributors to the school to choose eleven trustees from their number, to be known as the Incorporated Society for Promoting and Establishing the Public School in New Bern, and levying for a seven-year period a duty of one penny a gallon on all spirituous liquors imported into Neuse River.” At that time, Thomlinson wrote of the new school, “ We have now a prospect of a very flourishing school in the town of New Bern and which indeed has been greatly wanting for several years past. . .” Soon, he needed an assistant, and early in 1767 James Mc- cartney, a native of Ireland, arrived to assist Thomlinson with school. A year later, McCartney left for England where he became a candidate for the ministry. Lack of money and other difficulties forced Thomlinson to give up the school in April, 1772 with the pupils heavily in debt to him. Master Thomlinson then moved to Rhode Island for his health. During the Revolution, the school was disorganized, but was reactivated by the Assembly in 1784, and given the name of the New Bern Academy. The frame schoolhouse building, which had also served as a meeting place for the General Assembly from time to time, was destroyed by fire in 1795. The once-beautiful Tryon Palace was then used for a schoolhouse for a time, since the state capital had been moved to the new town of Raleigh. Another school building, built in 1806, Is stQl standing. EXuing the Civil War, the “ new” building was used as a school started by northerners, and then later served as a hospital for nor­ thern soldiers. The 1806 building recently had its front portico restored. And It is still the dream of other New Bernians to restore entirely the old schoolhouse, site of many a lesson in readin’, ‘ritin’ and ‘rithmetic for many distinguished North Carolinians who claim New Bern Academy as their alma mater. Sub-District Youth Week-End The Davie County U. M. Y. F. Sub District is having a Youth Weekend for all Davie County Youth, January 10, 11, 12 at Liberty United Methodist Church in Cooleemee. This weekend, of fun and fellowship among Christians, will start Jan. 10 at 6:30 p. m. with a covered dish meal. Saturday’s activities will start at 9:30 a. m. - 5:00 p. m. and Saturday’s night activities beginning at 7:30 p. m. The weekend will conclude Sunday with special church services at Liberty and a covered dish meal. Young people from surrounding counties will be attending with Miss Rachel Cody from Kannapolis co­ ordinating the weekend’s ac­ tivities. Youth Group Will Sing The Believers, a youth singing group from Cooleemee, were guest singers at the Thomasboro Presbyterian Church, Charlotte on Sunday night, January 5. There were 15 young people, accompanied by the Rev. Jim Knight and several of their parents who attended the service. A group of singers from Thomasboro will return the visit here on Sunday ,January 12, when the “ Ekklesia” will be guests at the Cooleemee Presbyterian Church at 7:30 p.m. This group is composed of about 40 youth. Heaven Nothing is farther than the earth from heaven; nothing is nearer than heaven to earth. Hare k k k k k k k k k k k k kgivetothe mnncH Of Dimes In Oavie County Sunday, January 12 Your support will ba appreciatad FACTORY TO YOU C u s to m Made Furniture LIVING ROOM FURNITURE ALL STYLES OF RECLINERS LOVE SEATS & ODD CHAIRS All Styles Made To Meet Your Needs. Early American, Traditional, Contemporary, Spanish. We Have The Finest Factory Selected Nylon Florals, Solid Herculons, Plaid Herculons, Floral Cottons, Vinyls, In All Colors, All Solid Oak Frames. PRICED AT NEAR WHOLESALE PRICES Spanish 2 Piece Sofa & Cliair Regular *329.00 SALE ‘269.00 2 Piece Sofa And Cliair Regular *299.95 SALE *148.95 Limited Quantity-2 Piece Early American Suit In Herculon Or Vinyl Regular *329.00 SALE *259.00_______________ Large Selection Of National BRANDS OF BEDROOM—LIVING ROOM, DINING ROOM, FURNITURE. American Drew > Basiett • Craftique • Lazy-Boy Reclinen • National Mattress Reupholstwy Worii Done At Reasonable Prices Edwards Furniture & Uphol Ca Modiwille.N.C.Hwy.64W.RLl Phone 634>2244 12 - DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, THURSDAY, JANUARY 9, 1975 NONE SOLD TO DEALERS O ooleem ee SUPER MARKET OPEN EVERY NIGHT TIL 8:30 P.M. SAVE WITH OUR LOWER PRICES c Lb. LEAN & TENDER CENTER CUT PORK CHOPS $ |2 9 Lb. I PORK — LEAN PORK BACK BONES895 100% PURE EXTRA LEAN GROUND BEEF * 6 9 ' U.S. CHOICE WESTERN BONE IN RIB STEAKS $159 Lb. I U.S. CHOICE WESTERN WHOLE BEEF RIBS $109 Lb. I CUTS IN STEAK FREE U.S. CHOICE WESTERN BONELESS RIB STEAKS 89 Lb. HAIR SPRAY REG. HARD HOLD 0*^^ CanUNSCENTED PHILLIPS — BLACKEYE PEAS — GREAT NORTHERN PINTOES 40'Oz. PKG. 16 AMERICAN SUCES MtnUMBOMOCaiCHHKRXW IESIICISIV4 0nAI«ll*l 'lOlS Kraft Individually Wrapped American Sliced Cheese 8 'O Z . PKG. LOG CABIN BUTTERED SYRUP 24.01. BTl.99' Viva JUMBO ROLL Dec. t e s 4 7 Hl-C ASSORTED DRINKS 46-01. Can 47 EXTRA LEAN PORK CHOPS 59 ENDCUT PORK CHOPS 89 c Lb. WAFER THIN PORK CHOPS 69 u . DUNCAN HINES CAKE MIXES 62 c Box ALL PURPOSE BLEACH CLOROX Vi Gal. Ctn. YELLOW ONIONS Lb. U.S. No. 1 — Baking — Purpio Mesh Russet _ A Potatoes’s 7 7 Gerber's Strained BABY FOOD 4 V 2 Oz. Jar 13 BANQUET FROZEN MEAT PIES • CHICKEN • TURKEY • BEEF YOUR CHOICE 8-Oz. Pies Mix or M MIRACLE WHIP MARGARINE STICKS BETTY CROCKER POTATO BUDS 16.5 01. Packigo 77 PET DRY MILK A jS X K j p g B q x Laundry $ 1 5 9 Detergent Maxwell House INSTANT COFFEE 10-oz. JAR $ Satah Myers ^ves Skeater a piU. Skeater Is 98! Fam ilj Pet Almost Haman^ “Skeater" show off his new rain suit, which was a Crhistmas gift. D A V IB C O U N T Y Features - IB LJanuary 9, 1975 Story by Marlene Benson Photos by Janies Barringer There are dogs . . . and there are dogs! And then, there is “ Skeater,” the little chihuahua and feist mixture, who doesn't know he’s a dog, “ Skeater” has always been just another member of the Myers family. His masters, John Henry Myers and his two sisters, Sarah and Alma Myers of Route 4, Mocksville treat “Skeater” with the same love and attention that parents show their children. “ Skeater” celebrated his 14th birthday Tuesday, January 7, and if one year in the life of a dog is equivalent to seven years in a human’s life, Skeater is 98. Should a p&son live t)o be almost 100 years old, they would have to live with the ailments that automatically accompany the aging process of the body. This is also true with “ Skeater.” He has heart trouble and a chronic case of asthma, which Sarah says he got from her. She explained that John Henry bought “Skeater” when he was just a little puppy for their mother, who died four years ago, and Sarah had been bothered with asthma for years. “Skeater” has always slept on thp foot of Sarah’s bed. However, she says she has not been bothered with asthma since they got “Skeater” but “Skeater” now has a bad case of asthma. “ He’s got my asthma,” Sarah says With belief that such a thing is possible. It is quite obvious that “Skeater” does have asthma, or at least he breathes like an asthmatic victim when he gets excited and the vet has diagnosed it as such. Every night before bedtime, John greases “Skeater’s” throat with men- thalatum, to help him breathe easier. Each and every morning at 5 a. m. “Skeater” makes one of them get up and give him a baby aspirin. Sarah says she usually does this little cliore. After he.gets his aspirin, he likes to lie on the sofa. Sarah says “ He wants me to always leave the den I light on and to cover him up.” When she gets “ Skeater” nice and comfy, she then goes back to bed. After dinner, “Skeater” takes a little green heart pill, and he. gets a white digestion pill in the mornings. He also takes milk of magnesia tablets and kidney pills. Sarah says he always lets them know when he needs medication “and the kind of pill he needs.” For instance, when “Skeater” needs a kidney pill, Sarah says “He’ll chatter his teeth.” And whenever he does want something, regardless of whether it is food, ice cream, or a pill, they all agree that you don’t ignore “Skeater.” "He will aggravate you to death until you get him what he wants.” And when he gets sick, Sarah added, “Skeater” wants all three of us to do something.” When “Skeater” wants to go outside, he helps one of them put his little sweater on. They tell him, just like a child, "to hold his foot up” and he does. Once his head starts through the neck of the sweater, all they have to do is hold it. "Skeater” does the rest by walking forward until it is all the way on.To takeoff the sweater, they just have to hold it and “Skeater” backs right out of it. It is a fascinating gesture to watch “Skeater” come in from outside. Someone always has to clean his little feet and he never lets them forget. Like a child, “Skeater” always waits for the car if one of them is gone. Whenever they pull into the drive, they always have to stop and let “Skeater” ride into the garage. "He’ll be hungry and won’t eat a mouth- (continued on page 2B) John Henry Myers lends Skeater a hand with his sweater at left. Skeater and John take a stroll outside (center photo) and at right, Sarah cleans his feet as soon as he comes back inside. 2B - DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD. THURSDAY. JANUARY <), 1975 Skeater Almost Human (continued from page IB) ful,” Sarah says, “ until we pretend to eat his food." The neighbors all know “Skeater” and talk to John, Sarah and Alma about him just as if he were a child. As a matter of fact, Alma says one of their neighbors, Mrs. Don McCoy, even gave him a new rain suit for Christmas. This was the first rain suit for a dog that they had ever seen, but it has proved to be a worthwhile piece of clothing for little “Skeater." “ It’s really gonna hurt when we los# “Skeater,” Sarah says realizing his age and physical condition are two strikes against him. However, in the meantime, they are all grateful for the years of happiness they have shared with this little fellow and plan to enjoy him for just as long as they possibly can. “ Skeater” has no complaints - a dog never had it so good! The call this hand towel Skeater’s “ housecoat” because when it’s cold he wears it around the house and it is also used as cover for him. UNC-G Professor Reports Couples Are Happier When They Share More Leisure Time By Nancy von Herrmann UNC-G News Bureau To increase marital satisfaction, couples should spend their leisure time in joint activities with each other after they are first married and also during the post-parental-period after the children leave home. This is a key finding in a recent study by Dr. Dennis K. Orthner, a family relations specialist in the School of Home Economics at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. Orthner studied a cross- section of middle income, non­ student couples in Tallahassee, Fla. while he was completing requirements for his Ph.D. ' from Florida State University. For this study, he excluded the presence of children and looked for the use of leisure time by the husband and wife as a couple. He divided leisure events into three categories: individual, parallel and joint. Individual activities are those done alone such as reading or knitting. Parallel activities are those which may be done with other people but which do not require verbal interaction to take place. Examples are watching television, attending church or a play and listening to records. Joint activities are those which require interaction between participants. They include such things as playing games, visiting friends and camping. He further divided parallel and joint activities into two categories, those done with the spouse and those done with others besides the spouse. From the study Orthner concluded that it was not so much the amount of leisure time families had, but how they used it that counted. “ In the early years of a marriage and immediately after the children leave home, the couple is having to adjust or readjust to each other,” he explained. ‘‘They must have open com­ munication to resolve this conflict of adjustment, and it appears that couples who participate in joint activities with the spouse are more likely to develop open com­ munication." Orthner quickly pointed out that none of these activities is bad. “ There are times when each spouse participates in individual and parallel ac­ tivities, and this is not harm­ ful,” he said. “ But when either the individual or parallel becomes dominant, then it appears to be detrimental to the marriage. Women especially seem to react negatively to a dominance of individual ac­ tivities by indicating a greater dissatisfaction in the marriage." Orthner reported that almost all the couples questioned spent some time with persons other than the spouse. “ But here again, couples who indicated a predominance of these ac­ tivities showed much lower rates of marital satisfaction," ho said. He cautioned that' the par­ ticipation in joint activities with a spouse would have the reverse effect on a husband and wife who had opposite ideas about what each's role should be. “ By engaging in joint activities, they are likely to discover the wide gap between them and drift apart rather than come together," he stated. An assistant professor in the School of Home Economics and a research associate in the Family Counseling and Research Center at UNC-G., Orthner found that the effect of free time on couples seem to diminish while children are in the home. “ When children were at home, leisure activities of any kind didn’t have as much impact as other factors,” he said. “ Apparently at this time, the spouse's perceived success at parenting was the most important factor.” Another influence on marital satisfaction was the vacation. “ In every family that didn’t take a vacation, marital satisfaction was very low,” Orthner remarked. The research showed that although a dominance of parallel activities in the early years of marriage had a detrimental effect, this tended to be less important after some time had evolved in the union. “For example, TV watching after 15 to 20 years of marriage seemed to lose its negative effects,” the researcher said. Orthner, new to the UNC-G faculty this year, is emerging as somewhat of a pioneer in the study of leisure. “There are many global concepts retarding the use of leisure such as ‘the family that plays together, stays together,’ but there has really been little research into the area,” he said. Orthner added that the society and the institutions of society in general do a great deal to separate family members. “ There are things men do, women do, boys do and girls do, and we are not prone to change.” He cited the recent case of men in Boston who tried to get a court order to prevent boys from taking home economics. He feels that the use of leisure is becoming even more crucial since the family as a unit is moving away from the traditional family, one in which each member’s role is narrowly defined, into a companionate family in which members assume .varying roles and functions. “ In the companionate family, there is a flexibility in roles and openness in communication which can be developed during the sharing of leisure time,” he noted. Orthner also feels that studying leisure time is more important now that Americans generally have more discretionary time. “ Fewer workers appear to want to work overtime, especially the younger workers who in­ creasingly find their jobs boring and monotonous. This is not to say that jobs are any different from earlier, but the ex­ pectations of what life is sup­ posed to be like have changed and the job no longer is the focal point for many workers.” Not only does this have im­ plications for family relations specialists, said Orthner, but it also tumbles into the related fields of sociology, physical education and recreation. “ We are examining the broader aspects of leisure such as how people use time and how they interact in this sense of freedom,” he said. Vehicle Operator's License Suspensions Suspensions and revocations of motor vehicle operators licenses for the week ending December 20th in Davie County included: Ronn J. Anderson, 18, of Advance Rt. l, suspended as of November 25, 1974 until February 25, 1975. Troy W. Meltoii, 47, of Ad­ vance Rt. 1, suspended as of December 29, 1974 until August 29, 1975. Calvin E. Willoughby of Advance, suspended as of December 27, 1974 until February 25, 1975. Larry D. Brown, 18, of Mocksville Rt. 4, revoked as of November 25, 1974 until November 25, 1975. Harold P. Campbell, 36, of Mocksville Rt. 7, suspended as of January 4, 1975 until July 4, 1975. Edward C. Cook, 36, of Mocksville Rt.2, suspended as of December 28, 1974 until January 27, 1975. Walter Holman, 50, of 904 Railroad Street, Mocksville, revoked as of December 2, 1974 until December 2, 1975. Clement Howell, 60, of Mocksville, revoked as of November 10, 1974 until November 10, 1978. Joe F. Lee, 35, of Garner St., Mocksville, revoked as of December 29, 1974 until December 29, 1975. Cletus D. Seamon, 22, of Mocksville Rt. 4, revoked as of November 25, 1974, indefinitely. David K. Simpson, 24, of Mocksville Rt. 6, suspended as of December 27, 1974 until February 25, 1975. Jerry W. Smith. Sr., 31, of Mocksville, suspended as of December 27th 1974 until MD. Opportunity No man possesses a genius so commanding that he can attain emmence, unless a subject suited to his talents should present itself, and an op­ portunity occur for their development. Pliny NOTICE! The Annual Stockholders Meeting of the Mocksville Savings And Loan Association Will Be Held In Its Offices on the Premises Thursday, January 23rd, at 7 p,m. By Robert L. Stear, D.V.M. As Americans become more security conscious, the demand for large dogs increases. It seems a bargain to get a wat­ ch d og-ch ild p ro te cto r- companion all for the price of one animal. Unfortunately, this trend is leading to the hasty and in­ discriminate breeding of large dogs. As breeders of shepherds, retrievers and other large types strive to keep up with the demand, they are less careful to eliminate defective breeding stock. As a result, a condition called congenital hip dysplasia is showing up with increasing frequency. Hip dysplasia is a hereditary disease and involves improper development of the ball-and- socket joint of the hip. If the Sqcket is too shallow or the ball too flat, a misshapen joint is produced which tends to come out of place. Mild cases result in varying degrees of lameness. Acute cases cause the hip to fall completely out of the socket, making walking virtually impossible. Also, arthritis seems to accompany the con­ dition. The disease occurs in large and medium-sized breeds like the German shepherd, St. Bernard, golden retriever, boxer and Great Dane. The condition is rare in small dogs. Signs of hip dysplasia start appearing in puppies from 3 to 6 months old. Lameness is the first symptom. As the disease progresses, the dog will show increasing reluctance to stand, and may sit with the hind legs stretched out to one side at an unnatural angle. When the dog does move, it has an abnormal walk, with a pronounced swaying of the rear quarters. If your pet shows signs of lameness, make an ap­ pointment to see your veterinarian. With the help of an X-ray, he will decide if the cause of the lameness is hip dysplasia or just a temporary dislocation caused, perhaps, by an accident. If your veterinarian diagnoses a case of hip dysplasia, he may suggest pain relievers, rest and limited exercise to make your pet more comfortable. Unfortunately, nothing short of surgery will stop the progress of a severe case. If you wish, your veterinarian may be able to suggest an orthopedic surgeon to evaluate your pet and decide if surgery would help. In older dogs, removal of some of the bone may reduce pain and irritation even though it will not restore the normal method of walking. In younger pets, where arthritis has not yet appeared, the hip can sometimes be reconstructed by surgery. To avoid this problem, ask to see the parents if possible when you decide to buy a shepherd or other large puppy. Also, examine the other puppies in the litter, since some affected animals show symptoms earlier than others. Since 1966, some kennels have been registering their breeding stock with the Orthopedia Foundation for Animals, which certifies that they are dysplasia-free. ■ Puppies from O.F.A. registered stock have a greatly reduced chance ofgetting the disease. If your pet does develop hip dysplasia, you should not use it for breeding purposes, since Uiis will only pass the trait on to another generation of dogs, I.ifr Remember that life is neither pain nor pleasure; it is serious business, to be entered upon with courage and in a spirit of Sflt-sacrifice. Dr TiK'gurx illr Tanglewood Barn Theatre To Offer Free Tickets To Area Underprivileged Lynn Johnson, Community Associate of Northwest Arts Development and Ron Law, Producing Director of the Piedmont Repertory Company, which operates the Tanglewood Barn Theatre, have announced Juno 29, July 13, July 27, August 10 and August 24. Project FUN will be coor­ dinated by Ms. Johnson and Mr. Low. Participants of the program will come from the fivc-counly area served by a program to provide free ' Northwest Arts Development, tickets for the underprivileged Northwest Arts Development is to the Tanglewood Barn Theatre. The free ticket program will be called Project FUN (Free for Un­ derprivileged Neighbors). IjOW income people will be able to attend special Sunday evening performances at the Tanglewood Barn Theatre, which is located at Tanglewood Park in Clemmons, N. C. There will be a 7:00 p.m. curtain for these performances on June 15. designed to help coordinate, promote and initiate cultural activities in Davie. Forsyth, Stokes. Surry and Yadkin Counties. Ms. Johnson slated that through Project FUN, disenfranchised citizens in the five-county district, who otherwise could not afford tickets, will have an opportunity to experience professional theatre. Participants of the project from the counties of Yadkin, Davie. Stokes and Surry will includc such groups as FEP VII participants. Head S(ar( parents, YEP youth groups senior citizen groups. Scheduling and tran­ sportation lor these groups will bo provided by the Yadkin Valley Economic Development District under the supervision of Ms. Linda Burchelte, Boonvillc, N, C, and The North­ west Regional Library under the supervision of Mrs. Jane McRae, Elkin, N. C, Forsyth County participants will include such groups as Goodwill In­ dustries. N, C. Jewish Home, Experiment in Self-Reliance and the Downtown Church Group. Law stated that funding for purchase of these tickets is Ixjing sought from foundations and corporations in the five- county district. There will be 300 tickets available for each of the six productions. The amount needed is $7,200.00. Ms. Johnson said that this unique program has great merit and will be a valuable resource by which the arts can become an essential factor in the growth of the rural communities in the Northwest District. The six-play season to be presented at the Tanglewood Barn Theatre is fi Rms RIv Vu; The Lion in Winter; Play It Again. Sam; Finishing Touchcs; Critic's Choice and The Dark at the Top of the Stairs. -B Y JIM DEAN I don't know how a large covey of quail ever arrives at a mutual decision-maybe they lake a quick straw vote-but I do know one thing for certain. Once they have decided to leave a place, they do it together and they do it quickly. One moment, Mike and I were moving boldly through the dense undergrowth and briers. Cindy was to our left standing high and proud. Then the birds were up and the air was full of partridges. One passed so close over my head that it nearly brushed my cap. I whirled around and snapped off a fleeting shot. It would have been an excellent peice of shooting had I been hunting pine trees. I joined Mike who was still staring into the woods with his gun poised and both barrels smoking. “ You gel any?” I asked. He shrugged his shoulders helplessly. In mock anger, he snatched his hat off his head and pitched it to the ground. He was about to stomp on it when we both began to laugh un­ controllably. “ I can’t believe it!” Mike shouted. “ The only covey shot we’ve had today, and we both muffed it. We oughta go back to . beanshooters.” “ Your dogs deserve better than this,” I admitted. Of course, we could have exchanged dog-eared excuses for missing those birds, but the truth is inescapable. No matter how we hunt, we are still awed and flustered by the noisy violence of a dozen or so quail blowing out of a peafield like the shards of a grenade. Sure, I know plenty of pwple who say that bobwhite quail are easy targets. I’m sure you’ve been told that many times. Have you noticed toat these people are always dressed in street clothes? However, it is true that some quail are easier to hit than others. Ironically, it its axiomatic that the difficulty of attaining a kill increases in Conservation Directory Liste Wiio’s Wlio In Environmental Movement proportion to the number of targets within shooting range at any given time. Or to put it another way, the more birds you have in the covey, the less likely you are to hit one. A scientist will tell you that this is ridiculous, and it is. But it’s still true. A novice might also expect that advance warning-a dog on point-would aid the hunter in achieving success. Not so. Your dog may hold a point on a covey for 30 minutes while you psyche yourself into readiness, but when those birds get up, your reflexes automatically turn to Jello. Most of the fine wingshots I know--and Mike is one of them- readily admit that they are more likely to miss an open field shot at a pointed covey of quail than a single bird that gets up wild in the middle of Dante’s Inferno. There is a good reason for this. Dante’s Inferno is a peaceful and orderly place compared to the nucleus of a covey rise (from which there is rarely any fallout). Our own experience on this particular day furnishes typical proof. For various reasons I choose not to pursue at the moment, Mike and I spent most of the day in the thickets hunting singles from busted coveys. We had six points and collected six quail. At the risk of seeming im­ modest, we shot very well. However, towards the end of the day when we were con­ fronted with the situation described earlier-an honest covey rise-our carefully honed talents fled as quickly as*the quail. I think I can speak for Mike- and certainly m yself-if I simply say that we both hope the day never dawns when we have become so jaded that we can stifle a yawn and routinely pick out and shoot a couple of cock birds from an erupting covey. If that day ever arrives. I’ll sell my shotguns and take up something less exciting like dismatling time bombs. Need to find out about botanical societies in Hawaii? Or about forest preservation groups in New England? Or do you need the name of the chairman of the Marine Mammal Commission? The answers to these questions and thousands more can be found in the National Wildlife Federation’s 1975 edition of the “ Conservation Directory", The new 20th edition lists more than 1,500 conservation organizations and over 8,000 individuals, “ The many new listings this year for international, national, interstate, state and federal organizations indicate clearly that the conservation movement is still growing," said Gloria Decker, editor of the Library News A cactus is more than a prickly little pest! If you don’t believe it, ask Vivian Poole who has arranged a part of her collection of eighty seven cacti to provide a most interesting display in the Davie County Public Library. Collecting these little plants with the intriguing names can develop into an easy and inexpensive hobby, ac­ cording to Vivian, who loves them and believes that talking to them helps them to thrive. (Some varieties are expensive, however!) Friends contribute additional specimens to the group she owns, and she loves it, for the care is simple - once a month watering - and it is a real thrill to wait several years and then have a beautiful bloom appear on a plant! Forty varieties are in the display case, many of then in bloom. So come during January and see the Mules Ears, Yello Bunny Ear, the Healing Plant, the Good Luck Plant and others. This hobby just may prove contagious! Reserve the evenings of January 13th and 27th to see the Sherlock Holmes Thriller, STUDY IN SCARLET and the Alfred Hitchcock film, THE THIRTY NINE STEPS, at the Davie County Public Library, free entertainment for the general public! Films will begin at promptly 7 p.m. 220-page reference volume. The new book lists the ad­ dresses, activities, and officers of such diverse organizations as the African Wildlife Leadership Foundation, Inc., in Nairobi, Kenya, and the International Pacific Halibut Commission, established by a convention between the U. S. and Canada in 1923. A large section devoted to the federal government lists all Congressional committees and subcommittees concerned with the environment as well as government departments and agencies. The largest section is devoted to citizen organizations, listed by states, including NWF affiliates in all 50 states, Puerto Rico, Guam, and the Virgin Islands. The new ‘‘Conservation Directory” also includes: . A guide to major colleges and universities offering < professional training for careers in conservation and environmental matters. . An index of periodicals and directories of interest to con­ servationists. . A listing of fish and game administrators in the U.S. and Canada. . References to audio-visual and bibliographic materials. . An alphabetized name index of officials and leaders in conservation work. “The section listing foreign government conservation and environmental offices is twice the size of that section last « year," said Mrs. Decker, “and ' that reflects a growing awareness that the need for conservation is worldwide.” The 1975 “ Conservation Directory” , a standard reference tool for con­ servationists for nearly two decades, will be available in mid-January at a cost of $2.50 from the National Wildlife Federation, 141216thSt., N. W ., Washington, D.C. 20036. Liberty The spirit of liberty is not, as multitudes imagine, a jealousy of our own particular rights, but , a respect for the rights of others, and an unwillingness that any one, whether high or low, should be wronged or trampled under foot. Channing Summertime English Ironstone Dinnervvare. ’fo u r first {dace setting free! Save $25 or m ore at Northwestern and your first place setting o f Sum mertime dinnerware is free. Then each time you save $25 or more, you can yet an additional place setting for only $3.95. Northwestern has all the accessory pieces, too. A lon g with the highest interest rates allowed by law. Som ething you’re always sure to get at Northwestern! THE NORTHWESTERN BANK One free place sctling per family- Free iiffer ends Februarv 2K. FDIC iniiurance has been increased to S40.000. Member FDIC Clemmons, N.C.- -Intersection of Hwy. 158 and 801 in Davie County DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, THURSDAY, JANUARY 9, 1975 - 3B Davie Takes Double Win Over Nortli Rowan; S. Rowan Here Friday Davie High won a doublohcader at Spen.;er Tuesday night over their arch rivals North Rowan. Coach Billl Peeler's girls turned on the steam to notch their second win of the season with a 52 to 16 win over the North Rowan lassies. Coach Bob Henry’s bovs continued their wnning streak with a 75 to 57 victory over the Cavaliers. The Davie girls jumped out .to a 12 to 6 first quarter lead and increased this to a 32 to 10 count at halftime. In the third quarter the Eaglettes netted 17 points while holding North Rowan to a single foul shot to lead 49 to 11 going into the final stanza. With Davie playing most ot their second siring, the final quarter was a low scoring affair with Davie netting 3 and Nort Rowan 5, to make the final score 52 to 16 in favor of Davie The Davie girls are now 2 an v in the conference. Cathy Hutchens led the attack for the Davie girls with 20 points. Ronda Smoot had 15; Debra Howelll 7; Connnie Howard 7; Connie Dixon 2; Wanda Beale , 1. The War Eagles poured 23 points through the hoop as they jumped out to a 23 to 4 first quarter lead. Things simmered: down a bit in the second quarter as Davie scored 14 to, 15 for the Cavaliers to make it 37 to 19 at halftime. In the third quarter Davie had 20 points to 18 for North Rowan and it was 57 to 37 going into the final . In the final i|uarter Davie had 18 points to 20 for North Rowan to make the final 75 to 57.. The War Eagles had four players in the double figures Robert Pulliam led the attack with 31 points, a career high. Dwayne Grant had 18; Larry Mock had 12; Kim Wilson, 10; Bill Cozart and Jeff Barker 2 each. The War Eagles are now 6 to 3 in conference play. South Rowan will play here Friday'night and the schedule lists Davie as having an open date, Tuesday. The War Eagles knocked the East Rowan Mustangs out - of first place in the North Pied­ mont Conference last Friday night at East. A field goal by Dwayne Grant with 39 seconds left to play gave the Eagles a hard-earned 66-65 victory in an exciting battle from start to finish. Earlier, the East Rowan girls strengthened their grip on first place in the conference chase with a 74-46 romp. It was the second highest total in a single game for the defending Western North Carolina High School Activities Association cham­ pions of the season. The victory was the eighth straight in the conference for the East girls. They are now 10- 1 for the campaign. lODAY’S PORTSMAN ' rtow To Catch Bass In Winter • During the winter, bass find a new home. It is in Ideep water where the temperature is more ' cpmfortable than in shallow areas. That easy spinner bait and shallow water lures ot a few days ago are gone. All fish — not only bass — are harder to find and even more difficult to catch in the winter than in warmer weather, according to the pros at Zebco. 'Fish are cold-blooded creatures whose body metatolism and activity slow down to almost a halt generally according to size, just off deep . old river channels and in the beds of old inundated lakes. The best all-around lure for these bunched-up bass is unteubtedly the age-old favorite, the jig-n-eel. The standard jig has a lead head on a single hook with a body of feathers, nylon, hair or a rubber skirt. The better sizes for siiper-depth angling range from % to W* ounces. The eel is a pork rind, rubber or plastic strip, (rom 2 to 6 inches in length, Impaled on the hood (2-0 to 4-0) and allowed to trail seductively behind the jig. This combination lure may be vertically jigged beside steep bluffs, in standing timber or just along the edge of deep drop-offs. It probably produces best though when cast a long dlstane across a submerged point, over an underwater knoll or vertically along an old creek or river channel and allowed to sink to the bottom. The retrieve should be slow, very slow, and with soft bounces along the bottom. This bottom-hopping very I of your line. is done by gently flexing the rod tip as the lure is reeled In. Oiten the "take" or “ pick-up" of the lure is [entle, and often it is only a slij mg ot weightlessness on the end of you Don’t wait, at the first sensation of “something different" set the hook with vigor and be ready for a cold-weather tug-of-war from possibly your biggest bass of the year. ;Bla^Powder Exemption Bill , Actions taken by Congress passed a Black Powder Exemptn Bill (S. 1083). This Bill is designed to offer .relief to restrictions imposed by the Organized Crime ,Control Act of 1970 (PL 91-452) upon legitimate users of antique firearms by preventing them from obtaining sufficient quantities of their only suitable ^rope lant. i Many law-abiding American citizens use black powder firearms tor historically oriented recreation, including target shooting, hunting, historical ^reenactments and demonstrations... ; “ The passage of this legislation, aimed at lifting |he restrictions on the purchase and storage of black ^wder, paves the way for many millions ot Americans to enjoy historial reenactments, pageants, and shooUng matches as well as those which will be Jield In conjunction with the forthcoming Bi-Centennlal celebration," said General Maxwell E. |Uch, Executive Vice-President of the National Rifle Association. “ I have made my personal view known to the President urging him to act quickly’in Signing this piece ot legislation into law. This ' srtalnlyas law-abidir certainly a step In the right direction for the millions of law-abiding Americans who enjo' " ' t-ecreation o f sport shooting with' Americans who enjoy the wholesome ------------ - sport shooting with black powder,” general Rich concluded. I [The American Sportsman Premieme > “ The American Sportsman", will start its llth consecutive season on the ABC Television Network ^day. This year's premiere will feature an |«ur-long special program title "Following the Tunda The special details the life style of the wolf, which Is now in danger of extinction. The film was made in Northern Canada with virtually all the filming done |n the remote outposts of civilization. ; The focus for the program is the long and arduous annual journey through the Canadian Northwest lerritories of the caribou, the principal source of food for the tundra wolf, where the caribou goes and the Inherent drama of this symbiosis is at the heart of this {elevisi^ documentary. : The special is narrated by Robert Redford and airs 9C1 ABC Television 3:30-4:30 p.m. The East Rowan boys suf­ fered only their second con­ ference setback in the nightcap. It left them with a 6-2 mark. West Rowan moved into first place with a 73-66 decision over South Iredell. West owns a 7-2 loop record'. East is 7-3 for the season. Following Grant’s game- winning goal. East got two opportunities for a goal. Harvey Robertson missed with 15 seconds to play. Larry Mock recovered the rebound for the Eagles and was fouled. He missed his free throw and East captured the ball. Brent Bost missed a desperation shot with two seconds to play. Grant got the rebound as the final whistle sounded. Robert Pulliam and Grant combined to account for 49 points. Pulliam'was high scorer with 28. Grant had 21. Mock contributed 16. Rick Vanhoy and Kevin Abel were the big guns for the Mustangs. Vanhoy had a career high of 22. Abel scored 19. Abel provided the punch in the first half and Vanhoy did most of his scoring in the second half. He did it in sensational fashion. He made eight of 10 from the floor in the last half, including his last seven attempts. He made all six field tries in the last quarter. Both 'teams scored 30 field goals. East made exactly 50 percent of its attempts from the field. Davie County sank 46.9 percent. It took four more field goal attampts. Davie got its winning edge at the foul line where it outscored the Mustangs by a single point, 6-5. East dominated the early portion of the game and held the biggest lead at 12-6. Then Davie County rallied to cut the deficit to 20-18 at the end of the first period, Pulliam and Mock led a Davie Ck)unty surge that propelled the Eagles out front at 26-24 mid­ way the second stanza and they went to the dressing room with a 32-30 halftime advantage. Davie built up a four-point spread in the third period at 38- 34, but the Mustangs charged back to pull ahead by 39-38 on a three-|»int play by Abel and a two-pointer by Robertson. The teams then exchanged the lead with the Eagles holding a slim, 48-47, cushion at the end of the third period. Pulliam ushered the Eagles to a three-point lead at 54-51 but Vanhoy look charge for the Mustangs. He kept East in the game with four straight goals, cutting the margin to 56-55 with 4:50 to go. Walter Sifford shoved East ahead at 57-56. Bost followed with a goal for a three-point, 59-56, lead. But Davie County fought back. Grant and Mock scored to regain the lead at 60-59. Abel scored for East, 61-60. East regained the basketball with 2:05 to play and stalled for a while. Vanhoy scored to put East out front by 63-60 but Grant reduced the margin to a single point for Davie County. Vanhoy scored again for East, putting the Mustangs ahead by 65-62 with 70 seconds to go. Pulliam pumped in a jumper from in front of the key to cut the East lead back to one again, 65-64. Abel missed a free throw with 55 seconds to go and the Eagles got the basketball. Then came Grant's game-winning goal. Cristy Earnhardt was the big star for the East girls. She collected 24 points. He got 14 of them in the first half. Ear­ nhardt hit eight in the opening quarter as East took a 16-10 lead. She added six in the second stanza as the Mustang girls stretched their lead to 38- 22. Antionette Hacket was runner-up with 13, and Donna Misenheimer followed with 12. Ronda Smoot paced Davie Ctounty with 15. Scoring summary: C irliO irmDAVIE COUNTY (46) - Howard 4, Howetl 6. Goodtett 4, SmQot IS. Hutchens B, Athey i, Dixon, Bean, Seats 2, Beal 7. Grant.EAST ROWAN (74) — Brown 5. Sapp t, Hackett 13. Earnt>ardl. 24. Lverly. MMler, Misenheimer 13, Holshouser 4. Ritchie, Peeler 2. Jane Johnson 2. Jean Johnson 4.Score by quarters;Oavie County 10 12 U 9~44 East Rowan 1* i i 1* 17-^4 Boys GameDAVIE COtiNTV (M ) - Cot9r\, Mocfc 16. Pulliam 2B, Grant 21, Wilson.EAST ROWAN (6S) Honeycutt 4. Bost 4, Abel 19. W. SHford 4. H. Robertson 10. K. Slftord 2. Vanhoy 22.Score by quarters:Davie County M 14 16 1 »-UEast Rowan 20 to 17 10--6S Deacs To Ploy In Gator Tourney JAC KSO NVILLE , Fla. The Wake Forest basketball team, which won the Big Four Tournament last weekend, has signed to compete in the 1975 Gator Bowl, Tournament Dec. 26-27 in Jacksonville. Oxford Man No. 1 In State Tennis In year-end rankings by the North Carolina Tennis Association, an Oxford young man. Gray Yancey, has been ranked No. 1 in the state for 1974 in the boys' 14 year-old tennis singles. Yancey is the son of Mr. and Mrs. T. H. (Moo) Yancey of 511 Williamsboro Street, Oxford. He is the grandson of Mr. and Mrs. W. T. Yancey of Oxford. His grandmother is formerly of Mocksville and is the sister of Mrs. J. K. Sheek, Sr., and Miss Linda Gray Clement of Mocksville. During the ranking period for 1974, young Yancey played in eight North Carolina Junior Tournaments sanctioned by the Southern Lawn Tennis Association. He won five of the tournaments, was runner-up in two and a semi-finalist in another. Gray is six feet, three inches tall and weighs 200 pounds. His stature prompted requests at several of the tournaments for Mr. Yancey to produce the birth certificate of his son, assuring officials that he was playing in the proper age group. In a three-day tournament concluded recently at the Lynchburg Invitational tennis tournament, held at the Central Virginia Indoor Tennis Center in Lynchburg, Gray won the boys’ 16 singles. In the round of 16, he defeated Miami Dolphin Coach Skis At Hound Ears Don Shula, coach of the Miami Dolphins of the National Football League, and his family recently escaped the pressures of professional football for a skiing vacation in this area. The Shula family checked into the lodge at Hound Ears Club on Friday, Dec. 27 and stayed through Tuesday, December 31, skiing at Hound Bars and nearby Beech Mountain. "When 1 am on the slopes, it takes my mind off everything else," said Shula less than a week after the' two time Super Bowl champion Dolphins were eliminated by the Oakland Raiders in the NFL playoffs. "I enjoy it because I don't fight it. I think the better you are, the more chance you take in getting hurt because you try things you shouldn’t. I came down the big hills-but not always on my skis," Shula said in describing his approach to skiing. Shula stated that he and his family came to Hound Ears to gel away from football during a time of the year when he has been preparing the Dolphins for Super Bowl appearances for the past four years. "The people here were really nice- they saw me and spoke to me, but most of them sensed that I didn’t come up here to talk football," Shula said. This was the first trip to the North Carolina mountains for Shula, his wife and their five children who range in age from 9 to 15. Dolphin linebacker, Bob Matheson, a Boone native, recommended the area to his coach. "W e’d like to come back," Shula said. “ When we lived in the upper mid-west we went to Florida in the winter to get warm. Now we look for snow during our winter vacations, and I am glad we found out about Hound Ears and this area." CHEESE EATERS Americans seem to be a cheese-eating nation. About 15 percent of all the milk we produce in the United States goes Into the making of cheese, says Mrs. Ruby Uzzle, extension consumer marketing economist, North Carolina State Uni­ versity. Not only that, we import cheese from other countries to supplement our own. r-> I i. ? Short, Gilbert Mason, Mike Carter, Dwayne Grant, KevinD a v t c W a v E a ffle fi Wllson, Jeff Barker, Terry Smoot. 6 Front Row; Robert Pulliam, Billy Cozart, Larry Mock, Bernle Davis. Piedmoitf Stdnidings/Sch^ulV NORTH PIEDMONT BOVSConf. Overall West Rowan East Rowan North Davidson South Iredell Davie County South Rowan North Stanly North Iredell West ireden Mooresville North Rowan W L7 2 6 2 6 26 3 5 35 34 4 2 6. 2 61 7 1 7 NORTH PIEDMONT GIRLSCom. Overall East Rowan South Rowan North Stanly Mooresville South Iredell West Rowan North Iredell North Davidson Oavl« County West Iredell North Rowan ' W Le O' 7 1 6 2 S 3 5 4 S 4 4 4 3 5 I 7 1 7 0 B Bruce Knox 6-3, 6-1. In the quarters, he defeated Blitz James 6-1, 6-4 and in the semi­ finals, he posted scores of 2-6, 6- 1, and 6-0. In the finals, his win over Mike Brady was 6-3, 2-6, and 6-2. Two tennis sharpies, Gray’s father and George Duffy, were his first instructors, teaching him fundamentals of the game, and in those days, they were able to turn an easy victory over Gray. Time and experience have changed the situation and the two older players are smug about victories in recent con­ tests. J. W. Isenhour, tennis coach at N. C. State University, Raleigh, is now Gray’s coach. in last year’s final AP twll. Indiana is led by lorwaras Steve Green and Scott May, sophom ore center Kent Benson and guard Quinn Buckner, who gave up football this fall U> concentrate on basketball. Michigan, 9-1, placed llth in this week’s poll with 206 points, followM by Arizona State, 11-1, 171; Marquette, 6-2, 160; USalle, lO-l, 93;' North Carolina, 5-3, 70; South Carolina, 6-3, 66; Minnesota, 9-1, -36; Tennessee, 7-1,26, and Providence and Wake Forest, each 7-3, tied for 19th with 24 points. I (naltiv (3612. UCUA (U l 3. Loulsvllla (2)4. No. Carolina St5. Maryland 6. So California7. Kentuclir •. Alabama 9 Oregon 10. Ariipna M Michiaan 12 Arizona St13 Marquette 14. LaSalle a . No. Carolina 1} 12-010^ 10MM «t 7-1«*010-1M11-16-210-1S36 3 »-1 7-1 7 3 7 3 1.010m776 15S024ffm4U»1 171 ISO93706636 16 14 24 11. Tennesiae 19 Providencette Wake Forest ^ W hefs receiving votes, listed alphabati tally. Bradlay, CaHtornia. O m ttnvy. Central Michigan. OePaui. Florida St.. Fordham, Houston, Illinois s t , Kansas, ^ m p h is S t. Miami. Minnesota, New . Notre Dame. Oregon $c. Pann, Penn St., Purdue, Rutgers. St. Jqnn s N Y,. San Francisco. Southern li> Davie Players Lead North Piedmont Conference Scoring Friday's ScheduleConcord at Salisbury South Rowan at Oavie County North Davidson at North Rowan North Stanly at East Rowan West Iredell at Mooresville North Iredell at South Iredell Statesville at Tt>omasville Albemarle at Kannapolis Lexington at Asheboro State Drops To Fourth After Setbacit The Hooslers, rated No. 2 last week, took over the top rung on the ladder from defending national champion North Carolina State, which was ujjset by Wake Forest 83-78 Friday night. Indiana received 36 first- place votes and a total of 1,020 points from a nationwide panel of sports'writers and broadcasters. Second was undefeated UCLA, which drew 14 top votes and 988 points. Louisville, another unbeaten club, received the remaining two first-place votes and 776 points, good for third place over N.C. State, which got 762 Mints. Each of the three unbeatens climbed one notch from last week. Balloting is based on games played through last Saturday, and at that time Indiana was 12-0, UCLA 10-0, Louisville 8-0 and N.C. State 9-1. Maryland, 9-1, grabbed fifth place with 558 points, up from seventh after a week in which the Terps beat rugged Notre Dame. Southern California, 101, which lost to Fordham in the final of the ECAC Holiday' Festival, dropped one spot to slxthwith 502 points. Kentucky, 8-1, climbed two spots to seventh with 479 points; Alabama, 7-1, dropped two notches to eighth with 429; Oregon, 9-0, climl>ed two' places to ninth with 425, and- Arizona, 10-1, rounded out the top ten with 221 points, up from 14th place a week ago. The Hoosiers were co-cnam-~ pions of the Big Ten last year when they compiled a 23-S record, won the Collegiate Commissioners Association tourney and were rated ninth Three Davie County players are among the top six scorers in the North Piedmont Conference boys high school basketball scoring race. Dwayne Grant leads the race with a 20.5 average, but he is closely followed by teammate Robert Pulliam with a 20-point average. Another teammate, Larry Mock, is sixth in the conference in scoring with a 16.3 average. . The three players have scored 454 points in Davie County’s eight games for a ^6.8 average between them. The entire Davie County teams have only socred 555 points in the eight games for a 69.3 average. Grant has scored 164 points, Pulliam has 160 and Mock has 130. Following Grant and Pulliam in the conference are Charles Walker of Moooresville (19.4), Jack Campbell of South Iredell (18.7), Kevin Abel of East Rowan (17.9) and Steve Qoer of North Davidson (16.3). Deana Morrow of South Iredell holds a sturdy lead in the NPC girls scoring race. Morrow has scored 353 points in 12 games for a 29.4 average. Cathy Hutchens and Ronda Smoot are the only two Davie girls in double figures. Hut­ chens has 115 points in ten games for a 11.5 average. Smoot has 112 points in 10 games for a 11.2 average. The leaders as of last weekend were as follows: BOYS Ptayer, Ttam Grant. Oavie County Pulliam, Davte County Walker. Mooresville Campbell. South Iredeif Abel, East Rowan Mock. Davie County Cloer, North Davidson Waugh, West Iredell Moore. North Stanly Moore, South Iredell Allen, West Rowan Witherspoon, Norih Rowan Nanney, Mooresville Barringer North Stanly Hairston. North Davidson Thomas. North tredell Barnes. South Rowan Long. South Rowan OIRLS Player. Team Morrow, South Iredell Hayes. North Davidson KImrey, North SUnly Earnhardt, East Rowan Johnston, Mooresville Atorgan, ^ t Rowan Chambers, West Iredell Rhyne. South Rowan Rodgers, Mooresville Hutchens, Davie County Smoot. Davie County Bradford. South Iredell Gold. West Rowan 16.3 15.114.4 V4.214.2 13.9 13.6 W.7 TP O AVO.164 8 20.S 160 8 20.0213 11 19.4206 M 18.7 179 10 17.9 130 8 16.3 179 11 136 9115 8 1S6 11 1S6 It 125 9 150 11 102 8 .140 IJ .... 125 to 12.S124 10 12.4 120 10 12.0 TP O AVO. 353 12 29.4234 to 23.4187 8 23.4 222 t1 20.2177 10 17.7163 n 14.8 113 9 12.6135 11 12.3121 10 12.1 tt5 to t(.S ' 112 10 11.2127 12 10.6 116 11 10.S Recreation Basketball In the opening game of M ock sville's R ecreation Basketball League Jan. 2, James’ Barber Shop rolled over Heritage 81-40. Jerry Goodlett scored 28 points for James’ and Sammy Jackson had 20 to lead Heritage. Dewey’s Radiator and Body Shop topped Firestone 69-56 in the 8.00 p.m. contest, Terry Anderson had 17 points for Dewey’s. • Rick Allred and Randy McDaniel each scored 16 points for Firestone. Gray’s ■ Exxon nipped Ingersoll-Rand 51-49. Wayne Cassidy led Gray’s with 15 points. John Parker picked up 13 for IR. Jan. 6 Mocksville Insurance defeated Baity’s Tire Service 54-49 in overtime. Mickey Morrison tossed in 18 points for Mocksville Insurance, and Perry Creason scored 14 for Baity’s. ^ Davie Enterprise slipped by Firestone 45-44. Terry Johnson scored 20 points for the En­ terprise. Rick Allred took scoring honors with 24 points for Firestone. James’ Barber Shop won a close one over Ingersoli-Rand 43-42. Eric Hudson tossed in 14 points for James’ and John Parker scored 18 to .lead IR. Tattletales ' “ Woody” Correll almost set another record last Saturday night. “ Woody” , who is believed to hold the record as the most permanent and transient resident of the new jail, almost became M ocksville’s first streaker........to be caught, that is. It may have been the tem­ perature, around 30 degrees, that kept Woody in his un­ derwear. Anyway he was picked' up by Mocksville Policeman “ Cotton”. Edwards Saturday night around'10 p.m. in this attire going down Depot Street. Once Policeman Edwards had "Woody” inside the door of the warm jail............off came everything as “ Woody” made it ” bare-bottomed” to his own famiiar bunk. He was charged with public drunkenness. Tut SHOftriCT lOXlMS aaatcmOMaCCORP THE n i K t r P t m c M f ! - o o » e o THS Off OHfMr AMO TMt t t t f f u s t s r e r r c D t h e c o m e s T WITH a c o u n t o f - riSSSX M ietu .! Il-you'regomg lofigW getprolectiontfom aeoRoee.f^MCINTYRE F A R M B U R E A U IN S U R A N C E ?3Cei.'iSaw4/« MOCKSVUlt k C 6)4 Rti i34-6l60 THE LAKE NORMAN MUSIC HALL Hwy. 150... Terrell, N.C. BiG~B[UEGMSS SPECIAL Sat., Jan. 11, 8 P.M. With The Popular "COUNTRY GENTLEMEN” Tlie^tuilotte Bluegrasg Boys Adm.$3.00-Children$1.00 Adv. Ret. $3.S0-Cail 478-2498 BMHeiWertMooresvllh.. Know the joy of leasing a High Quality Ford 'You can enioy thl< plaaiure tiy leaiino it frqfn u«.That way, you eliminate • down paynvnt, and enjoy carafree car driving because we lee that your car it pro­ perly serviced. We do this for you becauM we're part of the largest deal­ er leasing organization in the worid. You get the Ford of your ehoice at rock-bottom cost. "CARS AND TRUCKS" See Us Today! Reavis Ford Inc. Leasing Division PHONE 634-2161 Hwy. 601 No.-MocksvlllexN.C Phone ToU FREE from Winrton-Salem 72W386 .NCDLNp.2416 NOTICE Due to the slow market for new home, we are now soiiciting remodelling and repair jobs. This is an excellent time to get those small jobs done-porches, carports, finish basements, panelling installed, rooms add­ ed, etc. Our staff of these skilled carpenters now have the time to take such work im­ mediately: BenChildeis Charlie Cozart David Cozart Call us today for a free estimate for your pet projecL We are scheduling work to begin in INC.LAREW-634-59 4B - DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, THURSDAY, JANUARY 9, 1975 In Search O f The American Dream XV: C itie s O n A n d O v e r T h e H ill Folk - Ways Rditor's Note; This is the ISth of 18 articles exploring the tlicmc, In Searcli of the American Dream. This article discusses the change in American life from a rural environment and suspicion of cities to the rapid growth of cities and departure from the farms. The author is professor of English and comparative literature at University of California, Irvine. By Jay Martin Copyright. 1974, Regents of the University of California Distributed by Copley News Service. During the iBth and early 19th centuries Americans orten idealized the land and the yoeman farmer who lived a simple, vigorous life on it. The Promised Land, the New Eden, the expanding frontier, with its opportunities for riches, freedom, and self-reliance, was close to the heart of the American Dream of a more virtuous, more prosperous life. Gertrude Stein summed up the American pastoral vision when she said: “ In the United States there is more room where nobody is than where anybody is. That is what makes America what it is.” Partly by contrast to the open land, and partly because they associated urban centers with Europe-corrupt Paris, diseased Rome-many Americans iooiced upon the city with suspicion. In the city lived immigrants with strange ways; here political corruption flourished, as typified by the Tweed Gang in New Vorlt City; here crime was more obvious, education more difficult, racial antagonism more evident, unemployment more frequent; here men lived cramped, stunted lives. No wonder that Jefferson, Emerson, Thoreau and other American writers drew back with distaste from urban degradation. For a long time, then, traditions associated with the open land induced many rural Americans to assume that cities were blotches on the country, necessary merely for defense, commerce and manufacture. Perhaps cities had served only these functions once, but even after they had grown to giant size, many agrarians persisted in downgrading their importance. "The great cities rest upon our broad and fertile plains,” WiUiam Jennings Bryan said in his “ Cross of Gold” speech. “ Burn down your cities and leave our farms, and your cities will spring up again as if by magic; but destroy our farms and the grass will grow in the streets of every city in the country.” METROPOLITAN EXPERIENCE But by the mid-19th Century, American life was changing, and so, subtly, were American attitudes toward the city. The urban experience of Americans was creating a new set of values which assumed that in cities a more intensely human life was possible. Throughout the mid-l9th Century, forward-looking American planners were preoccupied with the design of finer cities. Between the Civil War and World War I, while the rural population was' doubling, urban dwellers multiplied seven times. As early as 1870, G. M. Towle, a critic of American manners, noted that "city folks” were the "heroes and heroines” of the time. Many of the best American novels of the period were city books; Henry James, William Dean Howells, Stephen Crane, Theodore Dreiser, and Edity Wharton all dealt mainly with urban themes. So did most popular writers. When Horatio Alger’s young men started on a journey, some city was their inevitable destination. Some people might still see degradation in the city, but these writers and others associated it with culture, prosperity, social intercourse, created beauty, human opportunity, and all that makes for a finer, more humane, civilization-education, science, public hygiene, and the arts. Around the turn of the 20th Century, the urban planner, building on the foundation of these ideals, actually sought to create' utopian cities. The classical designs of the World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago was one such attempt. Frank Parsons, one of the earliest urban theorists, claimed in “ The City for the People” (1900) that the city might embod|y "all that is best in civilization.” These early urbanists have been succeeded by others like Lewis Mumford and Joseph Hudnut. "We are held in the city,” Hudnut writes, “ by our need of a collective life; by 010" need of belonging and sharing.” Sometime between 1915 and 1920 occurred an event as significant as the statistical closing of the frontier: the old rural majority became a minority. But cities were palpably in trouble just at the time Americans really began to appreciate urban, advantages. Part of the difficulties stemmed from rapid growth. Between 1900 and 1970, the population of every major American city at least doubled; Los Angeles grew to 25 tiipes its earlier size. Much of the growth occurred among lower income groups, creating vast slums in many cities. Many other associated problems-unemployment, low wages, inadequate housing, disease due to overcrowding and inad^uate sewer systems, poor public transportation, inefficient public services, and ineffective or corrupt municipal governments-were the result of neglect, age and poverty. By the end of World War II the problems were obvious and they were rapidly intensified in the 50s. As middle-and upper-class whites sought refuge from urban problems by moving to the suburbs, ghetto conditions worsened in the inner cities. Efficient public transportation was desperately needed, but transit equipment was wearing out. Many hospitals, schools, and city-supported and private housing were crumbling, but there was little money in city coffers for rebuilding. City income derives mainly from the property tax, but the higher that tax goes, the more it discourages improvements in land or buildings. The city must tax business heavily, but not so heavily that business leaves for the suburbs. Instead of solving urban problems, then, the property tax aggravates them and keeps the city poor. Nor could cities look to states for aid. Quite the contrary. Foreseeing and fearing a time when city populations might be able to control state affairs, rural state legislators in the 19th Century enacted laws to restrict their voting power. The result was that budgets were controlled by rural legislators, a condition not effectively altered until Baker CLIFF DWELLERS — This painting by George Wesley Bellows depicts correctly the flight from the farms to the cities and the tenements that are part of the cities. This flight contributed to overcrowding and slums, even though a better life for some Americans. vs. Carr (1962) applied the equal protection clause to votes depreciated by gerrymandering. City problems are enormously exacerbated, too, by the automobile. The automobile consumes land as voraciously as it does gasoline, polluting the landscape as much as the air. Streets, parking lots and gas stations ear up more than one-third of city space; highways in the city and outside its limits consume enoumous swaths of land. Cities need the suburbanites who travel to the city to maintain taxable business there; they need the materials which a complex trucking system delivers; but metropolitan areas become so crowded that they threaten to strangle the transportation that makes them possible, and cities can harcfly afford the space which motor vehicles take away from business. The most general problem of cities is that of design. Alexis de Tocqueville long ago described the gap existing in American planning between tlie monument^ and the “ inconsiderable product” -the indifference to the necessary, the daily, the human craving. That gap has not yet been bridged. Contemporary architects, say some critics, are trained to build monuments, not to solve problems or to plan in terms of a distinctive city culture. The continuous state of crisis and disorganization experienced by cities is also a problem of rapidly changing size and lack of control over migration into cities. No matter what policies are promoted or how much money is appropriated for the solution of urban problems, they are bound to be inadequate if the size of the city is constantly changing, making its need for schools, police, and municipal and private services completely unpredictable. Until this growth factor is controlled, cities will continue to be “ clots” in the migratory bloodstream of America, unable to keep people out or to accommodate them adequately when they arrive. THE URBAN WILDERNESS Americans have long resisted a decisive choice between the urban and rural ways of life, wanting both. Thus, as they covered the land with cities, they created a vast national park system. They also brought the country into the city, and even into the very design of new city buildings, with their fountains and flower gardens. In the early 60s, when President Kennedy urged Americans to commit themselves to a “ New Frontier,” he did not have pioneering in mind; by the time of his administration, the frontier was metropolitan, and he was urging Americans to undertake the adventure of creating a life which combined city and country ideals. President Lyndon B. Johnson continued this theme when he spoke in his 1965 State of the Union message about “ blighted cities and bleak suburbs” and committed the Great Society to "a national effort to make the American city a better and more stimulating place to live.” Poor, aged, wasted corrupt, degraded, polluted-these epithets all characterize American cities. Yet the city is, in fact, in frontier along which American development is now proceeding, the area in which the national character is being created-as it once was shaped along the edge of settlements. The city is also the richest repository for contemporary social planning-for utopian planning, if there is to be utopian planning at all. In the urban wilderness, the urban historian Sam Bass Warner, Jr., has said, reside new opportunities for the American character. Population statistics suggest that the medium- size city, of about 120,000 is becoming our most prominent urban form. During the next 30 years, probably about 100 new American cities will reach a population of 100,000. At that size, the polity is large enough to be functional and to offer a variety of life-styles, yet small enough to allow the opportunity for meaningful civic participation. Many /^ericans, even in older cities, now seem prepared to experience urban localism. Surveying the area between Boston and Washington, the French scholar Jean Gottman called it “ Megalopolis,” after the city the Greeks hoped would be the greatest in the world. He declared that he saw in it “ the dawn of a new state in human civilization. . .the cradle of a new order.” The city is the space in which will be organized whatever utopias future Americans will possess. For all their problems, cities offer the best prospect in modern life for education, enlightenment, and human interchange -the same utopia which Jefferson once thought Americans would create in the country. Courses by Newspaper was developed by UCSD Extension and funded by grants from the National Endowment for the Humanities, with a supplementary grant from the EXXON Education Foundation. Next: Revolutions of Rising Expectations by Jay Martin, professor of English and comparative literature, University of California, Irvine. Planetarium Offers New Production The Morehead Planetarium is offering a new production on one of the earth’s critical problems, the energy shortage. It is entitled “ Energy Unlimited” , and will run from Jan. 7 through Mar. 3. “ In a universe pulsing with incredible energy, earth faces power shortages,” said Planetarium Chairman, R.S. Knapp. "This program takes a look at what future sources might be tapped.” The Planetarium also offers free art and scientific displays. “ Energy Unlimited” can be seen every week night at 8 p.m., on Saturdays at H a.m., 1,3 and 8 p.m. and on Sundays at 2,3 and B p.m. In addition, it will be offered at special week-day times during the Planetarium's Another sa\/ir^ tip fton Centel How to avoid extra in stallatio n costs. Before you have new service installed, consider carefully all the styles and colors how many phones you want and exactly where you want them. If you change your mind after your phones are installed there is a charge for extra visits. | O E ^ CfNTRM. TEUPHONE COMPANY \bu can c a ll on US. Rowan Tech Offers Courses Beginning crocheting and creative stitchery will be of­ fered by Rowan Technical Institute during the winter quarter. The beginning crocheting class will include instruction in the basic pattern stitches. Beginning crocheting will meet each Monday from 12-2:00 p.m. beginning January 6 and con­ tinuing until February 24 at the City Park Center. The creative stitchery course will include various types of creative and crewel stitchery using a variety of yarns and fabrics. Instructions will also be given on creating your own design. No materials are needed for the first class. Creative stitchery will meet each Wednesday from 10-12:00 noon beginning January 8 and continuing until February 26 in room 109 at Rowan Tech. To pre-register, call the Continuing Education Division of Rowan Tech. Students are required to pay a $2 registration fee and bring their social security numbers to the first class meeting. diol 634-2121 roue STORE AND OTHIi PHWMACr COMMtNTiH E A L T H N E W S Roy Coli*ttt' Bill Collttt*. Jr. Robtrl Rtuch Beat His Head. Then, Punch Him in the Mouth! The'old time "Shrink" has shrunk. Today's psychiatric profession is highly respected. "However," says one of my witty psychiatrist acquaintances, "attaining public re­ spect was no easy tasic.” Tongue in cheek, he recalled how he wins his patients' re­ spect: "First, 1 establish, by use of a few skillfully selected questions, a belittlement of the patient. Then, by gesture and expression. I let him know that I know he is ignorant and that I have superior knowledge. And flnally, I drop a few big words to let my patient know he’s in the right place to get help. Otherwise, if there's no observable success, 1 then proceed to punch the patient in the mouth!" Ah, sol Psychiatry has come of age — but not, thank goodness, like my friend's example. We try to give you the be»t pretcriplion eervice at the loweet poetible price. Alwaye feel free lo call ue. by Roger Whitener Long before I had developed more than a passing interest in folklore. I recall that one of the interesting features appearing in the Watauga (N. C.) Democrat and several other mountain papers was a column under the heading. News From Pigeon Roost. Written by a man with no great amount of formal education, it revealed a natural style of story-telling and a down-to-earth manner of relating the everyday events in a small mountain community. It was a column to which I turned with anticipation and one in which I was seldom disappointed. Because it had not appeared in the local paper in recent months, I had come to the conclusion that the columnist had either passed away or grown weary of the task of rounding up enough information to meet a weekly newspaper deadline. Happily I have discovered that the columnist, Harvey J. Miller, and his column are both hale and hearty at this writing. In addition, through the good offices of Eliot Wigginton a compilation of 25 years of the column has been printed as an issue of Foxfire, and additional copies have been printed under the title. News From Pigeon Roost. Wigginton notes that in selecting the columns to be reprinted, he waded through a “ three-foot high stack of m aterial” and became thoroughly engrossed in the lives of the people who found their way into Miller’s column: "Holt Herrell, for example, who started out as a merchant on Pigeon Roost and wound up preaching. Or Donald Mc- coury, whose birth was duly recorded, and who progressed through the columns from a child weather recorder to a father of two children whose parents were visiting him rather than the other way around. Personalities emerged, grew and faded; roads were washed away in spring floods, then paved; and always in the background were the ever­ present hills-noted, reveren­ ced, studied, exploited and loved.” Perhaps Folk-Ways could perform no better service than to offer a sample of Pigeon Roost news as seen by Mr. Miller. The following column appeared in March of 1965, and readers can judge from the items noted why the column has continued to be published over the years. "There came a new heifer calf on Friday, February 19 to the farm of C. W. Hughes on Byrd Creek at Pigeon Roost that bad a bob tail of about only two inches long. Hughes said for one thing sure the shorttailed calf will never have the ‘hollow tail.’ All the old timey cattle raisers of this hill country says when a worm gets in a cow’s tail or any other kind of big cattle, if their tail is not split openlti the middle and salt put in the wound, the cattle will die. They also said that sometimes to pour turpentine on the cow’s tail will kill the worms. One old timer recently reported to the writer that he once found a cow that was so sick that she was down and couldn't get up, and he got him a short plank and held the cow’s tail on it and split the cow’s tail with his pocket knife where he could tell it was hollow. He put salt on it and tied up the tail with a piece of cloth and it wasn’t long until the old cow got up and (began to eat some com meal mixed with black soot from the chimney. It was the first thing that she had eat in two days. It's balm of Gilead bud picking time again.” News From Pigeon Roost may be seen in the current volume (V III) of Foxfire Magaiine or may be ordered at $2.95 per copy from Harvey James Miller, Box 293-Relief Route, Greenmountain, N. C. 28740. Please send all material to Rogers Whitener, FoIk-Ways and Folk-Speech, Box 376, University Station, Boone, N. C. 28608. Brady Spry On Honor List Brady E. Spry of Route 2, Mocksville, is included among the record 171 students at Catawba Valley Technical Institute in Hickory named to the President's List for academic achievement during the Tecently completed fall quarter. CVTI President Robert E. Paap, who announced the honor roll, noted that 60 students compiled perfect 4.00 academic averages last fall. He said the president's list students represent 33 cities and towns in . 15 western North Carolina counties. The 171 honor roll students, Paap added, easily exceed^ the previous president’s list!; record for one quarter, 134 in the 1972 fall quarter. The fall quarter president's list represents 10.3 percent of the record 1,668 students enrolled in CVTI's 29 career programs last fall. This per­ centage is closely comparable to the percentage of president's list students in recent quarters. To qualify for the president's list, a CVTI student must compile at least a 3.M academic average, based on four points for each credit hour of "A ” course work, three points for each "B ” hour, etc. A student must also carry a minimum course load of 12 quarter hours. History History is philosophy teaching by example, and also by warning; its two eyes are geography and chronology. two-week festival ot science and man, Jan. 13-26, entitled “ Once Upon a World” . Featured NASA and UNC lectures, and special activities, events and exhibits will be open to the public without admission throughout the festival. A complete agenda of these activities is available from the Planetarium upon request. Admission is charged only for Planetarium programs, and is 75-cents for children through age 11 or grade 6, $1 for students through college and $1.25 for adults. One adult is admitted free with each ten members of organized school and youth groups. Clergymen are ad­ mitted free at all times. ih em w e you do withm e, them we lean do for you. If y o u 're lo o k in g for a b an k that c a n hielp you d u rin g th e s e tight m o n e y tim es, c o m e to C en tra l C a ro lin a B an k C C B bu ilds Its b u sin ess b y takin g c a re of g o o d c u s to m e rs , la rg e a n d sm all. S o if you d o all you r b a n k in g w ith m e. I ll h elp you with all you r b a n k in g n ee d s. Y ou h a v e faith in C C B , a n d w e'll h a v e faith nrx.ky IV Johnson Vn.u Pre^jclt-ni In Mry.'f'sv'i/fe in you C C B .W eh avea^ that (rther banks donlt. Memtwi FDIC, which now intures all depotiti to $40,000. DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, THURSDAY, JANUARY I'^VS - SB Six Plays Scheduled For Tanglewood Theatre Ron Law, Producing Director of tlic Piedmont Repertory Company, which operates the Tanglewood Barn Theatre, has announced the professional theatre’s 1975 summer season. The line-up of six plays includes five comedies and a drama. The shows to be presented are: June 10-21 - B Rms Rive Vu, a comedy by Bob Randall. June 24 - July 5 - The Lion In Winter, a comedy by James Goldman. July 8 - 19 - Play It Again, Sam, a comedy by Woody Allen. July 22 - August 2 - Finishing Touchcs, a comedy by Jean Kerr. August 5-16 - Critic’s Choice, a comedy by Ira Levin. August 19 - 30 - The Dark at the Top of the Stairs, a drama by William Inge. The Tanglewood Barn Theatre is located at Tanglewood Park, just off 1-40, in ClemmCns, N. C. Law said that all per­ formances will begin at 8 p.m. except the July 4th per­ formance which will begin at 6:30 p.m. This will enable audience members to attend the Adult Education Classes Are Set Adults who did not finish high school now have a chance to begin at any grade level and work through high school - free. Come to Brock Community Center on Monday and Thur­ sday nights from 6-9 p.m. (top floor) for classes sponsored by Davidson Community College. fireworks display put on by Tanglewood Park following the performance. Special Sunday night performances for low- income groups will begin at 7 p.m. Performances will be held every Tuesday through Saturday evenings from June 10 through August 30. There will be no price increase for adult tickets which are $4.00. Students and Senior Citizens get a special rate of $3.00. Multiple punch season coupon books are available and enable pur­ chasers to see one show free. The adult price is $20 and the price for students and senior citizens is $15.00. Group rates will be available. Audiences, will also be able to meet with Uie actors after each per­ formance. Tickets for the Tanglewood Barn Theatre will be sold daily from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. In the office of the Little Theatre (rf Winston-Salem. Telephone reservations will also be ac­ cepted. The Tanglewood Barn Theatre is the area’s only professional theatre operating under an agreement with Ac­ tors' Equity Association. Life Life, like war, is a series of mistakes, and he is not the best Christian nor the best general who makes the fewest false steps. Poor mediocrity may secure that, but he is vest who wins the most splendid victories by the retrieval of mistakes. F. W. Robylson New Smith Grove Volunteer Fire Department Members of the Smith Grove Volunteer Fire Department are shown above putting roof on the new fire department building which they hope soon to occupy. They are chartered and all necessary documents and schooling have been taken care of and the men are anxious to complete the building so they can officially begin protection of the area from fire. Complete story about the fire department will follow when the building is completed. (Photo by Gray Smith) Nation’s 20th Agriculture Census Underway l| @ SUPER DOLLAR m ^ STOREW/D£ D/SCOUA/T PR/CeS £y£RVDAy/ ^ The 1974 Census of Agriculture got underway the week of December 29th with the mailing of approximately four million report forms to farms and ranches in the 50 States according to Vicent R Barabba, Director of the Bureau of the Census. The Bureau is part of the Department of Commerce’s Social and Economic Statistics Administration. Farmers and ranchers are being asked to report on their agricultural operations during 1974. This 1974 census, the Nation’s 20th farm census in a series that started in 1840, will update data most recently obtained in 1970 for 1969 operations. Primary emphasis will be on obtaining information about farms and ranches with sales of $2,500 or more annually. Such operations accounted for 98percent of the total value of all agricultural products sold in 1969. To avoid undue burden on small farmers and to reduce processing costs, a short ver­ sion of the census report form is being mailed to the over one million addressees estimated to have had both farm receipts and expenses of less than $2,000 in 1973. All other addressees are receiving the standard form. Forms are being mailed to a list of the following: persons who filled out Schedule F of the N.C. Is One Of 5 Best Immunized States North Carolina is one of the top five best immunized states in the nation against measles, polio, rubella, diptheria, whooping cough and tetnus (DPT), according to John Irvin, program coordinator for the state’s immunization program. Irvin said a recent survey, which included 1,000 two-year old children, showed that two- year-olds with a basic series of immunizations had risen from 38 percent in 1972 to 67 percent in 1974. He said basic im­ munizations consist of three or more doses of DPT and oral polio vaccines, along with measles and rubella. The public health official said 79 percent of North Carolina’s two-year-olds , have been adequately immunized against polio, compared to 60 percent for the United States. Over 78 percent have been immunized against measles compared to 61 percent for the nation. He said the same picture holds true for DPT and rubella. Irvin paid tribute to county health departments, as well as private physicians for most of the success of the immunization push during the past two years. He said the survey revealed that 47 percent of the two-year- olds receive their im­ munizations from health departments, as opposed to 46 percent from private physicians. Three percent were immunized by the military, while four percent received no Telerama Plans Are Announced Auditions for the Second Annual March of Dimes Telerama are set for Saturday, January 11, at Summit School in Winston-Salem and on Sunday, January 12, at Elliott Hall on the UNC campus in Greensboro. Experienced performers who wish to audition for the Telerama should call the nearest March of Dimes office to schedule an audition time. The phone number in Winston- Salem is 723-4386 and in Greensboro 273-7334. The 18-hour Telerama will begin at the Benton Convention Center on Saturday night, February 1, at 11:30 p.m. and run continuously until 5:30 p.m. the following Sunday evening, February 2. Television Star Gary Collins of NBC’s “ BORN FREE” fame and his wife, former Miss America, Mary Ann Mobley, will host the special event. Singer Leo Kirk, a favorite 'with last year's Telerama audience, will be back again this year to promote the effort to fight birth defects. Presented by the Northwest Piedmont Chapter-March of Dimes, the Telerama will again be produced through the facilities of WXIl-TV, Channel 12 in Winston-Salem. Tastr Fur llonry The taste for honey is age-old, the National Georgraphic Society says. Aristotle called it "dew distilled from the stars and the rainbow.” In the Middle Ages, honey came into its owti as a medicine good for "grumbling in the guts” and '•w am b lin g s to m a c h ." shots at all. Irvin expressed concern that nearly one-third of the surveyed two-year-olds had not com­ p lete the basic series of shots. “ In most instances the series can be completed with one additional visit,” he noted. “We must also step up efforts to get black children properly im­ munized. Only 15 percent of the black children are seen by private physicians, compared to 59 percent for whites,” Irvin said. “The mother’s educational level has a direct bearing on her child’s immunization level,*’ Irvin stated. “Family size and the mother's age are also contributing factors. We found that a child’s immunization level goes up as the mother’s age goes up. However, it flattens out at age 29 and drops steadily throughout the rest of the childbearing years.” Rowan Tech Offers Sewing Rowan Technical Institute has scheduled two classes in basic sewing during the winter quarter. Basic sewing will instruct students in the construction of simple garments from patterns. Proper use and care of sewing machines will also be em­ phasized. One class will meet from 7-10 p.m. on Mondays beginning January 6 through February 24. A second class is scheduled on Wednesdays from 7-10 p.m. beginning January 8 through February 26,1975. Both classes will meet at the Spencer Center. Interested persons should pre-register by calling the Conti- uing Education Division of Rowan Tech. All students are required to pay a $2 registration fee and have their social security numbers available at the first class. 1973 individual income tax return, persons listed with other Federal agencies as associated with agricultural operations, and those reporting large or unusual farm operations in 1969 census (such as institutional farms, farms on Indian reservations, etc.). This combined list of addressees forms a pool of potential respondents in the census. The final total of farms counted is expected to be well under three million, as it was in 1969. A new kind of report form is being used in the 1974 farm census in order to reduce costs. The report form instruction sheet, and return envelope have been printed and addressed in a single operation, thus eliminating separate printing, assembling, stuffing, and the attaching of the printed address labels. It is the first time that this type of operation has been used in a Federal census. Also, for the first time, the forms are being mailed out at the third class bulk rate to reduce postage cost. The return evelope containing the farm operator’s completed report carries first class postage to protect the confidentiality of the information reported. Completed forms are to be mailed back as soon as possible. Census by mail allows operators to fill out their reports at their convenience and use their farm business records. Estimates are acceptable and should be reported in the ab­ sence of records. Recipients of census report forms are cautioned not to discard them. Follow-up mailings costing additional postage will be required until all forms are received. Even if the recipient is not farming, the form should be returned with that fact noted. The United States took its first Census of Agriculture in 1840. Until 1920 they were taken every ten years; since then, there has been one every five years, recently covering years ending in “4” and "9” . The five-year censuses are the only source of statistics on agriculture that are com­ parable county by county for the entire Nation. They are the sole source of comprehensive agricultural data tabulated for each State and for the U.S. as a whole for farms classified by size, tenure, type of organization, market value of products sold, and type of farm organization. The selection of questions in the ’74 census was based on needs expressed by users of agriculture census data, ex­ perience gained in earlier censuses, results of a January 1974 pretest census, and recommendations of the Census Advisory Committee on Agriculture Statistics. This committee is composed of representatives of farm organizations, academ ic, government, and research groups concerned with agriculture, as well .as organizations representing manufacturers and distributors of farm supplies and equip­ ment, and users of farm products. Also, there is con­ tinuous cooperation with agencies in the U.S. Depart- ■ ment of Agriculture. Response to the census is required by law (Title 13, United States Code). By the same law, information fur­ nished on report forms is kept confidential. It may be seen only by sworn Census em­ ployees and may be used only for statistical purposes. Even other government agencies cannot obatin or use the report made by any operator. The law also provides that copies retained by the operator are immune from legal process. Horse Fair in Raleigh Saturday The horse industry in North Carolina is going to be presenting something just a little different in January - a Horse Fair sponsored by the North Carolina Horse Council. The fair is to be held in con­ junction with the Mid-Winter Horse Show sponsored by the Border Belt Horsemen’s Association and the North Carolina Quarter Horse Breeders Sale at the State Fairgrounds in Raleigh. Starting at noon on Saturday, January 11, it is a new idea in helping to educate non-horse owners and horse owners in breed differences, and the ways horses can be enjoyed. Included are Appaloosas, Arabians, Quarter Horses, M organ s, S ad d leb red s, Thoroughbreds, Paints, Paso Finos, Walking Horses plus others. Each breed will have a booth with free literature. Films and slides will be shown and representatives will be there to answer questions. On Sunday afternoon January 12, there will be a IS-minute live demonstration of each breed. The Mid-Winter Horse Show will run from January 10 through January 12, except for the sale beginning at noon Saturday, the 11th. Glenn Petty, horse specialist with the North Carolina Department of Agriculture said this sale may provide some very good buys with the current tight money situation. “ I suggest horse enthusiasts to come to Raleigh and take ad­ vantage of the potential deals. Already better than 100 horses are consigned.” The sale, as all the other events will take place in Dorton Arena which seats about 5,000. Ladies Polyester PANT SUITS Mlitet & Half Slzei Originally up to $15.00 Ladies Polyester SUCKS Solids & Fancies Regular & Extra Sizes Originally up to $6.00 9 9 f t f t DRESSES Sizes 4 To 12 Regular Price $3.50 1 A l l S o u th e r n D is c o u n t MAKES Loans For Any Worth While Purpose 1. Back To School Needs 5. Cars Need Winterizing 2. Thanksgiving Holiday Expenses 6. Homes Need Winterizing 3. Christmas Shopping 7. New Winter Clothing 4. Bill Consolidation 8. Personal Needs Call Us Today About A Loan For Your Fall & Winter Needs. Open On Saturdatjs Through Holidays 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. _SEE_SD Southern Discount Court Square (Above Fashion Shop) Plione 634-3596 Tue*., Wed., and Thur*. 9-5:30 6B - DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, THURSDAY, JANUARY 9, 1975 V.C. Press Institute Is A Carolina Tradition BY PETE IVEY Welmer Jones once wrote: “ My sense of exhilarated well­ being and happiness is at a peak at those times in January when I gel in my car in Franklin and start the long drive to Chapel Hill for the Press Institute." Jones, late editor of the Franklin Press, was speaking of the third weekend in January when newspaper people of North Carolina have foregathered annually for the past half a century ; and longer. Editors, publishers, reporters and allied newsmen and women assemble at the Carolina Inn for a couple of days of shop talk, convlvality, sometimes in­ tensive study of a special problem in journalism and always with a speaker of two who will titillate the imagination. The newspaper folk come again next week - January 16 to 18 - and will hear U.S. Senator Jesse Helms; receive prizes for the best Journalism stories of the year; talk among them­ selves about newspapering in the state and be entertained by the University of North Carolina and Duke University. Tom Wicker of the N.Y. Times will speak at the Duke Dinner on Jan. 17. Gov. James Holshouser will present the prizes for the best news articles, features, e d it o r ia ls , c o lu m n s , photographs and the like. The Press Institute is 50 years old, or 57 years old, depending upon how you reckon it. Some people say it may be the oldest continuous press institute in the United States. But the records are not available; it’s best to say it’s one of the oldest. The 57-year-old timing dates back to 1918 when UNC President Edward Kidder Graham, counseled by Prof. L.R. Wilson, started the first Press Institute. It was to be a way of bringing the press and the University closer together and it was an opportunity for statewide service by the University to the people of the state. A press institute was one way of accomplishing the mission. The main speaker was William Howard Taft, former president of the United States and former Chief Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court. Taft also came to Chapel Hill to deliver the Well Lecture and he made both speeches. Elizabeth Gold of Wilson -- who became Mrs. Elizabeth Swindell - responded to the welcoming address and Josephus Daniels of the Raleigh News and Observer introduced President Taft. The Press Institute was off to a roaring start. But then came World War I and no meeting of the editors and publishers was held at Chapel Hill until the mid I920’s. Then UNC President Harry W. Chase invited the newspaper people to come to Chapel Hill again. The N.C, Press Institute has been a tradition in Chapel Hill and at the Carolina Inn ever since. In 1935, Duke University invited the newspaper people to com e to that campus for a dinner and Duke has joined UNC in the journalism weekend each year since. Chancellor Ferebee Taylor presides next Friday at the annual luncheon given by the University at Chapel Hill and President William Friday will assist Gov. Holshouser In the annual awards. William D. Snider, editor of the Greensboro Daily News and 1975 president of the Press Association, will be master of ceremonies. History History Is but the unrolled scroll of prophecy. Garfield m welcome FOOD STAMP SHOPPERS P M C iS GOOD THRU SAT., JAN. 11th QUANTITY RIGHTS RESiRVlD STEM CHOICE FULL CUT ROUND U.S. CHOICE BREAKFAST STEAK________lb U.S. CHOICE SIRLOIN TIP STiAIC_______UB CELLO FROZf P£RCH„ ^ . l i e r u m r e ri .LB. u:s. CHOICE SIRLOIN TIP ffO A |L __________________l b ^ m US- CHOICE BOTTOM ROUND R 04ST __________^.B ________CHAMPION _______ cham pion reg. or thick 7 7 * BOLOGNA^____LB A — — champion ^ CHAMPION LIVERMUSH ■ ^ m Jte CHAMPION bologna ___,oz CHAMPION ASSORTED 4 9 * LUNCHMEATS DELMONTE PEACHES DELMONTE mEAPPLE DELMONTE RAISINS NO. 303 CAN U.S. CHOICE SIRLOIN OR T BONELB. STCAK *l.tt MINUTE LB. S T IA K *119 PUREX BLEACH^ HUDSON FACIAL TISSUE^ SMUCKERS GRAPE JAM REYNOLDS ALUM. WRAP_____ DOMINO 10X SUGAR ..V2 GAL, 200 CT, ..... BOX 18 OZ .... JAR 25 FT. . ROLL 12 OZ. .LB. INTIRSTATE BRAND m m m HORMEL45 SIZZLERS SALT FISH 3 9 * HERRING. DAK COOKED EOT PICNIC 3 5 ‘ — 6 9 * ____________ EASY MONDAY FABRIC ^SOFTENER ___.o*l CLEANSER - - - — REG .........................SIZE DEI MONTE W.K. OR CS. CORN A MDI IND. WRAPo9* cffffSf- A A C CHAMPION PIMENTO99* CHEESE___ C V 9 0 HEAVY n FATBACK EVERYDAY SALE PRICE FOODS'^1 DELMONTE PEAS___??n-39* DELMONTE CUT GREEN ^ _ BEANS^3^Si.r*J^° DELMONTE CATSUP FRENCH FRIES 2-LB. BAG AJAX DETERGENT DRIVE GIANT SIZE 6 4 * / j V ^ KOBEYS SHOESTRING ■ ^ ^ I I 2 1 * POTATOES ^ « n o PLANTERS DRY ROAST PEANUTS fOODS'^, NO. IVa .CAN 8 OZ. ~JAR 1 6 * 6 9 * €veri|DQi| ^ €yeri|DQi| T €ven|Doi| T £yeri|DQi| Sole Ptiie Sole Price I Sole Price I Sole Price PARADE WHOLE TOMATOES a303^^ CAN STOKELY APPLE SAUCE 3 A 910. 3 0 3 K A 7 ANS ^ LYKES POTTED MMr 4 J 1■ CANS ■ HEINZ TOMATO CATSUP 26 OZ. STL.59 / V PILLSBURY REG. OR B.M. iSCUITS 8 OZ. CANS DAVtE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD. THURSDAY, JANUARY 9, 1975 - 7B Naturelist Sees Future Zoos Wired For Sight And Sound In tomorrow’s zoo visitors may listen to the electronically- amplified "heartbeat” of an Insect or watch via satellite TV as a lion moves through an African Jungle. But unless American zoos receive "m assive transfusions” of money and new ideas, they are In danger of extinction. ‘ These are the futuristic-and ^oomy-views of Roger Caras, one of the world’s top experts on zoological parks. Writing in the current (January-February) issue of the National Wildlife Federation’s magazine. In­ ternational Wildlife, on “ Zoos of the Future” Caras paints a glowing picture of modernized animal parks that will serve as “survival centers” for rare and endangered creatures. By TV hook-ups, he predicts, zoos will enable “ people watching a great orangutan exhibit in Boston” to see an "equally impressive gorilla exhibit in New York and the chimpanzees in Atlanta.” Present technology, Caras says, would allow for TV monitoring of game parks around the world and “con­ ceivably, a lion could carry a miniaturized video camera with It in the Serengeti” while zoo visitors in Minneapolis wat­ ched. Tomorrow’s zoos, he believes, will also employ such devices as “ micro-sound” to pick up, for zoo visitors, such faint animal sounds as heart­ beats and the beat of a hum­ mingbird’s wings. The ideal zoos, he says, will emphasize natural habitat and environment, will specialize in certain breeds of animals, and will operate in conjunction with such institutions as natural history museums and botanical gardens. A common fault of today’s zoos, he says, is that they collect "too many animals of too many different kinds.” Looking at today’s zoos, Caras, a naturalist and zoological consultant, sees many of them as "nothing more than nasty little 19th century menageries. Some of them are actually cruel, with crate-sized pens and wholly inadequate care.” As an example of today's money-short, troubled eoos Caras points to the six zoos operated by the City of New York, where the pay for menagerie keepers is $2,000 less per year than for the city’s common laborers, and which are run without a full-time veterinarian or hospital facilities. As an example of rising zoo costs he points to the In­ dianapolis ^ o , which acquired three giraffes for $21,000 in 1968, but had to pay $22,000 for just one giraffe in 1974. Chicago’s Lincoln Park Zoo, which buys 100,000 pounds of horsemeat a year, paid 29 cents a pound for it in 197.'?. The last quoted price: 58 cents a pound. In his International Wildlife article Caras is most pessimistic about the future of city-owned zoos, which, he says, get "mired in a morass of local bureaucracy.” Little Things Little things console us, because little things afflict us. Pascal \ 8 AJM.-7 PM.(M-r-w-s; 8 AM.-8 PJM. (THUR) 8 AM .‘9 PM. (FRI.) MUMFORD bbucl Home of the never ending sale. MIRACLE MARGARINE DELMONTE TUHA DELMONTE MANDARIN 0RANGiS-'^.v39 KRAFT LIM IT TWO W 7.50 OR MORE ORDER. lu c k s J i N o C m n n PINTO B M N S 3 rJ l°° BUTTiR PEANUT 18 OZ. JAR CHEF SPAGHETTI AND A PREMIUM MiATBALLS 2c% s89‘ SAITINES DELMONTE PINEAPPLEm c i— DELMONTE TOMATO JO/Cf____ DELMONTE A ^O. O A C L IM A S ^ ffN s O y * LUZIANNE WHITE LABEL C O F F i i ^_______LB. » NABISCO CHOC. CHIPS OR 7 9 * CHIPS AHOY- ARMOUR TRiET WHITEHOUSE APPLE SAUCE___ VAN CAMP PORK AND 12 OZ. CAN 14 OZ.i .PKG.NO. 300 CAN u VAN CAMP'S BEENll - WEENEES 8 01. CANS 1.00 4 ROLL PACK CORONET ULTRA 4 BATHROOM TISSUE_____ KRAFT MACARONI AND CHEESE-------7V2 02 PKO. STRONGHEART DOG FOOD.UVa OZ. .CAN - . KRAFT A! Ac DELICIOUS 6 4 M 'm Auows~~iio4y^ carrots. DETERGENT 31* JOY-,______ MOUTHWASH A A C 1 2 * LISTERINE------- WAXED RUTABAGAS FRESH RAW PEANUTS— .LB. LB. DURAFLAME 2-3 HR. FIRELOGS-EA. MTN. LODGE PANCAKE DELMONTE SYRUP_______iv?^89* SNACK PACK DELMONTE 'CEsas COCA COLA 64 OZ. BTL SKINNER DELMONTE MINI PACK RAISIN BRAN^‘ ° '5 9 * RAISINS. DELMONTE FRENCH STYLE ^ V O H COFFEE GREEN BEANS 3 £ r r ^ CREAMER 4 PACKi 141/2 OZ.^ .CAN 16 OZ. -JAR A K E R Y - D E L I CAKRY OUT LUNCH CHOP B.B.Q GR. BEANS CR. POTATOES HUSH PUPPIES FRESH BAKED POTATO ROLLS................. FRESH BAKED BANANA PUDDING LETTUCE FRESH CRISP HEADS 8B - DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, THURSDAY, JANUARY 9, 1975 Social Security -Questions—Angwcre- ril be 72 in March, and have been getting monthly social security payments since I was 65. I know that my earnings won’t affect my social security benefits after I’m 72, but what about the month of my birthday? Will my earnings that month affect my monthly social security checks? No, your earnings In and after the month you reach 72 will have no effect on your monthly social security payments. You will get your full monthly benefits no matter how much your earnings are. I get monthly supplemental security income payments. Lately I’ve found living alone is becoming difficult for me, so I’m moving in with my niece who has an apartment in the same house where I live. Since this won’t be a change of address for me, do I have to let social security know that I’ve moved? Yes, you should notify the Salisbury social security office as soon as you know exactly when you’re moving Into your niece's apartment. Any change In your living arrangements or family situation must be reported to social security even If your address remains the same. It Isn’t necessary for you to visit our office to give them the new infromation. You can call or write and someone will be glad to take care of It for you. The address is 105 Corrlher Avenue, Salisbury, N. C. 28144. Telephone 634-2868. My 8-year-old daughter has a serious kidney ailment and may need dialysis treatment. Somewhere I’m sure I read that she can get Medicare coverage for th^se treatments on my ■ social security earnings record. Is this true? Yes, If you've worked long enough under social security, your daughter can ' get Medicare protection to help pay for dialysis and other health care costs. You should get In touch with the Salisbury social security office as soon as possible. MENTAL HEALTH MATTERS Bertram S. Brown, M.D. Director National Institute of Mental Health The First Years Man has probably always sensed, and has known for sure after he began scientific study, (hat the first years of life were of paramount importance in the development of a person from dependent infancy to functioning maturity. Until recent times, however, not a great deal of attention had been paid to gathering in- iformation on such things as the when, where, why, how, and what of the first years of life in the individual's development. But now Dr. Reginald S. Lourie. an internationally Itnown psychiatrist, teacher, and researcher, has performed an invaluable service in studying this and providing an overview of what he caiis a new frontier of psychiatry: the first three years of life. Reporting in the American Psychiatric Association’s jqur- nai. Dr, Lourie' says that, al­ though we have known for a long lime that the roots of many mental health problems are in childhood, we have only recently loolicd at how early these roots lie in life. Indeed, he points out, the major single determinant of what the kind of unborn child or fetus is to be may be the nutritional state of the mother at the point of conception. Once born, the individual enters a period in which the brain will grow rapidly in the ensuing 18 months than it ever will again. At the beginning of life, he says, there is no connection among the senses. But there are "organizers" in the infant’s early experience. A major one is vision. Another is pain. The infant's second and third years of life are busy ones in terms of personality develop­ ment; and character formation proceeds actively, much of it simultaneously. It is in the first three years that the groundwork is laid for later behavior; and Ur, l.ourie emphasizes that those con­ cerned with human behavior problems musi be concerned with the first three years of life. So. it would seem, the old saying that as the twig is bent so is the oak tree inclined is true—as far as it goes—but it doesn't go far enough. The acorn and beyond arc involved, loo! QUILTING Quilting has become as modern as today. Its Influence ‘ is found in wearing apparel as well as in house furnishings, observe extension home economics specialists, North Carolina State Uni­ versity. With the revival of this art, fashion designers are producing everything from quilted shoulder bags to velvet pantsuits. Datebook Taiwan From Rice and Sugar to Television Sets NEW YORK (E D )— If you have bought n second televi­ sion set lately, chnnces are good thnt it was made In "raiwan. Only a decade ago, Tai­ wan’s chief exports were sugar and rice. But last year, the free Chinese island province exported 4.100,000 black/white and color TV .sets, more than any other country in the world. About 75 per cent, including 280,- 000 color sets, were shipped to the United States. Taiwan is also selling pock­ et calculators, digital clock radios, cassette recorders, and every electrical or electronic gadget you can think of. Pro­ duction of such appliances climbed 21 times in five years. Technologically skilled workers who produce at a reasonable price is one reason for such phenomenal growth. A stable government with freely elected local and na­ tional representatives is an­ other. Price levels are relatively steady and the cur­ rency is strong. But mainly it’s Taiwan’s econdmy that is responsive to the needs and opportunities of the system of free enterprise. The Republic of China has rounded the bend on the road to industrialization. Twenty years ago, agriculture ac­ counted for 35.7 per cent of her gross national product. Industry accounted for 17.9 per cent. Today, the roles are reversed. During 1973, agri­ culture produced only 15,5 per cent of her GNP. while industry contributed 37.5 per cent. Free China has success­ fully overhauled her economy to the benefit of all segments of her people. Skilled workers who produce at a reasonable price contributes to the phenomenal grov.th of free China’s electronic Industry. Since 1953, the nation’s GNP has been growing at the annual rate of 8.7 per cent, and industrial production rose 14.7 per cent each year. Diplomatic setbacks in recent years have not slowed down this trend. The free Chinese people are well fed, well clothed, healthy and happy and free. Ten out of twelve homes in Taipei, the capital, have TV seta. Of every fourteen fami­ lies, ten own refrigerators. ’There is a sewing machine in every other home. A third of the families own motor ve­ hicles. And ten out of thir­ teen households subscribe to one or more newspapers. This participatory form of modified capitalism has be­ come the norm by which de­ veloping nations around the world are measuring their own technologic and economic progress. Cedar Creek Four little sunbeams came to earth one day. Shining and dancing along on their way. Resolved that their cotirse should be blessed. “ Let us try,” they all • whispered. Some kindnesses to do; not seek our own pleasuring all the day through. Then meet in the evening at the west.” We have probably not been sunbeams all the year 74, so let us resolve to start the New Year with thankfulness and forgiveness and love to all mankind, then meet at the eve in the west. The holidays here at Cedar Creek was some happinesses along with sad hearts. However behind every dark cloud, the sunbeams are at play. Mr. and Mrs. Odell Eaton and children, Darryal, Kenneth and Tracy, Mrs. William Eaton and children, Jean, Don and Darrin of Cedar Creek and Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Eaton and children, Mike and Albert, Mrs. Ann Campbell, Mrs. Robert McKnight and Deborah of Winston-Salem were Christmas day dinner guests of Mrs. Queen McKnight at her home in Winston-Salem. Callers recently at the home of Mrs. Nellie Lyons were Mrs. Hopie Edwards and Mrs. Ella Tomlin of Winston-Salem. Mrs. Tomlin is the sister of Mrs. Lyons. Mrs. Edwards is cousin of the two. Callers at the Smith and Transou home recently were Professor William West and daughter Cathey and Vickie of Goldsboro, N. C., Mr. and Mrs. John West of Winston-Salem, Ernest Transou of Lewisville and Minor Smith of Houston- ville, N. C. Mr. and Mrs. Allen Transou called recently at the home of Mrs. William Eaton. William Tatum also called. McKinley Eaton called Sunday at the home of E. J. and Alla Eaton. Mr. and Mrs. Henry Scott and daughter, Tanya of Patterson"i N. J. visited in the home of their parents, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Scott and other relatives, and brother and wife, Mr. and Mrs. George Scott. Thomas Eaton of Winston- Salem called at the home of his mother, Mrs. William Eaton and sister, Jean recently and enjoyed a rabbit hunt. Callers during the holidays at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Ambrose Brock were Mrs. Daisy Tatum of Winston-Salem, Mrs. Mary Blackwell and daughter, Mrs. Frank Frost of Smith Grove, N. C., and Mr. and Mrs. McKinley Eaton of Win­ ston-Salem. Mrs. Grace Ridgell and Mrs. Lucy Tatum visited. Mrs. Martha Sutzer in her home in Winston-Salem Sunday evening. Mrs. Lester Morrison of Bethania called recently at the home of her father, Lonnie Williams. We were all glad to have P.N.S.M. William West and Mrs. West and little William, Jr. to enjoy the day with us; also our newlyweds, Mr. and Mrs. Napoleon Jackson of Winston- Salem. This community was sad­ dened over the loss of of one of our good neighbors and friend, Brother Roosevelt Sutzer who had been a shut-in for a good while. Our prayers go out to all the family, and families all over the world, those that we know, and others that we do not know. The Mackie Homemakers met at the home of Mrs. Odell Eaton and enjoyed their Christmas party with the ex­ changing of gifts. The weather was bad and sickness was in our community 'so our members were absent. Sunday, January 5, here at the Cedar Creek church, the ladies of the church sponsored a New Year banquet and en­ tertained the men of the church. It was an enjoyable occasion and there was food aglore! Mrs. Carl Cain from Chinquapin Grove Baptist Church was a guest. Good ars &nse hgnVUmmAIUmrtlm 8p«ci«l Consultant to ^ A v e o PINANCiAL BBRVCeS e e Mocks News Our Community wishes to extend sympathy to Tommie Brewbaker in the death of his brother Leo Brewbaker whose funeral was held new years day at Forsyth Memorial Cemetary in Winston Salem Todd Kiger spent the .week with his grandparents Mr. and Mrs. R. O. Kiger of Mocksville. Mr. and Mrs. Jimmy Kiger were patients at Davie County Hospital this past week. Mrs. Emma Myers spent the week with her son Wayne Myers of Yadkinville Mrs. H. A. Miller spent the week at her home in Hamp- tonville. Mr. and Mrs. Frank Potts, Jerry and Charles Potts spent last week in Orlanda, Flordia. Mr. and Mrs. Rickey Green and daughter. Misty of Kern- sville visited Mr, and Mrs Lonnie Hughes Tuesday night. Mrs. Iva Myers was a patient at Forsyth Memorial Hospital the past week suffering with pneumonia. Mrs. Ken Martin entertained her Sunday School Class at her home with a New Years party Tuesday night, AOTO FACTS FAST CHANGES Things change fast in America, including eat­ ing habits. The tradi­ tional American break­ fast of ham, eggs and — depending on location — grits has faded. Adults nowadays are likely to eat toast and coffee, while the children often prefer cereal and milk. Fingernails Need Help 5day, women look younger TEENS 40’S 60’S One of the bustling streets of Taipei. A metropolis of two million people, the capital of free China is experiencing traffic jams and other ecologi­ cal problems encountered by other large cities of the world. Winter is just about the worst time of year for car trouble. By taking a few simple precautions, you can insure that your car won't let you down. In many parts of the country, winter means you may need snow tires. If your standard tires are of the radial variety, make sure that your snow tires are radials too. “Studded" tires offer only one advantage: better trac­ tion on glare ice. Under most other circumstances they present some disadvantages. 'They can increase your stopping dis- tance on pave­ ment and may actually harm road surfaces, including your ^ 0 '• driveway. Keep your battery in top con­ dition. The terminals should be corrosion free. Have your ser­ vice station check the power each cell is producing. If effi­ ciency is down in a two or three >year old battery, consider replacing it before it fails. This gives you the opportunity to shop for the best buy and not be forced to buy under pres­ sure. Also, make sure you are using the right engine oil for your climate. Follow the manufac­ turer's recommendation. Be sure you always have a spare tire, jack and lug wrench. Always carry a supply of flares, a set of jumper cables and a spare set of fuses. And don't forget a first aid kit. Today, women look younger longer . . . That's a happy fact of life. But, beware . . . Hands can be a dead giveaway In an otherwise youthful ap­ pearance and, frankly your age Is no-one's business but your own. The secret Is care and ex­ ercise, Just as It is for your body and face. If exercise keeps the rest of you loose, limber and lithe why should­ n't It do the same for your hands. The manufacturers of RRP, Natural Protein Nall Con­ ditioner, have devised a daily hand-care b e a u ty program which is easy and fun to fol­ low. Walnuts anyone? Yes, they are great, says RRP, for exercising hands and fingers. Great for muscle tone. Grasp a walnut in each hand and open and close your fin­ gers around them ten times. Next, roll them around in the palms of your hands. Another honey of a hand exercise Is the RRP BEAN BAG BOUNCE. Toss the bag into th" air and catch it with your right hand, ten times. Re­ peat for left hand. Also, grasp the bean bag with great vigor, first with one, then with the other hand, opening and clos­ ing your fingers . , , a^ln. ten times each hand. The complete RRP hand ex­ ercise program follows. Make it a part of your daily body- beautiful routine, along with application of RRP Nail Con­ ditioner to make your nails healthy-looklng, too, RRP HAND EXERCISE EXERCISE #1 Toss a bean bag into the air and catch it In your right Nail Down BeautifuIIy-Young-Looking Hands With Easy, Fun-To-Follow RRP Nail Conditioner Care And Excrcisc hand. (10 times) Repent for left hand. Also grasp the bean bag with great vigor with each hand, opening and closing the fingers (ten times eanl. hand). EXERCISE *2 Starting position: Stand fac­ ing a wall or door, feet par­ allel and approximately twelve Inches apart. Extend arms for ward shoulder high and shoul­ der width apart. Move back­ ward or backward so that ap­ proximately ten or twelve in­ ches separate your finger tips from the wall. Lean forward and place the palms of your hands Hat against the wall with fingers pointing up. Spread fingers apart with thumbs pressed against fore­ fingers, (1) With the aid of the fin­ gers only — no thumb action — press away far enough so that only the finger tips touch the wall; count five; return to starting position, 12) Repeat exercise 10 times. EXERCI.SE #3 The Finger Orip — Stand erect, raise the arms on a line with the shoulders, hook the forefingers together and en­ deavor to pull them apart as you slowly raise the arms up and over the bend, and as far down the back as possible, expanding below the w.nistline by inhaling as the arms ascend and exhaling with their de­ scent. Repeat 3 limes for each pair of fingers, EXERCISE #4 Taking hold of one hand with the other and pressing them firmly together is a good exercise. Shake hands as if you meant it, A firm Indicates a strong character. Take hold of objects with all possible vigor. EXERCISE #5 Massage is also beneficial In developing and beautifying *he muscular structure of the ■ hands. After the skin has been softened with a cream or oil, each finger should be rubbed from the tip to the base, and the tip should be pressed at the sides to give a tapered ef­ fect. The back of the hand should be rubbed from each knuckle to the wrist, alterna­ ted with light pulls or stretch­ es of the skin crosswise. Pull­ ing the hand together In a conical shape with the other hand will have a tendency to give it a slender appearance. The palms should be massaged ' also length-wise, toward the fingers. I I I BROKER - An agent who buys or sells for a princi{^al on a commission basis | I without having title to property. I.X . Gwyn Street - 2 bedroom hoiise with bath.~CheerfuIlyj decorated tiiroughout. Lot with lovely fenced back yard with storage building and picnic shelter. This house and lot offers the “ most for your money.” Call, let us show it to yoii today.ir Carrowoods - 2600 so. _________,______ baths. Large recreation room with fireplace. Den with sliding glass doors opening onto patio. House is electrically heated and cooled. Situated on lot 125 x 200 with city water, TTiis house offers lots of room for even a large family. Call today for complete details. m Wandering Lane - Custom-designed Colonial home situated in the midst of 3V^ acres of beautiful woodland. A painted brick exterior combined with crab orchard stone wings is roofed with western cedar shakes with copper valleys. This home features superb construction throughout and will surely please the discriminating buyer. Hemlock Street - 3 bedroom rancher with 2 baths, full basement with 4 rooms and garage. Large lot with fenced in back yard. Call Mary Forest for complete details. nsli----- Walt Wilson Road - 4 bedroom house with bath situated on beautiful 1>A lot with several out buildings. House has 1238 sq. ft, with good loan assumption. Priced to sell at $12,900. Call today. yyO yQ JPH Q Q Sanford Road; This house has it a ll... Good location ... large lot (200 x 300) ... 1650 sq. ft. heated area ... Den with - fireplace & exposed beams ... 1650 sq. ft. basement with fireplace ... 16 x 36 in ground heated swimming pool. And many other features too numerous to mention. Call Mary Forrest for complete details. I Street - Nice 2 bedroom house with bath in very good condition. Must see to appreciate. Call us for complete details. New Construction - Sanford Road. Partially completed new home. Owner wants to sell as iS( Buyer may finish house to suit his likes. Call for complete details. Country Estates - 3 bedroom, baths. Electric heat. Large kitchen with built-in appliances including dishwasher. Lot 125 x 200. Financing at percent already approved. ACREAGE 7.6 acres land on Highway 64 east of Mocksville. 3 acres open remainder in woods. Excellent lot to build on. Priced to sell. Development Tract - water and sewage; Mocksville city limits. 100 acres of good prime land. Financing available. LOTS Woodland Development - 2 wooded lots available One lot, 150 x 200, priced at $3900. One lot, 230 x 355, priced at $3280. Southwood Acres ■ Lot approximately 150 x 160. Building? Choice lot which offers a beautiful building site in an exclusive residential area. Call us today for details. Corner of Main Street and Milling Road - 4 lots 112.6 x 303 with frontage on Milling Road. Priced at $50 per front foot. Hemlock Street - Approximately 2 acres of land with plenty of frontage. Call us for details. Depot Street - 3 developed lots conveniently located near town. Sale price is $1,000. HOUSES Hickory Hill - 2 story 4 bedroom house with 2‘^ baths. Den features a big fireplace. Kitchen has all modern, built-in appliances. This house has so many pluses we can't list them all here. Call us today. We would appreciate the opportunity to tell you about them and even better show you! Woodland - 3 bedroom brick rancher with 2 baths. Kitchen with all modern appliances. Full basement, paved drive. This house is in excellent condition. Call us lor an appointment tosee it. We think you’ll like it. Clemmons - Linwood Drive. 3 bedroom brick rancher on I acre land. Nice neighborhood and is convenient to 1-40 interchange, Cali Mary Forest for complete details. Hwy. 601 South - 3 bedroom house with 2 baths, full basement on 1 acre lot. Priced"at $26,900. Call today for an appointment to see this house. RENTALPROPERTY Gwyn Street - Lovely 3 bedroom house with bath, new carpet and just paint^. Rents for $175 a month. SOI South - 3 bedroom house convenient to town. $125 per month. ' J , ,24 X 50 mocular homepermanently located on private lot. An entirely new concept in mobile home living. Spacious, yet cohipact in construction, this design offers the conveniences, luxuries, facilities and beauty of a permanent residence. Now available for monthly rental of $135. BUSINESS PROPERTY Commercial Property - 112 North Main Street, Mocksville. Building with 2200 sq. ft. situated on lot facing North Main Street. Lot extends back from building to Clement Street. Owner financing available. Call today for full details, RESORT PROPERTY Attention Campers! - Two lots platted with camping in mind. Located in the Boone-Linville area, N,C, Call us for details. REAL ESTATE CO. 333 Salisbury St. '------ Swicegood Profttiional BIdg. 634-5997 <terry Swioegood, Broiur •344907 Real Estate Sales, Appraisals, Leases, Management SiuTi ying by DAVIE SURVEYING CO. Mary Forrw t, 8iIm R ip . 4924437 DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRtSE RECORD, THURSDAY, JANUARY 9, 1975 - 9B ough Winter Can Hurt tjnprotected Landscape ^ . . . . A _ f ln t ir a t * ViSome predictions sugr* I gest that North Carolina is in for a severe winter, I Even if you don’t believe in weather “signs,” there's always a chance that the winter will be a rou^h one, and you may want to take precautions to protect landscape I plants. Some fairly hardy I plants that generally take “normar’ winters without any damage are often hurt by unusually cold temp- I eraitures. Some of these I fire rhododendron, box- I wood and several other I broadleaf evergreens, ac- I cording to Henry J. Smith, I North Carolina State Uni* I versity landscape horti- 1 culturist. The best method o f pro- Itecting these plants until ■ early 'next spring is to I plant them in a protected I location. Newly set plants Icuuld be moved to more I selected sites without in- Ijury. However, more ma* Iture plants can’t be mov- led without considerably ■more risk involved. For these, Smith sug- I gests building a simple scaffold on three sides— east, south and west— then cover the frame with burlap. This will give pro- I tection in case of severe jireezes, ice and heavy linow . I You’ll want to protect jrbrid tea roses, too. The St way is to make a bund of soil about eight Inches deep around the se of the plant. Smith said he has tried straw, Lay and similar materials {)r this purpose, but none been as satisfactory • soil banked around the il&nt. f^^What about mums? ^sed outside as garden vers, mums are only ni-hardy, Smith said, he safest thing to do is I )ift them and put them in I coldframe. Add peat I n)oss, straw or leaves Ijlround the base of the I tflants for further protec- non. Jv Here are some other l^ith suggestions fo r ^tectin g tender plants: jjBurround plants with lliitss wool for near-ideal lulation from cold dam- You may' have to !ive a stake into the bund to help hold the Kost Test IBeterminesI n|>urability p—; itTHENTON— A demon- I stration of fence post dur- ~ptlity, begun over 20 {[ars ago on the Jones ^unty fairgrounds, is ^ l l providing valuable ijuormation for fence builders. project of the Agri- 4)ptural Extension Serv- ^ the fence was put up in* 1954 to demonstrate \ m life span of various ^ e s of wood used in fm ce posts. Former North I CSjtlrolina State University t e n s i o n specialists , oward Etiis and John d ity and Jones County I ^^nsion chairman Jim- S Franck started the ject. Franck is keeping demonstration going. ^'After 20 years, five of me original posts are still ^Und and will stand up udder a 40-pound test piul. These include two (Ij^Bpaote pressure treated I^ie posts, an osmose salt tetated pine post, a penta c!^0-8oaked pine post and 4[|^dcedar post that is 80 I p«r cent heartwood. !!j[)ther types have been I l^a durable. Red oak, lite oak, black cherry li baldcypress have had It^be replaced every four |ojF|-flve years. Sweetgum Ian3 sapling pine have only |l<||(^d two to three years. X ' All Wet I po women catch more colds than'men? They should, if they hoirt. Seems that more women Ih ^': you might imagine walk Bround with wet heads — a par- licvlarly foolhardy habit during |hw0 cold weather-rold catching nonths. Whatever time of day you iva'lh your hair, quick drying is Mg part of a coid-protection jam. Worthwhile preventive ieine includes the use of an \ir Brush to dry hair in min- Jt^. As well as speeding up the le vtin g routine, the use of Clairol's light little dryer-brush Jift»r every washing leaves you lu it that much less exposed to Ihe hazards of colds. And re- Ineinber, germs are everywhere IheM days, even indoors, so stay­ ing home after washing your Tali is no protection at all — |iot if what you're staying home vit|^ is a wet head. glass wool in place. As Smith puts it, "This pro­ vides the entire plant with an overcoat." Infra-red heat lamps can also be used, although you may want to offset the extra use of electri­ city by watching less TV or burning fewer lights in the house. For example, a lamp can be used to protect a camellia that is in full flower bud. It should be positioned outward from the plant so the rays of the lamp completely cov­ er it. Smith said he often iittaches a lamp to a step ladder in order to get enough height to cover the plant. The NCSU specialist warns that only an infra­ red bulb should be used. A clear one will break in the sleet. Howard Realty ASSUME 7% PERCENT (A P R ) LOAN Beautiful 3 bedroom brtck home w ‘hK r 'l . “'kilch”e ™ » lovely den^ yHh large fireplace. M u st see to appreciate. Only |35,ooo. Call today. ______________________________ ONLY 1100.00 DOWN PAYM ENT FOR JH,"?. NEW THREE BEDROOM, BRICK. ALL ELECTRIC HOME. LOCATED ON LARGE PRIVATE COUNTRY LOT. PRICED AT $20,500.......................................................................... 460 M APLE AVENUE - Nice two bedroom home with extra nice lot. Central heat. Priced to sell at only $13,500.________________________ HARMONY - Good five room house with an acre lot. Good well and new pump. Owner will finance part of the >8,500.__________________________________________ BOONE - 3 large bedrooms, living room with excellent view and fireplace. All electric, completely furnished. Priced at only $27.000. _______________________ MOCKSVILLE - 6 rooms with bath in this home. Beautiful yard with fruit trees.. CaU for appointment. Reduced to $21,000. BETHEL CHURCH ROAD - 6 beautiful acres with a remodeled home. Three large bedrooms, modern kitchen with range and refrigerator, large fireplace. Only $30,000.______________________________________ CRAFTWOOD - See this 3 bedroom, iMi bathroom, all electric home. Nice'kitchen with range included. Large lot with paved drive-way. 100 percent financing. ______________________________________ CRAFTWOOD - Full basement, all electric, 3 bedroom home at a reduced price. Must see to appreciate the value here. Only $100 to approved buyer. Low monthly payments. HWY. 64 W - Three Jtchen with range, living room carpetet javed drlve-way-all for only $20,000. $11 payment. 128 Acres farm - with a large two-story frame house completely remodeled. Pack house, tool house, chicKen house. All fenced. Barn, two tobacco bams, old smoke house. 3 acres of tobaccb allottment. Owner will help finance. HICKORY H ILL - We have two beautiful homes at Hlckon' Hill lust waiting to be lived In. These homes were built by Carolina Custom Builders. Four bedrooms, 2V^ bathrooms, the upmostln comfort. Call us to see three homes. Good thiancing.________ NEW LISTING - Davie Academy Road. Three large bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, caraort with utility room, beautiful lot . . . owner win finance: Call us for appointment to see. COM MERCIAL <'»AIl stock, equipment, appliances of this furniture store. A good business for an energetic couple. Call us today lo r full Information. We have added a complete Insurance Department. Let us discuss your Insurance needs with you. Call us for information. Julia C. Howard Office 634-5273 Home 634-3754 LAREW-WOOD, INC. INSURANCE- REAL ESTATE NEW LISTINGS Road 1308, off Hwv 601 North 3 bedroom brick veneer home with bath, living room, kitchen-dining combination, carport, basement and large outbuilding. Only $26,000 GREENHILL GENERAL MERCHANDISE BIILDING - Intersection of Greenhill Road and County Home Road. One acre lot, plus over 4,000 square feet, plus partial basement. A grocery store is being operated in this building now, but it is ideal for many types of businesses. Only $28,500. Good Loan Assumption. HARDISON STREET - 3 bedroom brick veneer home with bath, living room and kitchen. I'/i acres behind this house also available. House and both lots priced at $18,000. HOUSE AND 16.42 acres located on Rd. 1100 (Riverdale Rd.). From Greasy Corner, travel south on 601 2.7 miles. Turn right on Riverdale Rd. last house on left. Upper story has 2 bedrooms, living room, hall and bath. Lower story has 2 bedrooms, bath, kitchen-dining combination, and den. Carport has sundeck on top. Laundry room and storage room on back of house. Electric heat. LA-QUINTA MOBILE HOME VILLAGE - Total electric double wide mobile home has living room, dining room, kitchen, den, 3 bedrooms, 2 baths and large screened porch. The kitchen appliances, washer, dryer, drapes, and several pieces of furniture are included. This is one of the most attractive lots in La Quinta and is close to the Club House which has tennis courts and will have a swimming pool. See to appreciate. SOUTHWOOD ACRES - Have you seen the new section which has just been opened? Make your choice from many beautiful woodeo lots. GARDEN VALLEY Three bedroom home now under construction. Tliis home has many fine features, such as double carport, full basement, fireplace in den and basement, central air, etc. TOT STREET - 3 bedroom brick veneer home with 2 baths, living room, dining room, kitchen, utility room, storage room and carport. Central air. CALL OR SEE DON WOOD or HUGH LAREW Office 634-5933 Nights 634-2826 or 634-2288 Dollars &Good fe n sc i f m illu m * Martin c e e Many top economists believe that consumers must play a dominant role in the battle against inflation. And, it’s go­ ing to take some innovative thinking on our part. Inflation has developed a mo­ mentum of its own, and trying to reduce the family budget is close to impossible. But there are effective ways to outsmart inflation. Renew­ ing an old-fashioned principle of personal economics-self-reli- ance-is one of them. We should concentrate on reducing de- 0 . ^ 0 . pendence on an economic system in which price hikes are au- ^ tomatic. There are hundreds of ways to do it yourself and save. Some people are reducing groc­ ery bills by growing their own vegetables. Others have drasti­ cally reduced auto expenses, performing their own tune-ups and minor repairs. Smart consumers are dusting off sewing machines to make little items like pillows and big items like double-knit suits. Others have discovered do-it- yourself gifts, home repair, fix­ ing up used furniture and so on. Ideas and instructions for such projects are everywhere- in your own imagination, in bookstores, libraries, women's and men’s magazines. In the next few weeks I'll discuss specific ways to do it yourself and save. It’s a good weapon to use in the battle against inflation. Readers’ questions are wel­ come and should be sent to P.O. Box 2210, Newport Beach, CA 92663. AUCTION Sat, Jan. 18,1975 Time: 10:00 A.M. Approximately 30 acres divided into four equal tracts, one tract has Vh acre pond, total of 1600 feet of road frontage. Terms: 10% cash day of sale, remainder within 30 days. Directions: 1-40 east to Hwy. 64 Mocksviile Exit right, V4 mile right on Green Hill Road , 3^ mile look for auction banners. Bob Allen, Mike Bauguess will be there for property inspection Sat. 11:00, January 11. Call (919) 722-2515 or 722-2537 NCAL No. 564 NCRL No. 32881 THINKING OF REMODELING Or Adding That Fireplace? call: A. L (Pedro) Plott 634-5448 mtFj Lane Apartmenls, liu^ (UNITS AVAILABLE) Luxury Living In A Country Atmosphere Eachtwo.bedroom.uitit.. ovejrloo! -Other Features- Convenient to 1-40 Carpeted Living Room & Bedrooms Kitchen & Batn Tiled , , „ „ AU Electric (central air-luOlity_ bill pays all Laundry Hook-Up In Each Unit Ample Closet Space TO SEE UNITS NOW AVAILABLE: Turn off 601 North at city limits on Country Lane. Approximately H miles on right. Resident man­ ager available between 10;I a.m. to 6 p.m. in i^ t Jean Hauser Real Estate Agent Phone 634-5800 or 634-2884 A Home Of Your Own .... There'* Nothing Llko It R E A L ^J S T A T E “A Co-operating Brokerage Firrn^ A NEWLY CONSTRUCTED HOUSE IS A GOOD BUY BECAUSE THERE’S MONEY AVAILABLE AT 8V4 PERCENT INTEREST RATE The Interior Is suprlslng and fresh In appeal with an open expanse family room and kitchen featuring surface unit and oven built In a brick wass. There's gracious fonn^ living and dining rooms, 3 large bedrooms, 2 baths, sunny breakfast room, utility rooms - PLUS a tviro car paneled garage. A great house - In the high 40’s. NEW LISTING - Farmington, near Medical Center - A beautifully arranged, well planned house with large kitchen, family room with fireplace, 3 bedrooms, 1V4 baths. This brick rancher also has a carport and utility room and is in “like new” eondition. It fits beautifully on a one acre lot. $31,500. BUILDER'S DISCOUNT This 3 bedroom, 2 bath, colonial rancher is a steal at the offering price. Formal living and dining, ultra-large family room with fireplace, carport, plus a full basement. Many, many other nice features. YOU WON’T BELIEVE IT . . . . !$4S,S00. Everyone likes to get the most for the money .. t. Here's the opportunity. 2% acres of land in a great location with a completely renovated bouse, central heat and air. Customized mobile home with 3 bedrooms, 3 baths, den, patio, all modern conveniences including central heat and air. A package deal in the high 30’s. If neatness Is your thing, this is Ihe house for you. There's no need to lift a paint brush or a hammer in this colonial brick rancher just under two years old. The floor plan Is excellent and space and charm abound. It’s sitting on an acre lot and priced in the mid 30’s. Let's “see tM ay” . Will sell FHA, VA. Owner will consider paying closing cost. Country atmosphere with city convenience is the feel you get because this large formstone house has spacious rooms and two acres of land in a very private setting. Beautiful floors and 3 large bedrooms, basement, outside sitting porch and double carport. An extra plus-there's an extra building suitable for small business, apartment or workshop. Let's tour today! Breathing space is the beauty of owning this bungalow with 5>/i acres in a very desirable location. 3 bedrooms, two bath, large kitchen with an abundance of cabinets, full basement, double car detached garage. Shown by appointment. In the high 20's. Farm & Land We are offering a most desirable 5 acre tract for the Individual with discriminating taste. Good road frontage in a prime location, bordering a stream. Call for particulars. A good way to build security Is to invest In your own tract of land. Tracts of 1 to 4 acres for a building site, garden, beef, horses. In a very desirable area of Davie County. Financing can be arranged. Farming Is our future. A sound Investment In a good working farm. 180 acres surrounded by two large streams, suitable for hogs, cattle, etc. Excellent buildings. New Listing - 24 acres near Duke Perkins Power Plant site. Reasonably priced. Terms. Lots In Greenwood Lakes, the place to build a home of your choice is the river area. We have a beautiful lot over one acre, could we show it to you? Commercial Property A very good offering-Rarely do you find a tract ol this s i » on the market in town. 47 acres adjoining Ingersoll-Rand. Owner offers attractive terms and interest rate. Rental Property Farm house for rent in the Sheffield Community. 6 rooms with bath, electric heat, washer dryer hook-up. Beautiful view. Owner will allow tenant to keep some horses or cattle. Security deposit required. A Complete Real Estate Service Specializing In * Residential • Land *Fanm •Commercial ‘ Industrial 'Rentals Myrtle Crimen 634-5797 Offue 634>5800 Jean Hauser 634-2884 Inlroducino IheBronUeii H em eF in d er It's somelhing completely new in home finding. The Brantley HemeFinder System lets you consider the nelghbortiood, the number of bedrooms and baths and price of each listing at a glance. Then, when you've found the home with me features to fit your needs, read on for a more detdlled descrip­ tion. And you have It. Your dream home. All you have to do then Is give us a call. Remember the name, Brantley We've got the system. lOCAnON lOOMsj IlATHIMS raid OTNIIIFIATUIH FamiingtonArea 3 2 $59,600 Beautiful brick home, central air plus 5 acres, stream, building 24 x 39 with upstairs. Salisbury St. Mocksviile 3 2 $29,900 3^ acres land, home remodeled, plus 3 car garage, bam. Bailey St. Mocksviile 2 1 $14,500 New gold siding, large lot, garden space. Highway 64 West 2 or 3 2 $30,000 Lovely brick home, dishwasher, central air, double carport. Near Redland Kd.3 2 $41,900 4'/i acres land, custom built brick home, fireplace. Highway 64 East 4 2 $69,000 6.48 acres, plus 10 room brick home, 2 fireplaces, central air, plus basement. Bermuda Run 177 Rlverbeni Drive 5 354 $98,500 Beautiful 2 story colonial brick, formal dining room, beautiful setting, river on back lot. Milling Road 3 154 $27,500 Beautiful tri-level, central air, plus basement. Lake Norman 6 3 $135,000 3 story home on Main Lake, completely furnished, 2 kitchens, must see to appreciate. Davie Academy Rd.3 1 $19,500 19 acres land with this 3 bedroom home. Near Cornatzer 3 2 $24,500 New home, completely furnished, wooded lot. 6S0 South. Main St.6 154 $15,000 Nice home, recently painted, 2 lots with home. 318 Lexington St.3 1 $12,500 Home recently redecorated, beautiful new carpet. Location BRJ Acres ^NTLEY Streami 'S FAR Price M FINDER SYSTEM Other Features County Line Rd.tShefTield]28 1 $750. peraoe Good road frontage, financing available. Harmony 12 1 $59,000 Beautiful 7 room brick home, full basement, all land fenced, small barn. Peoples Creek Rd. (Advance)296 2 laket Yaalan River IbSdl 2 homes on property, all fenced and cross fenced, river frontage, can be subdivided. Davie Academy Rd.38Vi Spring IbSdl Old home to renovate, will subdivide into small tracts. Bethel Church Rd.31 2 TbSeU Old home and barn, some timber, will subdivide. Davie Academy Rd.46.54 Streami $55,000 7 acres open, balance wooded. Cedar Creek Rd (FarminKton)■ 13 Stream $1,650 par acre Beautiful tract, approx. 5 acres in timber. Nighway 64 E. Near Country Club 6.12 Stream $900. Deraoe Land lays well, stream on back property. Iredell Co. (Baymont Meadows) 60 Stream $1,700 peraoe Beautiful to develop, street cut through property, horses permitted. IredeU County 165 Stream $199,000 Tenant house, all under fence, modern barn, automatic feeders. 601 North Rd.l330 30 Farmipond $85,000 Nice 7 room brick home, electric heat, Vh acre tobacco allotment, approx. 8 acres fenced. Indian Hills Mini Farm Any Amounitak*Tb&U Let us show you your beautiful mini farm today, beautiful lake adjoining. B f o n l l e q R e o l l q & b t / u r o n c e C o . 2070 Beach Street 722-7136 Winston-Salem Mwiksvilje M ISBunch Martha Edwards, Eueene Bannett,Broker MMki«iii«.N.c. Salesman Home ' 634-2244 • Office • 998-4727 - Home □ lOB - DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, THURSDAY, JANUARY 9, 1975 Excculor’s NOTICE NORTH CAROLINA DAVIE COUNTY Having qualified as Executor of the estate of Frank Raymond Smith, Jr.; deceased, late of Davie County, this is to notify all persons having claims against said estate to present (hem to the undersigned on or before the 27th day of June 1975, or this notice will be pleaded in bar of their recovery. All persons indebted to said estate will please make immediate payment to the undersigned. This the 26th day of December, 1974 North Carolina National Bank, Executor of the estate of Frank Raymond Smith, Jr.; deceased. 102 West Third Street Winston-Salem, N.C. Hatfield and Allman, Attorneys 12-26 4tn Do] Good I[ars& ense tgnrnm mAMmnlm .Soacial Conaufcant to ^Aveo FINANQAL S6>=W»ce8 Co^xecutor’s NOTICE NORTH CAROLINA DAVIE COUNTY Having qualified as Co- Executors of the estate of William M. Cartner, deceased, late of Davie County, this Is to notify all persons having claims against said estate to present them to the undersigned on or before the 27th day of June 1975, or this notice will be pleaded in )ar of their recovery. All oersons indebted to said estate vill please make immediate )aymenl to the undersigned. This the 26th day of lecember, 1974 Sam Cartner and William Partner, Co-Executors of the estate of William M. Cartner, deceased. 12-26 4tn Administrator’s Notice NORTH CAROLINA DAVIE COUNTY Having qualified as Ad­ ministrator of the estate of Frank Alexander King, deceased, late of Davie County, this is to notify all persons having claims against said estate to present them to the undersigned on or before the 13th day of June 1975, or this notice will be pleaded in bar of their recovery. All persons indebted to said estate will please make immediate -payment to the undersigned. - This the 12th day of December, 1974 Joe H. King, Administrator of the estate of Frank Alexander King deceased. 12-12-4tn Executor’s Notice NORTH CAROLINA DAVIE COUNTY Having qualified as Executor of the estate of Eugene Clinton Benbow, deceased, late of Davie County, this is to notify all persons having claims against said estate to present them to the undersigned on or before the 3rd day of July 1975, or this notice will be pleaded in bar of their recovery. All persons indebted to said estate will please make immediate payment to the undersigned. This the 20th day of December,1974 James E. Benbow, Executor of the estate of Eugene Clinton Benbow deceased. William E. Hall Attorney at Law . ,l-24tn. With memories of last win­ ter’s fuel shortages still fresh in our minds, we should all be concerned with how efficiently our homes are heated this year. The first step is obvious. Set your thermostat to the lowest setting comfortable. You can set it even lower if you are ' willing to wear warmer clothes ~ around the house. Don’t heat rooms that aren't occupied. If every room has a thermostat, set each according to need. And close off all rooms that are not frequently in ^ 6 use. At night, v. close all bed- “ room doors 0 ™ and have the ^ g, heat on only in ^ 4? ^ those rooms. One of the most expensive rooms to heat is your garage. While it may be pleasant to get into a nice warm car in the morning, it can waste a lot of fuel. Instead, think about in­ vesting in one of a variety of engine warming devices, lliese range in price from about $4 to $15, use very little energy and insure an easy start in the morn­ ing. They pay for themselves quickly in terms of fuel saved. Be sure to plug up all leaky door and window jams. They not only let cold air in but allow that expensive freshly heated air to escape. And make sure your fireplace flue is closed when not in use. And be sure to open all your draperies on sunny days and let the heat in. Readers' questions are wel­ come and should be sent to P.O. Box 22JO, Newport Beach, CA 92663. Farm Tips By Dr. J. W. Pou Agricultural Sp aclaliil Wachovia Bank A Trust Co., NJk. Three Robeson County farmers are trying to open the door to a new source of farm income, according to Tom Byrd, N. C. State University Agricultural information specialist. Alien Currin Jr., and Alton Holcomb and his son Crowell are growing tomatoes for processing and they are planning to harvest them mechanically. Currin and the Holcombs have purchased — from California — the state’s first mechanical tomato harvester. The machine arrived too late to be of much value in harvesting the 1974 crop, but the growers feel they have learned a lot during the first year about producing tomatoes the new way. Processing tom atoes machine-harvested, they have found are quite different from hand-harvested tomatoes grown for the fresh market. Varieties, cultivation, pest control and nearly every facet of production are different. Currin and the Holcombs mastered some of these new tech­ niques in 1974 and some they didn’t. Nevertheless, they’re ready to try again in 1975. They grew 100 acres in 1974, which is about the acreage needed for one mechanical harvester. They plan to grow another 100 acres in 1975. Currin said that tomatoes for processing compare favorably with net income from tobacco if a farmer can average 12 tons or more per acre. He averaged 15 tons on one field of 28 acres in 1974. But, Currin added, “ . . . I wouldn’t attempt to grow them if I couldn’t harvest them by machine. I became convinced of this when our harvester didn’t arrive in time to use on this year's crop, and we had to harvest them with hand labor.” Currin estimates that the cost of hand harvesting is twice that of machine harvesting. _ Dr. Douglas Sanders, extension horticulture spe­ cialist at North Carolina State University, brieves North Carolina definitely has an opportunity to produce tomatoes for processing. About 80 percent of the processing tomatoes are currently grown in California. Acreage there is level­ ing off, tomato products are in short supply, and companies are looking for new sources of produc­ tion. The strategy on the Currin and Holcomb farms was to stagger the planting of tomatoes so they would mature over an eight-weok period. This would give them an opportunity to use the harvester, which averages about three acres daily, over a long period. The tomatoes are grown on wide, flat rows five feet apart — to accommodate the machine. Good weed and disease control is critical, but the chemi­ cals and know-how are available to do this. The mechanical har\'ester picks the entire crop in a once-over operation. The machine cuts off the plants just below the soil line and runs the vines and tomatoes over a shaker. After the tomatoes are separated from the vines, they are run over a belt where they are sorted by people on the harvester. Fruit with the right size and color is conveyed to a box in which it is taken to the processing plant. Administrators NOTICE NORTH CAROLINA DAVIE COUNTY Having qualified as Ad­ ministrator of the estate of Margaret E. Brown, deceased, late of Davie County, this is to notify all persons having claims against said estate to present them to the undersigned on or before the 9th day of July 1975, or this notice will be pleaded In bar of their recovery. All persons indebted to said estate will please make immediate payment to the undersigned. This the 2nd day of January, 1975 John T. Brock, Ad­ ministrator of the estate of Margaret E.'Brown deceased. l-9-4tn N O R T H C A R O L IN A DAVIE COUNTY NOTICE OF RESALE OF REAL PROPERTY Pursuant to the authority vested in the undersigned commissioners in a certain special proceeding entitled "William B. Smith et al vs. Evenda Sue Smith et al,” dated the 31 day of December, 1974, the undersigned will offer for resale and resell at public auction for cash on Friday, January 17,1975, at 12:00 Noon, ' at the Courthouse door in Mocksville, Davie County, • North Carolina, that certain tract or parcel of real property located in Davie County, North Carolina, and more particularly described as follows: Tract No. 2: BEGINNING at a point, the Southwest corner of a certain lot described in a deed recorded in Deed Book 76, at page 521, Davie County Registry, said point being located South 7 degs. West 210 feet of a point in the South edge of a private road, being the Northwest comer of the within tract, runs thence with the line of said lot and with the line of a lot described in Deed Book 86, at page 102, Davie County Registry, South 78 degs. East 420 feet to a point in Dallas W. Smith et ux’s line; thence with said line South 7 degs. West 105 feet to a point, an iron, and North 78 degs. West 420 feet to a point, an iron in line of said 10-acre tract above described; thence with said tract North 7 degs. East 105 feet to the BEGINNING, containing one (1) acre, more or less. See survey by S. L.' Talbert, Registered Surveyor, dated May 8,1971, filed in the records d f this proceedings. Tract No. 2 hereinabove described includes access to a private road as appears from said map above designated and has access to the public road as appears from said map. STARTING BID: $1,045.00. Said property shall be sold subject ■ to Davie County ad valorem taxes for years sub­ sequent to 1974 and shall be subject to upset bids and con­ firmation by the Clerk of Superior Court of Davie County, as provided by law. This 31 day of December, 1974, DALLAS W. SMITH, Commissioner WILLIAM B. SMITH, Commissioner By John Brock, Attorney 1-9-2TN Notice of Service Of Process By Publication State Of North Carolina DAVIE COUNTY In the District Court Raymond Leo Fisher, Public Notices NORTH CAROLINA DAVIE COUNTY Adminislrtor's Notice NOTICE OF SALE OF REAL PROPERTY Under and by virtue of the authority vest^ in the un­ dersigned substituted trustee under the terms of a certain deed of trust from Oscar Smith et ux, dated April 22, 1974, and recorded in Book 87 at page 683, Davie County Registry, and an instrument designating the undersigned as substituted trustee, V-ecorded in Deed Book 90, at page 794, Davie County Registry, the said deed of trust being subject to foreclosure upon default, and default having occurred, and at the request of the holder of the note secured thereby, the un­ dersigned substituted trustee will offer for sale and sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash on Friday, the 24th day of January, 1974, at 12:00 Noon, at the Courthouse door in Mocksville, Davie County, North Carolina, the following described tract of real property located in Davie County, North Carolina, and described as follows, to wit: Betty Foster Fisher TO: Betty Foster Fisher Take notice that a pleading seeking relief against you has been filed in the office of the Clerk of Superior Court of Davie County on the 7th day of January, 1975 in the above entitled action. The nature of the relief being sought is as follows: that the bonds of matrimony heretofore existing between the plaintiff and the defendant be dissolved and that he be granted an absolute divorce from the defendant. You are required to make defense to such pleading not later than February 18,1975 and upon your failure to do so the party seeking service against you will apply to the court for the relief sought. This the 7th day of January, 1975. Wade H. Leonard, Jr. Attorney for Plaintiff 21 Court Square Mocksville, North Carolina Phone No. 704-634-5020 l-9-3tp First Tract: Being Lot Number Eight (8) of Block No. 2, Section 2 of the GREENWOOD LAKE SUBDIVISION, according to a plat thereof prepared by John G. Bane, C.E. and duly registered in Plat Book 3, page 88, Davie County Registry, to which reference is hereby made for a more particular description of said lot. Second Tract: BEGINNING at a point, a stone, Ellis Plowman’s corner, said point being located North 30 deg. East 6.82 chains from a point in the center of Rainbow Road, runs thence North 87 degs. West 4.00 chs. passing through the common corner of Ellis Plowman and William Smith to a point, a stone in William Smith’s line, Glenn Smith’s corner; thence with Glenn Smith’s line South 5 degs. East 6.10 chains to a point in the center of Rainbow Road; thence^ with Duke Smith’s line North 3o' degs East 6.82 chs. to the BEGINNING, containing One and Twenty-two Hundredths (1.22) acres, more or less as surveyed by A.L. Bowles, Registered Surveyor, Sep­ tember 21, 1964. Said sale shall be made subject to outstanding liens and encumbrances of record in­ cluding Davie County ad valorem taxes and shall be subject to upset bids and coh- firmation of the Clerk of Superior Court of Davie County, as provided by law. This the 18th day of December, 1974. JOHN T. BROCK, Substituted Trustee 1-2 4TN NORTH CAROLINA DAVIE COUNTY NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE OF REAL PROPERTY Pursuant to the authority vested in the undersigned Trustee by virtue of a certain deed of trust from Country Lane Apartments, Inc. to Foy N. Goforth, Trustee, dated November 26, 1972, and recorded in Deed of Trust Book 83, at page 187, Davie County Registry, and a certain in­ strument appointing the un­ dersigned as Substitute Trustee recorded in Book 90, at page 728, Davie County Registry, the said Deed of Trust being by its ternis subject to foreclosure upon default, and default having occurred, and at the request of the holdei of the said Deed of Trust and the note secured thereby, the undersigned Substituted Trustee will offer for sale and sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash on Friday the 3rd day of January, 1975, at 12:00 Noon, at the Courthouse door in Mocksville, Davie County, North Carolina, the following described lots, or tracts of real property situated in Mocksville Township, Davie County, North Carolina, and described as follows: Being Lots No. 6 and No.7 of the Murray-Spillman Subdivision as described on a plat thereof recorded inT’lat Book 4, at page 22, Davie County Registry, to which said plat reference is hereby made for a more par ticular description of said lots Said properly shall be sold subject to ad valorem taxes for calendar year 1974 and prior years and shall be sold subject to any liens or encumbrances of record which are superior to the lien of said Deed of Trust. Said sale shall be subject to upset bids and to confirmation of the Clerk of Superior Court of Davie County, as required by law. This 3rd day of December 1974. JOHN T. BROCK Substituted Trustee 12-12-4tn NORTH CAROLINA DAVIE COUNTY Having qualified as Ad­ ministrator of the estate of Cecil D, Smith, deceased, late of Davie County, this is to notify all persons having claims against said estate to present them to the undersigned on or before the 12th day of June 1975, or this notice will be pleaded in bar of their recovery. All persons indebted to said estate will please make immediate payment to the undersigned. This the I2th day of December, 1974 Cathy L. Smith, Administratrix of the estate of Cecil D. Smith deceased. 12-12-4tn Mrs. Cathy L. Smith Route 3 Advance, N.C The principle of liberty and equality, if coupled >vith mere selfishness will make men only for his own interest. And here is the need of religion and its power, to bring in the principle of benevolence and live to men. John Randolph Administrator’s'Notice NORTH CAROLINA DAVIE COUNTY Having qualified as Ad­ ministrator of the estate of Anita L. Foster, deceased, late of Davie County, this is to notify all persons having claims against said estate to present them to the undersigned on or before the 9th day of July 1975 or this notice will be plead^ in bar of their recovery. All persons indebted to said estate will please make immediate payment to the undersigned. This the 3rd day of January, 1975 James D. Foster, Box 417, Cooleemee, administrator of the estate of Anita L. Foster deceased l-9-4tn Life We live in deeds, not years; in thoughts, not breaths; in feelings, not in figures on the dial; we should count time by heart-throbs. He most lives who thinks most, feels the noblest, acts the best. Bailey Executrix’s NOTICE NORTH CAROLINA DAVIE COUNTY Having quallfifed as Executrix of the estate of Woodrow Wilson Owlngs, deceased, late of Davie County, this is to notify all persons having claims against said estate to present them to the undersigned on or before the 27th day of June, 1975, or this notice will be pleaded In bar of their recovery. All persons indebted to said estate will please make immediate payment to the undersigned. This the 26th day of December, 1974. Sarah Lou G. Owings, Executrix of the estate of Woodrow Wilson Owings, deceased. 12-26-4TN Vladivostok V lad ivostok ’s sheltered harbor and miles of automated docks make it the Soviet Union’s largest Far Eastern port. But the vast harbor freezes over in winter, so a fleet of icebreakers plows open ship channels. PUBLIC HEARING Application has been made by Freewood Associates Ltd. to Davie County Board of Ad­ justment for a Conditional Use Permit for the operation of a private family campground on Approximately 60.65 acres owned by Freewood Associates, Ltd. located on State Road 1313 adjoining the property of Clay Gaither, Harper VanHoy, D.L, Whitaker, Mrs. Ola Smith, Ocie S. Dyson, Lethia B. Potts, P.G'. Barker, M.E. Stanley and E.W. Prevette, Jr. A public hearing on this Application for a Conditional Use Permit will be held by the Davie County Board of Ad­ justment at 7:30 P.M . on , January 6, 1975, in the Grand Jury Room in the Davie County Corthouse Mocksville, N.C. R. Bruce Tuttle Davie County Zoning Enforcement Officer l2-l9-3tn Newtpapert The careful reader of a few good newspapers can learn more in a year than most scholars do in their great libraries. F.B. Sanborn Modesty Modesty once extinguished knows not how to return. Seneca Notice of TAX LISTING During the Month of JANUARY 1975 A ll PROPERTY On Hand Januray 1, 1975-Either Real or Personal is SUBJECT TO TAXATION Regardless of Age or Sex of Owner All Btisiness should list their property by mail or at the Courthouse. Township listers will not be able to do this. It is noted that all property should be listed as of January 1,1975 except inventory. This should be listed as of your last fiscal year inventory. Tax listers will only be in Rural Areas a few days in various places, in each township. Please make a note of these days so that if you need help in listing, you may be able to go to them. You may list with any lister in any township. You are required to bring your listing form when seeking the aid of a list taker. However if you lose your form you can only list at the Courthouse. If you are a new lister, you may list with any lister in any township. You should have received your forms in the mail, if you listed in 1974. If you have not, contact the tax office. We have received many returns with wrong addresses. We urge you to list by mail if at all possible. The tax listers will be in the following places for listing taxes. Hie time will be from 9:00 A.M. until 5:00 P.M. each Monday and Friday. Each Wednesday from 12:00 Noon until 8:00 P.M. and each Saturday firom 9:00 A.M. until 12:00 Noon during the month of January and 9:00 9:00 A.M. until 12:00 Noon February 1,1975, except JerusalemTownship each Monday firom 8:30 A.M. until 4:30 P.M. Calahain Township Jan.l 3-20-27 J.C. Strouil Grocery Jan. 10-11-15-18-22 24-25-29-31 anil Feb. 1 Center Community BIdg. Mrs. Dale Chaffin, List Taker January 17 Sheffield Grocery & Hardware Jerusalem Township Jan.10-11-15-17-18-22- 24-25-29-31 and Feb. 1 Jerusalem Fire Dept. Jan.l 3-20-27 Cooleemee School Gym. Mrs. Margaret Cope, List Taker Farmington Township Jan.l 3-20-27 Bogers Kar Kleen Service Jan.l 1-15-18-22-25-29 and Feb. 1 Bates Grocery and Service Across Road From Old Smith Grove School Jan. 10-17-24-31 Ed Johnson's Grocery & Service Mrs. Jack Boger, List Taker Clatteville Township Jan. 10-11-13-15-17- 18-20-22-24-25-27-29-31 and Feb.1 William R. Davie Fire Dept. Mr. L.S. Driver, List Taker Shady Grove Township Jan. 10-11-13-17-18- 20-24-25-27-31-and Feb. 1 Advance Fire Dept. Jan.l 5-22-29 Robertson's Grocery (Bixby) Mrs. Jane Carter, List Taker Fulton Township Jan. 10-11-13-15- 17-18-20-22-24-25-27- 29- 31 and Feb. 1 Fork Fire Dept. Mis . Floyd Monday, List Taker Mocksville Township Mocksville listers will be at County Courthouse Monday through Friday from 8:30 A.M. until 5:00 P.M. Saturday, January 11 and 25 from 9:00 A.M.untU 12:00 Noon. Mrs. Marjorie Green, List Taker TAX RELIEF FOR THE PROI^ERTY OF ELDERLY PERSONS WITH LIMITED INCOMES If you are 65 years of age , or if you will become 65 during the year for which you are listing property taxation, and your disposable income did not exceed five thousand dollars ($5,000 includes husband and wife) for the preceeding year, you are eli^ble for a tax exclusionof up to five thousand dollars ($5,000) for property you hold and use for personal purposes. All Late Listing Subfect To 10% Penalty Please Make Your Return As Early As Possible TAX SUPERVISOR, DAVIE COUNTY DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, THURSDAY, JANUARY 9, 1975 - IIB Cards Of Thanks BARNEYCASTLE I wish to express my most heartfelt thanks to the many people who were so kind and sympathetic during our recent t^reavement. I appreciate more than words can express the many kindnesses shown and Ipray that God will richly bless each and every one. Helen Barneycastle RICHARDSON The family of the late Leroy Richardson wishes to express their appreciation to our friends and neighbors for the kindness, thoughtfulness, flowers and food during our time of l$reavement. : SAIN ^he family of the late Willie Alvin Sain wishes to express their appreciation to all our friends and neighbors for the kindness, thoughtfulness, flowers and cards during our time of bereavement. ; ThechUdrenofW .A.Sain EMPLOYMENT FOR RENT MISC.FOR SALE FOR SALE FOR SALE Help Wanted OPENINGS in this area with Sarah Coventry ... Fine Fashion Jeweliy ... Let me interview you for a fashion show or part time work ... Nina Scoggins 246-2397. 1-9 3TP HELP WANTED ... part time help for January 19-24 ... 18 or older ... good pay ... must have car... call collect 919-274-0213 or 919-275-2742.1-9 Itn I have an open territory in Mocksville ... it can be yours ... as an Avon Representative you’ll earn good money ... choose your own hours ... sound interesting? call Peggy Long, 704-873-9828 or write Route 3, Box 57 Yadkinville, N.C. 27055. 1-9-ltn Jobs Waniedi FINANCING CONSOLIDATE YOUR BILLS . . . Home Improvement . . . Second Mortgage Loans . . .' from $900 to $5,000 cash . . . ask ;for Mr. Wieneck, call collect '704-246-?136..., C A PIT O L FIN AN C IAL SERVICES, 17 'South Main Street, Lexington, '.N. C. '• 4-27-tfn Would like to keep children in my home on Sanford Road the first and second shifts. For information, call 634-2258 or 998- 4920, Advance. 12-5-tfn W ILL DO ODD JOBS such as : wall paneling, bathroom tile, floor tile, installing storm windows and doors, repairing porches, etc........ will also deliver firewood to your home by truck load or half load ... contact Karl Osborne at 634- 3398. 1-9 2tp FOR R ENT: Trailers and trailer spaces . . . 20 mln. from Winston-Salem . .. lO.mln from Mocksville . . . lighted and paved streets, with paved driveways, nice lawns with cemented patios . . . I--40 Mobile Home Village .... In­ tersections of 1—40 & Far­ mington Road . . . Route 2, Mocksville ... Call after 6 p. m. 634-3889 or 634-2244. 5-9tfn FOR RENT . . . CRESTVIEW APARTMENTS . . . Lexington Avenue, Mocksville . . . very nice four rooms and bath . . . call 634-5420. 6-20 tfn ROOMS FOR RENT . . . by the month . . . downtown . . . phone 634-2244. 9-26 tfn CLUB FAC ILITIE S FOR RENT: The former Masonic rooms above the Branch Bank on Main Street across from the Court House. For details, write: Holmes Investment Co., Box 904, Salisbury, N.C. 28144. 11-7 tfn FOR RENT . . . building in junction of Depot Street and Hwy. 64 E ... formerly Allens .. . $75 month as is or will remodel and repair for reliable tennant. Contact Mr. Lloyd Allen 634- 2421. 12-5-tfn MOBILE HOMES FOR RENT ... Two and three bedrooms ... all utilities furnished ... good location ... close to city ... Westside Mobile Home Village ... call during day 634-5959 ro 634-5086 at night. 12-12 tfn FOR RENT ... APARTMENT on South Main Street. Call 634- 2721 after 5:00 p. m. 12-26-3TP 'The highest hotel in Europe is the Holiday Inn In Augs- 'burg. West Germany! We have most any style piano. We can save you at least $200 on any new piano. We have no high rent, no city taxes, no high- commissioned salesman. Open Monday - Saturday 7 til 5. Cali 704-279-9555 for evening appointment. Located on U.S. 52, 7 ml. East of Salisbury. Kluttz Piano Co., Inc., Gnmite Quarry, N.C. WOOD CARVING ORDERS ACCEPTED Wil^ Keaton Rt. 3 Mocksville, N.C. Phone 493^716 Kitchen Cabinets Store Fixtures Commercial & Resident Remodeling & Repair All Work Guaranteed FBE6 6STtMM’E|To8m.H Jack Masten Phone 493-4266 Mocksville, N.C. Route 5 hieaith & Beauty Briefs Laugh lines, under the eye pouches and wrinkled skin under the chin are the most frequent symptoms that send older women to the plastic surgeon, according to a new book called “ Ageless Aging.” Men go for such operations most often for sagging eye­ lids, a frown between the eyebrows, or a “ turkey gobler neck.”***** As hair grays, it becomes thicker and coarser. It’s scalp trouble that brings on early grey hair, author Ruth Winter writes. Injury or disease of the nervous system some­ times cause graying patterns, she adds.***** Products that are pleasant and convenient to use are more likely to be used, and to provide the benefits for which they were developed. A cream that is used for pim­ ples and other blemishes has been reformulated and re­ packaged with this in mind. pHisoAc Is the result. It spreads easily, has a soothing, tingling feeling when applied, and blends with the skin, so that it can be used at night- and during the day.***** Soap is a highly effec­ tive skin cleanser, but may also wash away moisture. In­ viting dryness and irritation. pHisoDerm, a creamy liquid cleanser. Is reported to pre­ serve the skin’s natural pro­ tection, and can be used on face, hands, or body. ***•» Winter winds are drying to skin, and so are rooms that are steam heated. Dry, sensi­ tive skins may respond best to a loapleu skin cleanser. pHisoDerm liquid is one that contains emollients that help protect the skin. FIREWOOD FOR SALE . . . slabs or round wood. . .call 634- 3476 or 634-2684 after 6 p.m. 10-10 tfn FOR YOUR WALLPAPER needs contact M ERRBLL FU RNITU RE COMPANY, Wilkesboro Street, Mocksville, N. C. 10-24-TFN Opening — new craft shop at 505 Avon Street. THE CRAFTY LADY ~ plaques, tole pain­ tings, art supplies and decoupage. Phone 634-5219. 11-14-tfn TAKE soil away the Blue Lustre way from carpets and upholstery. Rent electric shampooer. C.J. Angell Ap­ pliance & Jewlry Store. l-2-5tn SPECIAL . . . best grade 100 percent polyester doubleknit reduced from $3.49 a yard to $2.98 a yard ... 62” and 64” wide ... large selection of colors... a real buy . . . SHEFFIELD GROCERY & FABRIC SHOP.. . phone 492-7983. l-2-2tn STAND up crushed c a i^ t with our new Racine cleaning . . . shampoos without water . . . Rent Machine at CAUDELL LUMBER COMPANY. SPOTS before your eyes- on your new carpet - remove them with Blue Lustre. Rent electric shampooer. Mocksville Fur­ niture & Appliance, Inc. l-2-5tn GERT’S a gay girl - ready for a whirl after cleaning carpets with Blue Lustre. Rent electric shampooer. Merrell Furniture Co., Inc. l-2-5tn FOR RENT: 2-bedroom 12 x 60 mobile home located one mile west of Mocksville on private lot on Prison Camp Road. Call 492- 7129 after 3 o’clock. 1-9 tfn FOR RENT — 3 bedroom home - N. Main St. Phone 493- 6588. 1-9-ltp NOTICE WANTED TO BUY LIVESTO CK Baef catt!«, ho^, V M it , or feeder cattle. I have an order for all type* of cattle. Will pay market price for your livpttock, ritfht on the farm. ■ftiyment in cash or check, twhlch ever you prefer. PRO*«PT PICK UP SERVICE i will buy one header a whple herd. Give nM a call! I FRED 0. ELLli Uvestqisk and Aucttoneerind' Service Rt. 4, Mocksville, N.C. 634-5227 or 998-8744 Lifelong resident of Oavie Grow Your Own Fruit. Free copy 40-pg. Planting Guide Catalog in color, offered by Virginia’s largest growers of fruit trees, nut trees, berry plants, grape vines, land­ scaping plant material. W ayn esb oro N u rseries- Waynesboro, Virginia 22980. l-9-4tn ACUPUNCTURE CENTER of Rock Hill - Charlotte an- nouces extension of its hours. For information call 803-336- 7191, Woolco Shopping Center, Rock Hill, S.C. l-9-2tn From wall to wall ... all your carpet needs can be met with carpet from M ERRELL FURNITURE COMPANY. 9-5 tfn OFFICE MACHnSES Typewriters Adduig RfadineB SenioeOiAUISUttB EARLE’S OFFICE SUPPLIES Dial 636-2341 SUUMry,N.C .‘ajiimiiimiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiu:CONTACT: = Brewer’s61ass& Mirror I (jiut off Sanford Road) s For Your Glass Needs | Stonn Windows And Doors | To Fit Any Size Opening 5 Mill Finish-White-Bronze = ★ Plate Glass ★Mirrois Shower Doois| ★ Storm windows and door repaired | 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. S Route 1 634-3435 Mocksville, N.C. i ^SIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIR; FOR SALE ALUMINUM £LAI£S Size 23 X 32 IncliBt,'.009 Thick 25* Eicli 020 par hundred) Now you CM com dut pump bouM... chlciMB coop... M P*a. ■ • pcny lublt... cIom In unteniNth ih« bouM. ..iwich duioM leaky hwn or dwIlM or bu04i tool howN for Out Uvn mowti to keep It In out of the tiiny wMllMr. XbouHBdi ilmdy idd. mIm nch diy, BUT: ... New Supply snibbh dtiiy. Get youi* no«( SALISBURY POST FRONT OFFICE 6M-423I Oi. «nu tfillvM to (h( UockiviUt EntcrpriM •ny Of din for previoui w«*k. FurriiUire NEW & USED Office Furniture Fireproof Files and Safes. Rowan Offk* Furniture 118 N. Main St. Salisbury, N. C. phone 636-8022. tfn FOR SALE . . . Philco and Sylvania Televisions .... financing and service available . . . VOGLER-S TV SALES & SERVICE ... Advance, N .C ... . phone 998-8172. 5-16 tfn Take Up Payment 3 Rm. Spanish Furn. Bal. Due $589.45 WANTED customer to take up payment on brand new Spanish furniture. Couple had furniture on lay-away for 6 months. Group consists of Spanish style triple dresser, large m irror, chest, bed, mattress, boxspring, 5 piece Dinette Set - Velvet Tuxedo Sofa and tub chair to match with tables and lamps; Free Delivery - Convenient Payment Plan...Ask for Mr. Zone's furniture at Furniture Land (across from Post Office) 201 W. Board or call 872-6577, Statesville,N.C. 1-9 2tn FOR SA LE : Countertop refrigerator used in dorm for two years. $60.00. Fine for camping trailer, dorm or rec room. Phone 998-4352. l-9-ltn Mobile Homes SPECIAL . . . 12 X 60 Mobile Home . . . 2 l>edrooms . . . completely furnished ... $5450 . .. over 35 more to choose from starting at $3995 . . . RAY'S HOMES, Hwy. 601, Mocksville. 9-5 tfn FOR SALE ... Mobile Home ... 60 X 12 ... air conditioned ... washer, dryer, dishwasher ... 2 porches... oil tank ... un­ derpinned ... 22 foot expando ... also 100 X 150 foot lot ... oak fence ... paved drive ... call 998- 5296 after 7 p.m. 10-17tfn Services. J. R. CAMPBELL AND SONS SEPTIC TANK SERVICE. Have largest truck and only (Company certified to pump' s ^ c tanks in the county, very experienced, Telephone Jimmy Campbell, 634-5341 or Norman Beaver, 634-5726. 5-14-tfn ELECTROLUX SALES & SERVICE . . . 118 East Broad Street... Statesville, N. C. call 872-7117. 5-23 tfn Small Transfer Fee and assume payments on like-riew reconditioned repossessions at Jim Pinnix Homes, 4000 Pat­ terson Avenue, Winston-Salem. BLACK & WHITE and COLOR TV R E PAIR ... in the Advance, Farmington and Fork areas .. . VOGLER'S TV SALES AND SERVICE . . . Call 998-8172. 9-20-73 tfn l-9-7tp WANTiP J O BUY Livestock A.L Beck & Son Wholesale Meats Thomasville, N.C. ■ Will Buy 1 Cow Or 100 Com | ! . . . alfo.Bulli, Vaili, Feeder! ■ Calves... We Pay Cash For ■ IA U Cattle When Picked Up. I I A.L. Beck, Jr. I I Rt. 1, Vhomasville I Painting and Repairs. James P. M iller, 998-8340 1-2-tfn Service on ail makes and models of color, B-W TV’s, Stereos. Antenna Systems. . .Service calls made evenings, weekends. . . Davie Elec­ tronics service, phone 634-3652 or 634-5110. l-2-5tp Free Hawaiian All Expense Paid Vacation for t^o ... visit us and register at no obligation at Jim Pinnix Homes, 4000 Pat­ terson Avenue, Winston-Salem. l-8-7tp AIR, WELL PRILilNG eg Roirie9,Baxl27 Stafasvme,N.C 2B677 FHOISE 872^%14 Advance, N.G PHONE 99^141 Aiitos FOR SALE....used car- s...several makes and year models to choose from....can be seen at CENTRAL CAROLINA BANK, Mocksville....or call 634- 5941. 12-19 tfn REPAIRS-REMODELING & CONTRACT WOltK [xperiencedjn All Kin^Of Plumbing Work J.C. Kimmer Phone 634-5707 or Dwight Sammons Phone 28M380 Wagner Plumbing & Heating Route 4, Mocksville No. License 5567 THERE'S SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE... All the current events...the latest in fashions...what's happening on the sports scene... you'll find the information you're looking for right in your local paper! IN THE PAGES OF DAVIE COUNTY 15^ per copy $6.00 per year (in state) 18.00 per year (out of state) »\ 12B DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, THURSDAY, JANUARY 9, 1975 Site Of Sunken Monitor Preserved As Sanctuary showed the clear outline of the wreck, from bow to stern. "We also discerned a circular structure that could be Monitor’s rotating gun turret,” Mr. Newton writes. A television camera lowered to the site made videotapes of other distinguishing features: (he Monitor’s flat-bottomed hull ringed with its protective armor belt, iron deck plates with their clearly visible rivet holes, and the large cylinder that was the turret, protruding from beneath the overturned wreck. The Eastward’s search, supported by grants from the National Geographic Society and the National Science Foundation, and by the United States Army Reserve, which supplied two craft to aid the expedition, successfully pin­ pointed the Monitor’s grave. But equipment problems prevented the team from photographing all of the wreck, and more identification was sought. A second expedition, supported by the National G^graphlc Society and the Navy, returned to the site in April 1974 aboard the Alcoa Seaprobe. The Seaprobe is an oceanographic research vessel equipped with special propellers at its bow and stern, permitting it to hover over a precise spot on the ocean floor like a seagoing helicopter. A camera pod lowered from a well amidships enabled researchers to obtain more than 2,000 photographs of the Monitor, disclosing additional details that dispelled any doubts about the wreck's Identity. Subsequently, Dr. Sheridan brought to the surface some of the Monitor’s deck plates and an encrusted two-layer disc that when cleaned was revealed as one of the warship’s distinctive iron deckllght covers. Mr. Newton observes that the depth and treacherous currents at the site rule out attempts to dive to the wreck. And he concludes: "The remains are in such a badly corroded and fragile condition that the ship may never be raised intact.” The Monitor won her place in history on March 9, 1862, when she repulsed the Confederate ironclad, Merrimack, in a duel at Hampton Roads, Virginia, and prevented the ^uth from breaking the crippling Union blockade. But the Monitor did more: Its revolving gun turret forever altered naval warfaje. The Merrimack, built on the burned hull of a Union frigate and later renamed the C.S.S. Virginia, had conventional batteries of | guns on each side of its deck. This required more I maneuvering to bring the | cannon to bear on a target. Within a few years, the world's I navies had adopted gun turrets | like the Monitor’s. As a National Marine Sane-1 tuary, the famous ship will be safe from underwater van­ dalism. Any archeological expeditions to the site in the future will require government permission and will be carefully scrutinized to insure thol Monitor’s preservation. ' ' Atlantic Reveals Secrets of Monitor’s Grave After 111 Years SINKING M O NITO R is ubnndoned as crew­ men clamber down the turret to a boat from the U.S.S. Rhotle Island in an engraving from “ Har­ per’s W eekly” of January 24, 1863, les.s than a month after the ironclad foundered in 220 feet of| water during a gale 16 miles off Cape Hutteras. The United States will dedicate its first National Marine Sanctuary, 16 miles off Cape Hatteras, in January. Seamen may think “ sanc­ tuary” an old term to apply to the storm-tossed currents around Hatteras, but the site marks the final resting place of the U.S.S. Monitor and 16 crewmen lost when an Atlantic gale sank the ironclad 112 years ago. In the January National Geographic, John G. Newton, the Duke University scientist who found the Monitor in 220 feet of water on August 27,1973, tells how the historic wreck was located after more than a century. A special fold-out page in the magazine contains a mosaic of hundreds of underwater photographs, pieced together by United Slates Navy technicians to form a complete view of the shattered warship lying upside down on the ocean floor. The Duke University research ship. Eastward, engaged in a submarine n n c for consumersfrom your BETTER BUSINESS BUREAU CAN I RETURN M YELEPHANT? Your Christmas list probably didn’t include purple satin pillowcases, a leopard print table cloth, a fuzzy angora sweater (that you’re allergic to), yellow slippers that you can’t quite squeeze into or a cigarette lighter you don’t want broause you quit smoking last New Year’s Day. But now that you have them, what can you do with them? Other than stuffing the gifts in a closet and writing gallant thank-you notes, you can try to return them, says the Better Bussiness Bureau. That is, if you know where the gifts were twught. But even then, don’t assume a store has to accept returned items; it doesn’t. Except in cases of misrepresentation or defective products, a store doesn’t have to accept any of your returned white elephants. But most stores want your business, so there’s a good chance you can get an exchange, credit or refund. If a store’s policy allows returns, usually it will require prcof of purchase. If the item was a gift, you won't have a sales slip. So take it back in the original box or wrapper when you return it. And try to take it back as soon as possible after the holidays. If the store’s policy is to credit the price o f the return to your account, be sure that this credit appears on your next statement and that it stays there until you decide to use it. Don't expect a refund on anything you’ve soiled or used. The store may not be able to resell it, and this just increased the cost of all items in the store for all customers. It also might prompt the store to adopt a stricter return policy. While you’re returning un­ wanted gifts, you’ll probably notice that everything seems to be on sale. This is a good time to pick up some real bargains. But it’s also a good time to pick up more white elephants. How many times have you bought something because it was on sale and then never really used it, or never really liked it? Buying sale items on impulse when you really don't need or want them doesn’t save you any money. Many items may be ad­ vertise as special values. You might see mittens and hats on a table with a sign saying, “Special Purchase: $1.99 to $2.99 ~ $5 to $7 value.” But if you stop to examine what’s being sold, you may discover that none of the items could really be expected to sell at $7 or $6 or even $5. This is the time of year when you can get some good bai^sins in sheets, pillowcases and towels. But if you buy linens in a white sale this year, you could get short-sheeted. Many manufacturers, caught in the squeeze of inflation, have simply shortened the width or length of their sheets. Some companies are doing this to avoid raising prices, and some ard doing it and still raising prices. You might not find the smaller sizes objectionable at all, but you better check the label to know what you’re getting. The accepted standard sizes of flat sheets in the past have been: king, 103” by 115” ; queen, 90” by 115” ; full, 81” by 104” ; and single, 72” by 104” . If you search carefully at this year’s white sales, says that Better Business Bureau, you might be able to discover a real bargain - yesterday’s bigger sheets at today’s special sale prices. Some of the sheets on sale probably were manufac­ tured before the dimensions were reduced, and the prices may be less than those for newer, but smaller, sheets. Januaiy 11,1975 801 ByLo Antique Hot Rod Cars On Exhibition New Owner And Operator David W. Atkins Location: intersection Hwy. 801 and 158 Advance, N.C. Complete Setvice Wash-Wax-Oil Change geological survey and a search for the Monitor, nearly sailed past the wreck, Mr. Newton relates. The scientists, who included Dr. Harold Edgerton of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dr. Robert Sheridan of the University of Delaware, and Gordon P. Watts, North Carolina state archeoiogist, wasted three days probing what they thought to be the Monitor. It proved to be a sunken trawler whose curved wheelhouse resembled the circular gun turret of the ironclad. When the search was resumed, Eastward’s sonar picked up a faint echo that almost went unnoticed. But Fred Kelly, chief of the vessel’s oceanographic party, walked past the echo recorder and spotted the slight variation. At his suggestion Eastward reversed course-and its sonar locked onto the Monitor. Dr. Edgerton, inventor of the strobe light for photography, directed lowering of a side-scan sonar he had helped develop. It Spencer Center Offers Course Rowan Technical Istitute will offer a course in self-defense for women which will meet Tuesday January 7, Thursday January 9, and Saturday January 11. The Tuesday and Thursday classes will meet at the Rowan County Peace Of­ ficers’ Club from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m. The course is designed to inform women on such subjects as laws pertaining to firearms, the proper handling of firearms, methods of personal self- defense, methods of handling annoying or obscene phone calls and intruders in the home, and observation of features for making meaningful iden­ tification. Students will take part in discussions as well as in practical demonstrations in these areas. Lt. D. L. Bradley of the Salisbury Police will serve as instructor for the course. Because class-size will be limited, interested women should preregister by calling the Spencer Center of Rowan Tech at 637-2385, or stopping by the center which is located pt Fourth Street and S. Carolina Avenue in Spencer. All students will be required to pay a $2 registration fee and have their social security numbers available at the first class meeting. Food Programs Receive Grants Robert Q. Beard, executive director of the N. C. Governor’s Council on Aging, announced today that $2,050,000 is being distributed throughout the state to provide approximately 4,400 hot meals per day during 1975 to persons over 60 years of age. Grants have been made to 23 projects for a second year of the Nutrition Program for the Elderly, which is largely funded by federal monies from Title VII of the Older American's Act. In compliance with federal guidelines, three new projects were awarded: Cherokee In­ dian Reservation, Pee Dee Council of Government (Montgomery, Moore, Anson, Richmond counties), and the Econom ic Im provem ent Council representing 10 nor­ theastern coastal counties. North Carolina’s allocation for 1975 is $67,000 less than for 1974, resulting in meal cuts for six projects. All applications for funds were evaluated by the Council on Aging according to per­ formance criteria and federal guidelines. Tiiree first year projects were not funded for the second year. These were all minimum 100- nieai projects, including Sen- cland Community Action in Columbus County, Carteret Community Action, and Blue Kidge Opportunity Commission I'l ojecl in Ashe, Alleghany and Wilkes Counties. IR O N C LAD U.S.S. M onitor lies upside down in this mosaic of undersea photos pieced together by Navy technicians. The Civil War vessel was found by a National Ceographic-Duke University team. Identifying features include: 1) distinctive anchor well at the bow; 2) armor belt around the hull) 3) the revolving gun turret, which slid off as the wreck sank and rests partly under the stem. Our Interest in You is at an all time high ! Annual Interest Rate Minimum Deposit Term Annual Yield when earnings are retained in account for one year 7%% *1,000 72 Months Certificate 8.06% 71/2% *1,000 48 Months Certificate 7.79% 6%%*1,000 30 Months Certificate 6.98% 61/2%*1,000 12 Months Certificate 6.71% 5%% *500 90 Days Certificate 5.91% 5 » / 4 %*1.00 Daily Interest Passbook 5.39% Federal regulations require that a substantial penalty be charged for Savings certificates redeemed prior to maturity. Interest Compounded daily on ail savings plans leNHSUiilwwtU B re t F e d e r a l S a v in g s 3001 Waughtown Street at Reynold> Park Road 230 North Cherry Street. Road, 130 South Stratford Road. Winston-Salem and 216 Gaither Street, Mocltsville. * h i Inflation Wipes Out Local Income Gains How much more income docs the average Davie County family have to have in these days of high inflation to equal the purchasing power it had five years ago? To what degree have Increased living costs and bigger taxes eaten into the wage gains that local workers secured in the period? During the first three years of that span- -in 1970, 1971 and 1972-- living costs rose at (he relatively modest rate of 4.1 percent a year, on average. Local families were able to compensate for that rise satisfactorily because their incomes were going up faster. In 197.3, however, prices started clim­ bing more rapidly. They jumped 8.8 percent that year and soared another 12 percent or so during 1974. Wage hikes, locally and elsewhere, could no longer match these increases and most families fell behing in perchasing power.- In the past year alone the loss was about 5 percent. Based upon figures obtained from theTax Foundation and the Department of Labor, only those families whose imcomes went up 34 percent or so in the last five years ended up even. Applied to Davie County, the average local family that had an income of $7,000 in 19G9 now needs approximately $9,400 to maintain its normal standard of living. The family that was earning $9,000 a year previously would have to have no less than $12,400 at present to equal its former buying power. Similarly all across the board. Those who were in the $12,000 bracket now required $16,300 and the ones who has $15,000, $20,700. The upward surge in the cost of food, ti-ansportation, rent and other necessities has created an especially difficult problem for the unemployed and for retired people, whose incomes are fixed, except, for oc­ casional increases in Social Security benefits. In families in which the man of the house has been the sole support, the pressure has been eased considerably in recent years because many married women habe become wage earners. In Davie County, some 50 percent of the married women are employed, the figures show. Davie History Mrs. Alice Evans Dyson and Charles DePalma hold bronze marker denoting the Hinton Rowan Helper house as a National Historic Landmarii. Mrs. Dyson is the firesent owner of the house and the DePalma family is currently living there. See eature story on Page I-B (Photo by James Barringer). H i n t o n R o w a n H e l p e r H o u s e DAVIE COUNTY $6.00 PER YEAR THURSDAY, JANUARY 16, 1974 SINGLE COPY 15 CENTS I s D e s i g n a t e d H i s t o r i c L a n d m a r k I mper U 6 01 p IOY HI 6 HI o 11U 311 OH In ■ -............. marK in tea. id m. Historic Sites, Buildings and Monuments, ^ m .j|hDavie Is A Mysteiy To Some The Hinton Rowan Helper House, located in Mocksville, N.C., has been of­ ficially designated a National Historic Landmark. Regional Landmarks Coor­ dinator Roger J. Rogers of the National Park Service’s Southeast Regional Office in Atlanta, Ga., presented to the owner, Mrs. Wade Dyson, the bronze plaque and official certificate of landmark status on Jan. 3. The certificate is signed by Secretary of the Interior Rogers C. B. Morton and National Park Service Director Ronald H. Walker. Morton originally announced the eligibility of the Helper House as a land mark in Feb. 1974. The history of this house and tract of land is the subject of this week’s feature on Page l-B. National Landmarks, though not owned or managed by the National Park Service, are officially recognized to encourage their preservation. Each owner is invited to apply to NPS for a bronze plaque and-or certificate attesting to the significance of the property. By applying, the owner agrees to preserve the site. The landmarks are Food Stamp Use Increasing In Davie Jaycee Jelly Week January 19 - 25 has been designated “ Jaycee Jelly Week.” The Jaycees of Mocksville, along with other civic groups will be utilizing this time to raise funds for the proposed North Carolina Burn Center. Funds will be raised through the sale of grape jelly, packaged in at­ tractive mugs. All proceeds from this project will, be used to finance the North Carolina Burn Center. A goal of 2400 mugs of jelly has been set for the Mocksville area. Residents may purchase the jelly from a volunteer salesman or through the Mocksville Jaycees by contacting Dick Hattaway at 492-5411. -But Not To Many By David Hoyle A large sign on thb .door to th<j Davie (Jounty Department of Social Services proclaims “ Food Stanp Hours 8:30 a^fn. - 5:00 p.m. M-F.” The need for such a sign is indicative of the increase in food stamp use among Davie County citizens as the local economy feels the pinch of a nation-wide decline. "The real increase came in December,” said Wayne Harrelson, director of 4he Davie Social Services department. Figures for December, 1974 showed 367 households participating in the food stamp program locally compared with 308 in Jtily of last year. Last July there were 988 household members participating in the county compared with 1,186 household members in December. In July, $12,695.50 was paid by food stamp participants for $19,759.50 worth of food stamps. In December, that figure was up to $15,810.75 for $24,137.25 in stamps. “ Most of the increase has come in December, 1974,” Harrelson said. “During the first week and one-half in January, there has been an average of five new cases per day.” Harrelson went on to predict that if the applications continue at the present rate, he anticiaptes 600 households with 1,500 family members entering the program in the next couple of months. The Social Services staff presently in­ cludes one eligibility specialist working full time with the food stamp program and another working half-time. “ So far we have been able to serve ap­ plicants without a waiting list,” Harrelson said, “ and the more emergency situations have been worked into schedules.” Most applicants are screened on the day they apply and rarely do any applicants have to wait over two days. One problem is that many of the new applicants are on unemployment (rather than a fixed in­ come situation like social security) and they have to be recertified each month. There are presently between 50 and 75 unemployment cases applying for food stamps making the case load for the eligibility specialist approach 1000 since they must be recertified on a monthly basis. . h <.^$6 iuad 'sh ^ ij b6 itr- cui ding to the r«com m eqd^n ^'u t Harrelson said the county comniiSsioners have been very receptive towards the employment of additional help in handling the increased case load. Should area layoffs and the economic slowdown continue at the present rate, there may be 750 to BOO new families and over 2000 family members participating in the food stamp program by July of 1975. Continued increases may require a team composed of eligibility specialists and secretaries to'go out to a plant that is in the Continued on Page 4 #i »Prayer Breakfast The Mocksville Jaycees will have their annual Mayor’s Prayer Breakfast at C’s Barbecue on Sunday, January 19, at Ba.m. Mayor Arlen DeVito, members of the Town Council, Jaycees and their ministers are invited to attend. Following the meal, Charles Dunn, a former Jaycee and who is employed at the Mocksville Savings and Loan Association, will speak to the group. After the 8 a.m. meeting, Jaycees are invited to worship together at the 11 o'clock service at Good Shepherd Episcopal Church in Cooleemee. Two More Bogus ^20’s Found Under Beians Student Holiday Friday January 17 will be a holiday for all students in the Davie County Schools. This is a designated teacher workday ill the school calendar for teachers to work on semester grades, ninth month progress reports, planning and evaluation. Teachers will report to their schools at the usual time on Friday. Two more bogus $20 bills, apparently related to the arrest of two persons in Mocksville on January 6 for passing counterfeit bills, were discovered in Lowes Food Store last Saturday. Mocksville Police Chief Alton Carter said the bills were found by a shopper, Warren Dulin, of Route 3, Mocksville, under a package of lima beans. Dulin turned the bills over to Chief Carter who sent them to the Secret Service office in Charlotte. Lowes was the store where a Buncombe County pair was caught the week before passing counterfeit bills. Mrs. Mary Hughey Cantrell, 27, of Hendersonville, Rt. 5, and Walter Keith Lindsey, 38, of Fletcher, Rt. 1, were ap­ prehended by the Mocksville Police Department after a cashier spotted a counterfeit $20 which Mrs. Cantrell was attempting to pass. The Secret Service was called in and Mrs. Cantrell and Lindsey were charged with possessing and passing counterfeit $20 bills. The pair appeared last Tuesday before a US Magistrate in Greensboro and Mrs. Cantrell waived a hearing and was released in the custody of her sister. Lindsey is being held by federal mar­ shals in Greensboro with bond set at $10,000. No hearing date has been set. It was theorized that Lindsey was in the store and observed his partner, Mrs. Cantrell, being challenged by the cashier. Wanting to get rid of the bogus money, Lindsey apparently slipped it under the beans. Eleven counterfeit $20 bills were passed in Winston-Salem last week—most of them at Thruway Shopping Center. On Jan. 4, seven bills were passed at Thaihimer's, one at Wilson-Pleasant Co., and one at the Buena Vista Shop, Inc., all stores at Thruway. Also on that day, one counterfeit $20 bill was passed at Dunkin’ Donuts on Peters Creek Parkway. On either Jan. 5 or 6, one counterfeit bill was passed at McDonald’s on Reynolds Road. Bailey said that two phony $20 bills were passed sometime last week at the Family Dollar Store in Statesville. All of the bills passed in Winston-Salem, Statesville and Mocksville have the same serial number E77265658A, and all are 1969 series A bearing the stanp of the Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond, Va., Bailey said. Bailey said that by looking at the green seal on the right side of the $20 bills, it is “quite evident" that the bills are coun­ terfeit. The seal is faulty with much of the linework missing, Bailey said. By David Hoyle There have been as many as 25 or 30 persons waiting in the Mocksville office of the Employment Security Commission of N.C. recently but the unemployment situation in Davie County is still a mystery. "W e don’t have any current figures,” said Thomas Butler, office manager of the Mocksville branch. "We just have a lot of people out of work.” There are figures available but they do not give a clear picutre for a variety of reasons. For one thing, the office in Mocksville, an outpost of the Winston-Salem Em- Breakin Occurs At Crescent Offices The offices to Crescent Electric Mem­ bership Corporation on Sanford Avenue were broken into on Sunday, January 12 around 7:30 p.m. MocksvUle Policeman A. D. Adams, the investigating officer, was on patrol when he came around the back side of the building in which the Crescent offices are located and observed the end door nearest the fire department closing. Patrolman Adams radioed for help and watched the door until additional man­ power arrived. When help reached the scene, the building was searched p d it was discovered that the window in the inner door was broken out and the door had been unlocked. No one was found inside the building although wet footprints were discovered. Officers said the thief may have escaped out a door on the east end of the building while the officer was guarding the door that had been broken into. Sam Berrier, manager of the Davie District of Crescent Electric Corp., was called in and he reported that around $43.00 in change hidden in the building had been taken. The Mocksville Police Department is continuing their investigation of the case. ployment Security Office, has been operating full-time only since last October. There is also the problem of persons working outside the county and filing for unemployment outside of Davie as well. Them there are those who are unemployed but for reasons unknown, do not apply for unemployment insurance. The biggest reason for the scarcity bf sound figures is the bureaucratic red tape. The information is sent from Mocksville to Winston-Salem and on to Raleigh before it gets back to Mocksville. ' .. “They can gi’-e you good figu^eeibut it’s six months after it happens,” Butler said. The Bureau of Employment Security Research in Raleigh has promised figures on the county unemployment situation by the first of February but they still may not show an accurate picture for the above stated reasons. "Unless the December figure is tit least the national average (7.1 per cent) or above, I wouldn’t be satisfied with it,” Butler said. So far, the figures have shown the unemployment rate far below what the number of people passing through the Mocksville office indicates it should be. The office is currently serving over 300 persons totally separated from their jobs and another 950 partially unemployed. Bloodmoblie ..llie Bloodmoblie will be at the National Guard Armory Wednesday, January 22, from 10:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. . Davie needs approximately 190 replacements of blood to catch up the quta for the county. AB negative blood is also desperately needed. Anyone who wishes to designate the recipient of their donation may do so. As an incentive for encourage donors, there will be a plaque given to the business or industry who has IS or more employees to donate blood. This will be passed around after each visit of the Bloodmoblie. The totally separated group is composed of persons permanently laid off from their regular job who are actively seeking other employment. Partially unemployed persons are those working shorther than 24 hour weeks on their jobs. If one works over 24 hours a week on their regular job, then they are not eligible to file. Als« complicating the picuture is the empibyers are allowed to lay off their workers for two weeks a year, paid or not. There is another waiting week required of a person laid off before he begins to collect on the fourth week out of work. Butler said that most of the local cases are from textile and sewing plants, with some permanent and mostly partial layoffs. There are also a lot of persons out of woric in the building industry where new jobs are hard to find. There are many persons coming in who Continued on Page 4 Pedestrian Is Struck By Car Roy S. Smith, 70, of Route 2, Advance, was taken to Forsyth Memorial Hospital with multiple injuries after being struck by a car on Thursday, January 9. The accident occurred around 6:15 p.m. on U. S. 158 in front of McCulloh’s Curb Market, at the NO 801 intersection, ac­ cording to the investigating officer, NO Highway Patrolman A. C. Stokes. Trooper Stokes said Smith apparently walked across the road into the path' of a 1967 Ford being driven by Charlie Bryant West, 42, of Route 2, Advance, who was traveling west on U. S. 158. Smith was taken to Forsyth Memorial with two broken legs, a broken pelvis and multiple injuries. ' No charges have been filed in the ac­ cident which resulted in $175 in damages to the West vehicle. 'Trooper Stokes said the investigation is continuing. . Jaycees Seek DSA Nominees Stolen Truck Recovered Ronald Wayne Ellis, 16, of Raleigh Road in Lexington, has been charged with larceny of a 1972 one-ton Ford truck. The truck belongs to B & F Motors ac­ cording to the investigating deputies Steve Stanley and Ted Shostak who apprehended Ellis within 2U minutes of the theft. Valued at approximately $3,000, the truck was taken from the B & F lot Wed­ nesday night, January 8. The theft was reported to the Davie County Sheriff's Department and Di'puties Stanley ami Shostak picked up Ellis and the truck near Hickory Hill where iie had run out of gas Ellis is being iield in llie Davie County Jail in lieu of $2000 bond The Mocksville Jaycees are seeking nominations for the Distinguished Service Award for 1974, This award is presented each year to the man of Jaycee age (21-36) who exhibits the most meritorius service to his family, community and nation. This is the highest award the Mocksville Jaycees annually present. The award will be presented at the DSA Banquet to be held January 23rd, 6:30 p.m., at the Hickory Hill Golf and Country Club. The speaker for this banquet will be Bob Struthers of the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. The Jaycees are asking individuals, organizations, institutions, etc. to submit names of young men in all fields of en­ deavor. The winner will be selected by a group of local citizens. Rules governing the nomination provide tiial the nominee not be over 35-years of- age as of January 1st, 1975. He must be a II.S citizen and work or reside within the Mocksville area Nomination forms may be obtained from Dick Nail. Jaycee DSA Chairman, i telephone 634-5462, Mocksville. All nominations must be in Mr. Nail’s hands by January 20th, the deadline for sub­ mitting nominations. "There are many young men in the Mocksville area who are deserving of the DSA award. However, they must be nominated. The Jaycees urge that friends, relatives, organizations, etc. submit these nominations for consideration of this year's award", said Mr. Nail. Previous Mocksville DSA winners are as follows: D.J. Mando, 1949; Ed Short. 1950; Clarence Hartman, 1951; Bill Daniel, 1952; Paul Richards, 1953; Ramey Kemp, 1954; Tom Hunter, 1955; no recipient list^ for 1956; Frank Ceruzzi, 1957; James G. Ldtham, 1958; Jack Cecil, 1959; Hugh Larew, 1960; Victor L. Andrews, 1961; Lester Blackwelder, 1962; Henry Blair, 1963; John Long, 1964; Benny Naylor, 1965; Don Wood. 1966; Harold Odom, 1967; Doug Collins, 1968; Jack Koontz, 1969; Charlie Dunn, 1970; Julius, Suiter, 1971; Mike Hendrix, 1972; Dick Nail, 1973; and 1974 will l>e presented January 23rd. , Thebaci(yardofMr. and Mrs. Bob Powell's home in MockivUle is Just r lo o d t ’tl that was flooded as a result of the heavy rains which fell in Davie Couni weekend. (Photo by Jim Barringer). one of many 2 - DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, THURSDAY, JANUARY 16. 1975 YVEDDI To Hold Public Hearing Here January 21st Public Hearings to determine com­ munity needs and problems will be held in each of the four Counties served by Yadkin Valley Economic Development District, Inc., (YVEDDI). The public hearings for interested citizens, program participants, and personnel from other agencies will be held in Mocksville at the Brock Center on Tuesday evening, January 21,1975, at 7:30 p.m. Persons attending will be en­ couraged to express their concerns about problems within (heir community and about community services currently available to them or needing to be developed. YVEDDI now operates Manpower programs (NYC, New Careers), senior citizens programs, (RSVP, Feeding the Elderly Centers), Nutrition services, child development programs (Head Start, Early Childhood Creative Library Program), neighborhood service centers (core ser­ vices and referral), and equal opportunity counseling. In planning for programs and services for the next three years the Board of Directors of YVEDDI and its Planning and Evaluation Committee determined to involve all aspects of the community in developing its three-year program development. Along with the public hearings a com­ munity needs survey form is being used to canvass communities. Information and suggestions from local citizens, both written and oral will be compiled and incorporated into a long-range plan. From this plan possible funding sources will be explored for program development. Currently YVEDDI receives funds from the U. S. Department of Labor, U. S. Department of Health, Education and Welfare's Office of Child Develop­ ment, ACTION, Office of Economic Op­ portunity, and the N. C. Migrant and Seasonal Farmworkers Association, as well as local governments. All Davie County residents are urged to attend whether they have participated in Aggency-sponsered programs, are local officials, or are interested citizens wanting to learn what a Community Action Agency is and does. Senator Childers Outlines State Democratic Program Senator Jack C. Childers says “ the overwhelmingly (49-1) Democratic majority in the Senate expects to fulfill its responsibility by developing a program to meet the needs from State Government consistent with current economic con­ ditions. Such a program was formulated by the Senate Democratic Caucus under the leadership of Lt. Gov. Jim Hunt, President Pro-Tempore John T. Henly, and Senate Majority Whip Billy Mills. Senator Tom Suddarth and I were present for the caucus and participated in the discussions. The leadership of the Democrats in the House has been con­ sulted in the development of the Senate program.” Senator Childers and Senator Tom Suddarth were scheduled to be sworn in at noon Wednesday as members of the N. C. Senate representing Davidson, Davie and Rowan counties. Senator Childers said the program will be presented by Senator Henly durine Superior Court Next Week Judge Thomas W. Seay, Jr. will preside over a criminal session of Superior Court convening here, Monday. H.W. (Butch) Zimmerman, Jr. will prosecute the docket. : Cases calendared for trial indlude; Criminal Sc Fa Docket; Charles R. Baker, defendant, and Henry & Ernestine C. Grant and Rosie & Hugh Carter, Sureties. Criminal Petition; Billy Joe Smith. Probation Violation; Kenneth Michael Cope and Ray Edward White, both for violation of probation. Criminal Trial Harvey Lloyd Dimmette, operating car intoxicated. ' George Gulover, larceny, breaking and Entering, possession stolen auto. Ray Holleman, public drunk and resisting arrest. Thomas Clinton Bates, possession marijuana for sale or delivery. Edward Ray Holleman, assault on of­ ficer. John Robert Riddle, manslaughter. Harold D. Peacock, operating car in­ toxicated. Sherman Eugene Wilson, speeding 68 mph in 55 mph zone. Tiny Cleo Williams, inadequate support. Edward Ray Holleman, possession .stolen vehicle. Ernest Lester Cranford, uttering forged paper. Amuel Rousseau, breaking with intent to commit larceny and larceny of auto. , Edward Ray Holleman, breaking and entering with intent to commit larceny. Archie E. Doby, larceny of auto, breaking and entering. Michael D. Jones, forgery (3 counts) James Bruce Whitley, speeding 66 in 55 mph zone. Willie Alton Lane, operating car in­ toxicated (2nd offense). Calvin Otis Burrell, operating car in­ toxicated. Jack Baysinger, felonious escape. Ronald Eugene Gaither, speeding 80 Chief Alton Carter Receives Note Of Thanks Only so often does a law official receive a note of appreciation and thanks for the way he discharges his duty. When he does, it is not only appreciated, but it is news. Sunday Mocksville Chief of Police Alton Carter investigated an accident on Wilkesboro Street at Mumford Drive in­ volving two vehicle. A 1965 Chevrolet operated by Zackey Roy Carter of Mocksville Rt. 3 had stopped for traffic when a 1967 Pontiac, operated by James Parker Dorsett, 21, of Mt. Airy ran into the rear of the Chevrolet. The driver of the Chevrolet, Carter, was injured and was taken to the Davie County Hospital. Damage to both vehicle totaled $1200. And Dorsett was charged by Chief Carter with following too close. On Monday, Chief Carter received the following letter: “Dear Mr. Carter, "M y husband and I want you to know how much we appreciate the kindness and courtesy you extended to our son, Jimmy, when you investigated the accident he had in Mocksville this morning. He was so nervous and scared, but your patience and understanding made it much easier for him. He repeatedly told us how nice you were to him. "W e’re all so sorry the accident hap­ pened and do hope the gentlemen he hit is going to be all right. This was Jimmy’s first accident and it has really frightened him. "Thank you again for your kindness. Sincerely, (Mrs. Frances P. Dorsett). mph m 55 mph zone and reckless driving. Paul E. Hodges, assault with deadly weapon (4 counts) and assault by pointing gun (2 counts) Billy Wayne Hutchens, felonious escape. Grady Ledbetter, simple assault. Kenneth Widner, felonious escape. Johnnie Cribb, felonious escape. Laura Durham, assault. Cole Freeman, assault on female. Harry Dull, non-compliance. Alphonzo Grant Spillman Jr., operating car intoxicated (2nd offense). Gordon Cleaveland Liddle, operating car intoxicated (2nd offense). William Eungene Cornatzer, operating car intoxicated. George Washington Dulin, operating car intoxicated. Benjamin Franklin Green, Jr., operating car intoxicated and speeding 50 mph in 35 mph zone. John Campbell, assault with deadly weapon with intent to inflict bodily injury. Ronnie Dean William, operating car intoxicated (2nd offense). Robert Lewis White, Jr., operating car intoxicated and no operator's license. Thurman Campbell, speeding 66 mph in 55 mph zone. John Author Ijames, operating car in­ toxicated. James Ceasar, felonious escape. Robert Lee Jordan, speeding 79 mph in 55 mph zone. Charles Graham Beeker, speeding 60 mph in 35 mph zone. James Frank Mullies, operating car intoxicated. Vernon Kelly Naylor, operating car intoxicated. David George McCall, felonious escape. Charles King Dunlap, Jr., speeding 82 mph in 55 mph zone. Ronald Eugene Cranfill, operating car intoxicated. Jerry Henley, felonious escape. Donnie Grayson Reece, felonious escape. Ronald Brown, felonious escape. Lewis Clinton Burleson, driving with license revoked. Jean Bennett Bowman, speeding 90 mph in 70 mph zone. Richard Pete, violation of probation. Carl, Cousino, violation of probation. Marijuana Found William Philip Markland, 21, of 475 Maple Avenue Extension, has been charged with possession of marijuana. The marijuana was discovered by State Highway Patrolman J.L. Payne when he stopped Marklin on a traffic violation last week. Trial has been scheduled for district court on January 27th. Bill Hall Is Appointed To State Commission One Way To Kilter! Mrs. Elizabeth Evans Smith, of Duke Street Extension, was taken to the hospital with facial cuts after her foot apparently slipped off the brake and onto the accelerator causing ner to crash into the yellow brick building occupied by the Veterans Service Office and M erle Norm an Cosmetics on North Main Street, Mocksville. There was $500 dam ages to her 1964 Dodge and |75 to the building in the Wednesday, January 8 accident. William E. Hall, a Mocksville attorney, was appointed to a 20-momber Human Relations Commission it was announced last week by Governor Jim Holshouser. Members of the commission and its executive director, Ronald K. Ingle, serve at the pleasure of the Governor rather than lernis of fixed duration For ad­ ministration and budget purposes, the commission is part of tW Department of Administration. Hall is chairman of the Davie County Board of Elections, past president of the Lions Club and a Baptist deacon. Mid- Winter Convention The North Carolina Lions Club Mid-Winter Convention for Districts 31-D, E and F will be held in Fayetteville, N. C. on January 24th and 25th. All members of the Mocksville Lions Club are urged to attend this convention. WiUiam E. HaU ... appointed to Human Relations Committee ceremonies marking the beginning of the 1975 session of the General Assembly. It is a broad program which covers six areas; the economy,' energy, effective government, integrity in government, consumer services, and education. Specific pieces of legislation will be developed by Senate Democrats in response to the program during the 1975 session. “ I am particularly pleased that the program Includes “steps to cut spending, to affect economics, to postpone costly projects which may be deferred at this time, and to be a watchdog over its own activities.’’ It seems to me that govern­ ment from the courthouse to state-house, to national capitol has to recognize and share the economic problems of the people who pay the bills,” said Senator Childers. “ I have been temporarily assigned of­ fice space in Room 2222, State Legislative Building, Raleigh 27611. Any questions or suggestions anyone may have are invited, said the senator. Emergency Run Deputy Sheriff Ted Shostak made an emergency run to carry a small child to Forsyth Memorial Hospital around 4:45 a.m. Monday morning. The incident began when Davie County Hospital called (he Sheriff's Department requesting an escort for Mrs. Elizabeth G. White, her sick child and her husband (who had no( yet arrived) to Forsyth Memorial. Deputy Shostak arrived before Mrs. WhKe's husband and since she had no transpor(ation and it was a rush sKuation. (he deputy put (hem in(o his pa(rol car and headed for Forsyth. Forsyth Coun(y Sheriff's Depudes were aler(ed to escort Deputy Shostak's car from (he Davie line into the hospital bu( they did not arrive in time so he wen( on in unescor(ed, arriving around 5:U0 a.m. Improvement Is Requested For Local Telephone Service Tires Are Stolen A breakin and robbery is reported to have occurred last week at the service station operated by Seabon Cornatzer at Advance. Tires valued at around $3,000 were reported stolen. This was said to include around 50 new tires and around 10 others. The sheriff's department is in­ vestigating. New Law Firm Powell, Keiger, Ijames and Parrish, a new law firm, has been established in Winston-Salem and Mocksville. Members of the firm are Harrell Powell, Jr., R. Kason Keiger, William G. Ijames and Carl F. Parrish. Ijames practices out of the Mocksville office. The others out of the Winston-Salem office. Dale Lanning... Master Masonic Lodge Installs Officers Mocksville Masonic Lodge No. 134 in­ stalled their new officers in ceremonies at their new temple on Friday, January 3. Dale Lanning took over duties as Master, replacing Lawrence Smith, for­ mer Master of the Mocksville Masonic Lodge. Other officers installed were; Sam Howell, Senior Warden; Bob Cook, Junior Warden; Clyde Glasscock, Treasurer; Gene Smith, Secretary; Ray Godbey, Senior Deacon; Raymond McClamrock, Junior Deacon; Sam Short, Jr. and Van Swicegood, Jr., Stewards; Tommy Tur­ ner, Chaplin and Jim Kelly, Jr., iVler. The Rev. Avery A. Ferguson, pastor of the Cooleemee United Methodist Church, represented the community at the N.C. States Utilities Commission meeting in Sylva Tuesday morning, January 14. Mr. Ferguson appeared before the commission, on behalf of the Cooleemee communityand Davie County, in request for the following improvements in the local telephone systems: (1) County-wide directory. (2) Extended area service for entire county and toll free service into Salisbury for Cooleemee residents (3) At least one'' part-time local operator for Cooleemee, (4) More efficiency in telephone operations in Davie County (5) No rate increase. The public was also represented by a Mr. Grubber, of the attorney general’s office and two attorneys. The company. Ferguson says was also represented by three attorneys. There were ap­ proximately 20 to 30 employees of Western Carolina Telephone company present, also. Ferguson said that he doesn’t expect action for a couple of months, however, he says he was assured, im private, by one of the engineers that these requests would be considered very carefully. Ferguson had with him a petition con­ taining some 569 names opposing the proposed rate increase by Western Carolina. The proposed increase, he says would mean a rate hike of about 44 percent for a single party residence. Ferguson, who was also Interviewed by a correspondent from WLOS-TV in Asheville, says “ my trip may prove fruitless, but we tried.” John Frank Garwood Is Honored For Sales All 18-Year-Olds Must Register “ All young men who reach age IB during 1975 should plan this year on making their first contact with Selective Service,” Thomas C. Smith, Chairman of Davie County local board, announced today. “ Even though we are not currently drafting for military service,” Smith said, “registration with Selective Service is still compulsory for all young men at age 18, so each young man should make certain that he complies with the law by registering.” Smith states that a young man has 60 days in which to register - 30 days before his 18th birthday and 30 days after. “This should provide adequate time for an 18- year-oldor a near-18-year-old to register," Smith added, “ and his timely registration will prevent any problems that might otherwise result from a late registration.” Smith stated that 18-year-old young men in Davie County who have not yet registered may do so at the Selective Mocksville Optimist To Sponsor Oratorical Contest The Mocksville Optimist Club in ac­ cordance with Optimist International, is sponsoring a local oratorial contest for the 7th and 8th graders. The theme this year will be "Give MeYour Hand.” The contest will be highlighted by a final county-wide contest of 5 best boys and 5 best girls with the winner receiving $50 Savings Bonds and the opportunity to compete in the district contest for a $500.00 scholarship. All contestants will receive certificates and the top 3 boys and top 3 girls will receive trophies and other awards. Although this contest has been spon­ sored by the Optimist International club since 1928 this is the first time in Davie County. Those locally interested may contact George McIntyre, Farm Bureau office or Tom Shuford at Branch Bank in Mocksville. Service office located at 130 N. Arlington Street, Loflin Center, Salisbury, North Carolina. They man also rigister with the following volunteer registrars: Mrs, Cheryel Bray and Mrs. Sadye Barger at Davie County High School. John Frank Garwood, CLU, local Underwriter for Jefferson Standard Life Insurance Company, has qualified as a member of the Company’s 1975 Thomas Jefferson Club, a special honor group for agents. Formal presentation of a Landowners Urged To Report Crops Ail landowners of ten or more acres are urged to cooperate with their County Officials by accurately reporting their 1974 crops and livestock in the 1975 Land Utilization Survey to be conducted in January. Lan­ downers will make their reports directly to the township listers, or in counties where the survey is done by mail they will complete and return the questionnaires to the person responsible for collecting the data. The information reported by the landowner is confidential and is available to the lan­ downer only. The law prohibits the use of such information for tax purposes. “ It is impossible to overemphasize the importance of accuracy in the individual reports. The information is a yearly history of the activities, crops, livestock, etc., of the individual landowner as in the instance of establishing future crop allotments, the possible allocation of fertilizer, gas, fuel oil and farm machinery and marketing quotas,” advised Ed Wester of the Drop Reporting Service, N. C. Department of Agriculture. “ It is also vitally important to government at local, state and national levels as a means of determining the needs for increases or decreases in production and in all areas of supply and marketing.” Landowner and - or farm operators can assure accuracy by preparing a record of their harvested cropland, idle cropland, pasture land (im- )roved and unimproved) and all and including forests. List the number of acres of individual crops, acres of grapevines, hogs sold (number for slaughter and number for feeder pigs) and sows and gilts kept for breeding, the number of cows and heifers that have calved (kept mainly for beef, kept mainly for milk), all hens and pullets of laying age Davie County Rainfall Last Week: 2.33 plaque commemorating this special honor was made at a recent meeting of the Winston- Salem Regional Agency held at the Hyatt House in Winston- Salem Saturday night. Membership in the honor club. Manager Hiatt explained, is earned by quality of service to policyholders and clients and producing three quarters of a million dollars during 1974. Young Republicans Plan Meeting The Davie County Young Republican Club will meet Monday, January 20, at 7:29 p.m. in the Grand Jury Room on the 2nd floor of the Court House. Election of officers will take place at this meeting. Dwynae Smith, chairman, urges all to attend. Vehicle Overturns On Davie Academy Road Damages estimated at around $1400 was done to a 1968 Plymouth in an accident around 10:30 p.m. last Friday on the Davie Academy Road. The vehicle was being operated by Willie Ray Redmon, 22, of Cooleemee. State Highway Patrolman Andy Stokes said his investigation showed that the vehicle came into a left curve at a high rate of speed, Redmon lost control, ran off the road on the right side into the yard of Sam Daywalt, struck an embankment and overturned into a plowed field. Redmon was charged with driving too fast for conditions. DAVIB COUNTY 124 South Main Street Mocksville, N.C. Published every Thursday by the DAVIE PUBLISHING COMPANY MOCKSVILLE ENTERPRISE 1916-1958 DAVIE RECORD 1899-1968 COOLEEMEE JOURNAL 1906- 1971 Gordon Tomlinson.......................Editor-Publisher Sue Short....................................Associate Editor Second Class Postage paid at Mocksville, N.C. SUBSCRIPTION RATES $6.00 p«r year in North Carolina; $8.00 par year out of itate Single Copy 15 cant* Hearing Tests Set For Senior Citizens Free electronic hearing tests will be given at Beltone Hearing Aid Service offices on Thursday and Friday. Factory-trained hearing aid specialists will be at all of the offices listed below to perform the tests. Anyone who has trouble hearing or understanding is welcome to have a test using the latest electronic equipment to determine his or her particular loss. Diagrams showing how the ear works and some of the causes of hearing loss will be available. Everyone should have a hearing test at least once a year if there is any trouble at all hearing clearly. Even praple now wearing a hearing aid or those who have been told nothing could be done for them should have a hearing test and find out about the latest methods of hearing correction. The free hearing tests will be given at Beltone Hearing Aid Service, Foster Drug Store, in Lowe’s Shopping Center, Thursdays. 10 a.m. til noon. If you can’t get there on Thur­ sday. call 634-2121 and arrange for an appointment at another time. What Am I? Often I am unrecognized - particularly in the very young. I make the elderly suffer. So much, they may cut themselves off from family and friends ... and they know the heartbreak of loneliness. 1 rob more than 15 million Americans of much that is good. I undermine their confidence and eat away their social life. I am equally hard on the rich and poor. I cause trouble on the job and in the hnme. Yet, few of those I attack do anything to fight me, because no-one wants to admit I exist. I am a hearing problem. Karly detertion is important. We’ll be happy to give you a free electronic hearing test. Just call or stop in. HEARING AID SERVICE Foster's Drug Store IN THE LOWE'S SHOf>PINQ CT. INFLATION FIGHTING POOL SALE Have you always wanted o swimming pool? Are you afraid of today's high prices? Well, we have an answer to your problem. For a limited time, we are rolling our prices back to last spring's level on our rectangular pools with concrete deck package. Savings range from $415.00 on smaller pools to $700.00 These pools come complete with full equipment and warranty, so act now. Whip inflation now. Buy wisely. I Please send me more information on your pools. I I I I I NAME- ADDRESS I PHONE.-STATE ____ZIP- CHARLES SHULER POOL COMPANY 225 West Kerr St. Salisbury, N.C. Phone 633*8323 DAVIE C0UN1YENTiTTTT?T toTmURSDAY7JAt> A rou n d g^n^Miont with .................. .......Robin Carter ATTENDS SEMINAR Mrs. Debbie Long attended a seminar on ceramics in Durham last Thursday and Friday. She learned many new techniques in painting while she was there. Mrs. Long will be teaching ceramic classes through Davidson Community College. The classes started January 1,1th at her shop on County Home Road. VISITS HER MOTHER Mrs. Deo York of Olin, spent Sunday afternoon with her mother, Mrs. Sue Holmes of Cartner St. ATTEND’S FUNERAL Mr. and Mrs. Jimmy Carter and Mr. and Mrs. Dennis Dyson attended the funeral of their uncle, Fred P. Carter of Kernersville, N.C., Sunday January 12th. SPENDSWEEKEND IN LENOIR Joe Foster was a week-end guest of Miss Dee Ayscue in Lenoir. Saturday night they saw a good movie and attended church Sunday at Berea Baptist church in Connelley Springs. IN THE HOSPITAL Mrs. Baxter Gregory had major surgery Tuesday morning at Davie County Hospital. She is recovering very well. RETURNS TO COLLEGE Miss Betsy Pennington returned to High Point College Sunday, after a months stay at home. RETURNS FROM HOSPITAL Gene Seats entered the Baptist Hospital last week for observation and treatment. He returned home Saturday. ATTENDED WEDDING ANNIVERSARY SUNDAY Mrs. Stella Lawrence and son Jeff Ayers attended the 25th wedding anniversary of Maxine and Harry Steine in Eden. Sunday at the Steine home their were attendance of a 100 or more relatives and well wishers. RETURNS FROM HOSPITAL Mrs. Laura Ashley returned from Davie County Hospital after a two week slay of treatment. She is recovering well. TRANSFERS Walter M. Broadway of Mocksville, transfered from the Food Town Store in Kernersville to the one in Winston- Salem recently. UNDERWENT SURGERY Mrs. Ella Mae Plott, of Rt. 6, Mocksville is in Davie County Hospital. She underwent surgery last week and is recovering well. VISITS SISTER Mrs. Margaret A. LeGrand and Miss Ossie Allison of Maple Avenue spent Monday in Charlotte with their sister, Mrs. Phil J. Johnson, who is patient at Wesley Nursing Center. SURGICAL PATIENT Miss Nell Holthouser is a patient at Davie County Hospital. She is recovering well after undergoing surgery last week. RETURNED FROM MEXICO Will Martin of Rt. 3, Mocksville, has just returned from Mexico from a trip with some friends. The highlight of the trip was touring the Yucatakn Peninsula. He will be home for several weeks. Home Economist Pick 'Teacher Of The Year’ The North Carolina Home Economics Association is soliciting nominations for the annual Home Economics Teacher of the Year Awards. Co-sponsored by the American Home Economics Association and Fam ily Circle magazine, the awardis will provide recognition for teachers who employ in­ novative, creative methods to stimulate students to learning and to application of their knowledge to situations outside the classroom. Nancy Hartman, of Mocksville, Chairman of the Northwestern Region Home Economics Association said that any individual or organization could submit nominations for the award. All home economics teachers of grades 7 through 12 are eligible. Nominations are due by February 15, and the winner of the North Carolina Home Economics Teacher of the Year Award will, in turn, be eligible for recognition as the National Home Economics Teacher of the Year. The state winner will be honored at the Annual State Home Economics Association Meeting in Greensboro October 30 - November 1. The national winner will receive his or her award at the American Home Economics Association Annual Meeting in June,1975, in San Antonio, Texas. Criteria on which nominees will be judged include: In­ novative and creative programs and teaching methods; Impact of teaching on individuals, family and community; In- -tegration of home economics subject matter with other related disciplines such as science, the arts, or social studies; Effectiveness of teacher in stimulating students to involve themselves in (heir own education and in the world outside the classroom. A selection committee including members of the North Carolina Home Economics Association and of community organization representatives will designate the winner. Mrs. Hartman urges in­ dividuals or organizations re p res en tin g te a ch ers, students, school administration, and community groups to submit nominations. For nomination forms, contact Nancy Hartman, Box 484, Mocksville, N.C. 27028. The North Carolina Home Economics Association, with its 2000 professional and student members, is affiliated with the American Home Economics Association--the national organization of more than 52,000 men and women in home economics. One of the 20 largest professional organizations in the United States, AHEA has affiliated home economics associations in each of the 50 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico. Hairdressers Have Meeting The Davie County Hair­ dressers met Monday, January 13, at C's Barbecue for a dinner meeting. The new officers for 1975 were installed. Announcement was made of a Hair Show to be held Monday, January 27, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at M argaret’s peauty Salon on the Yadkinville Road. Ernie Bowers of North Wilkesboro, well known stylist, will be the guest artist. He will be showing color and cutting as well as styling. All past and present members of the Association are urged to attend. Any hairdresser in the county who is not a member may join at this time. Square Dance Lessons Begin A new class in western style square dance lessons will begin Friday, January 17 at the Farmington gymnasium in Davie County beginning a* 7 p.m. All area residents are invited to attend these lessons which will continue for 12 weeks. Western style dancing is a great recreation offering fun, exercise and new friends. Anyone with children are invited to bring them along. The first two lessons will be free, so anyone who might be interested is invited to come out and observe. Ed Raybuck of Advance, a well known caller in the area will be the teacher. For more information call 998-4378 or 766-4777. Weslm orelan ds Presented Award James and Dot West­ moreland, Mocksville, North Carolina, were recently presented the Sapphire Executive Distributor award by The W.T. Rawleigh Company, headquartered in Freeport, Illinois. The Rawleigh Company, an 85 year old direct selling firm, recognized The Westmoreland’s in November as one of the twenty-five top Executive Distributors in the nation for outstanding sales and distributor development. The Westmoreland’s joined Rawleigh in January 1974, and qualified as independent Executive Distributors in March of the same year. In January 1975, the West­ moreland’s willl again be recognized by Rawleigh as one of the winners of a nationwide sales contest sponsored by the company. They will be flown direct to Las Vegas with all expenses paid, where they will enjoy a^ 3-day seminar and vacation. The Westmoreland’s are a part of an international organization which has been serving family needs since 1889. The W.T. Rawleigh Company manufactures and distributes specialty foods, proprietary medicines, food supplements, h o u seh o ld c h e m ic a ls , cosmetics, personal care products, and dog, cat and horse grooming and nutritional products throughout the United States, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand. POTATOES North Carolina produces slightly less than 20,000 acres of Irish potatoes an­ nually. Many of these po­ tatoes are bought by chip­ ping plants. The Kitchen Almanac Sprinkle lemon juice or herb vinegar on boiled vegetables for a delightful lart touch . . . Add leftover stuffing lo soups. Jl en­ hances the flavor and will help thicken the soup. * * * Memos from the men: John Gray, our resident Oak Park (111.) gourmet powdered sugar before sprink­ ling on the donuts. The corn starch absorbs the oil and makes donuts hold powdered sugar better . . . Also from John - for an extra special flavor savor, add some chopped parsley lo the dumpling mix when prepar­ ing your favorite "chicken and dumpling" dish. (Parsley also does wonders for vegetables, baked potatoes, meats and sal­ ads, too, John!!) If you're a spaghetti lover as am, you'll appreciate this nifty tip from Dolores Far­ ris of Down­ ers Grove, III.: to keep s p a gh etti from stick­ ing together while it cooks, add some vegetable oil to the cooking water. Celebrate 60th Anniversary Mrs. Myeis visits Mrs. Hellard at Davie Hospital Old Friends In County Meet After 51-Years Davie County may not be too big a place in the general scheme of things, but to some folks, it can seem mighty big. Ask Lillie Myers of Advance or Edith Hellard of Cooleemee. The distance between the two communities is not over 15 miles but it was enough distance to keep two friends apart for nearly 51-years before they were reunited this week in Mocksville. Mrs. Hellard (formerly Edith O’Neal) was a recent patient in Davie County Hospital when Mrs. Myers (formerly Lillie Hepler) stopped in to visit Mrs. Hellard’s roommate. Lib Sain. “ I saw her when I passed the door,” Mrs. Myers said, “ but I didn’t think I knew her.” She got a closer look at her face when she stopped into see Mrs. Sain, she said, “and that’s when I commenced to try to see her nameplate.” She looked at me and asked, ‘who are you,’” Mrs. Hellard said. “ I said Edith Hellard and she said I used to know an Edith O’Neal so I said, ‘that’s m e!’ ” After a tearful reunion, (he two women dicided it had been 51 years since they had last seen each other although both had lived in the county during all that time. “ We went on a date to a carnival in Cooleemee with the Mr. and Mrs. Albert Smith of Center Street. Cooleemee celebrated their 60th wedding anniversary Friday. January 10. They were the dinner guests of their daughter and son-in-law. Mr. and Mrs. Joe Cuthrell also of Center Street. Another daughter, Mrs. Betty Smith, attended the dinner. The couple has two other children, a son, Richard Smith of Charlotte and daughter, M rs. H azel Ija m es o f C ooleem ee. Lifelong residents of D avie County. Mr. and Mrs. Smith were m arried in 1915 by Justice of the Peace K etch ie in D avie County. Heart Fund Volunteers The following volunteers will collecting for the Davie County Heart Fund on Heart Sunday. February 23, in Mocksville. The ann9uncement was made this week by the Mocksville co-city chairmen, Mrs. Jo Anne Barney and Mrs. Geraldine Hendrix, both of Route 6. The volunteers will be making door-to-door solicitations are: Mrs. Sam Howard, Mrs. Henry Howell, Mrs. John Cottle, Mrs. Arthur Youngberg, Mrs. Melvin Dull, Mrs. Buck Keller, Mrs. R. 0. Kiger. Mrs. James Everidge, Miss Kathy Webb, Mrs. Randall Cave, Mrs. Joe Everett, Mrs. Larry Spencer, Mrs. John Ginther, Mrs. Elmer Wall, Mrs. Ed Short, Mrs. Danny Marion, Mrs. Kenny Jordan, Mrs. Glenn Miller and Mrs. Roy Cartner. DCCC Starts New Classes Davidson County Community College has started two Decoupage Classes at “The Crafty Lady” on Avon Street. The night class is already filled; however, there is still room in the morning class which will meet on Wednesday from 9:00 until 11:00 beginning January 15th. A Yoga Class started again on Monday, January 13th, from 1:00 until 3:00 at the Brock Building. Also, a Class in Ceramics started on Monday, January 13th from 6:00 until 9:00 p.m. at Debbie’s Ceramic Shop on Green Hill - County Home Road. “ We still do not have quite enough people who have ex­ pressed an interest in a Morning Crocheting Class and a Night Income Tax Class, which is due to start the last of January. If you are interested in these, or any of the above, please call Gray Everhart at 634-3415.” man I later married,” said Edith, now Mrs. Roy Hellard. That was in the spring of 1924 and they both married that fall, not to see one another again until this year. While they had been friends only a short while, “at the time, we hit it off fine,” Mrs. Myers said. “ 1 hadn’t seen her since and I often wondered what happened to her,” she added. Having finally located each other, the two women hoped not to let another 51-years go by before another reunion, even though they live on opposite ends of the county. Perhaps it is not such a small world after all. FUND RAISER Pernons looking for a new way to raise funds could well take a tip from Extension Homemak­ ers Club women in Martin County. Homemakers, under the supervision of Mrs. Clar­ ence Stallings, created a red, white and blue Bicen­ tennial quilt and sold chances on it for one dol­ lar each. The more than $1,000 raised was donated for re­ storation of the Burras House, built about 1800. Womans Club Has Meeting The Mocksville Woman’s Club mel al (he Rotary Hul. Wednesday, January 8th, with Mrs. Grady McClamrock, Pr"sident presiding. Hostesses were Mrs. William Long, Mrs. Howard Hanes and Mrs. John Holdsworth. Guests present were Mrs. Henry Long and Mrs. Henry Jurgenson. Student guest was Miss Athena Redmond, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Dewey Redmond of Mocksville. Athena. Davie High's nominee for the Morehead Scholarship is active in several organizations al Davie High School. She has been accepted at UNC-CH and is interested in Music and Psychology. Mrs. George Shutt was in charge of the program and introduced David Fergusson, Davie County's Libraian. Mr. Fergusson noted the im ­ portance of reading and taking advantage of the opportunities available at the Library. He listed the programs available at the Davie County Library and briefly reviewed several books, Supper Planned A chicken pie supper will be held February 1 at 4:30 p.m. at the Ruritan Building on High­ way 158 across from the Smith Grove Community Building. The supper will be sponsored by the Smith Grove Fire Department and all proceeds will go toward their building fund. Fire Department members will solicit donations for the supper on January 18. I I I Vacation time is any time at Morehead City. Fishing is good any time at this part of North Carolina and you cannot beat the Eastern coast for good seafood. I have been to Morehead City, but, the other day I received a card from a very good friend of mine that was vacationing at Morehead and she had eaten at the wonderful seafood place, Sanitary Fish Market and Restaurant, which is located on Morehead City’s waterfront. On this card was the famous recipe for their Tar Heel Hush puppies. They are so good. I want to pass it on to you before I add it to my collection. TARHEEL HUSH PUPPIES 1 Ib. Fine Corn Meal 1 egg 1 tablespoon salt ) tablespoon sugar pinch of soda 1 cup buttermilk Stir, adding water to thick consistency. Drop in deep fat, perferably oil. Cook in tem­ perature of 375 degrees. Serves 6 persons.____________________ Lecithin! Vinegar! B6I Kelp! Now All Four In One Capsule Ask For ,leffrey Corncllson, son of Mr. and Mrs. I.nrry Ct. - nellson of Route n. Mocksville. celebrated his. Ith birthday Tuesday. January 7. Birth i Ainiouncvinents Mr. and Mrs. Andy Atwell, of Mocksville, announce the arrival of their first child, a son, Seth Anderson, born January 13 al Rowan Memorial Hospital in Salisbury. Al birth the baby weighed 8 pounds 2 ounces and was 20 % inches in length. Maternal grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. Frank H. Short of Rt. 7 Mocksville. Paternal grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. Jay A. Atwell Jr. of North Garden Virginia. Maternal great grandmother is Mrs. S.S. Short Sr. of Mocksville. Materanl great grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. C.J. Mawyer. Paternal great grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. Jay A. Atwell Sr., all of North Garden, Virginia. Mrs. Atwell is the former Patsy Short.__________________ Mr. and Mrs. Michael S. Hardy of Statesville announce the birth of a son, Michael Brad, born Thursday, January 9, at 9:45 a.m. at Iredell Memorial Hospital in Statesville. The baby weighed 8 lbs and Vi oz. and measures 20 inches. Maternal grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. Henry Sanders of Route 5, Mocksville. Paternal grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. Grover Hardy of Route 10, Statesville.__________________ Mr. and Mrs. Mike McIntyre of Fayetteville announce the birth of their second child, a daughter, on January 7, in Fayetteville. The baby has been named Melissa Dawn. They also have a son, Gerald. Mr. McIntyre is formerly of Woodleaf and Mrs. McIntyre is a former Salisbury resident. Cooleemee Drug Company If you use Hazel Keller Cosmetics and appreciate its quality, you might enjoy selling them. Small cash investment. Commissions paid. Car necessary. Will train. Contact Mrs. Marlene Johnson 546-7558, Rt. 2 Harmony, N.C. 28634 or Sarah Harris 493-4508 m n Z E L KELLEI! ...... TRAVEL With The Madison Touts, 1975 Personally Conducted Tours Natchez, New Orleans..................................March B-16 Florida, Disney World...................................March 19-23 Hawaii, San Francisco....................................May 11-21 Mexico, Deep South......................................June 14-July 5 California, Old Mexico...................................June 14-July 6 Nova Scotia, New England...........................June 21- July 6 Alaska, Western Canada................................July 11-August 12 CalKornIa, Canadian Rockies.......................July 12-August 9 Write R.B. Madison, Mocksville, N.C. Tel. 634-2525 [ H l G E K i O L O C K I Ik luiiiinc I ((\ I'l'ojilc Will) ( (lie \lxiu I ) nil 122 S. Mam Street Mocksville, N.C. 1111 n; 111 IVf(.* I y NOTICE! The Annual Stockholders Meeting of the Mocksville Savings And Loan Association Will Be Held In Its Offices on the Premises Thursday, January 23rd, at 7 p.m. D R A P E R Y FREE sheer fabric with overdraperies made from Empress or Cameo fabrics. Choose from 82 fashion colors. s: GUTHRIE’S DRAPERY DEN 998-5255 / 724-9869Our decorator comes to your home, at your jconvenience, days, evenings, weekends. No charge or obligation. 4 - DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, THURSDAY, JANUARY 16, 19/b Dlt. R. A. CRONEMEYER Psychologist Joins Complex Staff Dr. Robert A. Cronemeyer, psychologist, has been named to the staff of the Tri-County Mental Health Complex, according to an announcement made by Larry Parrish, complex director. Dr. Cronemeyer’s appointment brings the number of psychologists on the staff to four, serving Rowan, Davie, and Iredell counties, with clinics in Salisbury, Mocksviile, Statesville, and Mooresville. He will spend three days each week in Salisbury where he’ll work with patients and will coordinate the special programs for retarded and severly handicapped children. The other two days will be spent In Mocksviile where he’ll serve as a consultant to the Davie County Schools and will see clients at the clinic. A native of Queens, N.V., Dr. Cronemeyer received his BA in psychology from Catholic University In Washington, D.C., his master In clinical psychology from St. John’s University In New York, and his Ed. D In guidance and counseling from New Mexico State University in Las Cruces, New Mexico. He worked for three years as a school psychologist for the public school system in Las Cruces. He has also had experience in two psychiatric hospitals, including New Hampshire Hospital In Concord, N.H., and Mercy Hospital in Rockville Centre, N.Y. His wife, Barbara, is a psychiatric nurse. They and their two daughters, ages three and one and a half, are now making their home at 2527 West Innes Street in I Salisbury. Driver Is Injured One person was Injured In a two vehicle collision on Sunday, January 12 around 10:30 a.m. on Wllkesboro Street in Mocksviile at the intersection of Mumford I Drive. Involved were Zackey R. Garter, 61, of I Route 3, Mocksviile operating a 1965 Chevrolet and James Parker Dorsette, 21, of Mount Airy operating a 1967 Pontiac. According to the investigating officer, Mocksviile Police Chief Alton Carter, Carter was stopped for a traffic light when Dorsett, falling to get stopped, ran into the 1 rear of the Carter vehicle. Carter was taken to Davie County Hospital following the accident and Dorsett was charged with following too I close. The Carter vehicle received $500 in I damages and there were $700 in damages I to the Dorsett car. Tractor-Trailer Rig Cuts Down Utility Pole A telephone pole at the comer of I Salisbury and Depot Street in Mocksviile I was broken off by a Tractor-traller rig on I Friday, January 10 around 12:05 p.m. According to the Investigating officer, Mocksviile Police CapUin R.W. Groce, a 1972 International Tractor Trailer being operated by Jimmie Allen Kill, of Tampa, Florida, made a right turn off Salisbury Street onto Depot Street. The rig cut the corner too short and hit a telephone pole, breaking It off near the base. The truck which Kill was operating I belongs to Thrane, Marcel, and DIss,I Darrell, of Tampa Florida. Damage to the telephone pole was estimated at $300 and there were no In- I juries or charges In the accident. Rotary Has Musical Members of the Mocksviile Rotary Club I were treated to a musical program I Tuesday by a student at the North Carolina I School of the Arts. Miss Gail George of Youngstown, Ohio I sang a variety of numbers accompanying I herself on the guitar. Miss George is a I second year student in classical guitar at I the school of Arts. Hugh Larew had charge of the program I and introduced Miss George. President Ed IGoodwin presided. Driver Injured The driver of a 1971 Ford was Injured in la single vehicle accident on Thursday, ■January 9th around 5:05 p. m. on US 64 at |the Bethel Church Road intersection. Cindi Larae Beane, 16, of Rt. 3, iMocksville, was taken by the Davie County ■Ambulance Service to Davie County ■Hospital where she was treated and {released. N. 0. Highway Patrolman A. C. Stokes aid his investigation showed Ms. Beane post control and went down an em- ankment, striking a sewer culvert and [turning over. There were no charges or injuries In the Occident. Vechicle Overturns A one car accident occurred Friday, ■January 10, around 10:55 a.m. one tenth Imile east of Mocksviile on RP 1400. Involved was Dale Harding Cranfill, 23, ■of Rt. 7, Mocksviile operating a 1967 |Pontic. N.C. Highway Patrolman W.D. jrooms reported that Cranfill was at- Itempting a left curve at an apparent high Irate of speed when he lost control and Istruck the ditch bank on the left shoulder and rolled over on the vehicles right side, be car came to a rest on its top on the left ilder of the road. There were no injuries in the accident and tlie vehicle suffered $800 in damages, ranfill was charged with driving left of nter and traveling too fast for con­ ditions. 'First In Freedom’On License Explained Officials from the North Carolina Bicentennial Com­ mittee, an agency of the Department of Cultural Resources, and from the Department of Transportation and Highway Safety announced today the meaning of the slogan, "First in Freedom,” which North Carolinians are finding embossed on their new five-year motor vehicle license plates. Adopted by the Department of Transportation in an effort to promote recognition of the two hun­ dredth anniversary of the American Revolution, the phrase honors the fact that colonial North Carolinians both established a number of "fir­ sts” in America’s War for In­ dependence and were in the forefront of those who waged the battle for freedom. Among the firsts established by North Carolinians two centuries ago were the following: (1) North Carolina is often looked upon as the first colony to call a provincial assembly in defiance of a royal governor at New Bern on August 25, 1774. (2) North Carolina was the first colony to expel its royal governor when Governor Josiah Martin was caused to flee from New Bern on May 31, 1775. (3) North Carolina was the first colony to authorize its delegates to the Continental Congress to vote with delegates from other colonies for independence by the adoption of the Halifax Resolves on April 12, 1776. Of the several firsts, the adoption of the Halifax Resolves was by far the most significant. The Halifax Resolves framed by North Carolina’s Fourth Provincial Congress meeting in the town of Halifax constituted an aggressive act on the part of North Carolinians to insure that the question of Independence should finally be settled. Left unresolved by the Continental Congress in Philadelphia for nearly a year after the onset of fighting at Lexington and Concord, Mass., in April, 1775, North Carolinians urged reluctant rebels In other colonies to sever their ties with Great Britain. Troubled by the presence of the British fleet in Wilmington harbor, by menacing skirmishes between Henry J. Shoaf, owner and operator of Shoaf Coal 4 and Sand Company of M ocksviile, is shown with the A license tag he purchased for his truck Monday of this . week. According to the local license bureau, this is the O l C e n t c n n K l l issued in Davie County’s series with the 1776 numerals. The slogan "F irst In Freedom ” does T 'f . n appear on this license due to the fact that ail “ ft trucks, trailers and m otorcycles will carry a 1 year license while cars w ill carry a 5 year tag. Stickers will be purchased for cars for the next 4 years to designate a new year Tories and Whigs at such places as Moore’s Creek Bridge, and by the Threats of civil in­ surrection, North Carolinians at Halifax cut a bold swath across the process which led to the publication of Independence on July 4, 1776. But the claim of North Carolina to be "F irst in Freedom” rests less upon what North Carolinians did before anyone else than upon what they stood for during the American Revolution. Throughout the period of the Revolution, North Carolinians in great numbers were deeply concerned with the preser­ vation of justice and freedom. North Carolina’s unique War of Regulation in 1771, though not directly connected with the war for independence, was an ex­ pression by hosts of Carolinians of their concern for equal justice for all Englishmen. The patriot leaders of North Carolina were perpetually in the forefront of those who argued that the War for In­ dependence was a unique movement in history to establish the freedom of man. The last great act of the Revolutionary drama on the part of North Carolina did not, in fact, come until August, 1788, when North Carolinians, determined not to adopt a constitution berefit of a bill of rights, refused to ratify the United States Constitution. Convinced that they could not live under a system of law that did not guarantee the very freedom which they had recently won on the field of battle, North Carolinians did not ratify the Constitution until what we know as the Bill of Rights had been made forever a permanent part of the Con­ stitution. That act alone, due to its significance in the course of American history assured that North Carolina should always be designated "F irst in Freedom” , with the emphasis on Freedom. 400,000 Miles And 4,000 Citations, Trooper Andy Stokes Conservation Essay Dead Line Is March 17 Friday, March 17, 1975, is the deadline for entering the poster and essay contest which is being sponsored by the Davie Soil and Water Conservation District. It is not intended that essays or posters be restricted to soil and water conservation but to any sound Idea of our natural resources that the student may wish to present. The essay contest is open to all students at the sixth grade level. Winners will be Residents Warned The Davie County Sheriff’s Department warns local citifens to beware of door-to-door salesmen operating in the county. Residents are urged to check with the Better Business Bureau before making any purchases or signing any contracts with questionable businesses. There have been complaints during the past few weeks concerning door- to-door operations in the county and the Sheriff's Department warns that the time to be suspicious is before making a purchase. selected from each school and will be eligible for entry in the county contest. Prizes on the county level will be first $25.00 Savings Bond; second, $15.00; and third, $10.00. First and second place area winners are eligible for entry in the state contest. State prizes shall be first, $100.00 Savings Bond; second, $50.00 Savings Bond. The poster contest is open to all students in the fourth, fifth, and sixth grades in schools within Davie County. First place Broken Jaw Brings Charge A man intervening on behalf of a 11- year-old child, being severely beaten by his father, has been charged with assault inflicting bodily injury. Lawrence Ray Hairston jumped on Willie Alton Lane as he was severely beating on his ll-year-old child. Lane suffered a broken jaw and is a patient in the Baptist Hospital. The incident occurred around 3 p.m. Sunday in the Fairfield section of Davie County. Sheriff R.O. Kigerand Deputy "Cotton” Edwards investigated. winners on the county level, from each grade level, will be,eligible for entry in the areas contest. First place winners from each area, from each grade level, will be eligible for entry in the state con­ test. State prizes for each grade level will be: first prize $50.00 Savings Bond; secdnd prize - $25.00 Savings Bond. Interested students should contact their teachers for further information or call the local district office at 634-5011. While there are highway patrolman stationed in Davie County with more years on the patrol, none have served in this county longer than 28-year-old Trooper Andrew "Andy” Coleman Stokes. Trooper Stokes was stationed in Davie fresh out of patrol school in July of 1967 and he has been here ever since. Originally from Henderson, N.C., Trooper Stokes first worked for the N. C. Highway Patrol as a clerk in 1966. After his stint as a clerk. Trooper Stokes attended Patrol School at UNC-Chapel Hill from December 1966 until April 1967 and then on to Davie County. He has since attended breathlyzer school, VASCAR training and various other Highway Patrol schools. Trooper Stokes is the son of Mr. and Mrs. C. A. Stokes of Henderson. He has a sister and brother, still of the home and another ,sister who is married to a highway patrolman and who’s father-in-law is a 27- year veteran of the patrol. A member of the First Baptist Church in Mocksviile, Trooper Stokes is also a member of the local and state law en­ forcement associations. He said he became interested in the patrol from a hometown patrolman, Trooper A. C. Gray of Henderson, who most exemplified to him what a highway patrolman should be. With seven and a half years of patrolling Davie’s highways. Trooper Stokes has compiled some startling statistics. He estimates that he has driven 400,000 in the county while on duty and written 4000 citations. Davie has supplied Trooper Stokes with a number of memorable experiences while patroling the county but he was able to narrow it down to the three most notable incidents. First in his memory is the time he assisted Dr. Richards in amputating a leg from a 17-year-old accident victim. After removing the partially severed leg so the youth could be taken from the car, the leg was rushed by ambulance to the hospital but the attempt to save it failed. The accident occurred in 1971 soon after 1-40 was opened and a law suit is still pending. In another incident, Trooper Stokes had just pulled into a location on 601-South for a radar check when a lady pulled up behind and jumped out of her car, saying she had a pregnant woman who was due any moment and could he get her to the hospital. Trooper Stokes carried the woman to his patrol car and raced to the hospital,. radioing ahead to have a Mocksviile Policeman stationed at each stoplight in town to let him go straight on in to the hospital. The emergency room at the hospital was alerted and waiting when they arrived and Trooper Stokes smoked a few cigarettes to calm down, wondering if he might be made the godfather for getting the lady to the hospital on time. These thoughts were soon shattered, however, when the doctor came out and said the woman was only six months pregnant and not yet ready to deliver. She had been suffering from an acute case of indigestion. Th(^ final experience involved arresting a woman for public drunkeness and resisting arrest. Trooper Stokes said he made the mistake of handcuffing her in the front rather than behind her back and ^ ' - m . ': 7 W M after placing her in the front seat of the patrol car, they started for the jail. While in route, she grabbed for the steering wheel twice, nearly forcing him into the side ditch and making it necessary to radio in for assistance. A second patrolman arrived to drive the car while Trooper Stokes practically sat on the woman to keep her quiet until they could get to the jail. Even with 4000 citations to his credit. Trooper Stokes has been quoted by local youths as saying he would be glad to come and drive them home from a party If they had been drinking, whether he was on duty or not. If he catches them driving under the influence, however, he has made it clear he will write them a citation faster than you can say, "but, officer...” "Law enforcement is one of the most rewarding careers you can get Into,” Trooper Stokes said. "I have throughly enjoyed serving in Davie County and consider it my home, which of course it is.” Unemployment In Davie County (Continued from page 1) are used to drawing $250 to $300 a week, Butler slad. "Even drawing the maximum of $90 a week, look at the cut in their standard of living.” The average benefits paid out in Davie is around $50 a week with payments ranging from $15 up to $90. In spite of the gloomy picutre, this Is the time of year when there are normally a lot of layoffs. "Some people are getting laid off like they always do,” Butler said, "but the economy Is such that they are afraid that they can’t get back.” One bright spot Is that effective January 6, a Special Unemployment Assistance program allows persons who have never been covered by unemployment insurance to be covered. This includes state, county, domestic, and farm workers although self-employed persons are not yet eligible. The program will run until December of 1975. "But its like President Ford’s tax cut,” Butler said, “ Nobody knows how< it will work until we get Into the mechanics of it.” As for an exact assessment of the number of Davie citizens out of work today the answer will not be known until February, if then. And in a county the sl*e of Davie, a few percentage points could make a difference in the county. "But even if it is as high as eight per cent,” Butler pointed out, “ that (till means that 92 per cent are working.” Food Stamps Increasing (Continued from page 1) process of closing to handle the load. "The most tragic thing is seeing people feeling utterly humiliated,’’ said Harrelson, who had been helping screen people in group situations as they apply for food stamps. "They wonder, ‘how did this happen to me’,” Harrelson said. The department is getting more middle class people applying for food stamps, he said, people making more money and who are better educated. "It makes for a lot of guilt,” Harrelson said, adding that they often have to reassure people that it Is not something to be ashamed of. "It’s hard to explain how much these people suffer,” he said. "They’re proud people and up to now have been able to serve their families very well.” Harrelson said he would point out that they needed the nutrition as do their families. Food stamps would supply that nutrition until they can regain their former financial status. In addition, he said, food stamps bring a lot of federal money into the county, particularly to food stores as well as in­ creasing a food stamp recepient’s buying power in other areas. The county is required to pay one half Uie salaries for Social Service staff which is matched by the federal government which pays all the cost of the food stamps. Food stamps are just like money when it comes to buying food. With only a few exceptions, a person buys food at a par­ ticipating grocery store and pays for the food with stamps. Harrelson said, to his knowledge, all major food stores in the area are accepting food stamps. Eligible persons pay a certain amount of money and receive a larger amount of food stamps. The amount a person pays depends on the income of the household and iu size. The smaller the income, the more free stamps a household receives. Except in unusual circumstances, food stamp households must be able to prepare meals in their homes. The household must be made up of an individual or a group of persons who are living as one economic unit. The total income of the household must be considered when determining eligibility. Every able-bodied household member who is 18 years of age or older must register for employment if they are not already working. Households meeting the above requirements must also have a limited amount of income and financial resources to be eligible. Income is any money received by all members of the household, except students under 18 years of age. The monthly net income households may have and take part in the program is based on family size. Certain expenses are allowed to be deducted from gross income to determine a household’s net monthly income. These are: local, state and Federal income taxes; Social Security taxes under FICA; retirement and union dues. Other allowable deductions are: medical costs (but not special diets) when more than $10 a month; child care to ac­ cept or continue employment; fire, theft, hurricane or other disaster; educational expenses which are for tuition and man­ datory school fees; court-ordered support and alimony; rent and utilities or mor­ tgage payments above 30 percent of in­ come after all other deductions. The maximum monthly net income for a one person household is $194; two people $280; three $406; four $513; five $606, six $700, seven $793 and eight $886. A household in addition to having net income below the amounts above must have financial resources below certain amounts in order to be eligible for food stamps. Resources are such things as cash on hand, in a bank or other savings institutions; U. S. savings bonds; stocks and bonds; and such nonliquid assets as buildings (except for the family home), land, and certain real or personal property. Each household is allowed up to $1500 in such resources except for those households of two or more persons with a member or members age 60 or over. Then the resources may not exceed $3000. Regarding living arrangements, in town, the lot and house shall not exceed $25,000 and in the rural community, the house and land not over 10 acres. Persons who feel they are eligible for food stamps should contact the Davie County Social Services of which Wayne Harrelson is the director. Members of the Davie County Social Services Board are: Julius E. Suiter, chairman, Mrs. Alice Hoyle, Charles E. Alexander, Dr. A. R. Hartness, Mrs. Louise Smith and George W. Martin. DAVIE COIINI The above photo appeared in the December issue of State Magazine with tne following outlines: “ W eil bet there’s not another mailbox ornament in the world like the one above. Box 288, Route 6, Mocksville, N.C., which belongs to George E. Smith. The box is mounted on a jailhouse door, significant to Smith because he used to be High Sheriff of Davie County. As Smith explains, *. . . While I was Sheriff they condemned our jail (built in 1909), and soon afterward (1970-71 > they started work on the new one. I asked for and received the old jailhouse door; I also have the keys. The door was used to serve the prisoners’ meals, and at other times ... I had a hole dug about 3 x 6 feet and mounted the door in cement, after I had a mail box mounted on it. The mailbox itself is one that 1 am sentimental about. It came from the Holt Haywood estate, located on Highway 158, now the rmuda K«ibeautiful and exclusive Bermuda Country Club.”iun Golf and I Tips From Your j ! Home Economics Agent i by Ostine West -»•by How do you decide which orange to buy? The very cold of oranges reminds us that they are a gold- inine of vim and vitality. So it’s a small wonder that Americans eat more oranges per person, per year, than any other fresh fruit. Lucky for us ... oranges are now at their peak of quality and supply ... and prices are at­ tractive. Less than half of the oranges grown in this country are marketed fresh- and it looks like this trend will con­ tinue. Frozen concentrate head the list of processed orange products, followed by canned juices. Or, if you prefer, you can buy canned orange sections, grapefruit and orange sections, chilled citrus sections or salads, or chilled juices. ■But let’s turn our attention back to fresh oranges. When shopping, keep in mind that the best quality oranges are firm and heavy for their size. The larger sizes are usually .the better buys. They have more juice and more sections than the smaller ones. Also keep in mind that skin color has nothing to do with the ripeness or inner color of the fruit-a green tint is not a sign of immaturity. Most surface scars and russet spots don't affect flavor or juiciness either, unless oranges have soft spots or are wet. While they are in good supply, use fresh oranges often in salads, fruit cups, or desserts. Orange-Nut Biscuits 1 8-oz. package of ready to bake buscuits '/4 cup frozen orange juice concentrate (undiluted) 3 tablespoons chopped nuts 3 tablespoons brown sugar , Place buscuits in ungreased 8 or 9 inch' round pan. Bake ac­ cording to backage directions. Combine undiluted orange juice concentrate, nuts and sugar. Spoon over buscuits. Bake 4 to S minutes longer. Yield: 10 biscuits. USDA To Issue New Food Stamp Series In March The U. ■ S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) will replace the current 50 cent, $2 and $5 food stamp series with a $1, $5, and $10 series on March 1, 1975. USDA's Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) said that the larger denominations were prompted by the volume of coupons needed to meet in­ creased food stamp allotments, paper shortages, and Increased production and shipping costs. The new food stamps-brown ($1), purple ($5), and blue- green ($10)- use a more sophisticated design to deter counterfeiting. They are in­ corporated into redesigned, revalued coupon books. Coupon Book Value All current coupons not issued by Feb. 28, 1975, will be collected and destroyed. FNS said that food stamp recipients must spend their current food stamps by June 30, 1975 since retailers will not accept any old coupons after that date. Authorized food stamp stores will use the $1 coupons for making change instead of the current 50 cent coupon and credit slips of 99 cents or less for change under $1. FNS advised retailers to redeem the current food coupons as soon as possible; banks will continue to accept them for redemption until Aug. 1, 1975. Values and colors of the new coupon books follow: S2 $7 $40 $50 $65 Coupons Inside Book fs, two $ 1 ■•"I, three $5, Two One! Tv-wo SIO, five $ 1 Tpiree $10, three $5, 'our I 10, four $5, ive $ Color of Cover Green Purple Brown-gold Blue Reddish-brown NOTICE Due to the slow mailiet for new home, we are now soliciting remodelling and repair jobs. This is an excellent time to get those small jobs done-porches, carports, finish basements, panelling installed, rooms add­ ed, etc. Our staff of these skilled carpenters now have the time to take such work im> mediately: Charlie Cozart David Cozart Call us today for a free estimate for your pet project We are scheduling work to begin in early January. LAREW-WOOD, INC.634-SS33 JANUARY SALES • Cl£ARANCE SALE CONTINUES 1HIS WEEK WI1T1 FURTHER REDUCTIONS • WHITE SALE ENDS SATURDAY JANUARY 18 SALE LADIES PANT COATS ASSORTED STYLES LEATHER LOOK - FAKE FURS FUR TRIMS - CORDUROYS Regular *34.00 To *64.00 *22.90 TO *41.90 SALE LADIES SPORTSWEAR COORDINATES FIRST QUALITY FAMOUS BRANDS •SLACKS «SKIRTS -JACKETS -BLOUSES \«KNIT TOPS -VESTS ^Regular *11.00 To *26.00 * * ^ 6 ^ TO * 1 7 . 3 4 SPECIAL SALE LADIES PANT SUITS POLYESTER KNITS EXCELLENT FOR SPRING SIZES 8 TO 18 Regular *35.00 » 1 9 “ ONE GROUP MEN'S DRESS SHIRTS SOLIDS AND FANCIES Values To *7.00 sRu * 3 « 8 8 ONE GROUP MEN'S CASUAL KNIT SHIRTS SOLIDS AND FANCIES BUnON FRONTS AND PULLOVERS *9.00 And *10.00 ^ 5 * 8 8 ONE GROUP MEN’S SWEATERS CARDIGANS-PULLOVERS-VESTS ASSORTED FIBERS Usually *6.00 To *16.00 ^ 4 . 5 0 td ^ 2 . 0 0 MEN'S WINTER JACKETS GOOD SELECTION OF STYLES AND SIZES PILE LINING Regular *30.00 To *40.00 • 2 3 “ ONE GROUP JUNIOR JEANS SCREW DRIVER STYLE COnON DENIMS SIZES 5 TO 13 Regular *9.00 ONE GROUP JUNIOR TOPS SHORT AND LONG SLEEVES Regular *5.50 To *13.00__________ • 4 .1 2 TO • 9 .7 5 ONE GROUP UUNESSHOES ASSORTED STYLES Regular *12.00 To *13.00 Price ENTIRE STOCK MEN'S SUITS POLYESTER DOUBLEKNIT WOVEN POLYESTER SOLIDS AND FANCIES Regular *60.00 To *115.00 SALE *39.88 i *57.88 CLEARANCE MEN'S SPORT COATS •POLYESTER DOUBLEKNITS -COnON CORDUROY Regular *40.00 To *60.00 sMi *27.88 TO *34.88 ONE GROUP MEN'S SLACKS POLYESTER DOUBLEKNITS WOOL AND NYLON BLENDS Regular *12.00 To *25.00 sw t * 7 .8 8 m * 1 2 .8 8 ONE GROUP _ _ MEN’S SHOES DISCONTINUED STYLES Regular *16.00 To *25.0(^ SAU • 1 0 .8 8 TO • 1 6 .8 8 :RED CAMEL" no-iron career clothes made will) ^ O R T R E L Shirts, 14V4-17 Pants, 29-42 Waists Neck Si7.cs 5.88 4.88 usually 6.99 usually 5.99 ENTIRE STOCK BOYS POLYESTER SLACKS SOLIDS AND FANCIES , Regular *8.00 To *12.50 ^ ^ OFF’ / 3 ENTIRE STOCK BOYS SHIRTS LONG SLEEVE SIZES 4-7; 10 To 18 Regular *2.69 To *7.00 *1.79 TO *5.44 NFL JACKETS Usually *15.00 Usually *18.00 *10.88___________*13.88 ONE GROUP GIRL JEANS SLIGHT IMPERFECTS OF *10.00 JEAN CORDUROY- DENIM - TWILL SIZES 7 TO 14 ONE GROUP O O G iR is KNIT TOPS POLYESTER COnON BLENDS ACRYLIC FIBERS Regular *5.00 To *9.00 ’ 0 « 8 0 GIRLS SLEEPWEAR BRUSHED NYLON AND ACETATE PAJAMAS-GOWNS Regular *4.00 To *6.00 ^ 2 . 8 8TO ^ 3 > 8 8 101317831523 1 2 2 1 1 2 1 1 2 4 12 25 2 4 1 135 9 4 7 16 1 26168 FWDAY MORNING SAVE 90% ON THESE ITEMS SOME OUT OF SEASON - SOME DAMAGED OINERS JUST PUIN "01E"D0GS LADIES DRESSES..............................$28.00............... LADIES DRESSES...............................$20.00.............. LADIES SPORTSWEAR.......................$12.00.............. LADIES SPORTSWEAR........................| 7.00.............. LADIES SPORTSWEAR.......................| 5,00............... LADIES SKIRTS..................................$15.00.............. LADIES SLACKS................................$10.00............... LADIES SLACKS................................$14.00............... LADIES JACKET..............................$23.00............... LADIES TOPS.................................... $ 6.00............. LADIES TOPS......................................$ 8.00.............. LADIES SHORT...................................$ 4.00............... LADIES SHORT..................................$ 7.00............... LADIES SKIRTS..................................$14.00.............. LADIES SPORTSWEAR.......................$10.00.............. LADIES BILLFOLD............................$ 3.00.............. LADIES BILLFOLDS...........................$ 2.00................ LADIES SUMMER BAGS.....................$ 4.99............... PAIR LADIES HOSE............................| 1.59............... PAIR LADIES HOSE............................$ 1.00............... PAIR LADIES HOSE............................$ l.oo____..... LADIES SCARVES..............................| 2.00................ LADIES SCARF...................................$ 3,00............... PAIR LADIES GLOVES.......................$ 2,00................ MEN’S SWIMSUITS.............................$ 5.00................ MEN’S SWIMSUITS..............................$ 6,00............... BOYS SWIMSUITS..............................$ 3,00................. BOYS SWIMSUITS..............................£ 4.00................ PAIR BOYS SHORTS..........................$ 3.50............... PAIR BOYS SHORTS...........................$ 4.00................ PAIR BOYS SHORTS...........................$ 5.00............... PAIR BOYS SHORTS..........................$ 6.00................ PAIR BOYS SHORTS...........................$ 3.00................ IRON ON INITIALS............................$ .29............... $ 2 .8 0 $ 2 .0 0 $ 1 .2 0 .$.70 $.50 1.50 $1.00 $ 1 .4 0 $ 2 .3 0 $.60 1 :fo $.70 $ 1 .4 0 $ 1 .0 0 $.30 .20 $.50 $.16 $.10 $.10 $.20 $.30 $.20 $.50 $.60 $.30 $.40 $.35 $.40 $.50 $.60 $.30 .<!.03 DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISF RECORD. THURSDAY, JANUARY 16, 1975 USDA Proposes Increases In Food Stamp Requirement PinebrookPtA rv special on George Hamilton Saturday Kond stamp recipient!! would |):iy a slandnrd 30 pcrconi of ncl liiJomc for Ihclr food stamp allnlmcnl, offcctlvc March 1, under an amendment to food stamp regulations proposed today by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). The intention to propose this increase was announced in President Ford’s Budget Message of Nov. 26. The proposal would mean an increased purchase requirement for all households e.xcept (1) certain households of eight iir more per.snns, which hii\(‘ been payiriR ;tO percent of income and (2 i llio.se entitled to free food stamps under the law( one and two persons households with net monthly income of less than $20 and all other households with income le.ss than $:io). For example, a four person hou.sehold with a monthly net income of $t.SO after allowable deductions (e.g. taxes withheld, shelter cost over ,'!0 per cent of income, medical expense over $10.(10 and child care expense) now pays $-11 for $!)0 in food stamps ttnder the proposed tiirnuila, that household would pay $4,'i for its food stamp allotment. The proposal is in line with the provision of the Food Stamp Act specifying that the amount a household pays for its food stamps should represent a reasonable investment on the part of the household, not to exceed HO percent of the household's income. Current purchase requirements vary widely in percentage of income. Today s proposal is designed to remove the differenlials in l«>rcentnge of ineiime paid for the food stamp allotment by providing that every household with the same income pays the same purchase requirement. The proposed amendment will be published in the Federal Kegister of Friday. Dec. fi. I97‘l. Written comments should be mailed or delivered to P. Royal Shipp. Director. Food Stamp Division, Food and Nutrition Service. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Washington. D C. 202,'i0 so as to be received not later than Dec. 27. 1H74. Comments received will be open to public inspection. Coal Kven lu'fore thi' oil shortage, Hampton Koads, Virginia, was the world's largest coal ex- IMirler, sending an average of :i.'i.(loo.i)(lo tons a year to ports all "'<-r Ihc' globe, the N.itional Geographic says. Has Meeting The Pinebrook Elementary School P.T.A. met on Monday. January i:t, at 7:30 p.m. After a brief business session, Bobbye Draughon, Director of the Learning Disabilities Demonstration Center at Pinebrook, explained the workings of the Center to the group. The benefits to Pinebrook Klementary school and Davie County from the establishment of such a program here were discussed. W.XII-TV will present IV. a special on the life of George Hamilton the Fourth. Saturday, .lanuary t8 at 2:.-)0 P.M. IV, narrated by Arthur Smith, (races (ho life of George Hamilton, IV. from a youngster influenced by country music to the 'international Amba.ssador of Country Music." He is not only a star in his hometown of Winston-Salem and the United States but also in Canada, England and he was the first country performer to ever pertorm tiehind the Iron Cur­ tain. Orville Campbell, Hamilton’s first lecrod producer and n family r eunion to Reaver Creek and (tcorge at the old "Grand Ole Opry " in Nashville arc teatured in the half-hour special. Caviar Most caviar .sold in the United Slates is made fnmi the roe, or eggs, of red salmon or wliitetisli, rather than from stin-L'enn the National Gcogiaphic .Society says. U.S. CHOICE RIB EYE FRESH PORK SHOULDER VALLEYDALE HOT DOG ih V Z f i CHAMPION REG. OR THICK STEAK ROAST us 88® FRANKS BOLOGNA ^99® VALLEYDALE SMOKED SLICED FRESH PORK MDI IND. WRAP ^ CHAMPION PIMENTO m m ^ PICNIC b68® steak .9 8 ' cheese .0 .8 9 ' cheese »oz55* o i r i t i r 7 ^ ^ r n « B r B i D C Q O e J-CHAMPION POTATOL s/^ SPARE RIBS ^.99^ COUNTRY HAM . o fF ’ SALAD - 55® U,S, CHOICE m ^ S T E A K SIRLOIN OR T BONE I DRY CURED CHAMPION BRAND BACON119 DELMONICO ^U.S. CHOICE STEAK CAMELOT ENRICHED "W W r SHOWBOAT PORK AND M C V O O RED CAP CUBE DOMINO SHAMPOO iT? 7 6 ' BEANS DOG FOOD SUGAR CAMELOT DOMINO 10X m TIDY CAT A M ^ FRESH BABY KOSHER m ga _ BATH OIL SUGAR___15x59' CAT LITTER DILLS 7 2 ' CAMELOT HEINZ TOMATO STRONGHEART V SMUCKER STRAWBERRY ASPIRIN ,»ct4o catsup DOG FOOD 1 2 ' PRESERVES 1‘a? 8 9 ' CHEF CHEESE m JUICE gT. 4 9 ' piizA . o. 7 7 ' GREEN GIANT MED. PEAS 12 OZ. ..JAR JIF PEANUT BUTTER LIPTON TEA BAGS PARADE EVAP. MILK TALL CAN CHEF SAUSAGE r PIZZA .0 .9 9 ' B A K E R Y - D E L I CAiaiY OUT LUNCH CHICK. BREAST 2 VEGETABLES 2 ROLLS FRESH BAKED $J49 FRESH BAKED M ^ WHITE BREAD ..4 5 WISCONSIN HOOP AO CHEESE J r ^ MUMFORD DRIVE 13 01 . r P ill A 6» DAVIE COUNTY 1:NTI;KI'i<i5i ,xh. OrI). THURSDAY, Ciisiiiiltios from Iho Iragii' In the cotnmonplacc often romc- along with I he blusU-ry arrival of winliT. But a hroad range of cusiially loss lax dodui’tions can case the burden of taxpayers, notes Commerce Commerce Clearing House. A casually, says the Internal Revenue Service, is "the complete or partial destruction of property resulting from an identifiable event of a siiddeii, unexpected, or unusual nature." Deductions have been allowed Winter Casualty Loss Deductions Bear Checl(ing ____ fl f tM n ttrtf II'It A n n/1 r*AniS I PC t h o .1.... <•___motorist who.so car was damage due to an icy road, another whose car motor literally lr<)?e-up, and a tax­ payer whose garage wall collapsed beciui.se of an unusual freeze-and-thaw pattern. Other taxpayers have won deductions when pipes burst, and when asparagus plumnsus ferns and a tropical plant collection were chilled to ex- tenction. Purther nn down the casualty loss (lediiclion road are eaves collapsing from ice and snow accumulation, ceiling and floors damaged through thawing of collected ice and snow, and the death of fruit trees and or­ namental trees, shrubs and bushes by winter's wrath - all of which have won tax deduc­ tions for taxpayers. CCM noted, however, that certain rules are involved in claiming a casualty loss deduction. F’or one thing, it is allowable only to the person who owns the property, and he may take the deduction on'y in the vear be sustains the loss no matter when he repairs the damage or disposes of the salvage, Also he has to be able to prove he actually sustained the loss, and the amount deductible. To claim a casually loss deduction successfully, the taxpayer should be able to show the nature of the ca.sualty and when it occurred; that the loss was the direct result of the casualty; that he owned the property; the cost or other basis of the property including im­ provements; and the Guest Speaker For Ruritan Club depreciation allowed or allowable, if any. Al.so he should be able to show the "before-and-after” value of the property through photographs, appraisals, etc., and the amount of any in­ surance or other compensation received or recoverable, in­ cluding the value of restoration and cleanup provided without cost by disaster relief agencies. Heaven Earth has no sorrow that heaven c/iiuiot heal. Guest speaker at the Davie Academy Kuritan ('lub meeting Tuesday night, .January 7. was Don .lames, customer and services representative for the United .Slates Postal Service, out of Winston-Salem. Mr. James' lecture was \ ery enlightening, about the services and the methods used to deliver the mail throughout this area as well as across the country. f<oy Cartner. Mocksville Post­ master. accompained Mr. .lames to the meeting Charlie McMahan and Glenn Koont/, were visitors. In the Inisiness part of the meeting, it was agreed to have a Pancake, Egg, Sausage and Coffee Breakfast at the club on Saturday, January 18, from ,'i:30 a.m. until 9 a.in. This meal will be a freewill donation type. The funds raised at this breadkfast will be used to go toward the scholarship that is given each year to a senior of the Davie Academy area. Arthur Koontz is to attend the National Convention in Chicago ,laiui,irs 20. 27 and 2H. Reduce Excess Fluids With FLUIDEX only *1.89 Lose Weight With DEXA-DIET Capsules Ot'iV 4 , 9 g At COOLEEMEE DRUG COMPANY MUMFORD DRIVE 8 AM.-7 P.M. (M-T-W-S) 8 AM.-8 PJA. (THUR) 8 AM.-9 PM. (FRI.) COOKING on CRISCO LIMIT ONE ^ WITH S7 50 OR MORE FOOD ORDER. 3S OZ. BOTTll / V / TASTNmSH BREAD i fLOAVES ■ NABISCO PREMIUM SKINNER THIN M 0k LYKES POTTED m & m DELMONTE J| SALTINES kS 5 9 ' SPAGHETTI pkS 43® MEAT PINEAPPLE 42® CHEF SPAG AND ^ GLADE SOLID AIR BREAST OF CHICKEN f ” O C WELCH TOMATO M MEATBALLS 39® FRESHNERS TUNA JUICE ?j,49® RAGU SPAG. MURRAY ASSORTED A DELMONTE FRUIT ALL FLAVORS SAUCE i5;r 5 V ' cookies Z - s g y ' cocktail m e ^ M a aGIANT SIZE TIDE105 JFG QT. JAR Mayonnaise BANQUET ASJr. BUFFET ^ . M M s u p p e r s 2 LB. PKG. PARADE SOFT MOIST 36 OZ. • CAN 9 9 FLORIDA JUICY DOZEN DOG FOOD PARADE ASST. M 0km* FROSTING MIXA% 6 9 ^ PERSONAL SIZE IVORY JK O C *^UDSON PAPER A A c HGHT IH flA Jm BY BUYING SOAP................TOWELS............................? i? L L ^ W msn fnuns and vtetTABus CLEANSER 0 k m HUDSON FACIAL O A C FROM LOmS AJAX .................sMl 2 1 TISSUE.............i«^x"-39 gUff33«KRAFT M ...................................• m — coiD CUPS....... 7 9 ' K r :.......k 3 5 FRESH RED LADY KAY VANILLA WAFERS PK°o j y ' PLANTERS ^ m iO MIXED NUTS EVERYDAY SALE PRICE RADISHES IDAHOAN INSTANT POTATOES 8 OZ. • PKG. 10 4 9 ' (OBEtNoi^ i Niblets GOLDEN COf^ GREEN GIANY NIBLET 12 OZ. CANS HUNTS SLICED NEWPORT CUT GREEN ^ PEACHES 3 9 BEANS I KRAFT DELUXE MAC. AND HAYES STAR PINTO JM t " C CHEESE...............'pV°o^73® beans ................. WATAUGA 0 k 0 k m PR'NGLES POTATO KRAUT a “3 3 CHIPS 49® Cverq Doq T Cveri| Doi| SolePfke SolePiUe Cverii Doi| Cverq Doi| Sole Price Sole Pme ARMOUR I van c am p beeneeI W.K. GOLDENTREET WEENEE CQRIi 8 - DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, THURSDAY, JANUARY 16, 1975 going, Qoing, GonC i/ The Myers Lumber and Pallet Company of Barber’s Junction sold out by auction last Saturday. Everything including lumber, machinery, etc, was sold by the owner Gilbert Myers. The auction was conducted by Col. C.A. “ King” Cole and associates out of Jacksonville, Florida. The "big buyers" came from New Yorit, New Jersey, Ohio, South Carolina, Tennessee and Florida. They fought It out with shrewd locals for items that went from around S30 to $20,000. Sales for the day totaled approximately $165,000. Heavy rains the night before, resulting in a muddy lot, no doubt affected attendance. However with the bright sun of Saturday morning, 500 to 600 people created massive traffic problems in Barber as they went about looking at the equipment, tractor-trailers, 5=- f piles of black walnut lumber; showing the kids the anitque engines; or Just listening to the nationally known auctioneers like Col. Archie Moody doing their thing. The West Rowan High School band also profited from the sale as they provided barbecue sandwiches, soft drinks and coffee for the crowd ... to the tune of an estimated $600 to $700 profit. Gilbert Myeis chats with a buyer.. Story and Photos by Jeff Ayers Heavy equipment being looked over... Col. C.A. “King” Cole takes a bid..A large piece of equipment is inspected...Heavy rains left a muddy lot for the 500 to 600 people attending. Central Plans $14 Million For New Projects Central Telephone Company will spend over S14,000,000 in 1975 for new construction projects and equipment modernization in North Carolina. An additional $6,000,000 will be expended on routine additions to cover small and miscellaneous projects. “ Our construction budget will be spent to meet continuing growth and upgrade demands of our customer,” said S. E. Leftwich, vice president and division manager. Leftwich said the m ajority of ex­ penditures will be u s^ for cable facilities, central office equipment, land and buildings and vehicles. In the Elkin district which covers 13 exchanges over $6 million is planned for new projects. The largest single expense will be for central office equipment for the new Elkin Toll Center which will serve Elkin and surrounding areas. The new equipment, which will supplement and eventually replace the present system, will reduce the time required to complete long distance calls as well as in­ crease the usage capability for local traffic. The new elec­ tronic system will be com­ pletely operative In 1976. Other major equipment ex­ penditures will provide an additional 1,800 lines and 1,300 terminals in Mocksville, Mount Airy, North Wilkesboro and Boonville. Land and building projects include a new central equip- Cedar Creek The night has a thousand egres, and the day but one; yet the light of the bright world dies with the dying sun. The mind has a thousand eyes, and the heart but one; yet the light of a whole life dies when love is done. What’s done in the dark will be brought to light. Francis Bourdillon The weather was rainy and cool Sunday. However every one here at Cedar Creek seemed to say, "I was glad to go to the House of the Lord.” There was a good attendance at Sunday School. The Supt. Bro. Eric Scott and Secretary Cathey Tatum were in charge. All teachers and classes were present. The worship devotional was conducted by Bros. James Horn and Thomas EUiton and was enjoyed by all. The Rev. W. C. Hay brought the message. The theme, “The Suffering Savior,” was a very spiritual one. The Lord’s Supper was administered by the pastor and deacons. We were very glad to have Mrs. Elmer Smith worship with us. Shehas been a shut-in. Mrs. George Scott is having trouble with a bad leg. We really missed her at church Sunday. Our prayers go out for her that the Lord will let her be out real soon. We also missed Mrs. Ann Campbell who is shut in with a cold. This community was saddened to learn of the passing of Miss Phoebe Eaton. She was always a good friend and neigh­ bor to all of us in Cedar Creek. We all really missed that family. She was such a lovely person. I can personally say that I really loved Miss Phoebe. I did a lot for her and she really did a lot for me and my family. So we here at Cedar Creek join in with the host of other friends in sympathy. Our prayers go out to all sick and shut-ins. And for the heads of our nation, we pray that God will give them wisdom and knowledge of how to lead so great a people. Mr. and Mrs. Eugene Scott of Winston visited in the home of their parents Sunday and at­ tended worship. Eugene is one of our lovely young men and we are proud of him and Mrs. Scott. Ckwerleaf Formas Peiformance Tested Sale Purebred Hogs HAMPS — YORKS DUROCS Sat., Jan. 18,1975 -1:00 P.M. Carolina Livestock Arena 2 Miles West Of Siler City Off Hwy. 64 70 Bred Gilts - 30 Open Gilts - 40 Boars Write Or Call For Catalog M.J. Pate & Sons Route 1, Staley, N.C. 27355 Tel. (919) 824-2122 - Home (919) 742-5665 - Sale Bam ment office and local business office to be completed in West Jefferson, The present central office building is leased and espansion is not economical due to size, location, lack of parking and unavailability of land. Other additions are planned in Dobson, Hays, and State Road on existing central office equipment buildings. Major cable and outside plant projects are planned for those areas where facilities have been filled to near capacity due to growth. The areas in­ clude Mocksville, the “ D” Street area in North Wilkesboro and the White Plains area of Mount Airy. In West Jefferson the business district will be requred and cable and conduit placed underground. Elkin district manager Larry Houck commented on the 1975 program. “The Elkin district is Central’s largest in North Carolina and we’ve directed a healthy portion of our 1975 working funds into this area. The investment will serve a twofold purpose; first for modernization of existing equipment and present facilities and second to provide new services and station ap­ paratus necessary to meet additional area growth.” Correction Made In Accident Reported Bowling Award Winners! ASCS News 1975 Flue-Cured Tobacco Notices Notices of allotment and quota for 1975 have been mailed from the county office. The notice includes an increase in the allotment of 15 percent and also any adjustment for over or under marketings in 1974. Lease and Transfer of Tobacco Producers may now enter into a lease and transfer agreement. These forms are available at the county office and are required to be signed in the office by both the Lessor and Lessee, and if the transferring farm is owned by one person and operated by another, then both the owner and operator are required to sign the agreement. New Farm Cotton, Feed Grain And Tobacco Allotments Applications for new farm cotton, feed grain and tobacco allotments must be filed at the Davie County ASCS Office on or before February 15, 1975. Eligibility requirements are as follows: 1. A written application for a new farm allotment must be filed on or before February 15th by the owner or operator of the farm. 2. Neither the owner or operator shall own or operate another farm in the United States with a current year allotment, base, or quota for the commodity for which the ap­ plication is filed. 3. The available land, type of soil, and topography of the land on the farm for which the allotment is requested must be suitable for the production of the requested commodity and continuous cropping of the land must not result in undue erosion. 4. The producer must own, or have readily available, equipment and other facilities necessary for the production of the commodity. 5. The operator must expect to obtain more than 50 percent of his current year income from farming, excluding the estimated return from tobacco. Ixjw income farmers may be exempted from this 50 percent income provision. 6. The farm operator must have 2 years experience growing tobacco out of the last 5 years and must own the farm which a new grower tobacco allotment is requested. Iiese two Davie County bowlers recently won the double bowling tournament at the Glenn Bumie Lanes in Lenoir. A doubles tournament, they teamed to bowl a total of 1385 for six games, plus handicap. For winning they received $1,000 in cash and the trophy. More than 150 teams entered this tournament. Mike Burnette of Mocksville Rt. 1 and Edward Godtey of Mocksville Rt. 6 bowl two or three times a week at the Major League Lanes in Winston-Salem, where ; each is a member of two teams. Each of these bowlers I have entered a number of other toivnaments, placing ; among the winners in 7 or 8 of the events during the ipast year. (Photo by Jim Barringer). Requirement Waived On Ambulance Attendants A portion of an accident report printed in last week’s Enterprise-Record omitted some of the information. The following is a reprint of the corrected article. One person was injured in a two-vehicle accident on December 31 on the Bethel Church Road. Injured in the accident was Mr. Marthalene Brannon, 31, of Route 3, Mocksville. Mrs. Brannon was driving a 1972 Chevrolet containing two passengers, Garren Mark Brannon, 9 and Gavin Shane Brannon, 3. Also involved in the accident was Gary Lee Nichols, 21, of Route 4, Mocksville operating a 1969 Cadillac. State Highway Patrolman J.L. Payne said his in­ vestigation showed that the Nichols vehicle entered the rural road from a private drive and turned into the path of the Brannon vehicle which had the right-of-way. Nichols was charged with failure to yield right-of-way. Estimated damage to the Brannon Chevrolet was $700 and, $250 to the Nichols Cadillac. Gary Bowden, 19, son of Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Bowden, Jr., Route 3, Advance, made Dean's List at N. C. State University in Raleigh for the fall quarter. A student must, have a 3.0 average to be named. Bowden is married to the former Kathy Allen,, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. ‘ Bob Allen, Route 5, , Mocksville. Wim’s Whims By Wim Osborne Haste makes waste, and waste ~ makes a mess. Whoso diggeth a pit — probably has a leaky pipe. A penny saved — still isn’t enough to pay the tax on a loaf of bread. A man may survive distress - - with a little Pepto-Bismol. A burnt child — “hollers.” You cannot get blood out of a stone — but give the science boys time - they’ll find a way. Liars should — keep notes. Stolen waters are sweet, and bread eaten in secret — will probably cause ulcers. As yo j sew — so shall you rip. God helps them that helps themselves — but He seldom gets any credit. Rub a galled horse, he will kick — well, wouldn’t you? Give the devil his due — he’s gonna get it anyway. Experience is the best of schoolmasters — experienced schoolmasters make the best teachers. Constant complaints — fall upon closed ears. Reprove thy friend privately - - or wipe your bloody nose publicly. If at first you don’t succeed — go back and do it the way you were told. The Office of Emergency Medical Services of the N.C. Department of Human Resources is waiving a requirement that on or after January I, 1976, every am­ bulance. on an emergency mission be staffed by at least one certified Emergency Medical Technician CEMT) who has been trained in a program approved by the Office of EMS. The waiver, which was an­ nounced by OEMS Chief Jim Page, is subject to approval by the Medical Care Commission at its March meeting. Page feels that the existence of the January 1, 1976, deadline has been a threat to volunteer services and has inspired an array of letter-writing cam­ paigns among some of the volunteer groups. The 1973 EMS Act calls for the upgrading of ambulance at­ tendants to the level of EMT by taking at least 71 hours of in­ struction, plus 10 or more ad­ ditional hours of emergency room training. " I ’m willing to bet that the volunteers will show their concern for skill and patient care without the oppressive insult of a deadline hanging over their heads,” said Page. He continued by saying, "Forty-one percent of North Carolina's ambulance service is provided by unpaid members of volunteer rescue squads and ambulance services, and 57 percent of the ambulance at­ tendants thus far trained in the program have been volun­ teers.” "M em bers of these have objected to the mandatory nature of the program, as well as the apparent lack of op­ portunity for educationally disadvantaged members of their oi'ganizations," stated Page. An alternative for educationally disadvantaged members is being considered, but it must be approved by the Medical Care Commission. “ If approved,” said Page, “ these members may complete the 81- hour training program and be certified as ambulance at­ tendants but not EMT s. They may also lake the American Red Cross Advanced First Aid and Emergency Care course which entitles them to cer­ tification as ambulance at­ tendants, but not as EMTs.” Conection In reporting the meeting of the Davie County Ministerial Association in the last issue, one paragraph was incorrect. It should have read: Rev. Ivan Ijames talked about the prison camp ministry and Yoke Fellow services at the prison and the possibility of forming a youth choir to go to the camp for services once a month. We regret the error. Agrifax.. a decision making tool. With Agrifax, the farm and ranch record keep­ ing system developed by the Farm Credit Service, you have fads to aid in making your decisions. Not guessw/ork. Your timely Agrifax reports are geared to your operation. They can provide the records needed in today’s specialized agriculture. Get in touch w^ith your Farm Credit Man. He’ll show you how Agrlfax can help you make key management de­ cisions a lot easier. Ideal Production Credit As^ation P.O. Box 365 MocksviUe, N.C. 634-2370 ^ Southern Discount MAKES Loans For Any Worth While Purpose 1. Back To School Needs 5. Cars Need Winterizing 2. Thanksgiving Holiday Expenses 6. Homes Need Winterizing 3. Christmas Shopping 7. New Winter Clothing 4. Bill Consolidation 8. Personal Needs Call Us Tod^ About A Loan For Your Fall & Winter Needs. Open On Saturdays Through Holidays 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. _ S ^ S D Southern Discount Court Square (Above Fashion Shop) Phone 634-3596 TuM.,WMi.,«nd Thur(. 9-6:30 DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD. THURSDAY. JANUARY 16. 1975 - 9 D istri Coach Lou Hoitz Heads Cancer Drive Farmington News ^____K 1 I U nll^ U nlntnK ______u ------nrivilpCf* lo work with M rs. O ____ The following cases were disposed of in the regular January 6, 1975 session of District Court with Lester P. Martin, Jr., Presiding Judge and Carroll C. Wall, III, Solicitor: Delmus Graves, damage to property, dismissed on cost; trespass, dismissed on cost. Leamon E. Peters, two counts of worthless checks, four months; no operators license and no registration, three months; two counts of worthless checks, four months; worthless check, thirty days; worthless check, thirty days. Michael D. Jones, receiving stolen goods, nol pros with I ’ leave; probationary capias, defendant is released from probation. Capias is dismissed; three counts of uttering forged papers, each nol pros with leave. Minor T. Steele, non support. Sentenced to six months suspended for three years, cost, support minor children. Clinton Lamar Stephenson, speeding 74 mph in 55 mph zone, ^ and cost. Roosevelt Hooper, operating motor vehicle while under the influence of intoxicating liquor. Sentenced to six months suspended for three years, $100 and cost, surrender operators |r license and not operate motor vehicle on highways of N. C. for ‘iod of twelve months, )late no laws of N. C. Driving too fast for conditions, nol pros with leave. Stephen Peacock, assault, $25 and cost. Billy Earl Stewart, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, $25 and cost. Jerry Lee Bailey, assault on female, $25 and cost. Ervin Jones Angell, improper passing, dismissed. Virginia Jones, assault, not guilty. Carson Lewis, Jr., assault with deadly weapon, $25 and cost. , Timothy W. Leonard, ' speeding 77 mph in 55 mph zone, ^ and cost. Robert Eugene Moore, speeding 76 mph in 55 mph zone, ^ and cost. Paul A. Potts, assault on female. Sentenced to six months suspended for three years, $100 and cost, not go on premises of prosecuting witness or assault prosecuting witness. Virginia Jones, assault with deadly weapon, not guilty. Robert E. Carter, speeding 83 mph in 55 mph zone, $28 and cost. Kenneth Ray Faucette, ex- ling safe speed, $25 and Thomas Richard Marlow, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, $15 and cost. Barbara Ann Potts, assault, prayer for judgment continued for one year on payment of cost and not to go on property of prosecuting witness or assault prosecuting witness. Mary Potts, assault, prayer for judgment continued for one year on payment of cost and not to go on property of prosecuting witness or assault prosecuting witness. Vetra Reep, assault, dismissed on cost. Raymond Timothy Nance, I ' i^peeding 76 mph in 55 mph zone, ^ and cost. Kenneth James Throck­ morton, exceeding safe speed, $15 and cost. James Thomas Evans, Jr., failure to stop for duly erected stop sign, on waiver of cost. Turner Olander Howell, speeding 50 mph in 35 mph zone, on waiver of $10 and cost. Elizabeth H. Sawyer, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, on waiver of $10 and cost. Clyde Alexander Pleasants, Jr., speeding 69 mph in 55 mph zone, on waiver of $10 and cost. Betty Jo Riddle Hartman, wrong side of road, on waiver of cost. ' Edward Charlie Smith, public drunkenness, nol pros with leave. Mae Neal Houser, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, on waiver of $10 and cost. Brown Thompson McKin- nery, speeding 68 mph in 55 mph z«ine, on waiver of $10 and cost. June Ogle Lawing, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, on waiver of $10 and cost. Erma J. Donner, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, on waiver of' $10 and cost. David Lee Naylor, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, on waiver of $10 and cost. Scott E. Palmer, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, on waiver of $10 and cost. , Vickie T. Pennix, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, on waiver of $10 and cost. Keith Terrell Snider, im ­ proper mufflers, on waiver of cost. James Middleton Somerville, speeding 67 mph in 55 mph zone, on waiver of $10 and cost. Harriett Tadlock Stephenson, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, on waiver of $10 and cost. James C. Welch, Jr., speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, on waiver of $10 and cost. Larry Shinault, public drunkenness, cost. Marlin Sidney Sherman, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, on waiver of $10 and cost. Mahlon Eugene Parks, speeding 68 mph in 55 mph zone, on waiver of $10 and cost. William C. Richardson, speeding 67 mph in 55 mph zone, on waiver of $10 and cost. William H. Reed, speeding 68 itph in 55 mph zone, on waiver of $10 and cost. Ronald D. Madison, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, on waiver of $10 and cost. Edward C. Miller, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, on waiver of $10 and cost. Elizabeth Perkins Massey, public drunkenness, cost. Charles H. Meadows, speeding 65 mph in 55 mph zone, on waiver of $5 and cost. Robert L. Jinks, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, on waiver of $10 and cost. Craig Fonnesbech Hausen, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, on waiver of $10 and cost. James S. Harvey, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, on waiver of $10 and cost. Charlene Barnetta Keeley, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, on waiver of $10 and cost. Ray Leslie Deppmann, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, on waiver of $10 and cost. Woodrow Correll, public drunkenness, cost. Walter Jackson Bares, public drunkenness, cost. James Richard Beckett, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, on waiver of $10 and cost. Don Pearle Brittle, speeding 49 mph in 35 mph zone, on waiver of $10 and cost. Mary A. Burcham, worthless check, cost. John Hugh Howell, failure to display current approved in­ spection certificate, on waiver of cost. John Robert Harnage, Jr., failure to display current ap­ proved inspection certificate, on waiver of cost. Luther Samuel Horne, Jr., no inspection and no registration plate, on waiver of cost. Jack Hampton Adams, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, on waiver of $10 and cost. Ronald Wayne Boger, failure to drive on right half of highway that was sufficient width for more than one lane of traffic, on waiver of cost. Melvin Adams, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, on waiver of $10 and cost. Burton Craige, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, on waiver of $10 and cost. Richard Burgess Elder, speeding 68 mph in 55 mph zone, on waiver of $10 and cost. Ava Ellis, worthless check, cost. Ronald Morris Millsaps, failure to reduce speed to avoid collision, on waiver of cost. Bobby Ray Vance, speeding 67 mph in 55 mph zone, on waiver of $10 and cost. Edward Alva Wockman, speeding 67 mph in 55 mph zone, on waiver of $10 and cost. George Emery Bumgarner, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, on waiver of $10 and cost. Ted W. Belch, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, on waiver of $10 and cost. Henry Monroe Boyer, Jr., speeding 69 mph in 55 mph zone, on waiver of $10 and cost. James Ronald Bange, failure to reduce speed to avoid collision, on waiver of cost. David Normon Bowman, speeding 68 mph in 55 mph zone, on waiver of $10 and cost. Milford Fletcher Budd, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, on waiver of $10 and cost. Johnny Ray Cowans, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, on waiver of $10 and cost. John Chrastina, speeding 68 mph in 55 mph zone, on waiver of $10 and cost. Boyd Lee Cook, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, on waiver of $10 and cost. Maria Christ Merrell, speeding 67 mph in 55 mph zone, on waiver of $10 and cost. William Douglas Moore, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, on waiver of $10 and cost. Charles Emmett Matthews, exceeding safe speed, on waiver of cost. Daryl Scott Lindsey, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, on waiver of $10 and cost. James Moore, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, on waiver of $10 and cost. Fred Allen Neal, following too close, on waiver of cost. Donald Ennis Sloop, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, on waiver of $10 and cost. Robbie Moore Terry, speeding 69 mph in 55 mph zone, on waiver of $10 and cost. Theodore Wilson Tilghman, III, speeding 68 mph in 55 mph zone, on waiver of $10 and cost. William Asbury Teague, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, on waiver of $10 and cost. Doyce Edgar Trull, speeding 68 mph in 55 mph zone, on waiver of $10 and cost. Sherman Desi Arnold, im­ proper mufflers, on waiver of cost. John William Ransom, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, on waiver of $10 and cost. Myra Ellen Enders, speeding 66 mph in 55 mph zone, on waiver of $10 and cost. Nancy Burke Martin, speeding 69 mph in 55 mph zone, on waiver of $10 and cost. Byron Douglas Lackey, spewing 66 mph in 55 mph zone, on waiver of $10 and cost. Christa Tulbert Myers, too fast for conditions, on waiver of cost. Jerry Wood, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, on waiver of $10 and cost. Frank Frost, Jr., public drunkenness, cost. Mary Whisenant Dowda, speeding 67 mph in 55 mph zone, on waiver of $10 and cost. Harold Lee Gorman, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, on waiver of $10 and cost. Daniel Lee Harriness, failure to display current approved inspection cirtificate, on waiver of cost. Redmon Francis Haynes, speeding 68 mph in 55 mph zone, on waiver of $10 and cost. Oscar Thad Johnson, failure to yield right-of-way at duly erccted stop sign, on waiver of cost. Isaac King, Jr., speeding 69 mph in 55 mph zone, on waiver of $10 and cost. Vernon William Leonard, improper brakes, on waiver of cost. Granville Ernest McCrary, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, on waiver of $10 and cost. Freda Hickman Ramsey, failure to stop for duly erected stop sign, on waiver of cost. William Frank Boyd, speeding 69 mph in 55 mph zone, on waiver of $10 and cost. Michael Allan Baber, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, on waiver of $10 and cost. Betty Smith Cline, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, on waiver of $10 and cost. Julius E. Miller, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, on waiver of $10 and cost. Carl Stephenson Richie, failure to yield right-of-way while entering highway from private drive, on waiver of cost. Gary Lane Combs, operating motor vehicle while under the influence of intoxicating liquor (2nd offense) and driving while operators license revolked (3rd offense). Sentenced to twelve months suspended for three years, $500 and cost, not operate motor vehicle on highways of N. C. until issued a valid license, not violate any laws of N. C. for three years. Gwendolyn Victoria Clay, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, on waiver of $10 and cost. Frederick Dougi Cundiff, II, speeding 68 mph in 55 mph zone, on waiver of $10 and cost. William Rodney Crawford, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, on waiver of $10 and cost. Andrea Whisnant Denton, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, on waiver of $10 and cost. Allen Vaughn Dagenhart, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, on waiver of $10 and cost. William James Good, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, on waiver of $10 and cost. Joe Wilson Gates, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, on waiver of $10 and cost. George Carlton Hill, speeding 68 mph in 55 mph zone, on waiver of $10 and cost. Stacy Asbury Beck, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, on waiver of $10 and cost. Calvin Travis Blair, speeding 68 mph in 55„mph zone, on waiver of $10 and cost. William Taylor Biggers, speeding 49 mph in 35 mph zone, on waiver of $10 and cost. Edward Hughett Barnes, speeding 65 mph in 55 mph zone, on waiver of $5 and cost. Woodrow Correll, public drunkenness, cost. Michael B. Duncan, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, on waiver of $10 and cost. Alvin N. Crenshaw, speeding 67 mph in 55 mph zone, on waiver of $10 and cost. James Dwight Frye, speeding 67 mph in 55 mph zone, on waiver of $10 and cost. John G. Jaeger, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, on waiver of $10 and cost. Lester C. Johnson, speeding 67 mph in 55 mph zone, on waiver of $10 and cost. Calvin Sylvester Johnson, speeding 68 mph in 55 mph zone, on waiver of $10 and cost. Norman Jenkins Potter, speeding 68 mph in 55 mph zone, on waiver of $10 and cost. Barbara A. Schaer, speeding 67 mph in 55 mph zone, on waiver of $10 and cost. John L. Ward, speeding 67 mph in 55 mph zone, on waiver of $10 and cost. Alexander Mclvaine Torrance, speeding 70 mph in 55 mph zone, on waiver of $10 and cost. Steven W. Walden, speeding 68 mph in 55 mph zone, on waiver of $10 and cost. Joe Max Walker, speeding 68 mph in 55 mph zone, on waiver of $10 and cost. Operator License Supensions Suspensions and revocation of motor vehicle licenses in Davie County for the period ending January 3rd, 1975 include: Mitt G. Marsh, 69, of Ad­ vance, Rt. 2, suspended as of January 13, 1975, indefinitely. Bright C. W iley, 58, of Mocksville Rt. 5, revoked as of January 9,1975 until January 9, 1976. Classes Planned In Cooleemee Coach Louis L. Holtz. Raleigh was today named 1975 American Canccr Society Crusade Chairman by Mrs. Robert W. Scott, President of the North Carolina Division. In naming Holtz, Mrs. Scott said, “ He is a tremendous coach, an able administi'ator, and an expert in the team management philosophy so needed in the fight to conquer cancer in our lifetime." Mrs. B. Everett Jordan, Saxapahaw, was named by Mrs. Scott as Honorary Crusade Chairman. She is the widow of Senator B. Everett Jordan, 1973-74 Crusade Chairman, whose untimely death from cancer was a great loss to North Carolina and our nation. His efforts made possible the greatest Crusade in the history of the Tar Heel State. Mr. Holtz has proven his ability as a successful athlete and coach. He was head foot­ ball coach at William and Mary College from June 1969 to November 1972 and since that date has been head football Davidson County Community College will start a Lap Quilting Class on Monday, January 20th, at 9:00 a.m. and also a Cake Decorating Class on Wed­ nesday, February 5th, at 9:00 a.m. "We are still working toward a Crocheting Class and a Class in Sewing of Knits. If you are interested in any of these classes lo be held at the Cooleemee Kecreation Center, please call Gray Everhart at 634-3415.” Registration will be during the first class session. coach al North Carolina Stale University. He is married, has four children, and is well known throughout the country as an excellent platform speaker. In accepting this assignment, Mr. Holtz stated, “ It is a privilege lo work with Mrs. Scott, the Board of Directors and .staff of the North Carolina Division, and my team of Area Vice Chairmen will be named soon. Helping to lick cancer in my lifetime will be my greatest challeng Louis L. Holtz Mrs. B. Everett Jordan The Farmington Community was saddened Thursday January ninth by the death of one of its senior citizens, Miss Phoebe Eaton. She was born here and spent the most of her life in the large community. For several years she taught first grade in the Farmington High School. She left a host of friends. Mrs. Louise Perryman of Lewisville was the dinner guest Friday of her cousin Mrs. G.N. Tucker and Mr. Tucker. Mr. Bob Lakey is suffering much pain from a pinched nerve in his back. He is taking treatment and receiving some relief. Sunday visitors of Mrs. Queen Bess Kennen were Mr. Hoyle Ridenhouse and Mr. and Mrs. Earl Williams of Concord. The United Methodist Women met Friday night in the home of Mrs. Elva Cash with thirteen members and one visitor present. The meeting was opened with the singing of “ Give of Your Best to the Master," followed by an in­ spiring message on Christian Symbols used in the Christian Churches given by Mrs. Leon Foster. She discussed sixteen of the many symbols and told of their meanings lo the lay person. To name a few -- good shepherd, dove of peace, the circle, rainbow, harp, lamp, anchor,balance, star, the cross, clasped hands, the Bible and many more. After a business session Mrs. Cash assisted by Mrs. G.H. Smith served a salad plate with sweets and Russian tea to the guests.The meeting closed with prayer and song. James Goodin Completes Basic Army Private James C. Goodin Jr., 19, whose parents and wife, Phala (sic), live at 617 Wandering Lane, Mocksville, N.C.,completed eight weeks of basic combat training at Ft. Knox, Ky. 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All are C A W e attractive accents in this out- a M V B standing modell And sw ivel H n i *caster* are concealed In bate DANIELS FltNITIIIIE & BLECRIC CO. At Overhead Bridge Mocksville, N. C. / 10 - DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, THURSDAY, JANUARY 16, 1975 Deaths And Funerals PHOEBE EATON Miss Phoebe Eaton, 88, of Rt. 5, Mocksvillc. the Famington community, died at Davie County Hospital Thursday afternoon after a one day illness. Funeral services were con­ ducted Saturday at 11 a.m. at Eaton Funeral Home Chapel. Burial was in Eaton Baptist Church cemetery. Miss Eaton was born in Davie County to Thomas F. and Bell Tatum Eaton. She was a graduate of Meredith College and was a retired school teacher. She was a member of Farmington Baptist Church. There are no immediate survivors. MRS. GAIL CASTELLOE Mrs. Gail Wofford Castelloe, 36, of Windsor. N. C. died Saturday at the home of her mother, Mrs. Charles Wofford in Cooleemee. Surviving are her husband, Earl Castelloe; her mother, three sisters, Mrs. Earl Braxton of Kinston, N. C,, Mrs. William Hellard of Cooleemee and Miss Betty Sue Wofford of Cooleemee; one brother, Charles Wofford, Ft. Walton, Fla. Funeral services were con­ ducted Monday in Windsor, N. C. March Of Dimes Telerama Feb. 1st WXH-Television will sponsor a Marchof Dimes Telerama to raise money for the March of Domes Association to help fight birth defects. The telerama will be held at the Benton Con­ vention Center beginning Saturday, February 1 at 11:30 PM and running continuously through the night untiH;30 PM, Sunday, February 2,1975. It will be aired live from the con­ vention center under the direction of Roger Shaver of wxn-Tv. Chairman for the Telerama is Jim Humphries, a local at­ torney. Linda Lee Reynolds is March of Dimes Chairman Stars agreeing to come to Winston-Salem include: Gary Collins, star of NBC’s BORN FREE, Mary Ann Mobley, former Miss America and actress, Robert Fuller, star of NBC’s EMERGENCY and Lee Kirk. Anyone who brings in a bucket of money will get a kiss from one of the stars. Local television and radio per­ sonalities will also be on hand. Talent from the surrounding area will appear. A battle of the bands will be held between 3 and S AM. 4-H News DAVID BAKER David Ronson Baker, 18, of 529 Church St. Ext., Mocksville, died Thursday evening at Forsyth Memorial Hospital. Funeral services were con­ ducted Sunday at 2 p.m. at Eaton Funeral Home Chapel. Burial was in Rose Cemetery. Mr. Baker was born August 24.1956 in Forsyth County to R. Dwight and Betty Rhodes Baker. Surviving are his parents of Mocksville; two brothers, Darrell D. Baker and Joseph Wayne Baker, both of the home; and his grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Mack Baker of Mocksville, and Mr. John Rhodes of Mocksville, formerly of Win­ ston-Salem. Church Activities SMITH GROVE The Smith Grove 4-H Club met Friday night, January 3, 1975 at 7:00 p.m. in the Dingbat Hut. The meeting was called to order by Susan Blakely. The devotions were given by Janet Carter. The business discussed was club programs for the year and who would have the devotions and serve refreshments for the year. Members received their year pins. The meeting was then ad­ journed and refreshments were served by Susan Blakely. Reporter-Teresa Myers DOGWOOD The Dogwood 4-H Club met Monday night, January 6, 1975, at 7:30 p.m. in the Jerusalem Fire Department. Programs were planned for the year and a Bake Sale was planned for January 25. Reporter-Ivy Godwin DAVIE ACADEMY The Davie Academy 4-H Club met Monday, January 6, at 7:00 in the Davie Academy Com­ munity Building. The club received a check for $66.21 from the paper drive held on November 31. Another paper drive was planned for a later date. Jimmy koontz built ping pong tables with m aterials pur­ chased by the club. These tables will be placed in the community building. The group voted to find out about a sign welcoming visitors to Davie County. A flower plot was also discussed. Project Selection Sheets were given out and the meeting was adjourned. Paula-Shew-Reporter Fire Department To Have Meeting T iie C o rn a tz e r-D u lin Volunteer Fire Department will hold their annual meeting Saturday. January 18. at 7:30 p.m. at the Fire Department to elect officers for 1875. Also, the presentation of the Fireman of the Year award will be made at this time. Everyone in the community is urgt'd to attend. Refreshments will 1)0 served following the niei‘ling CORNATZER There will be a Gospel Singing at Cornatzer United Methodist Church Saturday, January 25, at 7:30 p.m. Featured groups will be The Ross Family, The Singing Crusaders and The Young Revelations. Rev. Jack Luther is pastor of the church. The public is in­ vited to attend this program. FIRST METHODIST The UMW of First United Methodist Church is sponsoring a special program “Mini Meals To Feed Many” the week of January 20-24. Each day during the week a meal of broth and crackers will be served in the Fellowship Building of the church from 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. A freewill offering will be taken for the meal and the money will be used to help alleviate the world hunger problem. The public is cordially invited to participate and to come and share a meal with a friend. Various slogans have been adopted in relation to the meal: such as, "shed inches for others”, “a pound lost is a pound given”, and “help others survive in ’75”. PENTECOSTAL Revival services will begin Sunday, January 26, at 7:30 p.m. at Mocksville Pentecostal Holiness Church on Milling Road. Rev. Lloyd Carlyle of Winston-Salem will be the visiting evangelist. The public is invited to attend. Rev. H. B. Hickling is pastor of the church. COOLEEMEE The Cooleemee Methodist Men will meet Sunday, January 19, at 7:30 p. m. with Bob Adams, of the N. C. State Parks and Recreation Department presenting the program. The New Heritage Singers of Midway Methodist Church and Dr. Robert A. Davis, president of Brevard, who sang and spoke at the District Conference of the United Methodist Church in Denton on January 5, will be featured on W. D. S. L. Radio Sunday mornings beginning January IB, and continuing for three weeks. There will be a combined service of the Church of the Good Shepherd Episcopal Church, Cooleemee and the Ascension Church, Fork, on Sunday, January 19, at Cooleemee at It a. m. Members of the Mocksville Jaycees will be special guests. BIXBY There will be a Gospel Sing at Bixby Church of the Living God Saturday, January 18, at 7:30 p.m. Special guests will be The Turrentine Trio of Mocksville, and The Young Revelations of Cornatzer United Methodist Church. Also, other groups will be featured. The public is invited to attend. All donations will go to the Building Fund of the church. The regular schedule for the church includes: Sunday School at 10 a.m.; Worship at 11 a.m.; LGCY at 6 p.m.; Evening Worship at 7 p.m.; Cottage Prayer meeting in Homes each Saturday night; special Bible Study on Revelations 4th Saturday night in the month. School Center Has Guest Ted Drain, Director of the Division of Exceptional Children for the State Depart­ ment of Public Instruction, visited, the Learning Disability Demonstration Center at Pinebrook Elementary School on Tuesday, January 7. After a slide presentation on the Resource Program of Davie County and an examination of the plans for teacher training to be held at the Learning D isability D em onstration Center, Mr. Drain toured the school with Bobbye Draughon, Director of the LDDC; Cynthia Howard, Director of School Psychologists for the State Department of Public In­ struction, and Ann Elledge, Consultant for Exceptional Cliildren in Educational District VII ^"Sounds Of Joy’’' The “Sounds of Joy", a m usical group from High Point, will present a program at the Cooleemee United M ethodist Church on Sunday, January 19, from 7:30 until 8:30 p. m. David Tutterow will be In charge of the service. "THERE IS A TIME FOR EVERYTHING . ” Eccles'astes 3 1, The Living Bible. Tynriale House Q O t ) ’s f i v e M i N U x e s C. A. SEAFORD LUMBER COMPANY [toiclib Boed Mocksville, N. C, Phone 634-5148 DAVIE FREEZER UKKER, INC. 262 Salisbury Street Phone 634-2736 MARTIN HARDWARE & GENERAL MERCHANDISE Feed;, Dry Goodi, Groceries, Fertilizer Phone 634-2128 A SEN$E OF VALUES An old yellow tabby cat has a bank account of S200.000 says my morning paper. A woman died and left her entire estate to her cat. Orphaned children? Other lonely, elderly people? Mission causes? No, just to an old cat. When one loses ones sense of values, one often makes the same kind of mistake. Most likely and almost certainly, this woman, and others just like her, had no place in her life for God. I'm not Implying she did an evil thing, though God may judge otherwise. I'm saying she had lost her sense of values toward things. "But seek ye first the kingdom of God, and his righteousness; and all these things shall be added unto you" is not just a promise from our Creator. It is the establishing of an order of importance from the greater to the lesser. It puts life-all of life-in proper perspective. . .If a person hates all mankind so much, so that at death she figuratively spits in their faces by leaving'her fortune to a cat, that person has not only misused her money, she has misused her life. 1)111 celiic + + + + + + + ATTEND CHURCH THIS WEEK + + + + + + +CCommuntty Atfiwrfittnf • of fl oftt»Mitl»er«ndth»tMto»idpwWMMr ofthtbookimaibvgitnn. • andp«Vt1.00ler I. In tha c to “ Ood** F in MlnMlaa/* Bok 12167. Fort Worth, Ton. T ill 6 BILL MERREa FURNnURE., INC. ‘•Where Comfort And Economy Meet" 701 Wilkesboro St.Modxvffle. N. Ct Phone 634-6131 REAVIS FORD INC. Where People Listen Bejtet Hwy. 601 North Mocksvaie,N.C. Phone 634-2161 PARKS & scon Intulofing Sarvic* AAoektviile, N. C.. 27028 Cootog In The Summer Warm In The Winfer Office Phonei 634-5939 COLLETTE ANTIQUES & ART SUPPLIESAntiques & Collectibles Fumiture-Lamps-GUsswaie-SDver Old aocks-Picture Ftames- WE BUY, SELL OR TRADE 1021 Yadldnville Road Mocksville, N.C. 634-229B This feature is published in the interest of a better community and is made possible by these sponsors who believe in building character. HOblST CHURCH ADVANCE BAPTIST CHURCH « g f s V » C H IITED IRCH EATON’S BATOST CHURCH Sunday School 10 a.m.Morning Worship U ajn.Training Union 7 p.m. EDGEWOOD BAPTIST CHURCH FARMINGTON BAPTIST CHURCH ENTOOSTAL IRCH KENTUCKY FRIED CHICKEN HAVE A BARREL OF FUN Monday - Thursday 11 A.M. To 8 P.M. Fnday - Sunday 11 A.M. To 9 P.M. YaddnviDeHaMl MadavOle, N.C Highway 601Rev. A.C. Cheihlre. PaftorMorning Worship 11 a.m.Evening Wotihip 7:45 p.m. MXBY^PRESBYTERIAN CALVARY BAPTIST CHURCH FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH Cooleemee, N.C. Rev. Charles Bullock FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCHChurch School 10 a.m.Worship Service 11 a.m. FORK BAPTIST CHURCH 6 miles Halt on Hjw. 64 Rev..Yates K. WUI^son, Pastor MOCKSVILLE CHURCH OF GOD Depot StreetRev. James I. Morris, Pastor Sunday School 10 A.M.Worship Service 11 A.M. Evening Service 7 P.M.Wednesday 7:30 P.M. ___iSnl* Hi'cUinirMiiilster^n(^ Y^ajn. EvaiueTistic Service 7':30 pjn.Youth Night Sun. 6 p.m. MO^WLLE^W^IUEYAN CHURCH MomS^%^^p ll7jn.Evening Worship7:30 p.m. ^THOTKTfflWCH NO CREEK PRIMITIVE BAPTIST CHURCH LYNN HAVEN NURSING HOME INC. P.O. Box 423 State Licented B. E. Seats, Administrator STC lRC RCH MITED BAI ROVE gg^pW c?^" firciS!Si?,»4(Ephe«..) Evening Worship 7 p.m. Wed. Service 7:30 pjit. p.m. CHURC Bixby, IH^OF THE LIVING GOD HER/t HVRCH FULLER WELDING & FABRICATORS Certified Welding-Portable Welder on Hand -Trailers Our Speciality MocksviUe, N.C. Philip Fuller Owner Phone: 634-3712 rayeiRlee8n“weS'.™8pjn. ILLEPE^COSTAL _____Route 5Rev. Albert Gentle II^|APTIST CHURCH iMl 10 a jn.____ rvice II ajn.Evening WorslUp 7 p.m. Rev. Avery A. Ferguson COOLEEMEEPRESBYTERIANCHURCHRev. James P. Kni^t, Minister Sunday Service 10 A.M.Worship Service 11A.M. Nl- uiday School 9:45 a.m. orihip Service 11 a.m. ;S ROADS IRCH JERICHO CHURCH OF CHRIST Churls iKn^ere MinisterOffice: 492-529f-Home: 634-5257 M B|^pPTjST CHURCH 11 a.ni.7 p.m. TCriijRCH LIBERTY WESLEYAN CHURCH Troy C. V au^, Pastor MACEDONIA MORAVIAN CHURCH Rev. John H. Kaop, Putor Sunday School lu a.m. Momi^Worship II a.m.Youth noir RetearA 6 p.m.Youth FeUowdap 6:30 p.m. X » ,» e i ; ? S S : T 5 pjn. {JethodistcSurch MOCKS »TSTCHURCh CORNATZER BAPTIST CHURCH DAVIE BAPTIST TABERNACLE B W O T urch ( D i a l — A — P r a y e r - 6 3 4 - 3 3 1 1 ) LFNESS METOODKTCHURCH SECOND PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST Milling Rd., Mock^e, N.C.Lonny G. Lielxlt. Pastor SabbaU) School ID a.m.Morning Warship 11 a.m. SHILOH BAPTIST CHURCH ■S'^TPrch ED i VbnCannon, Putor I welcome ^A'nfi^'lpMISSIOIJ10 ajn.' Sunday oblifitioo •uo at jmticipitory mau oo '^’SiSSgfeyeti’Service Pl^PA L CHURCH '■ of ^Ascension yer. Sermon 11 ajn. TURRENTINE BAPTIST CHURCH rCHL«^^ yAf DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, THURSDAY, JANUARY 16, 1975 - 11 Legion Post To L Meet January 21 I The Samuel E. Water, Jr. American Legion Post No. 174 of Mocksville will hold Its second monthly meeting on January 21st at the cafeteria of the Brock Community Center. Social hour will start at 7 p.m. with the regular business meeting at 8 p.m. “These first meetings of a new year are very important for now is the time that the programs and projects for 1975 will be established. It is urged that all members attending this meeting” , said Commander Bob Thies. "In 1974 a great American legion Post was born. In 1975, The Samuel E. Water, Jr. Post I is headed towards even greater f , goals but it will take all of us veterans. Your attendance is needed. Bring a member”, said Commander Thies. Advance News Mrs. Matt Poindexter ac- compained Mr. and Mrs. Frank Potts and sons Jerry and Charles to Florida last week for a few days. Mrs. Poindexter \isited her children Mr. and (Mrs. George Poindexter in ' Orlando. The Potts family enjoyed going to Disney world. Mr. Randolph Smiley of Beckley, West Virginia and Mr. Mason Slley of Roanoke, Virginia spent two days last week visiting their brother and sister-in-law Mr. and Mrs. Blake Smiley. This was the first time Mr. Randolph Smiley had ever been here for a visit. Mr. and Mrs. George Judd, Sr. of Kingsport, Tenn. spent the weekend with their son and daughter-in-law Mr. and Mrs. Qeorge Judd, Jr. and daughter Karen. :a group from the Advance Baptist church enjoyed an evening of roller skating at <Skate Haven on Country Club Road, Forsyth county, last Saturday night. Among those skating were Mr. and Mrs. Qiarles Markland, Jr., Mr. and Mrs. Douglas Markland, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Crawford and daughter Tammy, Mr. and Mrs. Don Hutchins, Mr. and Mrs. Bo Potts, Mrs. Cathy Smith and daughter Tracy, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Span and children, Mrs. Faye Stroud and son Kenny, Mrs. Gaytf Potts and daughters Cammie and Kendra, Mrs. Atlee Cornatzer and daughter Karen. ■ Mrs. Hazel Phelps of rabaville was a Saturday af- iWnoon visitor of Miss Laura ^ u tt. We are happy to report that Miss Shutt is showing Improvement after a weeks Ulness. ' Mr. and Mrs. Ollle Allen and son of Norfolk, Virginia spent the weekend with his brother and sister-in-law Mr. and Mrs. Charlie Alien. -Charlie Latham entered Forsyth Memorial hospital Monday for scheduled surgery on Tuesday. A speedy recovery is wished for him. Mocks News Fred P. Carter By Gordon Tomlinson The first time I remember Fred P. Carter he was playing right field for the Mocksville semi-pro baseball team. The year was around 1935 or 38, and Fred had already graduated from the Mocksville High School. Some of the team­ mates of Fred on this team included Ollie Anderson (deceased) first base; M. C. Deadmon and Lookabill, second base; Felix Deadmon, short stop; J. Lee Dwigglns (deceased) and Brewster Grant (deceased) third base; Jake Allen (deceased) centerfield. It was also around this time that Fred first entered the newspaper business. Joining the Mocksville Enterprise as a linotype operator. At that time the Mocksville £;nterprise was owned by A. C. Huneycutt of Albemarle. Miss Mary J. Heitman was the social editor. In 1938, Fred as a 25-year-old employee of the Mocksville Enterprise, drove with A. C. Huneycutt to Kemersville to discuss with community leaders the possibility of starting a newspaper. They encountered enthusiasm for a community newspaper in Kemersville, with church leaders agreeing to sell 1,000 subscriptions and merchants agreeing to try advertising in it. On their way to Mocksville, Huneycutt asked Fred if he would like to go to Kemersville and operate the paper. Fred enthusiastically agreed. In Mocksville Fred had met, courted and married a pretty teautician from Catawba County, Ruth Smith. So it was this young couple that embarked on the project of establishing a weekly newspaper in Kemersville. In the beginning it was basically a one man operation, with the able assistance of his wife. However, as The Kemersville News led the way for growth and progress of the community the same growth and progress took place with the newspaper. Although always at heart a production man, Fred also assumed editorial responsibility. However, he never relinquished his love and devotion to the mechanical side of putting out a newspaper. In 1961 the newspaper and printing company in Kemersville was incorporated under the name of Carter Publishing Company with Fred as president and Ruth, secretary-treasurer. Several years ago he was joined in the venture by his son, Frederick. Also joining the company were such newsmen as Leonard Dudley and John Staples. Two or three years ago Fred and his newspaper joined the trend of switching to offset. As the Enterprise-Record had previously entered this field, he and Ruth visited our shop several times to view our operation and discuss this new method of newspaper production. Kemersville made the switch and continued to produce one of the state’s outstanding weeklies, printing it at Eden. Having constructed a new and modem building, Fred and his staff began, about a month ago, the installation of a new offset press in Kemersville. Last Friday, January lOth, Fred telephoned me and for ten or fifteen minutes we discussed newspaper layout and printing. “When we get these new press units installed I will let you know and I want you to come over here and see our operation”, said Fred in closing. To this I readily agreed. But Fred never lived to see his new press in operation. At 5 p.m. last Friday he suffered a heart attack and died. However, he leaves behind him a newspaper with an organization capable of carrying on his aims and ideals..........of serving Kemersville and its people. This newspaper, which he organized, nursed and built.........and which has meant so much to Kemersville.......will always be a monument to his life and work. Fred was born in Davie (bounty on April 23, 1913 to Frank and Jennie Smith Carter. In Kemersville he was a member of the Lions Club, the Winston-Salem Moose Lodge, and was one of the leading organizers of the Kemersville Exchange Club. He was a member of the First Baptist Church and taught Sunday School for 15 years. Surviving in addition to his wife, are one son; Frederick P. Carter; one daughter, Mrs. Connie Owensby of Kemersville; two grandchildren; two brothers, Hix F. Carter of Winston-Salem and Hubert Carter of Mocksville. Funeral services were held Sunday in Kemersville. Alcoholism Seminar Is Set For Ministers Bits Of Life Tri-County Mental Health Complex is sponsoring a sem inar on alcoholism for ministers in Rowan and Davie Counties. It will be held on February 3, 1975, at Ketner Cafeteria in the Town Mall, Salisbury from 8:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Registration will be from 8:00 to 8:50. The fee of ^.0 0 will include lunch for participants. Speakers will provide up-to- date Information on resources for referral: local, state& federal; “Games alcoholics play with helpers” ; and, “Counseling with the family of the alcoholic.” In addition, there will be a preview of the New Film, “The •Alcoholics Within Us”. Speakers will include: Larry Parrish, Area Director of Tri-County Mental Health Complex. Loy Devine, Alcoholism Program Coordinator, Tri- Local Student Attends Conference Wayne Scott, Route 2, Ad­ vance, N.C., attended the Solution Bowl, a Christian training conference, in Washington, D.C., December 27 to January 1, He was ac­ companied by Isaac Munyua, Kenya, East Africa, who was visiting him for the holidays. The two are students at Bryan College, Dayton, Tenn. They joined approximately 800 other college students from five mid- Atlantic states. The conference was held at the Sheraton Park Hotel and Motor Inn in Washington, D.C. and was sponsored by Campus Crusade for Christ, In­ ternational. The purpose of the SOLUTION BOWL was to train college students how to ex­ perience the abundant Christian life and how to share their faith effectively with others. Campus Crusade for Christ is an interdenominational student Christian movement active on campuses throughout the U.S. and in 23 other countries. The SOLUTION BOWL was one of twelve student training sessions held during the holidays throughout the nation. Mrs. Charlie Allen Spent Thursday with her mother Mrs. Annie Myers who is a patient at Davie County Hospital. Mrs. Emma Myers spent the past week with Mr. and Mrs. Alden Myers of Winston Salem. Mr. and Mrs. Harry Williams of Winston visited Mr. and Mrs. Roger Mock Jr. on Sunday. Mr. and Mrs. Joe White of Winston Salem spent Sunday afternoon with Willie and Clyde Jones. Several members of our church are absent each Sunday because of illness, Mrs. M argaret Carter, Mrs. Iva Myers, Mrs. Emma Myers, and ^ m Right. Meeting On Food Stamps There will be a special meeting ' concerning Food Stamps on Saturday, January 25, from 9 a.m. until 1 p.m. at the B. C. Brock Community Center. . Staff of the Davie Community Action Program will provide information, answer questions and take applications for Food Stamps. Anyone interested in applying for Food Stamps is asked to .bring the following: Social iSecurity card, payment stubs, rent receipts or mortgage payments, imcome tax records, records of bank accounts, names, ages and imcome of everyone living in the household. Grass Tetany Leo F Williams, Davie County Extension Chairman, reminds Davie cattlemen that this is the time of year that people begin losing cattle to grass tetany. This can be averted, he said, by using a mineral mixture of 50 percent steam-bone meal, 25 percent trace mineralized salt and 25 percent magnesium oxide. All other salt should be removed from the herd, Williams said. Cows with calves on them are more prone (o have grass tetany. Congressman Hefner's Gospel Sings To Continue North Carolina’s Eighth District Congressman W. G. (Bill) Hefner, who promoted gospel singings at the Charlotte Coliseum prior to his election in November, has announced that the singings will continue to be held. Mrs, Carol Whitley of Kan­ napolis, has been named to handle the singings and ticket sales. Cong. Hefner said Mrs, Whitley would be at their office daily from 9 a.m. until 5 p.m. The telephone number there is 938-4313. She may be reached after 5 p.m. and on weekends at 938-3790. The mailing address is Carolinas’ Song Festival, P. 0. Box 804, Kannapolis, N. C. 28081. Congressman Hefner said he piann^ to attend the singings because “ 1 have made many friends there over the years and I throuroughly enjoy both the friends and the singings.” The congressman is planning to attend the Easier singing on March 29 and will sing with the H arvesters’ Quartet, with whom he started his en­ tertainment career more than 20 years ago. Other groups scheduled to appear are The Thrasher B ro th e rs, In sp ira tio n s, Kingsmen, Goffs, London Paris and the Apostles and the En­ voys. The singing will culminate with sunrise ser­ vices^_______________________ Four Corners Mrs. Mary Laymon was honored Sunday on her birthday anniversary by her children, Mr. and Mrs. James Nance and family and Mr. and Mrs. Gray Laymon and family. There are four birthdays in their family this month. All brought dinner and the event was enjoyed by all at the home of Mr. and Mrs. George Laymon. Ricky Ratledge is very ill at his home. We hope he will have a speedy recovery. Mr. and Mrs. Grady Beck and Greg are all sick at this time. We hope they will soon be up and out again. Mrs. Flora Ruth Ragledge Taylor is now at Fran Ray Rest Home in Mocksville. J. B, Chaffin is doing fine after eye surgery last week. Green IMeadows Work on Green Meadows Sanctuary is presently at a standstill due to (he wet weather and also some factory flaw in the beams of the con­ struction. Mr. and Mrs. Royce Mat­ thews announce the birth of a daughter at Forsyth hospital at 2.29 a.m. on Sat. The baby weighed 9 lbs. 4 oz. and has been named Amanda Renie, the maternal grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. James Zimmerman of this community. Kimberly McKnight was ill last week with flu, now her grandparents Ernest and Ruby McKnight also are ill with flu, the diesease is attacking many residents of this area. David Howell son of Roger and Nancy Howell was ad­ mitted tu Davie Hospital on Sunday evening with pneuinuiiia. Donald Miller is a patient at the Forsyth Hospital where he was taken Sat. after he had fallen while working, his present condition remains serious and not fully deter­ mined. Miss Robin Leigh Drawdy and Bruce Lawrence Hester were united in marriage on Sunday afternoon in Winston Salem's First Presbyterian Church, she is the dau^ter of the late Hubert and Dorris Smith Drawdy. Attending from here were her grandmother Mrs. Bessie Smith, Lisa Smith, Rev. A. C. Cheshire and Mr. and Mrs. Joe Langston and Mr. and Mrs. Jim Nester from Virginia. Eugene Foster Bethlehem community is a patient at Forsyth Hospital and Blaine Smith at Baptist. Margie Hendrix at Davie and Nellie King at Baptist. County Mental Health Complex. Herb Moore, Administrator of ARC Hospital, Black Mountain. John Renn, Broughton Hospital Morganton. Dave Corns, Veterans Hospital, Salisbury. Gwyn Kellerman, Director of Mecklenburg Mental Health Association. Jerry Vuncannon, Alcoholism Counselor, Tri-County Mental Health Complex. Governor Proclaims Alcholism Awarness Citing the need for North Carolinians to be Aware of the problems and prevalence of alcoholism in the state. Governor Jim Holshouser has proclaimed the week of January 19 - 26, 1975, as Alcoholism Awareness Week in North Carolina. At present, there are an estim ated nine million alcoholics in the United States, with between 180,000 and 200,000 of them in North Carolina. Nationally, it is estimated that the cost of the alcohol problem (in lost wages, expenses to families, cost of liquor, etc.) tops $25 billion annually. Recent studies show that alcohol usage is not limited to the adult population, with half of ail high school-age youths having used alcohol at one time or another and 25 percent using alcohol on a regular basis. In announcing the proclam ation, G overnor Hoizhouser called on the Department of Human Resources to “make extra effort in that week to cause the public to become aware of the ever present threat of alcoholism and I ask the A lc o h o lism R e s e a rc h Authority, recently created by the N. C. General Assembly to sponsor research into the causes and prevention of alcoholism and to' encourage participation in this research by the institutions of higher learning in North Carolina.” Oratory Eloquence is vehement simplicity Cecil One Never Knows By ROSCOE BROWN FISHER It was around 9 o'clock at night, A cold rain was railing. Some sleet. All traffic had slowed considerably. Nearing Statesville from Salisbury, I suddenly came upon an icy place in the highway, where a new railroad had been installed at an angle leading Into a new industrial development. The front of my Impala simply followed the Icy rails of the railroad instead of the highway. liiere I am. , ,sliding crossways down the soft, muddy, semi-frozen side of the highway. Never had I felt so helpless. It Is a frightening experience —sliding sideways along the shoulders of an icy highway, not knowing how far you are going to slide. , .which direction you are headed. . .and what is going to stop you! I rememtier seeing a large pole. , ,and then the crash.. .Into the right front side of the Impala. The rear of the car swung around and settled six Inches from a fire hydrant, facing the way I had come. The motor still running, I Immediately switched off the ignition. At the time, I was unaware the power pole had bran severed. I must have clung tightly to the steering wheel which kept me from being thrown to the right side. My legs, which hit the dash, were pretty numb. I hoped not broken. When I was convinced they were all right, I stepped out of the car, directly under the dangling power line carrying 18,000 volts of electricity, which I later learned from the man with the wrecker, who refused to go under the power lines. I thanked God the 18,000 volt lines remained Intact. By this time I was pretty well shaken, but sufficiently coherent to tell a passing motorist to call Pauline and the Highway Patrol, and to tell son, Luther, to come immediately to the scene of the accident. Luther appeared more scared than I when he !;ii arrived, white as a sheet. I recall his saying: “Pop, are •:i: you hurt? Howard you?" My thanks go to a gentlemanly highway patrolman, iii: who helped a mighty scared preacher on a mighty cold •S: November night —and did not give him a ticket, iij: I have no more counseling for young people about iji: driving. Cooleemee Senior Citizens The Cooleemee Senior Citizens held their regular meeting Monday in the fellowship hall of the First Baptist Church with 40 mem­ bers attending. A program “What We Did Christmas”, under the direction of Mrs. Betty Murphy, was presented with club members all taking part. The next meeting will be held January 27, at 10 a.m. This meeting is designated “Soup Day” and all members are asked to bring their own bowl. Kappa Homemakers K a p p a E x t e n s i o n Homemakers Club met Thursday afternoon, January 9, at the home of Mrs. Margaret Ann Shew. Ten members answered roll call with “My neighbor’s need”. Mrs. Jean Green was welcomed as a new member. During the business session, the club voted unanimously to send $7.50 memorials Instead of flowers, when death occurs In m em bers' families. The memorials can be the families’ choice or one considered ap­ propriate by the club. The following officers were elected for 1975-76. President: Mrs. Otis Snow Vice-President: Miss Margaret Daywalt Secretary: Mrs. Armond Smith Treasurer: Mrs. Paul Shew Hostesses for each month and Program^)f-work chairmen were appointed for the year. Miss M argaret Daywalt showed some garments she’d made since she has been at­ tending Stretch and Sew classes. Mrs. Paul Shew showed some newspaper clippings on coming fashions and demonstrated the new Velcro fasteners. She also gave the following hints: To clean soiled stuffed animals, spray with spray starch and let dry, then brush vigorously with a stiff brush. The dirt will come off with the starch. To remove burned plastic from appliances, such as bread wrapper from toasters, use nail polish remover. To cover scratches on maple furniture, apply brown wax shoe polish and buff. For the program, Mrs. Shew played the recording of Dr. Oddvar Berg on “What’s right with America”. During the social period, Mrs. Shew served pound cake, pickles and tea. NAACP Executive Committee Meets The Executive Committee of the Davie County Chapter of NAACP will meet Thursday, January 16, at 7:30 p.m. at the B. C. Brock Community Service Center, Room no. 210. All executive officers are urged to be present. S a v i n g a t B B & T w i l l l e a v e a g o o d t a s t e i n y o u i r m o u t h . Y o u r choice of ^ these free*place settin g s w hen yo u save if $25 or m ore a t B B & T . A c la ssic reason to siave at B ra n c h B a n k in g and TVust C o m p an y is a free*4-piece place se ttin g of O rig in a l R o g ers S ilv e rp la te in an elegant d esig n , C am elo t. O r yo u can choose a 5-piece ilace se ttin g of In te rn a tio n a l jta in le s s in a bold M e d ite rra ­ nean p atte rn , Se re n ata. To take hom e yo u r free* place se ttin g , com e to B B & T and d epo sit $25 or m ore in a new or e xistin g R e g u la r S a v in g s A cco u n t. CAMELOT SILVERPLATE PBICE LIST lUm Your BB4T Prlc 4-piece Place Setting: $ 3,50 1 Dinner Knife 1 Dinner Fork 1 Salad Fork 1 Teaspoon 4-piece Completer Set: 3.50 1 Butter Knife 1 Sugar Spoon2 Tablespoons 4-piece Hostess Set: 4.50 1 Cold Meat Fork 1 Berry Spoon I Pastry Server 1 Gravy Ladle 6 Iced Teaspoons 3.50 6 Teaspoons 3.50 6 Soup Spoons 4.50 52-Piece Service for Eight 34.50 W ith each ad d itio n al deposit of $25 or m o re, yo u can purchase ano ther place se ttin g or accessories. A t about h a lf of re tail. I f yo u deposit $1000 in a R e g u la r S a v in g s A cco u n t, yo u can b u y a 52-piece service for eig ht rig h t aw ay. A t a special d isco un t price So com e to B B & T . Yo u r place is set. SERENATA STAINLESS PRICE LIST lUm Vour BB&T Price 5-piece Place Setting: $ 3,00 1 Dinner Knife 1 Dinner Fork 1 Salad Fork 1 Teaspoon 1 Soup Spoon 4-piece Completer Set: 3,50 1 Butter Knife 1 Sugar Spoon 2 Tablespoons 4-piece Hostess Set; 4.75 2 Pierced Tablespoons 1 Cold Meat Fork 1 Gravy Ladle 6 Iced Teaspoons 3.50 6 Teaspoons 3.50 52-Piece Service for Eight 24.50 B B & T BRANCH BANKJNOANOTRUSTCOMMNy F E O e R A t O tP O & T tNSLW ANCE CO RPOR ATION ■ T R E E (N F IiE R E N D S J A N m ^ 1 7 1 9 7 & Purchases with deposits may be made until further notice. 12 - DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD. THURSDAY. JANUARY 16, 1975 NONE SOLD TO DEALERS Cooleemee SUPER MARKET OPEN EVERY NIGHT TIL 8:30 P.M. U. s. CHOICE S IR L O IN T I P ROAST 5 9 Lb. SAVE WITH OUR LOWER PRICES W \ 9 Lb. U.S. CHOICE 1 y o z -^ / SIZE • REGULAR |H OR•MINT_^^W 9 9 ll^AY DEODORANT 4 Oi. Btl. SECRET ANTI DEODORANT 6 H^ASH BAGS 10 s: 79‘ KItchen bags 15 X" 69< 1 L LIPTON T E A B A G S 1 1 9lOOCt. ■ Bag H VAILEYDALESAUSAGE 12 OZ. PKG. c Lb.5 9 100% PURE EXTRA LEAN GROUND BEEF 6 9 ‘Lb. U.S. CHOICE SIRLOIN TIP 1 S T E A K I 6 9 VALLEYDALE F R A N K S OR B O L O G N A 12 Oz. Pkg.c ARMOUR STAR PICKLE & PIMENTO LOAF* LIVER LOAF* 6o^. SPICED LUNCHEON* c U.S. CHOICE TOP ROUND S T E A K 5 9 Lb. DUNCAN HINES C A K E M IX ES 6 2 ^ ALL PURPOSE BLEACH CIOROX £49IP CITATION ICE MILK ’/2 Gal. Ctn. c YELLOW H ONIONS 1 0 c Lb. U.S. NO. 1 REGULAR Potatoes Gerber's Strain^' B A B Y F O O D 1 3 ' 4’/2 Oz. Jar U.S. CHOICE TENDER CUBE STEAK 6 9 Lb. VIENNA SAUSAGE 4 p>”6 tted m eat 6i*r® OZ. CANi ' A 5 5 ^8'eastOChicl*;> HI PROTEI^^ HI PHOTUN _ w . ilE F STEW 24 i W r a i SPRAY 7 I T B e ODORANT CLEANER 88' FLORIDA A A ORANGES 39 c Maxwell House INSTANT COFFEE $ 0 0 5 10-oz. JAR The “Old Helper House" around the time the property was purchased by C. Flynn Meroney in 1917. The “Old Helper House” as it was first remodeled by George Evans in the early 1930’s.An Addition to the house and further remodeling as done by George Evans. The Man y Faces Of A. Historical Homesite Two miles west of Mocksville, just off US 64 on a gentle sloping hillside near the broad bottoms of Bear Creek, lies a tract of land that has much significance in American history. This, the homesite of the late Georjge kvans family, also served as the homesite of at least two other families that wrote their names on the pages of American history.....Daniel Boone and Hinton Rowan Helper. On December 29, 1753, Squire Boone purchased a 640-acre tract, containing this homesite, from Lord Granville. It was here in early 1754 that he built his home. Squire Boone’s house is described in James W. Wall’s History of Davie County as being “one story, 18 x 22 feet in size, and built of 12 X 18-inch faced logs. The roof was on a 60-degree slope, and there was only one door. The entire house, including the roof shingles, was pegged together. The heavy plank door, hung on wood hinges, had about 18 handmade nails in it. The floor was of heavy oak boards adzed smooth. The chimney was seven feet wide in front and six feet behind with a very deep fireplace and built of soapstone rocks and wood chinked with mud. A smaller log building, 12 x 14-feet with a hard smooth dirt floor and built of round post oak logs, stood near the house. Squire Boone’s house would have been typical of the better frontier cabins of mid-i700’s.” On October 12, 1759, Squire and Sarah Boone sold this Bear Creek tract to Daniel and Rebecca Bryan Boone. .The ^yyo had been married just three yeara earlier, August 14,1756. Squire Boone, who was a justice of the peace, performed the ceremony. According to tradition, Daniel and Rebecca first lived in a cabin on this tract and later lived for about ten years near the fork of Sugar Creek, some two miles east of Farmington on the present Bryant Smith farm on Rainbow Road. (James Wall’s History of Davie). In 1763 or 1764, Daniel and Rebecca Boone sold this Bear Creek tract to Aaron Van Cleve, Sr., who had migrated to the Yadkin River from New York and whose daughter Jane married Squire Boone, Jr. Later Vancleave (there are two spellings of this name) sold 200 acres of this tract to his son, Benjamin Vancleave. Benjamin Vancleave then sold John Dick the 200 acres. John Dick sold to Jacob Heifer (Helper) this 200 acres. Between 1813 and 1817, Daniel Helper, a son of Jacob, acquired sole ownership of the land. He was the father of Hinton Rowan Helper. In 1818 he built a log cabin on this site. Hinton Rowan Helper was born in 1829 at the former Squire Boone homesite, the log part of the present Evans house. His father owned the 200-acre farm and four slaves. He apprenticed to Michael Brown of Salisbury to learn the bookstore trade where he was accused of stealing $300. In 1850, he went to California to hunt for gold, worked three months at a mine claim and made less than 94 cents. It was from this experience that he wrote his first book in 1855 entitled “California, Land of Gold: Reality vs. Fiction,” which was highly unfavorable to California. Helper returned to Salisbury and began work on "The Impending Crisis” but soon moved to New York. He. completed and published the book there in 1857. It was this book which declared Helper an abolitionist. According to “History of Davie County” James W. Wall, Helper maintained that he wrote the bpok to prove that slavery was harmful to the non-slaveholding whites in the south. The book included ISO pages of statistical tables and rhetorical economic arguments. About 100 pages were devoted to testimony against slavery, including that of such Southerners as George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison and James Monroe. The tremendous impact of “The Im­ pending Crisis” was the result of its being a powerful abolition document. It denounced the slaveholding planter class and encouraged the slave to get his freedom by any means necessary. The South tried to prevent distribution of the book. Shipments of it were burned. Distributors and owners were whipped and impris oned. In North Carolina, punishment for distributing the book was imprisonment for not less than a year and whipping if the court ordered. Punishment for the second offense was death, but nobody was given the capital punishment. In January, 1861, the New York Herald declared that Lincoln’s election had been due to "This very work of Mr. Helper” and kindred speeches and documents. During the same month. Helper, unable to find employment, applied to President Lincoln fora consular appointment stating in his request that the book had made it difficult for him to pursue any profitable business. Helper was named consul at Buenos Aires, Argentina, in November. Helper remained for five years and married a native Argentinian. He returned in 1867 where he lived for a brief time in Asheville, but later moved to New York, St. Louis and Washington. He became a violent racist and wrote three volumes which were anti-Negro. In 1870 he became a claims agent for United States business firms and wrote of his experiences, trips and collection ef­ forts. His seventh and last book, “The Three Americas Railway,” which was an idea of building a railroad to connect North, Central and South America. The Hinton Helper House off US 64 West, as it appears today. DAVIB CO U N TY January 16, 1975 Story by Gordon Tomlinson Photos by Janies Barringer to interest J. P. Morgan, Andrew Carnegie and John D. Rockefeller in it. During his last years. Helper’s fortunes collapsed. His wife went blind. She returned with their son to South America where she died. Nothing is known about the son. Helper never mentioned his wife or son in any of his writings. Helper became mentally unbalanced and committed suicide in March, 1909. His burial plot was donated and the funeral expenses were paid by the Authors Society of New York. His grave is unmarked. On May 8, 1856, a year before he published “The Impending Crisis of the South”, Hinton Rowan Helper sold to his brother, Hanson P. Helper of Mecklenburg C^ounty, for $280, his entire interest, which was one-fourth part, in this 2004icre parcel on Bear Creek. A month later, Hanson Pinkney Helper secured the remaining (continued on page 8B) Concrete dobbing has replaced the former clay dobbing in the original log portion of the house. Clear varnish has also been put on the original logs in the interest of preserving them. DePalma, age 11, is shown in front of the old original fireplace in the portion of the bouse built by Daniel Helper in 1818. 2B - DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, THURSDAY, JANUARY 16, 1975 “Bob Garner On Main Street" Davie County Residents Comment On Wide Range Of To Among the Davie County and Mocksville residents who gave their comments and opinions last Friday to WFMY-TV reporter Bob Garner on “Main Street in Mocksville” were (all Mocksville addresses unless noted): Gordon Tomlinson, editor of the Davie Enterprise-Record, who said that among the current m ajor concerns of Davie County citizens were the general economic conditions and the controversy surroun­ ding the possible rezonlng of land for a nudist camp; Gil Davis and Bryan Sell, who requested suppoft for the $350,000 capita improvements fund-raising campaign for the Davie District of the Uwharrie Council of the Boy Scouts of America; Pat Murray, who opposed the amnesty program; Suzanne Hinkle, who opposed Duke power Company’s proposed Perkins nuclear power plant on the Yadkin River, and urged development of solar power as one alter­ native energy source; Eddie Wilkinson of Fork, who said that Mocksville needs another hair styling place for men; Mocksville Mayor Arlen DeVito, who told of Mocksville’s joining the Piedmont Triad Council of Government to help keep abreast of new develop­ ments and provide access to expert advice to help the town grow as it should; Joey Bailey of Fork, who said that Davie County needs a place for youngsters to go, so they won’t have to go to surrounding cities; C. K. McDaniel, Davie County farmer, urged national action If Mrs. Joe Holcomb comments on increase of crime (Photo by Joe Foster).Mrs. Gene Jones protests electric bills (Photo by Joe Foster). on behalf of the small farmer so he can survive; Mary Davis, who opposed Duke Power’s proposed nuclear power plant and commented on several factors which should be more seriously considered if the plant were built, such as the large volume of moisture which would be emitted daily; Mona Potts of Advance, who complained about the rate of increase in Duke Power Company bills and high prices in general and dog food in particular; Student Robin Phillips of William R. Davie High School turned out ot express his pride in the school’s basketball team, with the school recently winning its first game in four years; Kenneth Ferebee expressed praise for President Ford in efforts to solve the country’s problems, but opposed the amnesty terms; Mrs. Gene Jones brought three Duke Power Company bills to reinforce her discontent with the utility’s rate structure. (She showed two 1973 fall monthly bills, with 1690 and 1368 kilowatt hours respectively, bill indicated 2877 kwh for the previous monthly billing period, and she just could not un­ derstand that, (with no alterations to her house to account for the increased power usage); Irvin Riley urged more people to become active in support for the hard work of the community arts council; Tammy Boger and Paula Shoffner expressed ap­ preciation for the hard work of their school’s basketball coach and team; Ms. Sandra Smith of Advance outlined several advantages of living in a small town; Gina Boger said more recreational facilities were needed for young people; Kathy Hanes advocated an open lunch program for Davie Breakfast Planned At Davie Academy There will be a Pancake, Sausage, Eggs and Coffee Breakfast at the Davie Academy Community Building on Saturday, January 18, from 5:30 to 9 a.m. The breakfast will be spon­ sored by the Davie Academy Ruritan Club. Proceeds will go towards the Scholarship Fund. County High School; Judy Whitaker, high school student, thanked her teacher for letting students out of school to participate in the Main Street filming; Tanya Whitaker said it was the first year her school had ever had a gym and she was proud of it; Joe Mauldin reminded citizens that the only support for volunteer fire departments is from voluntary contributions; J.B. Holcomb urged that the state government look into the rapidly rising electric utility bills; Mrs. Bernie Holcomb ex­ pressed concern about the rising crime rate; Mrs. George Smith said she was concerried about the number of break-ins in Mocksville, and also the problems of inflation; Harry H. Osborne, Mocksville commissioner, told about the new federally-funded town hall; Joanna Ferguson and a group of high school students spoke about the need for more recreational facilities for young people. The filmed comments of Mocksville and Davie County residents were telecast on WFMY-TV’s four local newcasts last weekend. Special Program At Pinebrook On Thursday, January 9, a C om m unity A w areness Program was held at Pinebrook Elementary School sponsored by the Learning Disability Demonstration Center and the E x cep tio n al C h ild re n ’s Program of the Davie County Eleven service agencies from the Davie County area gave a short explanation of their services to Exceptional Children in this area. Those participating in the program were: Bobbye Draughon, LDDC; Deborah R ed m o n , E x c e p tio n a l Children’s program for Davie Kindergarten Evaluation Released Cathy Hanes and Gina Boger.. . school problems (Photo by Joe Foster). Five-year-olds who attended North Carolina’s state- supported kindergartens in 1973-74 scored higher than kindergarten students in the nation on language, mathematics, and reasoning ability (I.Q.), according to a report recently received by James Everidge superintendent of Davie County Schools. State School Superintendent Craig Phillips pointed out three significant findings of that evaluation which, he said, “proves that the State's in­ vestment in a comprehensive kindergarten program is definitely paying dividends.” The findings are; (1) At the end of the 1973-74 school year, as well as for each year since the State-supported kindergarten program was initiated, North Carolina’s kindergarteners have scored above national norms in language, mathematics, and reasoning ability (I.Q.); (2) The per­ formance of kindergarten students in language and m athem atics has improved each year during the last five years; and (3) Third grade students involved in the pilot kindergarten program in 1970- 71 obtained significantly higher scores than sim ilar non- kindergarten third graders in reading, punctuation, social- maturity, and reasoning ability (I.Q.).“The success of the North Carolina kindergarten program can be attributed to several important factors,” em ­ phasized Phillips. “First, the General Assembly provided resources that were adequate for starting and continuing a quality kindergarten program, ^condly, the program was started on a small pilot basis which insured efficient plan­ ning, staff development, im­ plementation, and evaluation. In the third place, ” Phillips added, “ the kindergarten program was implemented as a part of, rather than an ap­ pendage to, the regular primary school program. And finally, through a careful analysis of the pilot kindergarten program, the total group of kindergarten workers in the State have been able to profit from past failures and successes.” County Schools; Marvin M a n u e l, V o c a tio n a l Rehabilitation for Davidson County; Clifford File, Vocational Rehabilitation for Rowan County; Gay Anderson, Davie County Health Depart­ ment and the Developmental Evaluation Clinic in Winston- Salem; Sharon Howell, Mocksville Child Development Center; Dr. Warren Young, Davie County Mental Health Clinic; Wayne Harrelson, Davie County Social Services; Hal Walker, Governor’s Advocacy Council on Children and Youth; Kathy Shaw, Association for Retarded Children; and Edna Mulgrew, Division of Ex­ ceptional Children for Educational District VII and Special Education Instructional Material Center. Attending the meeting were Resource Teachers and guidance personnel from the Davie County Schools, ARC members, and interested members of the community. Vehicle Damaged In Saturday Wreck A one vehicle accident oc­ curred Saturday, January 11 around 1:35 a. m. three miles south of Mocksville on RP 1134. Involved was William Henry Parker, 60, of Mocksville operating a 1968 Dodge. He was uninjured in the accident. N. C. Highway Patrolman R. W. Ledbetter reported that Parker was traveling north on US 601 when he ran off the road on the right side and then traveled back across the road and struck two mailboxes before coming to rest on the left shoulder. The vehicle suffered $500 in damages and there was $15 in damages to the two mail boxes which belong to Linville E. Presnell and Keith B. Hege, bc'h of Mocksville, Rt. 4. Parker was charged with traveling left of center in the accident. Two Cars Collide On Wilkesboro Street A two-car collision occured Thursday, January 9 around 4:00 p.m. on Wilkesboro Street near the Yadkinville Highway intersection. Involved were Anna Anderson Owings, 58, of Route 1, Mocksville driving a 1973 Dodge and Sharon Thompson James, 23, of Route 7, Mocksville driving a 1968 Plymouth owned by J. & M. Motors, also of Rt. 7, Mocksville. According to the investigating officer, Mocksville Policeman J.W. Phipps, the Owings vehicle was turning into Lowes parking lot and the James car was leaving. Ms. James apparently did not see the Owings vehicle and struck it in the side. There were no charges and no injuries in the accident. There was an estimated $100 damages to the Owings car and $225 to the James vehicle. Ann Margaret Special On TV Ann Margaret Olsson - WXII- TV will present the third annual Ann-Margaret special on NBC Thursday, January 23 at 9:00 P.M. Ann-Margaret sings, dances and swims in her newest special. It includes her impressions of three movie pinups queens Kemps Attend Events In Washington Dr. and Mrs. Ramey P. Kemp of Mocksville joined other friends and supporters of U. S. Senator Robert Morgan and attended the 'festivities in Washington, D. C. this week. The group traveled from Raleigh to Washington on Amtrak, arriving early Monday afternoon. Monday night they attended a cocktail buffet honoring Senator and Mrs. Morgan in the Main Ballroom of the Marriott Crystal Hotel. Following the swearing-in- ceremony at noon Tuesday, a reception was held in the new Senate Office Building. The group returned by Am­ trak from Washington, arriving in Raleigh Wednesday night. Heart When the heart speaks, glory itself is an illusion. Napoleon C h e s t O f D r a w e r s Maple Or Walnut Finish 4 Piece C e d a r B e d r o o m S u i t $ 2 3 9 9 5 For Good TV Reception Ckamel Master Quantam Antenna We offer the best antenna for the money plus qualified personnel to install them. L a m p $ 1 0 9 5 2 Piece* L i v i n g R o o m S u i t Floral Pattern Loose Pillow Scotch Guarded *1 8 9 *® Daniel Fnrnitnre & Electric Co. LOCATED AT THE OVERHEAD DRIDGE PHONE 634-2492 — i MOCKSVILLE. N.C. >rl DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, THURSDAY, JANUARY 16, 1975 - 3B West Iredell Plays Here Friday West Iredell will play Davie here in a basketball doubleheader Friday night. Davie had an open date Tuesday night. Last Friday night South Rowan took a doubleheader from Davie. South Rowan’s girls used a balanced scoring attack to take the opener, 62-48, and the Raiders edged the War Eagles, 72-65, in a thriller in the nightcap. South’s girls are in a two-way tie for second place behind East Rowan. They have an 8-2 record in the conference and an 11-2 mark for the season. Davie’s girls are 2-8 in the conference and 3-9 for the campaign. South’s boys used a stingy defense to hold the War Eagles, to 18 points in the first half and then had to fight hard to stop a sensational Davie County rally in the last half to take the vic­ tory. It was the seventh loop win against three losses for the Raiders. They rest in a four­ way deadlock for second place, one game behind loop-leader North Davidson (8-3). Davie County, which appears to be a team to reckon with, is now 6-4 and is two games out of first place. South’s defense allowed the Davie Jayvees Lose To South Rowan The Davie High Junior Varsity dropped a 41 to 56 decision to the South Rowan Jayvess in a basketball game last Friday. Bivens led the attack for Davie with 13 points. Goodlett had ten. The’scoring summary; D A V IE C O U N T Y <41) - B lv ln j 13. Clem ent, Gross, Cocherham J. E!ct>tson, B row n Chaffin, Goodlett to, Jones, Law horn 2, R. M artin 4, M ille r 3, W atkins, A. M ille r 2.S O U TH R O W AN (56) — Truesdale 4, Propst t7. Gillespie 17, LIvinoston 12, M oon 2. B rooks. N o rto n . S te w a rt 4, Alexander, Leach. Score by periods; War Eaplos only eight field goals in tlie first half .is they built up a :t2-18 advantage. South made 16 of 33 field goal altempls during the first two periods while the Eagles, turning in their poorest shooting half of the season, made only eight of 32 attempts. It, however, was a different story in the last half. The Eagles hit five of their first six attempts in ttie third period to pull back into (he fight, reducing the South lead to five paints. Leading the Davie County charge were Robert Pulliam and Dwayne Grant. Pulliam scored 28 points — high for both teams — before fouling out with 5.;i3 to go in the game. Grant finished with 18. Davie County reduced the deficit to a single point at 48-47 with 7:20 to go in the game but could not muster the necessary punch to pull ahead of the hot- shooting Raiders. South Rowan made 55 per cent of its shots, hitting 33 of 60 Cathy Hutchens Best Set Of Antlers Contest To Be Held D a v it County Sotrth Rowan . 12-41 What is the best set of antlers ever taken from a North Carolina deer? No one knows, but the N.C. Wildlife Federation and the Safari Club International intend to find out. They are sponsoring a contest culminating in awards of trophies and certificates for the top ,50 heads at (he N.C. Safari Club Banquet to be held at 7 p.m., at the Hilton Inn in Raleigh on February 13, The entry fee is $5.00. Trophies must have been taken in North Carolina and must be received by 12 noon, February 13 at the Hilton Inn. Typical and non-typical racks will be scored under Boone and Crockett rules, a nationally- recognized scoring method. Charles Shaw of the Wildlife Federation said that mounted deer heads as well as antlers with skull plates attached would ODAY’S PORTSMAN BASS Tournaments Starts The Bass Anglers Sportsman Society cast oft this y ear’s professional bass fishing tournam ent at Velaka, Fla., on the St. Johns River, Jan. 29-3L This is the first of six tournam ents on the BASS tournament trail and will offer $22,900 in prize money. A limited field of 200 will be entered in each tournament, however tournament officials said that the Florida Invitational tournament was filled up in less tlian six day after the schedule was annouced. Other tournam ents on the BASS tour include: L ouisiana In v ita tio n a l M arch 5-7, A rkansas Invitational April 2-4, Virginia Invitational May 7-9, South Carolina Invitational June 4-6; and the All-American t()urnam ent on the Oklahoma Texas border Sept. 24-26. For inforniation on fishing the 1975 BASS Tourrfam ent T rail contact the Bass A nglers Sportsman Society, P. 0. Box 3044, Montgomery, Ala. Good Deer Hunting In 74 Jim Dean of the North Carolina Wildlife Commission passed on some information from field biologist on deer in North Carolina. Dean quotes Dick Hamilton, chief of the Division of Game for the North Carolina Wildlife Commission: "The deer season was good statewide, but there are 80 many deer in eastern North Carolina that we almost take them for granted. Estim ates of the deer population in the state range up to half a million, and that’s the largest in recorded history, Hamilton said. “The part that pleases me m ost," Hamilton continues, “is the fact that the deer season in the mountains was so good this year. Kills on the areas we surveyed approached the highest ever reported in western North Carolina, and that is partly because our deer herds are growing out there. There are deer in parts of western North Carolina where they have been virtually extinct in previous years,” Hamilton said. “The growing herd is a good s §n that the gam e lands are fiBniUng one of their roles m increasing the population and spreading the hunting pressure." Dean said Ham ilton pointed out that the increasing apd expanding western deer herds are directly related lo the Wildlife Com m ission's aggressive gam e law enforcement and habitat m anagement program s. He also cites excellent cooperation from the U. S. Forest Service which owns much of the Commission’s Game Lands. Annual Outdoor Recreation Show The annual outdoor recreation show is scheduled for the Charlotte Civic Center Jan. 14-19. One of the high lights of the show will be a program on bass fishing. The program will feature Bill Dance, 1974 bass angler-of-the-year; Tommy Martin, the Bass M aster Classic World finals; and Ray Scott, president of the Bass Anglers Sportsman Society. Their special one-day session is set for 2 p.m. ^ tu rd ay , Jan. 18, on the pla/.a level of the Civic Center. The six-day long outdoor recreation show will include dem onstration, exhibition, clincis, boats, tennis, snow skiing, golf, water skiing, fishing, camping, scuba diving, cycling and other forms of outdoor recreation. Other events will be a fashion show of outdoor recreation apparel and evening instruction session in fishing with Herbert Greene and Jim i.edbetter. The show will be open at 6 p.m. on Tuesday, Wednesdav, Tliursday and Friday. Saturday's show will open at noon and end at U p.m. Sunday's schedule will be from noon until 6 be accepted. “This is the first time such a contest has been held," Shaw said, ‘‘but we plan to continue annually. Hereafter, the deer must have been killed in the year of the contest.” For a copy of Boone and Crockett rules and other details on the Big Buck Contest, contact Charles Shaw, N.C. Wildlife Federation, Post Office Box 10626, Raleigh, N.C. 27605 or Dick Idol of Safari Club In­ ternational, Post Office Box 308- 5, Hillsborough, N.C. 27278. Piedmont Standings, Schedule N O R T H P IE O M O N T C O N F E R E N C E B O Y S N orth Davidson East Rowan South Rowan West Rowan South ire<}eil Davie County N orth Stsnly Mooresvilie West Iredell N orth Iredell N orth Rowan O IR L S East Rowan South Rowan North Stanly Mooresvilie South Iredell N orth Davidson West Rowan N orth Iredell Davie County West Iredell N orth Rowan S O U T H P IE D M O N T C O N F E R E N C E B O YS Cent. Overall W I. W LAltM m arle 7 0 S a lls b u rytX ) 5 I Thom asvllie S 1 Statesville 3 3 Ashet>oro 3 3 Kannapolis 2 4 Concord 2 S Lexington 1 5 Trin ity 0 6 (X ) ~ Saturday's gam e not included Conf. Overall W L W L8 2 11 2 7 3 8 47 3 8 4 7 3 7 57 3 9 3 6 4 6 4 5 5 5 53 7 5 8 2 8 2 92 8 2 to 1 9 1 11 Conf.Overaii W L W L 9 1 11 28 2 11 2 8 2 8 27 3 7 5 6 4 8 S 5 S 7 55 5 5 7 4 6 5 72 6 3 91 9 1 10 0 >0 t It 7 3 Albem arle 7 0 Statesville 6 0 T rin ity S 1 Salisbury 2 3 Asheboro 2 3Concord 2 5 Lexington 1 S Thom asvUie 1 5 Kannapolis 0 6 T H IS W E E K 'S S C H E D U L E__________ Frid a y Salisbury at TTiom asviile South i r ^ l l at East Rowan Mooresvilie at West Rowan M ^ th & ta n iv at N orth ^ a n ^ 'W g tH re ^ lT a tD a v leCounty _ , West Iredell alTTorth Davidson Statesville at Albem arle Asheboro at Trin ity Overall W L 812 Know the joy of leasing a High Quali^ Ford You can enjoy thii pleaiure by leasing it froin u>. That way, you eliminate a down payment, and enjoy «arafree car driving because we see' that your car is pro­ perly serviced. We do this for you because we're part of the largest deal­ er leasing organization in the world. you get the Ford of your choice at rock-bottom cost. ''CARS AND TRUCKS" See Us Today! H leasing Reavis Ford Inc. Leasing Division P H O N C 634-2161 H w y. 601 No.-M ocksville/N.C. Phone Toll TREE from Winslon-Salem 722-2386 NCDLNo. 2416 attempts. James Allen was the high scorer with 26. Bob Barnes was runner-up with 14. Terry Livingston had II and Jeff Long added 10. ‘‘Our defense did a real fine job,” said coach Terry Jones of the Raiders. "And I think we shot real well. Davie County made a fine comeback and really gave us a scare in the second half." South’s girls, now a game behind East Rowan, dominated their contest. They held an 11-9 lead after the first quarter and managed a 21-16 lead at half- time. Terri Weaver paced the South girls with 15 points. Pam Jordan and Mary Cress had 11 apiece. Mitzi Eury followed with nine. Cathy Hutchens led Davie County with 16. Connie Howard followed with 12. Scoring summary; °S(5i?Th"rowan (6]| - Jord«n U, Rhyn« b, Crm H, Eury 9,Whitley, MllUr, HoHm»n «. P»ll«r»n, ''U a v 'e ’ c o U N T Y ( « ) - H o w * rt tJ, Howell <, Smool 5, H ulcheni 1*. Athey 4, Dixon, Bean, Seats, Beal 4, C r ani 3.Score byqu a rle rs; Soinh Kowm ii « '»DevleCamrty 1 7 * *Voi?TH*ROWAN (72) - Bernel IJ. Grawley9, l.lvingtton 11, Long 10, Allen 26, Seagle, Fowler 2. Rem.DAVie COUNTY MSI -Colart, B»ker 2, Mock 5, Irnool, Pulllem a. Carter 4, Grant II, Wilson a.Score l>y quartern SeutliRman « '•Oayle Canty » II 15 22-45 Opinion I will utter what I believe today, if it should contradict all I said yesterday. Wendell Phillips Robert Pullium Dwayne Grant Recreation Basketball The nine-member Mocksville Recreation Basketball League squared off for a series of games on January 9th and 13th. On January 9th, Mocksville Insurance defeated Grays Exxon in the opening game of the night 60-48. Jake Cornelison and Mickey Morrison each scored 26 points for Mocksville Insurance. Wayne Cassidy had 18 points for Gray’s Exxon. Ingersoll-Rand beat Heritage 66-48. John Parker picked up 21 points for I-R and Sammy Jackson had 2S for Heritage. Davie Enterprise topped Baity’s by a score of 49-39. Bruce Tuttle tossed in 20 for the Enterprise and Ronnie James scored 12 for Baity’s. On January 13, Jam es' Barber Shop defeated Mocksville Insurance 76-48. Jerry Goodlett had 30 points for James’ and Mickey Morrison picked up 20 for Mocksville Insurance. Dewey's Radiator shaded Baity’s 59-53 in an overtime game. Terry Anderson led James’ with 19 points. Perry Creason scored 18 for Baity’s. In the final game Davie Enterprise beat Gray’s Exxon 55-36. Bruce Tuttle had 20 points for the Enterprise and Tim Barnhardt picked up 14 for Gray’s. Robert Pulliam Takes Over North Piedmont Scoring Lead MOCKSVILLE RECREATION LEAGUE STANDIl^ Won Lost James’ Barber Shop lo 1 Davie Enterprise g 2 Dewey’s Radiator g 2Gray’s Exxon 5 6 Firestone 4 6Mocksville Ins. 4 7 Baity’s Tire 3 8 Ingersoll-Rand 3 8 Heritage 2 8 SCORING LEADERS S. Jackson, Heritage 25.1 M. Morrison, Mocks. Ins 21.4 J. Goodlett, James 21.4 J. Cornelison, Mocks. Ins. 18.7 J. Parker, Ingersoll-Rand 18.3 Bruce Tuttle, Enterprise 18.0 T. Anderson, Dewey’s S. Dulin, Dewey’s 16.5 16.1 R. McDaniel, Firestone 15.4 R. Allred, Firestone 14.9 Robert Pulliam of Davie High has overtaken team mate Dwayne Grant for the leadership in boys scoring in North Piedmont High School basketball. As of last weekend, Pulliam had scored 219 points in 10 games, compared to Grant’s 200 points in 10 games. Pulliam is averaging 21.9 points a game, compared to 20 points a game for Grant. Larry Mock of Davie has scored 147 points in 10 games for an average of 14.7 per game. Following the two Davie County players are Charles Walker of Mooresvilie (19.7), Jack Campbell of South Iredell (19.1) and Kevin Abel of East Rowan (18.1). In the girls scoring race, Deana Morrow scored 32 points in South Iredell’s only game last week to up her seasonal average to 29.6 points a game. She has scored 385 points in 13 games. In second place is Elaine Hayes with 282 points in 12 games for a 23.5 average. Krystal Kimrey of North Stanly is the only other girl averaging more than 20 points per contest. She has scored 223 points in 10 games for a 22.3 norm. Rounding out the top five are Christy Earnhardt of East Rowan (19.8) and Pat Johnson of Mooresvilie (16.9). The Davie girls have two players in double figures: Kathy Hutchens has 151 points in 12 games for an average of 12.6 and Ronda Smoot has 132 points in 12 games for a 11 point average. The scoring leaders: New Booklet On Stress Released By Blue Cross Wolfpack Keeps Fourth In Poll N.C. State, Maryland and Southern Cal retained the next three spots in the poll, while Alabama and Oregon each moved up a notch, to Nos. 7 and 8, respectively. Arizona State jumped from 12th to ninth and Kentucky slipped from seventh to 10th after suffering its second loss of the season. The second ten had LaSalle, Marquette, Arizona, North Carolina, Providence, Min­ nesota, Rutgers, Tennessee, Michigan and South Carolina. Indiana, which extended its unbeaten record with victories over Big Ten rivals Michigan and Iowa last week, also ex­ tended its lead over second- ranked UCLA in this weel<’s A ssociated Press m ajor college basketball poll. The Hoosiers, who took over the No. 1 spot from defending national champion North Carolina State last week, beat Michigan 90-76 and then walloped Iowa 102-49 and opened a 144-point lead over the Bruins in this weeK s voting by a nationwide panel T he OPPICIAL WORLD speed eecoRD roe a MOTORCYCLE 224.569Mlues PER HOUR Ift atth e BONHEVIUE S a lt f la ts , u ta h OM SEPT. S , 136 2. •For speeding goto Utah Fo' INSURANCE come lo us GEORGE E. MCINTYRE n o r th CAROLINA FARM BUREAU INSURANCE 23CuuiiSau4'* MOCK&VlUl k C iyi 614 nil Rfv §34-^160 sports w riters and broadcasters, announced Monday. Voting is based on games through last Saturday, at which point Indiana was 14-0, UCLA 12-0 and Louisville 11-0. Indiana was the only member of the three to play Monday night, beating 16th-ranked Minnesota 79-59 for its 15th triumph of the year. The Top Tw enty teams in the weekly Associated Press m ajor college basketball poll, with first-place votes in pareniheses, season records throuQh \ day. Jan. 11, and total tabulated on basis of 20-16 6 -5 -< -3 M ; 1. Indiana (36) 2. U C L A (9) 3, Louisville (2) 4, N . Carolina St, i. M aryland6. Southern Cal 7. Alabam a 8. Oregon 9. Arlion a St 10. Kerttucky n . LaSane12. Marquette 13. A riio na14. N orth Carolina 15. Providence t6 Minnesota 17. Rutgers 18. Tennessee t9. M ichigan 20. Sou*h CarolinaO thers receiving votes, listed afphabetl c a iiy; Auburn, B radley. O eP aui. Florida Stale. Holy Cross, Kansas. M iam i-O hio, Morgai^ State, N ev-Las Vegas, Notre D am e, Oral Roberts, Pan Am erican, Penn, Purdue, Syracuse. T e sa s-E I Paso. U tah, California, Wake Forest lames of :Satur- points.' 1;>oints '16-14-13-10-94-7- 14-0 972 t2-0 826 11-0 730 10-1 644 I M 535 12-1 4909-1 387 10-1 336 13-1 279 9-2 249 12 1 229 9 2 172 12*2 159 7-3 1189 3 38 JO? 23 10-2 228-2 20 9.3 16 8-3 12 How to recognize and deal with stress is the subject of a new 96-page color booklet now available from Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina. Stress is seventh in the “Blueprint for Health” series which the voluntary prepaid health care organization has distributed since 1968. Written by leading authorities for the layman, the booklet’s 11 articles discuss what stress is, what causes it, how the body and mind react to it, and how to make it work for instead of against you. Included are ar­ ticles on stress in infancy, adolescence and old age. Stress was compiled under the professional guidance of Donald Oken, M.D., chairman of the psychiatry department at Upstate Medical Center, University of New York. The 11 contributors include Lee Salk, Ph. D, whose work in pediatric psychology is known world­ wide: and industrial psychiatrist; research scien­ tists: and physicians. Although not a scientific expert on stress, comedienne Joan Rivers has written an article poking fun at her own tensions. The booklet examines stress on the job and in the home, and explains how stress can lead to acute physical and mental illness. Also included is a special “Social Readjustment Rating Scale” designed for numerically calculating the amount of stress 43 different social changes can produce. The last article, “Learning How to Relax,” covers relaxation through breathing practice, exercise and meditation. Stress may be ordered from the Public Relations Division of Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina, P.O. Box 2291, Durham 27702. Single copies are free; additional copies cost 7 '/S> cents eaclj. Prosperity Prosperity is only an in­ strument to be used, not a deity worshipped. Calvin Coolidge to be BorsP layer. T ta m Pulliam . Davie County G ra nt. Davie County W alker, Mooresvilie Cam pbell, South Iredell Abel, East Rowan W augh, West Iredell Cloer, North Davidson M oore, North Stanly M ock, Davie County A llen, West Rowan Nanney, Mooresvilie M oore, S c ^ h Iredell Barnes, South Rowan Barringer. North Stanly Hairston, North Davidson Thom as, North Iredell O IR L S Playar, Team M orow ,Southlred«ll Hayes, North Davidson K im re y,N o rth Stanly Earnhardt, East Rowan Johnston, Mooresvilie M organ, West Rowan Cham bers. West Iredell Hutchens, Oavie County Rodgers, Mooresvilie Rhyrte, South Rowan Smoot, Oavie County Gold, West Rowan Jordan, South Rowan Bradford, South Iredell T P G 319 10 200 10 256 13 229 12 217 12 182 11 209 13 148 10 147 10 167 12 177 13 162 12 157 12 102 8 160 13 147 12 T P O 353 13 282 12 223 to 257 13 203 12 175 12 144 11 151 12 146 12 151 13 132 12 122 12 131 13 130 13 A V O . 21.920.0 19.7 19.1 18.1 16.5 16.1 14.8 14.7 13.9 13.6 13.5 t3.t 12.8 12.312.3 A V G . 29.6 23.5 22.3 19.816.9 14.6 13.112.6 112 11.6 11.0 • 10.2 10.1 10.0. Watch Channel 2 News' coverage of the State Legislature reported by capital correspondent John Satterfield 6 & n pm wfmy«tv The more you do widim e, the more lean do for you. II you re looking for a b a n k that c a n h elp you d u rin g th e s e light m o n e y tim es, c o m e to C e n tra l C aro lin a B ank C C B b uilds Its b u sin e ss by tak in g c a re of g o o d c u sto m e rs, larg e a n d sm all S o if you d o all your b a n k in g w ith m e. III h elp you with all your b a n k in g n e e d s You h av e faith in C C B a n d w e II h a v e faith in you CCB. We have a lot that other banks dont. Member FDIC, whith now insures all deposit to $40,000. 4B - DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, THURSDAY, JANUARY 16, 1975 In Search Of T h e A m e rica n D re a m X V I: R e v o lu t io n s O f R is in g E x p e c t a t io n s FOLK — WAYS (Kdltor's Note: This is the 16th of 18 articles exploring the theme, In Search of the American Dream. This article discusses the changes In American iife-migratlon of binclts to the cities, other ethnic problems and solutions and the rise of female Independence. The author is professor of English and contemporary literature at University nf California, Irvine.) By Jay Martin Copyright, 1974, Regents of the University of California Distributed by Copley News Service. “America,” as Archibald MacLeish said, “was promises”--promises and a vision of utopian opportunity in a society leaving behind the castes and classes of the Old World. Central to American utopianism is a belief in ' continuous progress in personal liberty, publi^morality, ; material posession, social harmony, and individual ' happiness, and an assumption that all these might be ; achieved simultaneously. But in the twentieth century such progress has been realized only partially and ' cyclically: the moral passion of 1911-1918, the individualistic prosperity of the 1920s, the collective action of the ’30s -each stressed one aspect of the American Dream. The real style of American ' utopianism, then, lies in the ability of Americans to maintain a faith in general perfection even while experiencing improvements only piecemeal. In the 1970s many Americans still believe in general progress but, as before, woric toward the realization of particular ideals. During the last decade, man's oldest and perhaps noblest dream, the dream of freedom, has been the repository of the rising expectations of a number of groups, particularly minorities and women. The movement among these groups for greater freedom is liicely to persist and seems to be one of the chief vehicles for today’s utopianism. By 1900, most American minorities lived in cities. The Irish, Poles, Jews, and Italians tended to remain where they landed or to make their ways along railroad lines to large inland cities. After 1900, Southern rural blacks migrated northward in increasing numbers to industrial centers. In the cities, these minorities were often manipulated and oppressed. Improvement in the legal, social and economic condition of minorities came only slowly. At first, many Americans belonging to the white, Protestant majority were alarmed about the new ethnic face of society and attempted to restore the old one. In May of 1917, Congress passed, over President Wilson’s veto, an act restricting immigration. Other anti­ immigrant acts followed, including the National Origins Act of 1924, which set quotas for immigration based on the population of 1890 (thus reducing immigration from southern Erope); and an act forbidding Japanese immigration entirely, passed over President Coolidge’s veto. Many contemporary observers felt that anti- immigrant sentiment played a part in the conviction and execution of Sacco and Vanzetti and in the defeat of A1 Smith, a Catholic, in the presidential compaign of 1928. Meanwhile blacks suffered discrimination at the hands of the federal government, which segregated the civil service under Wilson. And the Ku Klux Klan, revived in 1915, reached its period of greatest and most visible power in the 1920s. From this apex, nativist, antiminority impulses began only slowly to decline. Black migration to cities accelerated during and after World War I. After the 1920s, but expecially after World War II, Puerto Ricans left their island barrios for eastern cities and swelled the number of urban minorities. In California and the Southwest, the Chicano population grew steadily. White ethnic groups, blacks, Chicanos, and Puerto Ricans had to compete for-a diminishing pool of marginal jobs, housing, and services. This competition as well as social conflict over the Integration of schools and residential areas, caused tensions which found occasional release in violence, riots, and small race wars. Only after World War II was any real and steady improvement discernible. In March, 1945, Governor Thomas E. Dewey of New York signed the first state Fair Employment Practices Act. Two years later. President Truman told his Committee on Civil Rights: "I wantour Bill of Rights implemented.” The report of his committee, “To Secure These Rights” (1947), recommended "the elimination ot segregation based on race, color, creed, or national ori^n, from American life,” in housing, education, and employment. By his own executive orders Truman instituted fair employment practices in the civilian and military branches of the federal government. The crucial Supreme Court decision in Brown v. The Board of Education of Topeka (1954) demanded desegr^ation of public schools. The next decade brought the great civil A SIGN OF THE '60s — American life has changed over the years and the problems have multiplied. One of the changes involves the intensities of public emotions and this UPI photo of a 1963 demon­ stration at Washington's Lincoln Memorial illustrates the temper of the times. rights marches, dramatic expressions of idealistic fervor. The psychological impact of these legal changes in society was felt in the 1960s. The Kerner Commission report of 1968 revealed the extent to which racist attitudes pervaded society, and polemicists for racial minorities mounted an effective and sustained counterattack. Especially after 1920, writers who were themselves members of ethnic minorities helped to enlarge the imagination and move the heart of other Americans by sympatheUc portrayals of their fellows. Richard Wright’s “Native Son” and Langston Hughes’ “The Big Sea” began a movement continued by the fiction or poetry of Ralph Ellison, James Baldwin, Margaret Walker, Gwendolyn Brooks, Melvin B. Tolson and other more recent black writers. Alfred Kazin’s autobiography, “A Walker in the City,” novels by Bernard Malamud, Saul Bellow, and Philip Roth, and poetry by Delmore Schwartz and David Ignatow suggest the large body of contemporary writing whose meaning is embedded in Jewish culture. Kay Bennett, in “Kaibah,” and N. Scott Mcmaday, in “House Made of Dawn,” have written brilliantly of native American life. Other writers have similarly dramatized the distinctive existence of their own particular ethnic groups in America. The books of these writers suggest that perhaps the greatest source of the frustration for minorities has been their own belief in the American Dream of universal equality. Immigrants from Poland, Russia, and Italy, as well as Puerto Ricans; Chicanos, and blacks, could all subscribe to the same belief: “There is always Room at the Top! ’’-the motto of the class of 1886 at Tuskegee Institute, the black college founded by Booker T. Washington-or to the words of the Reverend Martin Luther King’s speech of 1963, “I have a Dream.” The struggle for racial and ethnic equality has been a revolution of rising expectations based on the acceptance of long-standing utopian traditions in America and this on the refusal to accept its long-standing inequities. Women, too, have long fought for equality. In 1777, Abigail Adams discussed in a letter to her husband, later the president, the new laws to be instituted in America: “If particular care. . .is not paid to the ladies we are determined to foment a rebeUion and will not hold ourselves bound by any laws in which we have no voice or representation.” Unfortunately, John Adams and his contemporaries did not listen; women struggled for more than 140 years for the right to vote, which was not fully achieved before 1920. Until then, suffrage was a goal so North Carolina Was First Gold Producing State As of the first of 1975, Americans are again permitted to own gold. Since 1934, American citizens have been prohibited from owning gold except for that in jewelry and coins of numismatic value. However, a century-and-a- half ago. North Carolina-minted gold coins were the favorite means of payment in Tar Heel transactions. In the early days of gold usage in North Carolina, the state could boast the first discovery of gold and the minting of the first gold dollar. Also for 50 years. North Carolina was the principal gold producing area of the United States, and for a few years, the source of all the gold produced in the country. Many of these “firsts” are due in part to a German e m ig ra n t, C h risto p h er Bechtler, and his son, Augustus, "m inters, miners and jewelers.” Christopher Bechtler came to Rutherfordton, N.C. from Germany in 1830. He and his son had arrived in New York two years earlier and then made their way to Ruther­ fordton by way of Philadelphia, where they’d stopped to begin the process of naturalization. Immediately placing an advertisem ent in the newspapers, the father and son began their jewelry business in a shop attached to their home four miles north of Ruther­ fordton. At that time, a “gold rush” was on in Ihe area. (In fact, between 1804 and 1827, North C^arolina mines had been the source of all the gold produced in the United States. > However, the nearest mint was al Philadelphia, many hazardous miles away. To facilitate trading, area panners began to have Beclitler assay and coin their gold. With the sanction uf the government he be^an making $5, $2.50 and $1 gold pieces, which became more widely accepted than the very scarce United States currency. Some of the coins were of different colors and weights, but each contained the precise amount of gold. The discrepancy was explained: the metal workers used the exact quantity of gold to bring their coins up to the gold standard, and some gold was inferior to that of other localities. It is said that Georgia gold was of a superior quality to some of that mined in North Carolina. Likewise, the color of the gold differed from locality to locality with that from Georgia and some parts of central North Carolina, a bright yellow color. That of the North Carolina mountain range and some South Carolina counties was a dull color. Scrupulously honest _and conscientious, Bechtler gained a reputation for quality work and his coins were unhesitatingly accepted at face value anywhere, ^ttlers and traders took them out of the state-many who heeded the 1849 call of gold from California took along their Bechtler coins. At the outbreak of the Civil War. and the issuance of Confederate paper money, Bechtler coins were carefully hoarded, and readily accepted, since the government had issued no spwie. Even con­ tracts specified “Bechtler coins.” Each coin bore the stamped Bechtler name and its value. During his years of minting, more than $3 million worth of gold coins and dust for assay passed through Bechtier’s hands-with more than two- thirds of the total minted into coins. The "only private mint' in Eastern United States," and "more gold coinage than any other mint except Ihe United Staes mint" are among the Bechtler claims to fame. The Bechtlers also coined the first gold dollar minted in the United States, since the first regular series of United States dollars was not released until 1849. The dies for coining were made by the Bechtlers them­ selves, one of which is now in the Museum of History at Raleigh, and the press is on display by the American Numismatic Society of New York. The rest of the machinery is owned by relatives and scattered in several states. Bechtler's minting and the need for it led to the opening of the government mint in Charlotte in 1837. However, Bechtler continued his coin and jewelry business until his death in 1842, when his son Augustus took over. Highly regarded in the state and elsewhere, Bechtler had the confidence of all who dealt with him. His maxim, “Mr. Bechtler is unquestionably a man of competent science and skill to assay and bring the gold of the mines to a standard value, in the form of coin; and we believe he has the entire confidence of all who have had any acquaintance with him...” In all his work, Christopher Bechtler was assisted by his son Augustus who carried on much of his father's work. However, Augustus ap­ parently found more profit in the jewelery business than coinage, and the coining declined after Christopher's death. The gold finds in California in 1849 caused a further decline in the gold industry of North Carolina and in the Bechtler business. Although Bechtler coined more than $2 million worth of coins, they are extremely rare today. The few existing ones are held by families as keep­ sakes and heirlooms. The Mint Museum of Charlotte has a collection, and the Museum of History, a few of the coins. At the 1837 establishment of the mint at Charlotte, many owners had their Bechtler coins melted and recoined. other coins passed out of the country in the course of trade, and in the 1870s large quantities were bought by speculators who had them recoined. In 1847 Augustus followed his father to the grave, and Bechtier’s nephew Christopher took over the business of coining and operating the jewelry shop. However, the younger Christopher lacked the honesty, integrity and industry of his talented uncle. He “did not adhere to the highest stan­ dards,” according to one ob­ server. Christopher moved to Spartanburg in the 1850s and thus Liied the Bechtler business. Today, nothing remains in Rutherfordton of the Bechtler gold coining operation. The house on the knoll and the shop adjacent long ago burned. At their deaths, Christopher and his son were buried on the Bechtler property. Later, however, relatives had the remains reinterred "somewhere up North,” so today nothing remains of the Bechtlers’ business. A historic marker beside US 221 reminds passersby of the first private mint in the United States and the Bechtlers who “died poor but honest." Smith Grove To Have ClassesDavidson County Community College will start a Knitting and Crocheting Class on January I6th, Thursday, and a Samll Motor Class on Monday, January 20th. Both of these will meet at 7:00 p.m. at the Smith Grove Community Building. Kegiblialion will be bring Ihe first class meeting. If you are interested in either of these classes, you might call Gray Everhart at 634-3415 or be present for registration. monumental and so urgent that it occasionally polarized women against other minority groups, who were simultaneuusly seeking to realize their visions fo freedom. Their single-minded goal caused such women leaders as Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton to condemn the enfranchisement of “Afraicas, Chinese, and all the ignorant foreigners the moment they touch our shores.” But the feminist movement has always been larger than the suffrage movement. With increasing clarity, it has been concerned with the personal and collective liberation of women, the freedom for them to be fully human; and this effort, as Arthur M. Schlesinger remarked, has constituted “one of the noblest chapters in the history of American democracy.” Today many white and black women leaders are working together to achieve their common goals. Anais Nin once observed that “we do not imderstand the psychology of women (because) women have not articulated their experience.” In her own autobiographical fiction, as well as in the works of Jane Bowles, Sylvia Plath, Flannery O'Connor, Joyce Carol Oates, Nikki Giovanni, and many other recent women writters, that articulation is well under way, and both men and women have begun to understand the special nature and distinctions of womanhood. Many of the social, economic, racial, and sexual inequities which existed in America at the beginning of the twentieth century have disappeared. But with every improvement, the continuing vitality of utopian thinking has persisted in raising and increasing new expectations. In the largest sense, the continuity of American utopianism in response to crisis is itself one of the most striking features of our time. Americans have not yet written what Dr. Martin Luther King once called a “Bill of Rights for the Disadvantaged.” Nor have they made politics pure and wars unthinkable, or perfected urban and rural life. They have not yet learned how to plan for progress in the context of constraints upon energy, resources, and human capacity. But their utopianism has remained vital. At the end of Fitzgerald’s novel, “The Great Gatsby,” Nick Carraway tries to imagine how the new world looiced to its first explorers. It offered, he says, “the last and greatest of all human dreams; for a transitory enchanted moment man must have held his breath in the presence of this continent, compelled into an aesthetic contemplation he neither understand nor desired, face to face for the last time in history with something commensurate to his capacity for wonder.” Americans have not lost this capacity for wonder. Their continent is now occupied, but not yet wholly possessed. To possess it wholly, to create a society commensurate with the continent, to dream new dreams even as old ones are accomplished-these are the tasks which future Utopians, like Uiose in the American past, must try to accomplish. Courses by Newspaper was developed by UCiSD Extension and funded by grants from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH), with a supplementary grant from the EXXON Education Foundation. Next: Now and History by Roberty Penn Warren, author, Jefferson lecturer in the humanities, NEH (1974), and professor emeritus of English, Yale University. by Roger Whitener There is a tendency to think of folklore as something only of the distant past, preserved through generations by way of custom and tradition. Actually It is still being created every day by the circulation of stories, songs, sayings, and other materials by specific groups of people. Some of the contemporary folklore is just as fascinating as that of the past. A case in point is a story heard in a number of versions in recent months about how Sugar Mountain, now the site of a southern Appalachian ski resort, got its name. Supposedly the legend grew out of continued questions by flatland skiers about the origin of the name: “Did the moun­ tain people tap maple .trees on the slopes for sugar? Was it because sunlight on the mountain top made the snow look like sugar?” Employees, faced with such questions on a day-to-day basis, eventually came up with a tongue-in-cheek response that might vary with the storyteller, "Oh, ho. Ma’am, that’s not how the name came about. Fact is it comes from what was once the finest sugar mine in these mountains. See that cleared section up the moun­ tainside where the ski lift operates? Well, that used to be the route of a narrow guage track that went clear to the top of the mountain where the mine was located. “Several times a week they’d run what they called the sugar cart up to the mine, fill it up, and then run it back down the mountain. People knew what days it operated, and they’d come for miles around with their pokes and buckets to pick up their sweetnin’-saved them the trouble of boiling down maple syrup or making sorgham. “Course, after a time the sugar was mostly mined out, and they closed the shaft when the country stores began to lay in supplies of the commercial stuff. But before the trees and underbush could grow up over the tracks, the ski people came in and started installing the lift you see operating. Next time you go to the top ask the lift attendant up there where the mouth to the sugar mine Is. Who knows-prlce of sugar being what it is and us with these mild winters of late, they may give some thought to startin’ up the sugar cart again!” FOLK-WAYS rounds out thl* installment with what Edwin Judkins, a regular contributor, calls ditties and couplets. His note of introduction follows: “Ditties and couplets have always intrigued me. Some of the following might be verses of a song as far as I know. In the first one I do not make fun of my black friends (throughout my life they have been legion), but it records a historical fact. It goes back to the underground railroad when slaves were smuggled north and to freedom.” Run, Negro, run the patrol will catch you. That Negro ran, that Negro flew. That Negro tore his shirt in two. A sheep shells corn with the rattle of his horn. And I never saw the likes since I have been born. Some like cabbage, some like kale. I like possum, all but its tail. When you buy meat you get bone; When you buy land, you get stone. “ My father-in-law, Mr. Robert Gray, who was city engineer for Bristol, Virginia, for many years liked to sing this one: When I was in Ireland I’ll have you know It took six little boys to milk and old ewe. Twi at the head and twi at the hams. And twi little boys to keep off the lambs.” If readers know tall tales, legends, stories that might be used in this column, they would be gratefully received. Please send all material to: Rogers Whitener, FOLK­ WAYS AND FOLK-SPEECH, Box 376, University Station, Boone, N.C. 28608. dial 634-2121 ™:UC STOREM AND OTMm PHAKMACY COMMINTt H E A I I H N E W S Your Pharmacitt*: Roy Collotto - Bill Coliatto. Jr. R ob«rt Rtuch Idea To Combat Doctor Shortage Will Congress enact a two-year civilian doctor draft? The rural shortage of MD’s makes such an idea tempting, and Congress is currently debating the issue. My thoughts, however, are negative. A free enterprise sy­ stem is not the place for such a program. In practice, an un­ happily placed doctor will not put forth an enthusiastic ef­ fort. Like so many military draftees, he’s likely to do his time (two years) and move elsewhere. If Congress has the “guts” to consider such, perhaps the Chinese have a solution to the rural doctor shortage. They train local laymen to diagnose simple illnesses, give shots, and advise on nutrition, hygiene, and sanitation. These “Barefoot Doctors,” as they re called, do a creditable and enthusiastic job according to reports. But, will Congress listen? We try to give the best prescription service at the low­ est possible price. Always feel free to call us. FACTORY TO YOU \ / t n r lp F u m t t u r eCustom M oae LIVING ROOM FURNITURE ALL STYLES OF RECLINERS LOVE SEATS & ODD CHAIRS All Styles Made To Meet Your Needs. Early American, Traditioiial, Contemporary, Spanish. We Have The Finest Factory Selected Nylon Florals, Solid Herculons, Plaid Herculons, Floral Cottons, Vinyls, In All Colors. All Solid Osjc Frames. PRICED AT NEAR WHOLESALE PRICES Spanish 2 Piece Sofa & Chair Regular *329.00 SALE ’269.00 2 Piece Sofa And Chair Regular *299.95 SALE U 48.95 Limited Quantity-2 Piece Early American Suit In Herculon Or Vinyl ______Regular *329.00________SALE *259.00____________ Large Selection Of National BRANDS OF BEDROOM—LIVING ROOM, DINING ROOM, FURNITURE. American Drew - Bassett • Craftique • Lazy*Boy Recliners • National Mattress Reupholsteiy Work Done At Reasonable Prices Edwards Furniture & Uphol Ca Hwy. 64 W.R ll MochariMe.N.C.Phone634-2244 DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, THURSDAY, JANUARY 16, 1975 - 5B h < i r U k t B B l L A H D l s a i f m s I i ^ a I ' , Ptr. OAILY-J«.r A«5( SQt, W'EK'NOS • Mr ySrpI £ o HY nr JERWTION Ot» .Y oMyr-N.* ' Mr> K CLO SFD I r...V • The Scouts are, kneeling front row; (L-R): Jam es Polk, Scott Souther, Frankie McCullough. Standing, Steve Shore, L arry Privette, M ark Shore, Terry Connell, Johnny Polk, Rusty Thompson, David Taylor, Mike Leazer, Tommy Brindle, Edw ard Moore, H.M. Jacobs, Jr. (Scoutm aster). Standing on sign, B arry Hepler, Bobby McDaniel. Not shown, Scott D avenaorf, M onte Blackw ood (a sst, scoutm aster) and J.W . McCullon (com m itteem an). Cooleemee Scouts Visit Tennessee Boy Scout Troop 500 of Cooleemee used their national travel permit for the first time Saturday, January 11, to visit Cumberland Caverns located near McMinniville, Tennessee. The scouts entered the cave at 6:30 p.m. to make the regular tour through the developed part of the cave. Following this tour, they went on a one-mile “spelunking” tour, which is a term used to describe cave exploring where tourists could not or would not go due to the lack of electric lighting and extremely light crawl spaces and passageways. A devotional period was held at the conclusion of the tours followed by a traditional ghost story. The scouts stayed the night in the 56 degree cave and enjoyed breakfast in the cave’s “Volcano Room” before returning to the surface about 8:30 a.m. on Sunday. Cumberland Caverns, open only to scout groups during the winter months, is the second largest in the United States. \^ e n the group surfaced Sunday morning, they were surprised to see a six-inch snowfall and still snowing, however, the 16 scouts and three leaders had no difficulty on thier return trip home. Troop 500, sponsored by the Cooleem ee P resbyterian Church, now has a total membership of 23 scouts. Ac­ cording to Ben White, the district scout executive. Troop 500 leads the Davie District for the fall recruiting campaign. Projects presently being planned, according to Scout Master, H.M. Jacobs, Jr., will include the selling of flower and vegetable seeds to pay for the new troop flags. They are also making plans to raffle off a Remington Automatic Shotgun. Proceeds from this project Jacobs says will be used in the purchasing of camping gear for this summer’s camping. Letter To Editor Dear Editor: I hope you may have a little space to print this letter of tribute to my first grade teacher. I know it is not adequate, but I believe it also speaks for hundreds of other Davie Countians. Davie Countys “Miss Phoebe” has gone from our presence to her final graduation. I’m sure she heard the words, “Well Done”, as she came into the presence of the Head M aster on Thursday, January 9, 1975. Miss Phoebe spent the major part of her life teaching first and second grade students in Davie County schools. She not only taught the ABC’s, 1, 2, 3’s and Baby Ray, but many other things a small child must learn. Above all she was dependable when the snow fell too deep for the bus to reach her. I’ve seen her come walking in with men’s knee rubber boots on, into Farmington school; maybe a little late but she was there. She continued right to the end to have great interest in the world about her and was greatly concerned for the welfare of her own U. S. A. She often called us to discuss some subject or idea she had in mind and it always pertained to the Bible, politics or the welfare of our country. I could go on and on, but those of you who knew her un­ derstand, and even those who don’t have really suffered a great loss because you didn't. If this entire issue of the Enterprise could be devoted to Miss Phoebe it could not begin to pay the deserved tribute to one of the county’s greatest citizens. Grace Langston Cooleemee News Mrs. Cody Osborne was moved from the Coronary C^re . Unit into a room Monday at ' Rowan Memorial Hospital where she continued to undergo treatment. Family members are the only visitors allowed at this time. Mrs. Stella House continues to undergo treatment at Davie Hospital where she underwent surgery last week. Mrs. Edith Hellard returned home from Davie Hospital this week after having surgery last week. She is improving. The Saturday visitors of Mr. and Mrs. James McIntyre of Woodleaf were Mrs. Nell Chaffin and Mrs. Pearl Click. , Mr. and Mrs. Jimmy Steele 4 and children plan to move into their new home on the Potneck Road, Woodleaf this week. Those visiting with Mrs. Maude Nichols and the Jim McIntyre family of Rt. 1, Woodleaf during the holidays were: Mr. and Mrs. Jimmy Steele, Lynn, Clay, and Pamela; Mr. and Mrs. Robert McIntyre, Wendy and Traci; Mr. and Mrs. W.M. Nichols of Jacksonville, Florida; Mrs. Hattie Bell and Alma, Mr. and Mrs. Sherman Wilson of Salisbury, Mrs. Grace Wooten of Rt. 4, Mocksville; Paul Ellenburg of Mocksville, Mr. and Mrs. Tom Stone, Kelly and Mandy of Asheboro, Mr. and Mrs. Ronnie Kerley of Rt. 4, Mocksville, Mr. and Mrs. Bill McGee of Danville, Va., Mr. and Mrs. Adolph Evans and . Sheryl of Orlando. Florida. Mr. and Mrs. Dennis Evans and children of Harrison, Arkansas, Harvey Evans of Kannapolis, Carey Meares of Woodbridge, Va., Mr. and Mrs. W.M. Rice, Mr. and Mrs. Benn Mitchell and Penny, Luther Miller, Mr. and Mrs. Sherman Wilson and Lydia, Tommy, Donna and Jeannie Propst all of Salisbury, Conrad Nichols, (Kristie, Bill and Matthew, Mike Thompson, Miss Kay McIntyre and Mr. and Mrs. Brady Barbee all of Woodleaf. A buffet-style meal was served and gifts were exchanged. Miss Cheryl Anne Jones has been named to the Dean's l.ist for the fall quarter at Wlnsalm Busineiis College with a 2.S average out of a possible 3.0 average. She is majoring in accounting. Miss Jones Is a member of the National llunur Society. She is em­ ployed at the Winston-Salem library. Miss Jones is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Kugene Junes, Jr. of Route I. Murksville. Mocksville Furniture & Appliance Co. BANK FINANCING No. 2 Court Square Phone 634-5812 BANlt FINANCING G e t A l o a d O f S o m e B e a u t i M F i g u r e s D t a i m i h t r Z e n i i h W i n t e r C l e a r a n c e S a l e . The{Mlo.MxidF4720 25” (diag, screen in a majestically The Julliard features the Allegro styled Mediterranean console, speaker system, 8-track tape play- Brilhant Chromacolor picture tube er, AM/FM/stereo FM, stereo pre- and Chromatic one-button tuning. cision record changer and 2 + 2 mTort<mMudelfmP Bold and beautiful Mediterranean styling. 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Capacity rrigeraTor-Freezer with Adjustable Shelf Model RT141R □ Completely Frost-Free □ Freezer door shelf □ 2 quick-release trays □ Adjustable shelf □ Full-width vegetable crisper □ Butter server □ Built-in egg storage □ Deep door shelves □ l\^agnetic door gaskets □ Separate temperature controls IKaiM Vou Biien « ’ 2 9 9 " Models LA49SP Westlnghouse 30-Inch Electric Range with Continuous Cleaning Oven Model KF332R □ Continuous Cleaning Oven □ Automatic timing center with 60-mlnute timer □ "Timed" appliance outlet (fuse protected) □ Three 6" Plug-Out Corox* surface units □ One 8" Plug-Out Corox surface unit □ Two surface unit signal lights □ Infinite Heat Control between "Off" and "High" □ Porcelain enameled no­drip top □ Lift-off oven door with seal □ Look-In oven window □ Interior oven light with "peek” switch on door □ Oven signal light □ Tilt-up bake, tilt-down broil elements □ Broiler pan with grid □ Full-width storage drawer □ Front leveling legs □ Optional accessory non­ electric griddle Westlnghouse Two-Speed Agitator Wasfiirwl Permanent Press Settings Models LA495P □ Big 18 lb. capacity □ Heavy duty spiral ramp agitator □ Two agitation/spin speed selections, ''Normal’’ and “Gentle" □ Five position water saver Including “Reselect" , setting □ Five position water temperatures (three for Permanent Press) □ Bleach dispenser n Porcelain enameled tub, top and lid □ Lint filter and water recirculation system □ Lock 'n Spin'" safety lid Q Fabric softener dispenser (optional accessory) Backed by Nationwide Sure Service Model KF332H' Reduced To * 2 4 9 « You can be sufeT.4 f ifs Westlnghouse 6B - DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, THURSDAY, JANUARY 16, 1975 ' CHUCK STEAK E A I K M L B M N STEW BEEE. BONELESS VALLEYDALE'S CUBED HONEEWEENEE EXTRA LEAN FRESH VALLEYDALE'S SLICED I LB.PINK FLAT CAN ★ SAVE 16* "Total Shopping Value 3 ^ 1 No Limit Specials 2 Valuable Trading Stamps 3-Discount Prices HEFFNER'S OWN WELL SEASONED FRESH PORK SAUSAGE HEFFNER’S PRICES Honners Vienna Sausage Spam Spiead W tthTSno^Plain^ Pledge Wax Daytime Pampers Kleenex Paper Towels Karo Blue Label Syrup Phillip’s Beans & Franks 5 Oz. Can 3 Oz. Can 7 Oz. Size 30 Count Jumbo Rolls 32 Oz. Bottle 8 Oz. Size Discount Price 2/69* 2 /59 ' 89* 25' Assorted Colors D i £ ^ p Pam Vegetable Spray Cooking Ease Reg. Size 9 Oz. Size 9 Oz. Size 2 £ 3 79' No Stick Frying . Butteiy Pan Pal Laundry Bleach Clorox 13 Oz. Size % Gallon YOU SAVE HORMEL'S ★ SAVE lo« CHILLI with BEANS 15 OZ. CAN FIGARO CAT FOOD 6 OZ. CAN ★ SAVE IV HEFFiWR'S LA saw WITH THISCOUF YOU BUY A _8 _ INSTANT I BRAND 97%CAFFEINFR| A T __H effner's Lanil Witliout Coud 8 OZ. JAR On I No. 4655-5 <1 ONE COUPON PER FAMILY I SMOOTHIE PINK LAUNDRY RINSE SMOOTHIE FOR DISHES LIQUID DETERGENT 32 OZ. BOTTLE ★ SAVE 10« HEFFNER’S PI Jack in the Beanstalk < Com__________ Duncan Hines ' Cake Mix Red Label Luzianne Coffee Coffee Mate Coffee Creamer Strongheart Dog Food Martindale Sweet Potatoes Quaker Quick Grits Green Giant Garden Peas Assorted Colors Kleenex__________ Kraft’s French Dressing Friskies Liver-Fish Cat Food ( Friskies Assorted Flavor Dog Food ^fulT o f ju k DO] DAVIE COUNTY ENTERI<ftlSE RELUi^JJ, UlbRSDAY. JANUARY 16, 1975 - 7H PURE VEGETABLE CRISCO OIL ’ 38 OZ. BOTTLE if SAVE 34« HORMEL'S VEGETABLE STEW 24 OZ. CAN KRAFT'S FINE PARKAY Marrarine III GORTON'S FROZEN FISH STICKS 15 OZ 'A L iLMON OF FOOD COUPON N enUAROF 12.59 1 LB. PKG.♦ ★ SAVE 20' KITCH N KRAI Fresh BLack^es ^ SAVE 24< 303 CAN SMOOTH OR CRUNCHY KRAFT'S AMERICAN JUBILEE PURE STRAWBERRY, PRESERVES LB. JAR if SAVE 19« 18 OZ. GLASS 1 Q W IT H J C O U P O N ^ feR EXPIRES . Jan. 18,1975 ___ pping Value ; No Lim it S p p ci;iK C / V aluable Trading ' Stam p s Discount Piicns SLICED CHEESE \ 12 OZ. PKG. ir SAVE 12< COLONIAL ASSORTED FLAVORS Oitcount Price Irp io le la Can Kernel 37' Pkg.69' lb. Bag 89' Oz. Jar z. Can I Size 6 ^ 49* YOU SAVE 10* 14* 30;^ 8* COOKIES McKINZIE'S FROZEN TURNIP GREENS OR COLURD GREENS 1 HEFFNER'S PRICES Diicount J r j c j ^ YOU ■■■■■■ Assorted Flavors Hi-C Drinks 46 Oz. Cans 51*8* Hetshey’s Cocoa 8 Oz. Size 69‘ 6* Hersh^’s Syrup 16 Oz. Size 39*10' 1 Red Band Plain-Self-Rising iHour 99*10' Duke’s Mayonaise Quart *1.29 20' Jif Regular-Crunchy Peanut Butter 18 Oz. Jar 8 9 ' 4* Tree Sweet Orange Juice 46 Oz. Size 55*2* Daytime Disposable Diapers Kimbies Pkg.ofso *2.05 20* C^skies - Assorted Flavors Cat Food 2/39*8* Tony Dog Food 15 Oz. Can 4 /5 9 ' 6* White House Apple Sauce 303 Can 31'4* Nibiet Com —^riCMncK;t,>a/ 12 Oz. Can 37'4 ' 1 8B - DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORD, THURSDAY, JANUARY 16, 1975 llie notched logs in the portion of the house built by Daniel Helper in 1818. H i s t o r i c a l H o m e S i t e (continued from page IB) interest in the land. On January 1, 1863, Hanson Pinkney Helper sold what had then become known as “The Old Helper Tract” to his step­ father, John Mullican and his half-brother, Lewis Mullican, for $1230. On April 6, 1889 Daniel Ott Helper acquired the land. On January 1, 1903 the land was tran­ sferred to M attie H. Mooring of Mecklenburg County, who retained the property until August 1,1917 and sold it to Driver’s License Refresher Course To Be Offered A Drivers License Refresher’s Course will be offered at the N. C. Drivers License office in Salisbury on February 3 & 10 from 7:00 to 9:00 p.m. The 4 hour course consist of 2 two-hour sessions in which traffic laws and highway safety will be gone into. Anyone interested should register by calling the Drivers License office at 633-5873 no later than Jan. 31. Library News In the past few months your library has added several new magazines and newspapers, and has others ordered. A partial list; Sunday New York Times - In addition to national and in­ ternational coverage, the Times has both an excellent Sunday magazine and book review. Christian Science Monitor - Monday through Friday. This national newspaper is known for its objective reporting. Harper’s Weekly - Published on newsprint, with the old Harper’s logo, this interesting magazine is made up of readers’ contributions - and contains valuable tips as well as common sense. Esquire - monthly. Esquire probably carries the best short fiction published today. National History - monthly. This publication of the American Museum of NatUrai History contains articles on animal life and ecological issues, accompanied by stun­ ning photographs. Smithsonian - monthly. Contains Americana, science, art - anything the Museum itself is interested in. Excellent magazine. Sea Chest - three per year. A seashort version of Foxfire - published by high school students in Buxton, North Carolina. Cricket - monthly. A quality children’s magazine done by authors of chil^ens’ literature. Highlights - monthly. Another fine childrens’ magazine offering a great variety of things to do and read. Tax Assistance is Available A. A. Walker, local Revenue Officer for the North Carolina Deiwrlment of Revenue, ad­ vises that personnel to assist in flling State Income and In­ tangibles tax returns will be available on Monday through Friday of each week through April 15, 1975. The office is located at 120 Court Street, Statesville, and assistance is available on those days between the hours of 8:30 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. Mr. Walker requests that taxpayers bring the pre-addressed forms which were mailed to them from Raleigh. Completed returns showing refunds due should be mailed to the North Carolina Department of Revenue, Post Office Box R, Raleigh, North Carolina 27634; other completed returns should be mailed to the North Carolina Department of Revenue, Post Office Box 25000, Raleigh, North Carolina 27640. Pardon Pardon is the virtue of vic­ tory. Mazzini the late C. Flyn Meroney of Mocksville. On April 8, 1924, the Meroneys sold the tract to the late George and Cuba Evans. George Evans was employed as Davie County Farm Agent in 1923 and en­ couraged proper fertilizer use, liming of soils, improved pastures, the raising of sheep and beef cattle, and dairying. While farm agent he organized what may have been the first farm tour ever taken by a group of Davie farmers. The house standing today is constructed around the log house built by Daniel Helper in 1818. These logs may be seen in many areas of the house. Down through the years it has been enlarged and remodeled many times. The house is owned today by Mrs. Wade Dyson, the former Alice Evans, daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. George Evans. Renting the house is the Charles DePlama family, who recently moved here from New York. Archie K. Davis (above), new chairm an of the Trustees of The Duke Endowm ent, is shown as he presented the keynote speech a t a 50th anniversary luncheon in C harlotte honoring representatives of the Institutions and program s in North Carolina and South Carolina assisted by The Endowm ent. Also pictured (left to right): South Carolina Governor John C. W est; Dr. Russell G. Mawby, president of the Kellogg Foundation; M arshall I. Pickens, trustee and h o n o ra^ chairm an of The Endow m ent; M rs. Pickens; North Carolina Governor Jam es E. Holshouser, Jr., and M rs. Holshouser. Davis Heads Dulie Endowment Archie K. Davis, former chairm an of the board of Wachovia Bank and Trust Company of North Carolina, was elected chairman of the Trustees of The Duke En­ dowment at a recent meeting of The Endowment Board, ac­ cording to an announcement yesterday (January 13) by Marshall I. Pickens whose term as chairm an expired on December 31, 1974, as provided in the Endowment’s bylaws. Mr. Pickens, who was elected Honorary Chairman, stated that Mr. Davis’ executive skills and insight as a nationally recognized business leader, who understands the educational, health, child care, and religious needs of this region, will be of great value to The Duke En­ dowment during the important years that lie ahead. “Mr. Davis has served as a vice chairman of The En­ dowment since 1972, and he will be an ideal chairman as we now begin in 1975 to move ahead to the second fifty years of The Endowment’s program of philanthropy for North Carolina and South Carolina,” Pickens said. Mr. Davis was associated with the Wachovia Bank and Trust Company from 1932 to 1974 and served as its board chairman for 18 years. He has been chairman of the board and president of the Chamber of Commerce of the United States Metric System Course To Be Offered “An Understanding of the Metric System” course will begin at Davidson County (immunity College January 16. The class will meet each Thursday from 7-9 p.m. for eight sessions. A registration fee of $2 will be charged, and registration will remain open through January 23. The course was organized as a result of the world trend to m etrics in ail areas of measurement. Content of the course is designed to acquaint citizens with practical knowledge on how tthe con­ version will affect them as consum ers, businessm en, educators, engineers, and other areas. It will be of particular interest to persons in business and industry as the course will relate in a real way how all forms of measurement from the simplest to international trade and national security will be affected when the complete change takes place. Material will be presented in a most practical and useful manner by instructor, Zane Matthews of Lexington. Matthews is an engineering technician and production analyst. He is a graduate of Winston-Salem State University and has completed further study at Davidson County Community College, Forsy#i Technical Institute, and the H.B. Maynard Company Management Consultant Firm. In speaking about the course, Matthews said. "The metric system is easy to learn and to use in everyday life. You will need to know ten basic units, become accustomed to new temperature readings, and be willing to accept this concept as a way of life in terms of measurement.” Persons will receive materials which will better help them to “think metric”, Matthews said. There will also be a metric ruler available for purchase by those persons interested in obtaining this item as a useful unit of measurement. A representative of the college indicated that this is expected to be a very popular course since the United States and the world will be converting to this system within only a few years from now. Persons interested in pre- reglstering for the course can contact the Adult Education Division of the college at 249- 8186 or 475-7181. Formal registration will be held during the first two class sessions, January 16 and 23. NAACP Meeting The regularly scheduled meeting of the Davie County Chapter of NAACP will be held Tuesday, January 21, at 7:30 p.m. in Room no. 210 of the B. C. Brock Community Service Center. The Chapter is open for and welcomes new memberships. "You are invited to join and urged to attend. This is an important meeting.” as well as president of the American Bankers Association. From 1958 to 1962, he represented Forsyth County as a member of the North Carolina State senate. He now serves as president of the Research Triangle Foun­ dation of North Carolina, as chairman of the Independent College Fund of North Carolina, Inc., and as a member of the board of trustees of the Mary Duke Biddle Foundation. As chairman of The Duke Endowment, Mr. Davis will play a key role in directing the affairs of one of the nation’s major philanthropic trusts. Founded in 1924 by the late James B. Duke, it contributes funds to hospitals and child care institutions in North Carolina and South Carolina, as well as Davidson College, Duke University, Furman University, and Johnson C. Smith University. It also supports a program in North Carolina for rural United Methodist Chur­ ches, retired ministers, and dependent families of deceased ministers who have served the United Methodist Church in North Carolina. He is a director of the American Telephone and Telegraph Company, Southern Railway Company, Chatham Manufacturing Company, and a member of the International Advisory Board of R. J. Reynolds Industries, Inc. He is also a director of Jordan Spinning Company, Media General, Inc., Royal Cotton Mills, Sellers Dyeing Company, and Sellers M anufacturing Company. He will continue to serve as a director and an executive committee member of both the Wachovia Corporation and Wachovia Bank and Trust Company, N. A. A member of Phi Beta Kappa and a University of North Carolina graduate, Mr. Davis makes his home in Winston- Salem. He is married to the former Mary Louise Haywood and they have one daughter, Mrs. Bruce R. Bennett of Atlanta. Georgia, and three sons, Archie H. Davis of Savannah, Georgia, John Haywood Davis of New York, and Thomas Whitmell Davis, IV, of Winston-Salem, North Carolina Honors List The students listed below have made the Forsyth Technical Institute Honor’s List for the Fall Quarter. The Honor’s List indicates two levels of performance - High Honor grades and Honor grades. Based on 4.0 quality points. High Honors indicate a 3.5 or above quality point average. Honor grades indicate a 3.0 to 3.4 quality point Students who qualify for the Honor’s List are full time students who are taking 12 or more credit hours. High Honors: Adams, John W.; Krause, Linda Wheeler; Lakey, Roland W. II; Sbamon, Ronald J.; Smith, Danny F.; White, Samuel Leon; Honors: Anderson, Terry E.; Barnhardt, Becky Lee; Cormatzer, Katherine Frye; Dyson, Linda Belton; Foster, Janet Boger; Gaither, Wayne H.; Jones, Gwedolyn; Latham, Anne Alexander; Peoples, Bobby J Roberston, Carter A.; Spillman, Deborah C.; Sushereba, Louse E.; Trent, Deborah K.; Williams, Barbara T.; I Poiice In formation ISetivork School ..P ictured above are the law enforcem ent m en and women who attended the Police Inform ation Network school at Davidson Community College. According to Howard M. Livingston, D irector for Police Inform ation Network in Raleigh one police officer and three depu^sheriffs from Davie County successfully passed the lest adm inistered by the PIN and are certified PIN term inal operators in compliance with the rules and regulations govem lM the PIN which is a nationwide network for law enforcem ent officers. The Davie County men in the above plctiu-e are Chief Alton C arter, Police D raartm ent; W alter Phipps, Jr., Robert Purvis and W ayne G aither of the Sheriffs D epartm ent. Woodland - 3 bedroom brick rancher with 2 baths. Kitchen with all modem appliances. Full basement, paved drive. This house is in excellent condition. Call us for an appointment to see it. We think you’ll like it. Hickory Hill - 2 story 4 bedroom house with 2^ baths. Den features a big fireplace. Kitchen has all i built-in appliances. This house has so many pi can’t list them all here. (^11 us today. We would Kitchen has all modem, luses we appreciate the opportunity to tell you about them and even better show you! Gwyn Street - 2 bedrooTnhouse wlBTBath. 'CheerfuUyl decorated throughout. Lot with lovely fenced back yai^ with storage building and picnic shelter. This house and lot offers the “most for your money.” Call, let us show it to you today.Carrowoods - 2600 sq. ft., tri-level, 4 bedrooms, 2 full baths. Large recreation room with fireplace. Den with sliding dass doors opening onto patio. House is electrically heated and cooled. Situated on lot 125 x 200 with city water. This house offers lots of room for even a large family. Call today for complete details. • Wandering Lane - Custom-designed Colonial home situated in the midst of 3V^ acres of beautiful woodland. A painted brick exterior combined with crab orchard stone wings is roofed with western cedar shakes with copper valleys. This home features superb construction throughout and will surely please the discriminating buyer. Hemlock Street - 3 bedroom rancher with 2 baths, full basement with 4 rooms and garage. Large lot with fenced in back yard. Call Mary Forest for complete deUils. Walt Wilson Road - 4 bedroom house with bath situated on beautiful VA lot with several out buildings. House has 1238 sq. ft. with good loan assumption. Priced to sell at $12,900. Call today. / H Sanford Road: This house has it a ll... Good location ... large lot (200 x 300)... 1650 sq. ft. heated area ... Den with flreplace & exposed beams ... 16i0 sq. ft. basement with fireplace... 16 x 36 in ground heated swimming pool. And many other features too numerous to mention. Call Mary Forrest for complete details. ..Jill Street - Nice 2 bedroom house with bath in very good condition. Must see to appreciate. C^U us for complete details. New Construction - Sanford Road. Partially completed new home. Owner wants to sell as is^ Buyer may finish house to suit his likes. Call for complete details. Country Estates - 3 bedroom, l>/4 baths. Electric heat. Large kitchen with built-in appliances including dishwasher. Lot 125 x 200. Financing at 8% percent already approved. Gladstone Road ACREAGE 7.6 acres land on Highway 64 east of Mocksville. 3 acres open remainder in woods. Excellent lot to build on. Priced to sell. Development Tract - water and sewage; Mocksville city limits. 100 acres of good prime land. Financing available. LOTS Woodland Development - 2 wooded lots available. One lot, 150 X 200, priced at *3900. One lot, 230 x 355, priced at $3280.Southwood Acres - Lot approximately 150 x 160. Building? Choice lot which offers a beautiful building site in an exclusive residential area. Call us today for details. Corner of Main Street and Milling Road • 4 lots 112.6 x 303 with frontage on Milling Road. Priced at $50 per front foot.Hemlock Street - Approximately 2 acres of land with plenty of fronUge. Call us for details. Depot Street ■ 3 developed lots conveniently located near town. Sale price is $1,000. HOUSES Clemmons - Linwood Drive. 3 bedroom brick rancher on 1 acre land. Nice neighborhood and is convenient to 1-40 interchange. Call Mary Forest for complete details. INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY - Buy this going business in Davie County. Owner has netted better than $20,000 a year for past five years. Limited capital needed. Call today for further information. Hwy. 601 South - 3 bedroom house with 2 baths, full basement on 1 acre lot. Priced at $26,900. Call today for an appointment to see this house. RENTAL PROPERTY Gwyn Street - Lovely 3 bedroom house with bath, new carpet and just painted. Rents for $175 a month. 601 South - 3 bedroom house convenient to town. $125 per •’'onth. , . J , . .24 X 50 mocular home permanently located on private lot. An entirely new concept in mobile home living. Spacious, yet compact in construction, this design offers the conveniences, luxuries, facilities and beauty of a permanent residence. Now available for monthly rental of $135. BUSINESS PROPERTY Commercial Property - 112 North Main Street, Mocksville. Building with 2200 sq. ft. situated on lot fqcing North Main Street. Lot extends back from building to Clement Street. Owner financing available. Call today for full details. RESORT PROPERTY Attention Campers! - Two loU platted with camping in mind. Located in the Boone-Linville area, N.C. Call us for details. e s t a t e CO. 333 Salisbury St. Swieagood ProfMiional BIdg. 634-5997 Jffry SwIoMood, Broker 634-6M7 Real Estate Sales, Appraisels, Lesset, Management Surveying by DAVIE SURVEYING CO._________ Miry ForrMt, Satot Rep. 492-6437 DAVIE COUNTY ENTERPRISE RECORU, Overweight Contributes To lillajor Cause Of Deatli By Clay Williams Overweight contributes to "ctically every Itnown major Buse of death except suicide, |according to Dr. Lewis Bocic, 'lief of the Personal Health ction of the Division of Health rvices. “Perhaps the single most I Important cause of widespread obMity in the United States is ttKB over use of high caloric ! with low nutritive value," ck stated, “and Uble sugar the list of such foods." ■Bock said the recent surge in IsQgar prices has pointed up our Ipre-occupation with sugar as a Iflavor additive. “Babies are introduced to l ^ a r immediately after birth," ■; noted. “From then until I death we consume tons of it. An average cola drink contains about seven teaspoonfuls of ar, and we think nothing of nsuming several per day. Americans eat an average of about 150 pounds of sugar each year, enough to add SO pounds of weight if eaten in addition to an adequate diet. When you con- lider that sugar is absolutelyI void of nutritive value, and actually foreign to our bodies, there’s little wonder we suffer I many chronic diseases.” said one-fourth of all ar is sold as refined table _ar. The rest is added to feds. He pointed out that Sntrary to the popular view a does not need a candy r or a bottle of pop to provide rick energy. He said most of e foods we eat contain enough ilTrbohydrate ( a safe form of ^ |a r ) to provide ail the energy •;”'If we would eliminate sugar from our diets we would be R jealthier p eo p le,"B o ck ■tressed. “Eating excessive Iratorio Singers In Concert Saturday ;^he Oratorio Singers of iirlotte will present their first ' scription concert of the m n on Saturday, January 18, 8:15 P.M. in Ovens Utorium. This outetanding I of ISS singers, who have ved a high standard of Hence during their twenty- lOttr years, is under the lirection of Donald Plott, Birman of the Music artm ent of Davidson .Jge. he Singers have been as being one of the gtlon’s finest choral en- .—nibles, showing marked Ijticipline, skill, excellent icianship and singing. At a > when it is rare to find a j of this maturity in the „htry, presenting works of 1^ v a ri^ style ai^ difficulty, ' irlotte is fortunate to have ’^opportunity to hear them icert. The chorus will be ...npanied by a full orchestra l!noted soloiste in the field of •io. exciting choral works lite performed, including the Jm ier perform ance in hiarlotte of the “Hora irissima’’ by American r Horatio Parker. Few ■lean compositions have ' received the acclaim that ■Iwork did immediately after t performance under the r's direction on May 3, It became the first rican work ever to be nted at the famous Three rtrs Festival in Worcester, pgland. In the “Hora ‘ issim a", Parker shows his ct for massed effects, for !.choraI texture, and for full nent of the hymn-like nes. Fugal writing and lahts are contrasted with nning effect, solidity and nity. The text is from the n, De Contemptu Mundi, by ii ilwelfth century monk of the of Cluny, Bernard de rlaix. Horatio Parker is vn chiefly for his vast ntribution to American I Music. Born in 1863, he in 1919. He was organist id choir director of the wned Trinity Church of ■ton, and became the first of the Yale School of fic. Featured in this work rbe four outstanding soloists, > Harsanyi, Soprano, Jane ard, Mezzo-Soprano, Jerry [ton. Tenor, and Arnold Vj||etaitis, Bass. & riy’s Texaco II Award Winner ;;Oarry Potts who owns and I o r a te s Garry's Texaco, Rt. 1, |A|ivance received the special 3ftes “Mystery Car" Award 11^ 30, 1974. 'S eaw ard , a plaque bearing tfiiree Eisenhower Dollars, and t\{o Kennedy Half-Dollars, was pM^ented for exceptional cilftomer service by a ropresentative of The Gates Rul^ber Company, Denver, q^orado. iGstes sponsors the nation­ wide contest, now in its 42nd y«ar, to reward service station personnel who properly check fof worn or defective parts. A flaet of "Gates Mystery Cars" travel across the country stoppi